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  1. McGraw-Hill, Daniel Gilbert, Eric G. Wilson & Jerome Kagan, Are You Happy?
    Chances are if someone were to ask you, right now, if you were happy, you'd say you were.[1] Claiming that you're happy —that is, to an interviewer who is asking you to rate your "life satisfaction" on a scale from zero to ten—appears to be nearly universal, as long as you're not living in a war zone, on the street, or in extreme emotional or physical pain. The Maasai of Kenya, soccer moms of Scarsdale, the Amish, the Inughuit of Greenland, (...)
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  2. Bennett Gilbert, Moral Impartialism and Moral Internalism.
    A. Moral impartialism is a theory in normative ethics. Moral internalism is a theory in meta-ethics. One’s manner of twining normative ethics and meta-ethics varies according to his or her position on the relations of normative ethics and metaphysics, as to in what ways ethics needs analysis, or ontology, or metaphysics, if it needs any of these at all. This large question is the deeper background of this paper. Here I will show why impartialism and internalism both need each other (...)
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  3. Bennett Gilbert, Polanyi's Proof.
    Cybernetics,” which he presented as en suite with six articles by several others on the same subject in the same journal during the preceding 18 months. This group of short papers, starting with one by Karl Popper, may be regarded as part of the first wave of response to Alan Turing’s famous paper, “Computing Machinery and Intelligence,” in 1950. Polanyi read Turing’s paper in draft and discussed it directly with Turing. The polemic as to whether machines can think and the (...)
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  4. Margaret P. Gilbert, Acting Together, Joint Commitment, and Obligation.
    What is it to do something with another person? In the author's book On Social Facts and elsewhere, she has conjectured that a special type of commitment - joint commitment - lies at the root of acting together and many other central social phenomena. Here she surveys some data pertinent to this conjecture, including the assumption of those who act together that they have associated rights against and obligations towards each other. She explains what joint commitment is, how it relates (...)
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  5. Margaret P. Gilbert, Collective Remorse.
    This essay explores the nature of an important collective emotion, namely, collective remorse. Three accounts of collective remorse are presented and evaluated. The first involves an aggregate of group members remorseful over acts of their own associated with their group's act; the second an aggregate of persons remorseful over their group's act. The third account posits, in terms that are explained, a joint commitment of a group's members to constitute as far as is possible a single remorseful body. Construed according (...)
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  6. Margaret P. Gilbert, Collective Wrongdoing: Moral and Legal Responses.
    This is a review essay of Christopher Kutz's Complicity: Ethics and Law for a Collective Age, and Jonathan Bass's Stay The Hand of Vengeance: The Politics of War Crimes Tribunals. Topics addressed include the nature of collective intentions and actions, the possibility of collective guilt, the moral responsibility of individuals in the context of collective actions.
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  7. Margaret P. Gilbert, Gilbert Harman and Judith Jarvis Thomson's Moral Relativism and Moral Objectivity.
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  8. Margaret P. Gilbert, On Being Categorized in the Speech of Others.
    Some psychologists argue that in general we self-ascribe characteristics according to others' perceived reactions to us. In illustration michael argyle cites a case involving the self-Ascription of popularity. But popularity is what I here call a 'reaction-Determined characteristic, That is, A characteristic such that certain others' reacting to someone in a certain way is logically sufficient for his having it. The general import of cases involving such characteristics needs careful examination and I argue that in fact argyle's case does not (...)
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  9. Margaret P. Gilbert & Fred R. Berger, On an Argument for the Impossibility of Prediction in the Social Sciences.
    This paper criticises a line of argument adopted by peter winch, Karl popper, And others, To the effect that the course of human history cannot be predicted. On this view it is impossible to predict in a particularly detailed way certain events ('original acts') on which important social developments depend. We analyze the argument, Showing that one version fails: original acts are in principle predictable in the relevant way. A cogent version is presented; this requires a special definition for 'original (...)
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  10. Nancy Berlinger, Pauline W. Chen, Rebecca Dresser, Nancy Neveloff Dubler, Anne Lederman Flamm, Susan Gilbert, Mark A. Hall & Lisa H. Harris (forthcoming). Elizabeth Mitchell Armstrong is Asso. Hastings Center Report.
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  11. Helen Stanton Chapple, Jessica C. Cox, Leonard M. Fleck, Marian Fontana, Susan Gilbert & Lawrence O. Gostin (forthcoming). Courtney S. Campbell is the Hundere. Hastings Center Report.
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  12. Lynn Chiu & Scott F. Gilbert (forthcoming). The Birth of the Holobiont: Multi-Species Birthing Through Mutual Scaffolding and Niche Construction. Biosemiotics:1-20.
    Holobionts are multicellular eukaryotes with multiple species of persistent symbionts. They are not individuals in the genetic sense— composed of and regulated by the same genome—but they are anatomical, physiological, developmental, immunological, and evolutionary units, evolved from a shared relationship between different species. We argue that many of the interactions between human and microbiota symbionts and the reproductive process of a new holobiont are best understood as instances of reciprocal scaffolding of developmental processes and mutual construction of developmental, ecological, and (...)
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  13. Frederic Gilbert (forthcoming). Self-Estrangement & Deep Brain Stimulation: Ethical Issues Related to Forced Explantation. Neuroethics:1-8.
    Although being generally safe, the use of Deep Brain Stimulation has been associated with a significant number of patients experiencing postoperative psychological and neurological harm within experimental trials . A proportion of these postoperative severe adverse effects have lead to the decision to medically prescribe device deactivation or removal. However, there is little debate in the literature as to what is in the patient’s best interest when device removal has been prescribed; in particular, what should be the conceptual approach to (...)
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  14. Frédéric Gilbert (forthcoming). State of the Concussion Debate: From Sceptical to Alarmist Claims. Neuroethics:1-7.
    Current discussions about concussion in sport are based on a crucial epistemological question: whether or not we should believe that repetitive mild Traumatic Brain Injury causes Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy . This epistemological question is essential to understanding the ethics at stake in treating these cases: indeed, certain moral obligations turn on whether or not we believe that mTBI causes CTE. After discussing the main schools of thought, namely the CTE-sceptic position and the CTE-orthodox position , this article examines the concussion (...)
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  15. Gary Gilbert (forthcoming). Book Review: The First Christian Historian: Writing the “Acts of the Apostles”. [REVIEW] Interpretation 58 (4):428-428.
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  16. S. Gilbert (forthcoming). The Invisible Hand in Medical Education. Bioethics Forum.
     
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  17. Susan Gilbert, Sara Goering & Lawrence O. Gostin (forthcoming). Kelly Fryer-Edwards is an Ethics Facul. Hastings Center Report.
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  18. Susan Gilbert, Joyce A. Griffin, Gregory E. Kaebnick, Robert Klitzman & Charles W. Lidz (forthcoming). Paul S. Appelbaum is Elizabeth K. Hastings Center Report.
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  19. Gilbert & Gilbert Jr (forthcoming). Epilogue. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:166-167.
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  20. Gilbert & Gilbert Jr (forthcoming). Why Have a Strategy? The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:57-68.
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  21. Joyce A. Griffin, Susan Gilbert, Nora Porter, Nancy Berlinger, Mary Crowley, Josephine Johnston, Thomas H. Murray & Erik Parens (forthcoming). Laughter in the Best Medicine. Hastings Center Report.
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  22. Joyce A. Griffin, Susan Gilbert, Nora Porter, Nancy Berlinger, Mary Crowley, Josephine Johnston, Thomas H. Murray & Erik Parens (forthcoming). What Would a Thought Look Like? Hastings Center Report.
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  23. L. Syd M. Johnson, Brad Partridge & Frédéric Gilbert (forthcoming). Framing the Debate: Concussion and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. Neuroethics:1-4.
    Concussion and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury affect millions of people worldwide. mTBI has been called the “signature injury” of the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, affecting thousands of active duty service men and women, and veterans. Sport-related concussion represents a significant public health problem, with elite and professional athletes, and millions of youth and amateur athletes worldwide suffering concussions annually. These brain injuries have received scant attention from neuroethicists, and the focus of this special issue is on defining the (...)
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  24. David R. Gilbert & Paolo Maffezioli (2015). Modular Sequent Calculi for Classical Modal Logics. Studia Logica 103 (1):175-217.
    This paper develops sequent calculi for several classical modal logics. Utilizing a polymodal translation of the standard modal language, we are able to establish a base system for the minimal classical modal logic E from which we generate extensions in a modular manner. Our systems admit contraction and cut admissibility, and allow a systematic proof-search procedure of formal derivations.
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  25. Gwendolyn Lesley Gilbert & Ian Kerridge (2015). Communication and Communicable Disease Control: Lessons From Ebola Virus Disease. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (4):62-65.
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  26. Sam J. Gilbert (2015). Strategic Use of Reminders: Influence of Both Domain-General and Task-Specific Metacognitive Confidence, Independent of Objective Memory Ability. Consciousness and Cognition 33:245-260.
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  27. Zdenka Babikova, David Johnson, Toby Bruce, John Pickett & Lucy Gilbert (2014). Underground Allies: How and Why Do Mycelial Networks Help Plants Defend Themselves? Bioessays 36 (1):21-26.
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  28. Kristie Dotson & Marita Gilbert (2014). Curious Disappearances: Affectability Imbalances and Process‐Based Invisibility. Hypatia 29 (4):873-888.
    In this paper, we analyze the recent public scandal involving Nafissatou Diallo and Dominique Strauss-Kahn to offer an account of the role affectability imbalances play in process-based invisibility. Process-based invisibilities, in this paper, refer to predictable narrative gaps within public narratives that can be aptly described as disappearances. We demonstrate that compromised, complex social identities, maladjusted webs of reciprocity, and a failure to fully appreciate basic affectability in large part cause affectability imbalances. Ultimately, we claim that affectability imbalances and the (...)
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  29. Thomas D. G. Frost, Devan Sinha & Barnabas J. Gilbert (2014). Should Assisted Dying Be Legalised? Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 9 (1):3.
    When an individual facing intractable pain is given an estimate of a few months to live, does hastening death become a viable and legitimate alternative for willing patients? Has the time come for physicians to do away with the traditional notion of healthcare as maintaining or improving physical and mental health, and instead accept their own limitations by facilitating death when requested? The Universities of Oxford and Cambridge held the 2013 Varsity Medical Debate on the motion “This House Would Legalise (...)
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  30. A. Gilbert (2014). Book Review: Capitalism and Climate Change: Theoretical Discussion, Historical Development and Policy Responses. [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 120 (1):124-127.
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  31. Frédéric Gilbert & Susan Dodds (2014). Is There a Moral Obligation to Develop Brain Implants Involving NanoBionic Technologies? Ethical Issues for Clinical Trials. NanoEthics 8 (1):49-56.
    In their article published in Nanoethics, “Ethical, Legal and Social Aspects of Brain-Implants Using Nano-Scale Materials and Techniques”, Berger et al. suggest that there may be a prima facie moral obligation to improve neuro implants with nanotechnology given their possible therapeutic advantages for patients [Nanoethics, 2:241–249]. Although we agree with Berger et al. that developments in nanomedicine hold the potential to render brain implant technologies less invasive and to better target neural stimulation to respond to brain impairments in the near (...)
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  32. Margaret Gilbert & Daniel Pilchman (2014). Belief, Acceptance, and What Happens in Groups. In Jennifer Lackey (ed.), Essays in Collective Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
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  33. Michael Gilbert (2014). Arguing with People. Broadview Press.
    Arguing with People brings developments from the field of Argumentation Theory to bear on critical thinking in a clear and accessible way. This book expands the critical thinking toolkit, and shows how those tools can be applied in the hurly-burly of everyday arguing. Gilbert emphasizes the importance of understanding real arguments, understanding just who you are arguing with, and knowing how to use that information for successful argumentation. Interesting examples and partner exercises are provided to demonstrate tangible ways in which (...)
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  34. Michael Gilbert (2014). Emotive Language in Argumentation. Informal Logic 34 (3):337-340.
    Book Review Emotive Language in Argumentation by Fabrizio Macagno and Douglas Walton New York: Cambridge UP. 9781107676657 . Review by MICHAEL A. GILBERT Department of Philosophy York University 4700 Keele St, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3 gilbert@yorku.ca.
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  35. Paul Gilbert (2014). The Ethics of War and Peace: An Introduction, by Helen FroweAggression and Crimes Against Peace, by Larry May. Mind 123 (490):598-601.
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  36. Maureen O'Malley, Ingo Brigandt, Alan C. Love, John W. Crawford, Jack A. Gilbert, Rob Knight, Sandra D. Mitchell & Forest Rohwer (2014). Multilevel Research Strategies and Biological Systems. Philosophy of Science 81:811-828.
    Multilevel research strategies characterize contemporary molecular inquiry into biological systems. We outline conceptual, methodological, and explanatory dimensions of these multilevel strategies in microbial ecology, systems biology, protein research, and developmental biology. This review of emerging lines of inquiry in these fields suggests that multilevel research in molecular life sciences has significant implications for philosophical understandings of explanation, modeling, and representation.
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  37. Sébastien Calvignac‐Spencer, Fabian H. Leendertz, M. Thomas P. Gilbert & Grit Schubert (2013). An Invertebrate Stomach's View on Vertebrate Ecology. Bioessays 35 (11):1004-1013.
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  38. Andrew Gilbert (2013). Book Review: Chamsy El-Ojeili, Politics, Social Theory, Utopia and the World System: Arguments in Political Sociology. [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 117 (1):144-146.
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  39. Andrew Gilbert (2013). The Culture Crunch Daniel Bell's The Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism. Thesis Eleven 118 (1):83-95.
    Daniel Bell’s The Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism lies at the intersection of the three main theoretical currents of sociological thought, those of Karl Marx, Émile Durkheim and Max Weber. His ‘three realms’ methodology moves away from deterministic accounts that subordinate the political and cultural to the economic realm. By granting each realm an autonomy and principles of their own, Bell locates the contradictions of capitalism in the friction between them. With constant innovation, individual expressiveness and libertarian social values becoming forces (...)
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  40. Barnabas J. Gilbert, Calum Miller, Fenella Corrick & Robert A. Watson (2013). Should Trainee Doctors Use the Developing World to Gain Clinical Experience? The Annual Varsity Medical Debate – London, Friday 20th January, 2012. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8 (1):1-4.
    The 2012 Varsity Medical Debate between Oxford University and Cambridge University provided a stage for representatives from these famous institutions to debate the motion “This house believes that trainee doctors should be able to use the developing world to gain clinical experience.” This article brings together many of the arguments put forward during the debate, centring around three major points of contention: the potential intrinsic wrong of ‘using’ patients in developing countries; the effects on the elective participant; and the effects (...)
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  41. Barnabas Gilbert, Calum Miller, Fenella Corrick & Robert Watson (2013). Should Trainee Doctors Use the Developing World to Gain Clinical Experience? The Annual Varsity Medical Debate ¿ London, Friday 20th January, 2012. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8 (1):1-.
    The 2012 Varsity Medical Debate between Oxford University and Cambridge University provided a stage for representatives from these famous institutions to debate the motion “This house believes that trainee doctors should be able to use the developing world to gain clinical experience.” This article brings together many of the arguments put forward during the debate, centring around three major points of contention: the potential intrinsic wrong of ‘using’ patients in developing countries; the effects on the elective participant; and the effects (...)
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  42. Christopher Gilbert (2013). Descartes, Passion, and the Ability to Do Otherwise. Journal of Philosophical Research 38:275-298.
    What does Descartes regard as necessary for human freedom? I approach this topic from a distinctive angle by focusing on the role of the passions in Descartes’s account of free will. My goal is to show that (1) Descartes takes us to have the ability to do otherwise when we judge or choose under the influence of the passions, and that (2) while such ability does not constitute freedom in the fullest Cartesian sense, it does ensure that the judgments and (...)
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  43. Christopher Gilbert (2013). The God Debates: A 21st Century Guide for Atheists and Believers (and Everyone in Between), by John R. Shook. Teaching Philosophy 36 (3):296-300.
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  44. Christopher J. Gilbert (2013). Toward the Satyric. Philosophy and Rhetoric 46 (3):280-305.
    Theorists have long sought to repress or domesticate the shaggy, obscene, and transgressive satyr that ranges through satire’s long history, lurking in dark corners, and to make it into a model of a moral citizen.Unruly, wayward, frolicsome, critical, parasitic, at times perverse, malicious, cynical, scornful, unstable—it is at once pervasive yet recalcitrant, basic yet impenetrable. Satire is the stranger that lives in the basement.Instead of trying to resolve all the problems that arise from the particular of a given tragic dignification, (...)
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  45. Frederic Gilbert (2013). Deep Brain Stimulation for Treatment Resistant Depression: Postoperative Feelings of Self-Estrangement, Suicide Attempt and Impulsive–Aggressive Behaviours. Neuroethics 6 (3):473-481.
    The goal of this article is to shed light on Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) postoperative suicidality risk factors within Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD) patients, in particular by focusing on the ethical concern of enrolling patient with history of self-estrangement, suicide attempts and impulsive–aggressive inclinations. In order to illustrate these ethical issues we report and review a clinical case associated with postoperative feelings of self-estrangement, self-harm behaviours and suicide attempt leading to the removal of DBS devices. Could prospectively identifying and excluding (...)
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  46. Frederic Gilbert, Andrej Vranic & Samia Hurst (2013). Involuntary & Voluntary Invasive Brain Surgery: Ethical Issues Related to Acquired Aggressiveness. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 6 (1):115-128.
    Clinical cases of frontal lobe lesions have been significantly associated with acquired aggressive behaviour. Restoring neuronal and cognitive faculties of aggressive individuals through invasive brain intervention raises ethical questions in general. However, more questions have to be addressed in cases where individuals refuse surgical treatment. The ethical desirability and permissibility of using intrusive surgical brain interventions for involuntary or voluntary treatment of acquired aggressiveness is highly questionable. This article engages with the description of acquired aggressiveness in general, and presents a (...)
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  47. Margaret Gilbert (2013). Commitment. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  48. Margaret Gilbert (2013). Joint Commitment: How We Make the Social World. Oup Usa.
    This new essay collection by distinguished philosopher Margaret Gilbert provides a richly textured argument for the importance of joint commitment in our personal and public lives. Topics covered by this diverse range of essays range from marital love to patriotism, from promissory obligation to the unity of the European Union.
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  49. Michael A. Gilbert, Commentary On: Charlotte Jørgensen's "Rhetoric, Dialectic, and Logic: The Triad de-Campartmentalized.
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