Search results for 'fulfillment' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. William Lauinger (2011). Dead Sea Apples and Desire-Fulfillment Welfare Theories. Utilitas 23 (03):324-343.score: 18.0
    This paper argues that, in light of Dead Sea apple cases, we should reject desire-fulfillment welfare theories (DF theories). Dead Sea apples are apples that look attractive while hanging on the tree, but which dissolve into smoke or ashes once plucked. Accordingly, Dead Sea apple cases are cases where an agent desires something and then gets it, only to find herself disappointed by what she has gotten. This paper covers both actual DF theories and hypothetical (or idealized) DF theories. (...)
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  2. Douglas W. Portmore (2007). Desire Fulfillment and Posthumous Harm. American Philosophical Quarterly 44 (1):27 - 38.score: 12.0
    This paper argues that the standard account of posthumous harm is untenable. The standard account presupposes the desire-fulfillment theory of welfare, but I argue that no plausible version of this theory can allow for the possibility of posthumous harm. I argue that there are, at least, two problems with the standard account from the perspective of a desire-fulfillment theorist. First, as most desire-fulfillment theorists acknowledge, the theory must be restricted in such a way that only those desires (...)
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  3. Michael J. Zimmerman (2006). On the Fulfillment of Moral Obligation. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (5):577 - 597.score: 12.0
    This paper considers three general views about the nature of moral obligation and three particular answers (with which these views are typically associated) concerning the following question: if on Monday you lend me a book that I promise to return to you by Friday, what precisely is my obligation to you and what constitutes its fulfillment? The example is borrowed from W.D. Ross, who in The Right and the Good proposed what he called the Objective View of obligation, (...)
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  4. Mark C. Murphy (1999). The Simple Desire-Fulfillment Theory. Noûs 33 (2):247-272.score: 12.0
    It seems to be a widely shared view that any defensible desire-fulfillment theory of welfare must be framed not in terms of what an agent, in fact, desires but rather in terms of what an agent would desire under hypothetical conditions that include improved information. Unfortunately, though, such accounts are subject to serious criticisms. In this paper I show that in the face of these criticisms the best response is to jettison any appeal to idealized information conditions: the considerations (...)
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  5. Paul Lichterman (1995). Beyond the Seesaw Model: Public Commitment in a Culture of Self-Fulfillment. Sociological Theory 13 (3):275-300.score: 12.0
    Communitarian sociological theory and research of the past 30 years has often assumed that a growing culture of self-fulfillment, or "personalism," is ultimately incompatible with commitment to the public good. This article argues that this "seesaw model" does not exhaust the possible relations between personalism and public commitment. It borrows insights from radical democratic theories to argue the existence of a form of public commitment that is enacted through, rather than impeded by, personalism. A cultural analysis that highlights everyday (...)
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  6. E. Holly Buttner, Kevin B. Lowe & Lenora Billings-Harris (2010). The Impact of Diversity Promise Fulfillment on Professionals of Color Outcomes in the Usa. Journal of Business Ethics 91 (4):501 - 518.score: 12.0
    This paper explores the relationship between psychological contract violations (PCVs) related to diversity climate and professional employee outcomes. We found that for our sample of US professionals of color including US-born African Americans, Hispanics, Asians, and Native Americans, employee perceptions of breach in diversity promise fulfillment (DPF), after controlling for more general organizational promise fulfillment (OPF), led to lower reported organizational commitment (OC) and higher turnover intentions (TI). Interactional justice partially mediated the relationship between DPF and outcomes. Procedural (...)
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  7. Noah Weinberg (2004/2003). What the Angel Taught You: Seven Keys to Life Fulfillment. Distributed by Mesorah Publications.score: 12.0
    " In their ground-breaking book, "What the Angel Taught You; Seven Keys to Life Fulfillment," two world-renowned educators collaborate to ask and answer some of ...
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  8. Joel Feinberg (1994). Freedom and Fulfillment: Philosophical Essays. Princeton University Press.score: 12.0
    This collection concludes with two essays dealing with concepts used in appraising the whole of a person's life: absurdity and self-fulfillment, and their interplay.Dealing with a diverse set of problems in practical and theoretical ethics, ...
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  9. Gregory Mellema (1987). What is Optional in the Fulfillment of Duty? Faith and Philosophy 4 (3):282-293.score: 12.0
    Moral duties are often described in terms of rigid requirements to perform, or refrain from performing, actions of certain specific types. In various theological traditions this point is often expressed in terms of the demands God places upon His creatures. However, there are several important ways, as Kant, Mill, and others have noted, in which the fulfillment of duty admits of options. In this paper an effort is made to offer a precise characterization of these ways. On this basis (...)
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  10. Susan Randolph, Michelle Prairie & John Stewart (2012). Monitoring State Fulfillment of Economic and Social Rights Obligations in the United States. Human Rights Review 13 (2):139-165.score: 12.0
    This article adapts the economic and social rights fulfillment index (SERF Index) developed by Fukuda-Parr, Lawson-Remer, and Randolph to assess the extent to which each of the 50 US states fulfills the economic and social rights obligations set forth in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights. It then extends the index to incorporate discrimination and examines differences in economic and social rights fulfillment by race and sex within each of the states. The overall SERF Index (...)
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  11. Stephen Palmquist, Silence as the Ultimate Fulfillment of the Philosophical Quest.score: 10.0
    The surprising comment Wittgenstein makes at the end of his Tractatus suggests that, even though the analysis of words is the proper method of doing philosophy, philosophy’s ultimate aim may be to experience silence. Whereas Wittgenstein never explains what he meant by his cryptic conclusion, Kant provides numerous clues as to how the same position can be understood in a more complete and systematic way. Distinguishing between the meanings of “silence,” “noise” and “sound” provides a helpful way of understanding how (...)
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  12. Aaron Smuts (2013). The Good Cause Account of the Meaning of Life. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (4):536-562.score: 9.0
    I defend the theory that one's life is meaningful to the extent that one promotes the good. Call this the good cause account (GCA) of the meaning of life. It holds that the good effects that count towards the meaning of one's life need not be intentional. Nor must one be aware of the effects. Nor does it matter whether the same good would have resulted if one had not existed. What matters is that one is causally responsible for the (...)
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  13. William Lauinger (2012). Well-Being and Theism: Linking Ethics to God. Continuum.score: 9.0
    Well-Being and Theism is divided into two distinctive parts. The first part argues that desire-fulfillment welfare theories fail to capture the 'good' part of ‘good for’, and that objective list welfare theories fail to capture the 'for' part of ‘good for’. Then, with the aim of capturing both of these parts of ‘good for’, a hybrid theory–one which places both a value constraint and a desire constraint on well-being–is advanced. Lauinger then defends this proposition, which he calls the desire-perfectionism (...)
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  14. Robert Bernasconi (2011). Fanon's The Wretched of the Earth as the Fulfillment of Sartre's Critique of Dialectical Reason. Sartre Studies International 16 (2):36-47.score: 9.0
    Frantz Fanon was an enthusiastic reader of Sartre's Critique of Dialectical Reason and in this essay I focus on what can be gleaned from The Wretched of the Earth about how he read it. I argue that the reputation among Sartre's critics of the Critique as a failure on the grounds that it was left incomplete should take into account its presence in Fanon's The Wretched of the Earth . Their shared perspectives on the systemic character of racism and colonialism, (...)
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  15. Walter Hopp (2010). How to Think About Nonconceptual Content. The New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 10 (1):1-24.score: 9.0
    This paper provides a general account of what nonconceptual content is, and some considerations in favor of its existence. After distinguishing between the contents and objects of mental states, as well as the properties of being conceptual and being conceptualized, I argue that what is phenomenologically distinctive about conceptual content is that it is not determined by, and does not determine, the intuitive character of an experience. That is, for virtually any experience E with intuitive character I, there is no (...)
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  16. Kristjan Laasik (2011). On Perceptual Presence. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (4):439-459.score: 9.0
    In his book Action in Perception , Alva Noë poses what he refers to as the “problem of perceptual presence” and develops his enactive view as solution to the problem. Noë describes the problem of perceptual presence as the problem of how to conceive of the presence of that which, “strictly speaking,” we do not perceive. I argue that the “problem of perceptual presence” is ambiguous between two problems that need to be addressed by invoking very different resources. On the (...)
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  17. William A. Lauinger (2013). The Strong-Tie Requirement and Objective-List Theories of Well-Being. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (5):953-968.score: 9.0
    Many philosophers with hedonistic sympathies (e.g., Mill, Sidgwick, Sumner, Feldman, Crisp, Heathwood, and Bradley) have claimed that well-being is necessarily experiential. Kagan once claimed something slightly different, saying that, although unexperienced bodily events can directly impact a person’s well-being, it is nonetheless true that any change in a person’s well-being must involve a change in her (i.e., either in her mind or in her body). Kagan elaborated by saying that a person’s well-being cannot float freely of her such that it (...)
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  18. Tamas Pataki (1997). Self-Deception and Wish-Fulfilment. Philosophia 25 (1-4):297-322.score: 9.0
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  19. Ronald de Sousa (2000). Alan Gewirth, Self‐Fulfillment. Ethics 110 (4):833-834.score: 9.0
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  20. Gregory Mellema (1991). Supererogation and the Fulfillment of Duty. Journal of Value Inquiry 25 (2):167-175.score: 9.0
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  21. Mark Van Atten, On the Fulfillment of Categorial Intentions.score: 9.0
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  22. Robert A. Montaña (2009). The Gewirthian Principle of Generic Consistency as a Foundation for Human Fulfillment: Unveiling a Rational Path for Moral and Political Hope. Kritike: An Online Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):24-39.score: 9.0
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  23. Daniel Bonevac (1990). Paradoxes of Fulfillment. Journal of Philosophical Logic 19 (3):229 - 252.score: 9.0
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  24. L. H. Hunt (2000). Self-Fulfillment. Philosophical Review 109 (4):589-592.score: 9.0
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  25. James Gordon Clapp (1948). Freedom as Fulfillment. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 8 (4):522-531.score: 9.0
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  26. Jehangir N. Chubb (1972). Sri Aurobindo as the Fulfillment of Hinduism. International Philosophical Quarterly 12 (2):234-242.score: 9.0
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  27. Monika K. Hellwig (1986). Actual and Possible Convergences in Christian and Marxist Projections of Human Fulfillment. Philosophy and Theology 1 (2):121-156.score: 9.0
    Christian hopes for salvation and redemption, and Marxist promises of emancipation and liberation have had and do have today much to do with each other. Historically they have grown up in dialogue with one another and today they address each other more than ever. Mutual condemnations get us nowhere. This article tries to identify areas of common intention and cooperation, without ignoring real differences, and offers a theological reflection that suggests an alliance with the critical elements within Marxist circles that (...)
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  28. Anthony Simon Laden (2005). David Ingram, Rights, Democracy, and Fulfillment in the Area of Identity Politics: Principled Compromises in a Compromised World:Rights, Democracy, and Fulfillment in the Area of Identity Politics: Principled Compromises in a Compromised World. Ethics 116 (1):235-238.score: 9.0
  29. Joel Feinberg (1980). Absurd Self-Fulfillment. In Peter van Inwagen (ed.), Time and Cause. D. Reidel. 255--281.score: 9.0
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  30. Jasmina Čelica (2001). Self-Fulfillment. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 1 (3):366-368.score: 9.0
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  31. Paul Gyllenhammer (2001). Between Noema and Fulfillment. International Studies in Philosophy 33 (4):45-61.score: 9.0
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  32. William J. Morgan (2010). Sport as a Form of Human Fulfillment: An Organic Philosophy of Sport History By Robert G. Osterhoudt. Published 2006 by Trafford Publishing, Victoria, BC, Canada. (Two Volumes, Iii + 821 Pp.) ISBN 978-1-4120-4659-6. [REVIEW] Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 37 (1):126-129.score: 9.0
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  33. K. W. Rankin (1972). The Non-Causal Self-Fulfillment of Intention. American Philosophical Quarterly 9 (4):279 - 289.score: 9.0
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  34. Carl Wellman (1996). Freedom and Fulfillment. Philosophical Review 105 (3):413-415.score: 9.0
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  35. J. L. Cobitz (1958). Metaphysics as Wish Fulfillment. Philosophical Review 67 (1):76-84.score: 9.0
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  36. R. Ehrlich (1983). America's Quest for an Ideal Self: Dissent and Fulfillment in the 60s and 70s. Telos 1983 (57):213-221.score: 9.0
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  37. Joseph P. Rice (2003). Reimers, Adrian J. An Analysis of the Concepts of Self-Fulfillment and Self-Realization in the Thought of Karol Wojtyla, Pope John Paul II. Review of Metaphysics 56 (3):673-676.score: 9.0
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  38. Leonard R. Sorenson (2007). Rousseau's Fulfillment of the Natural Public Law Tradition and His Contribution to its Demise. The European Legacy 10 (5):439-454.score: 9.0
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  39. Dieter Wandschneider (2010). Dialectic as the Self-Fulfillment of Logic. In Nektarios Limnatis (ed.), The Dimensions of Hegel's Dialectic. Continuum. 31.score: 9.0
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  40. Kawser Ahmed, Sean Byrne, Peter Karari, Olga Skarlato & Julie Hyde (2012). Civil Society/NGO Leaders Perceptions of the Effectiveness of the IFI and the EU Peace III Fund in Promoting Equality, Equity, Social Justice and the Fulfillment of Basic Human Needs in (L') Derry and the Border Area. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 22 (2):73-99.score: 9.0
    External economic aid has played an important role in Northern Ireland’s peacebuilding process, particularly by funding community-based intervention projects.As a consequence of the Troubles, Northern Ireland suffered from severe socioeconomic inequality. These locally funded projects have fostered social cohesion by encouraging cross community interaction aimed at reducing violence and sectarianism. The NGO projects also promote social justice, reduce inequality, and provide the means to meet people’s basic human needs. The field research for this article was conducted during the summer of (...)
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  41. Duane L. Cady (1983). Individual Fulfillment (Not Social Engineering) In Plato's Republic. Idealistic Studies 13 (3):240-248.score: 9.0
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  42. Todd Darnell & Dennis Rohatyn (2010). Sartre's Debt to Rousseau: Freedom, Faith, and Fulfillment. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 4 (2-3):244-263.score: 9.0
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  43. Janusz Kuczyński (2007). The Birth of Complementarity From Historic Dialectics and the Spirit of Dialogue—Towards the Complementarity and Synergy of Secularand Religious Universalism as Metanoia and the Fulfillment of the Essence of Life and History. Dialogue and Universalism 17 (7-8):179-185.score: 9.0
    I. THE ORIGINS OF THE COMPLEMENTARITY CONCEPT IN SECULAR AND RELIGIOUS UNIVERSALISMa) Keywords, categoriesb) G. McLean: the emergence of philosophical and social complementarity from the Polish dialogue and Solidarityc) Secularity open to all human dimensions including the sacral (the structure of religious values approved not ontologically but on the ethical and cultural plane)d) The Catholicism of John Paul from Cracow and Rome as realistic global and dialogue-based universalisme) Laborem Exercens—source of modern universalismf) “John Paul II’s ‘Labour Manifesto’ and universal society (...)
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  44. Isaac Padinjarekuttu (2001). Human Longing and Fulfillment: The Gandhian Vision. Disputatio Philosophica 3 (1):147-168.score: 9.0
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  45. C. G. Prado (1982). Struggle and Fulfillment. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 12 (1):201-216.score: 9.0
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  46. Murray N. Rothbard (1989). World War I as Fulfillment: Power and the Intellectuals. Journal of Libertarian Studies 9:81-125.score: 9.0
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  47. Claus Dierksmeier & Anthony Celano (2011). Thomas Aquinas on Business and the Fulfillment of Human Needs. In , Humanistic Ethics in the Age of Globality. Palgrave Macmillan. 60.score: 9.0
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  48. R. Ehrlich (1981). New Rules: Searching for Self-Fulfillment in a World Turned Upside Down. Telos 1981 (50):218-228.score: 9.0
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  49. S. Eisenblatt (1987). Fulfillment in Marriage: A Comprehensive Guide for Making Your Marriage a Success Story: Ideas for Dealing with Various Kinds of Problems: Restoring the True Glory to Married Life. Feldheim.score: 9.0
     
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  50. Jasmina Čelica (2001). Alan Gewirth, Self-Fulfillment. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 3:366-368.score: 9.0
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