Search results for 'function of consciousness' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ned Block (1995). On a Confusion About a Function of Consciousness. Brain and Behavioral Sciences 18 (2):227-–247.
    Consciousness is a mongrel concept: there are a number of very different "consciousnesses." Phenomenal consciousness is experience; the phenomenally conscious aspect of a state is what it is like to be in that state. The mark of access-consciousness, by contrast, is availability for use in reasoning and rationally guiding speech and action. These concepts are often partly or totally conflated, with bad results. This target article uses as an example a form of reasoning about a function (...)
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  2. Jean E. Burns (1991). Does Consciousness Perform a Function Independently of the Brain? Frontier Perspectives, Center for Frontier Sciences, Temple University 2 (1):19-34.
    Even if all of the content of conscious experience is encoded in the brain, there is a considerable difference between the view that consciousness does independent processing and the view that it does not. If all processing is done by the brain, then conscious experience is unnecessary and irrelevant to behavior. If consciousness performs a function, then its association with particular aspects of brain processing reflect its functional use in determining behavior. However, if consciousness does perform (...)
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  3. Owen J. Flanagan & Thomas W. Polger (1995). Zombies and the Function of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 2 (4):313-21.
    Todd Moody’s Zombie Earth thought experiment is an attempt to show that ‘conscious inessentialism’ is false or in need of qualification. We defend conscious inessentialism against his criticisms, and argue that zombie thought experiments highlight the need to explain why consciousness evolved and what function(s) it serves. This is the hardest problem in consciousness studies.
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  4.  15
    Craig DeLancey (1996). Emotion and the Function of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (5-6):492-99.
    Certain arguments that phenomenal conscious states play no role, or play a role that could be different, depend upon the seeming plausibility of thought experiments such as the inverted spectrum or phenomenal zombie. These thought experiments are always run for perceptual states like colour vision. Run for affective states like emotions, they become absurd, because the prior intension of our concepts of emotional states are that the phenomenal experience is inseparable from their motivational aspects. Our growing scientific understanding of emotion (...)
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  5. Antti Revonsuo & Katja Valli (2000). Dreaming and Consciousness: Testing the Threat Simulation Theory of the Function of Dreaming. Psyche 6 (8).
    We tested the new threat simulation theory of the biological function of dreaming by analysing 592 dreams from 52 subjects with a rating scale developed for quantifying threatening events in dreams. The main predictions were that dreams contain more frequent and more severe threats than waking life does; that dream threats are realistic; and that they primarily threaten the Dream Self who tends to behave in a relevant defensive manner in response to them. These predictions were confirmed and the (...)
     
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  6.  30
    Hakwan Lau (2009). Volition and the Function of Consciousness. Faith and Philosophy 26 (5):537-552.
    People have intuitively assumed that many acts of volition are not influenced by unconscious information. However, the available evidence suggests that under suitable conditions, unconscious information can influence behavior and the underlying neural mechanisms. One possibility is that stimuli that are consciously perceived tend to yield strong signals in the brain, and this makes us think that consciousness has the function of sending such strong signals. However, if we could create conditions where the stimuli could produce strong signals (...)
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  7. Hakwan Lau (2009). Volition and the Function of Consciousness. Faith and Philosophy 26 (5):537-552.
    People have intuitively assumed that many acts of volition are not influenced by unconscious information. However, the available evidence suggests that under suitable conditions, unconscious information can influence behavior and the underlying neural mechanisms. One possibility is that stimuli that are consciously perceived tend to yield strong signals in the brain, and this makes us think that consciousness has the function of sending such strong signals. However, if we could create conditions where the stimuli could produce strong signals (...)
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  8.  49
    Ilya B. Farber (2005). How a Neural Correlate Can Function as an Explanation of Consciousness: Evidence From the History of Science Regarding the Likely Explanatory Value of the NCC Approach. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (4-5):77-95.
    A frequent criticism of the neuroscientific approach to consciousness is that its theories describe only 'correlates' or 'analogues' of consciousness, and so fail to address the nature of consciousness itself. Despite its apparent logical simplicity, this criticism in fact relies on some substantive assumptions about the nature and evolution of scientific explanations. In particular, it is usually assumed that, in expressing correlations, neural correlate of consciousness (NCC) theories must fail to capture the causal structure relating brain (...)
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  9.  7
    Benny Shanon (1998). What is the Function of Consciousness? Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (3):295-308.
    This paper proposes an answer to the title question on the basis of the analysis of empirical data -- a large corpus of what I call thought sequences, namely, trains of verbal-like expressions that spontaneously pass through people's minds. The analysis reveals several patterns that could not have occurred had thought not been conducted in a conscious manner. The feature that makes these patterns possible is the concreteness resulting from the articulation of thought in a particular medium: such articulation is (...)
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  10.  3
    J. F. Richard (1999). Object, Limits and Function of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (2-3):2-3.
    [opening paragraph]: The following comments are from a psychologist, involved in the study of complex human information processing such as problem-solving, in which overt behaviour cannot be isolated from the subject's representation, since it is the prototype of goal-directed activity. In that respect perception, i.e. interpretation of the situation, is intrinsically linked to action, i.e. to changing the situation so as to complete the goal. In that field representation cannot be assimilated to consciousness, and it is very important, in (...)
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  11. Richard Brown (2009). Review of 'Consciousness and its Function' by David Rosenthal. [REVIEW] Philosopher's Digest.
    David Rosenthal is a well-known defender of a particular kind of theory of consciousness known as the higher-order thought theory (HOTT). Higher-order theories are united by what Rosenthal calls the Transitivity Principle (TP), which states that a mental state is conscious iff one is conscious of oneself, in some suitable way, as being in that mental state. Since there are various ways to implement TP and HOTT commits one to the view that any mental state could occur unconsciously it (...)
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  12.  91
    Michael Tye (1996). The Function of Consciousness. Noûs 30 (3):287-305.
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  13.  43
    Harald Walach & Stefan Schmidt (2005). Repairing Plato's Life Boat with Ockham's Razor: The Important Function of Research in Anomalies for Consciousness Studies. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (2):52-70.
    Scientific progress is achieved not only by continuous accumulation of knowledge but also by paradigm shifts. These shifts are often necessitated by anomalous findings that cannot be incorporated in accepted models. Two important methodological principles regulate this process and complement each other: Ockham's Razor as the principle of parsimony and Plato's Life Boat as the principle of the necessity to 'save the appearances' and thus incorporate conflicting phenomenological data into theories. We review empirical data which are in conflict with some (...)
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  14. Pierre Jacob (1995). Consciousness, Intentionality, and Function: What is the Right Order of Explanation? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (1):195-200.
    I examine and criticize John Searle's view of the relationships between consciousness, intentionality and function.
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  15. Antti Revonsuo (2000). The Reinterpretation of Dreams: An Evolutionary Hypothesis of the Function of Dreaming. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):877-901.
    Several theories claim that dreaming is a random by-product of REM sleep physiology and that it does not serve any natural function. Phenomenal dream content, however, is not as disorganized as such views imply. The form and content of dreams is not random but organized and selective: during dreaming, the brain constructs a complex model of the world in which certain types of elements, when compared to waking life, are underrepresented whereas others are over represented. Furthermore, dream content is (...)
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  16. Stuart R. Hameroff (1999). A/T Evolution and Function of Consciousness—Va Introduction. In S. Hameroff, A. Kaszniak & David Chalmers (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness Iii: The Third Tucson Discussions and Debates. MIT Press 3--245.
     
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  17.  9
    David Navon (1991). The Function of Consciousness or of Information? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):690-691.
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  18.  1
    Pierre Jacob, Consciousness, Intentionality and Function. What is the Right Order of Explanation?
    I examine and criticize John Searle's view of the relationships between consciousness, intentionality and function.
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  19.  13
    J. D. Schmahmann, C. M. Anderson, N. Newton & R. Ellis (2002). The Function of the Cerebellum in Cognition, Affect and Consciousness: Empirical Support for the Embodied Mind. Consciousness and Emotion 2 (2):273-309.
    Editors’ note: These four interrelated discussions of the role of the cerebellum in coordinating emotional and higher cognitive functions developed out of a workshop presented by the four authors for the 2000 Conference of the Cognitive Science Society at the University of Pennsylvania. The four interrelated discussions explore the implications of the recent explosion of cerebellum research suggesting an expanded cerebellar role in higher cognitive functions as well as in the coordination of emotional functions with learning, logical thinking, perceptual (...), and action planning. (shrink)
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  20. David J. Cole (2002). The Function of Consciousness. In James H. Fetzer (ed.), Consciousness Evolving. John Benjamins 287-305.
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  21.  26
    Joseph E. Bogen (2001). An Experimental Disconnection Approach to a Function of Consciousness. International Journal of Neuroscience 111 (3):135-136.
  22. Keith Oatley (1988). On Changing One's Mind: A Possible Function of Consciousness. In Anthony J. Marcel & E. Bisiach (eds.), Consciousness in Contemporary Science. Oxford University Press 369--389.
  23.  2
    Robert S. Lockhart (1989). Consciousness and the Function of Remembered Episodes. In Henry L. I. Roediger & Fergus I. M. Craik (eds.), Varieties of Memory and Consciousness. Lawrence Erlbaum 423--429.
  24.  24
    Peter Mott (1982). On the Function of Consciousness. Mind 91 (July):423-9.
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  25. David M. Black (2001). Psychoanalysis and the Function of Consciousness. In Anthony Molino & Christine Ware (eds.), Where Id Was: Challenging Normalization in Psychoanalysis. Disseminations, Psychoanalysis in Contexts. Wesleyan University Press 47-57.
  26.  93
    M. A. Persinger & S. A. Koren (2007). A Theory of Neurophysics and Quantum Neuroscience: Implications for Brain Function and the Limits of Consciousness. International Journal of Neuroscience 117 (2):157-175.
  27.  6
    Terry D. Palmer & Ashley K. Ramsey (2012). The Function of Consciousness in Multisensory Integration. Cognition 125 (3):353-364.
  28.  1
    Brian Earl (2014). The Biological Function of Consciousness. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  29.  1
    Jason Samaha (2015). How Best to Study the Function of Consciousness? Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  30. Natika Newton (2001). The Function of the Cerebellum in Cognition, Affect and Consciousness: Empirical Support for the Embodied Mind--Introduction. Consciousness and Emotion 2 (2):273-276.
  31. Ezequiel Morsella, Stephen C. Krieger & John A. Bargh (2009). The Primary Function of Consciousness: Why Skeletal Muscles Are Voluntary Muscles. In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press
  32. Yu Guangyuan (1981). The Function of Consciousness on Matter. Contemporary Chinese Thought 12 (3):38-54.
    Note: This is an article I wrote in 1953. In recent years there have been new developments in the "debate between man and machines." Machines can "understand" what man says and do things according to human commands, facts that I did not know possible at the time. However, I believe that the ideas contained in this article concerning the views that only physical or material forces can effect changes in the state of matter and that there are two kinds of (...)
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  33. Robert van Gulick (1994). Deficit Studies and the Function of Phenomenal Consciousness. In George Graham & G. Lynn Stephens (eds.), Philosophical Psychopathology. MIT Press
     
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  34. K. Konno, Y. Katayama & T. Yamamoto (2002). Consciousness and the Intercortical Correlation Function of Electroencephalograms. In Kunio Yasue, Marj Jibu & Tarcisio Della Senta (eds.), No Matter, Never Mind. John Benjamins
     
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  35. Guven Guzeldere, Owen J. Flanagan & Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2000). The Nature and Function of Consciousness: Lessons From Blindsight. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The New Cognitive Neurosciences: 2nd Edition. MIT Press
  36. Yu Guangyuan (1981). The Function of Consciousness on Matter. Contemporary Chinese Thought 7 (3):38-54.
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  37. Gy Yu (1981). The Function of Consciousness on Matter+ How Consciousness Acts on the Material World. Chinese Studies in Philosophy 12 (3):38-54.
     
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  38.  4
    Ronald J. Pekala & Levine R. L. Wenger C. F. (1985). Individual Differences in Phenomenological Experience: States of Consciousness as a Function of Absorption. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 48:125-32.
  39.  1
    B. C. (1956). Icon and Idea: The Function of Art in the Development of Human Consciousness. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 9 (3):522-523.
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  40. David Rosenthal, The Function and Facilitation of Consciousness.
  41. James Rowland Angell (1905). Psychology: An Introductory Study of the Structure and Function of Human Consciousness. Philosophical Review 14 (4):481-487.
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  42. W. R. Hess & H. Fischer (1973). Brain and Consciousness: A Discussion About the Function of the Brain. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 17 (1):109-118.
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  43. Hiram M. Stanley (1897). Review of Consciousness and Biological Evolution , The Religious Instinct, and The Function of Religious Expression. [REVIEW] Psychological Review 4 (4):420-421.
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  44.  26
    Eric Russert Kraemer (1984). Consciousness and the Exclusivity of Function. Mind 93 (April):271-5.
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  45.  37
    Anthony J. Marcel (1998). Blindsight and Shape Perception: Deficit of Visual Consciousness or of Visual Function? Brain 121:1565-88.
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  46. Petra Stoerig & Alan Cowey (1993). Blindsight and Perceptual Consciousness: Neuropsychological Aspects of Striate Cortical Function. In B. Gulyas, D. Ottoson & P. Rol (eds.), Functional Organization of the Human Visual Cortex. Pergamon Press
  47.  1
    Aileen Chau, Andres M. Salazar, Frank Krueger, Irene Cristofori & Jordan Grafman (2015). The Effect of Claustrum Lesions on Human Consciousness and Recovery of Function. Consciousness and Cognition 36:256-264.
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  48.  8
    Tatiana V. Chernigovskaya (1999). Evolutionary Perspective for Cognitive Function: Cerebral Basis of Heterogeneous Consciousness. Semiotica 127 (1-4):227-238.
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  49.  3
    Jonathan Cole (2003). Review of “Understanding Consciousness: Its Function and Brain Processes” by Gerd Sommerhoff. [REVIEW] Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 11 (2):394-404.
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  50. A. Dietrich (2003). Functional Neuroanatomy of Altered States of Consciousness: The Transient Hypofrontality Hypothesis. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (2):231-256.
    It is the central hypothesis of this paper that the mental states commonly referred to as altered states of consciousness are principally due to transient prefrontal cortex deregulation. Supportive evidence from psychological and neuroscientific studies of dreaming, endurance running, meditation, daydreaming, hypnosis, and various drug-induced states is presented and integrated. It is proposed that transient hypofrontality is the unifying feature of all altered states and that the phenomenological uniqueness of each state is the result of the differential viability of (...)
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