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I. J. Good [50]James A. Good [14]Tom Good [13]Paul Good [12]
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Profile: Justin Good
Profile: Anel Good (Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf)
Profile: Ambs Good (Oxford University)
Profile: Brian Good (Antioch University)
Profile: Christopher Good
Profile: Dilllon Good (Southwestern College, KS)
Profile: Gloria Good
Profile: Gloria Good (Bristol University)
Profile: Mo Good (Houston Community College System)
Profile: Marie Good
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  1. João Biehl, Byron Good & Arthur Kleinman (eds.) (2007). Subjectivity: Ethnographic Investigations. University of California Press.
    This innovative volume is an extended intellectual conversation about the ways personal lives are being undone and remade today. Examining the ethnography of the modern subject, this preeminent group of scholars probes the continuity and diversity of modes of personhood across a range of Western and non-Western societies. Contributors consider what happens to individual subjectivity when stable or imagined environments such as nations and communities are transformed or displaced by free trade economics, terrorism, and war; how new information and medical (...)
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  2.  7
    Irving J. Good (1983). Good Thinking: The Foundations of Probability and its Applications. Univ Minnesota Pr.
    ... Press for their editorial perspicacity, to the National Institutes of Health for the partial financial support they gave me while I was writing some of the chapters, and to Donald Michie for suggesting the title Good Thinking.
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  3.  4
    James A. Good (2006). A Search for Unity in Diversity : The "Permanent Hegelian Deposit" in the Philosophy of John Dewey. Lexington Books.
    This study demonstrates that Dewey did not reject Hegelianism during the 1890s, as scholars maintain, but developed a humanistic/historicist reading that was indebted to an American Hegelian tradition. Scholars have misunderstood the "permanent Hegelian deposit" in Dewey's thought because they have not fully appreciated this American Hegelian tradition and have assumed that his Hegelianism was based primarily on British neo-Hegelianism. ;The study examines the American reception of Hegel in the nineteenth-century by intellectuals as diverse as James Marsh and Frederic Henry (...)
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  4.  10
    Byron J. Good (2012). Phenomenology, Psychoanalysis, and Subjectivity in Java. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 40 (1):24-36.
  5. I. J. Good (1974). A Little Learning Can Be Dangerous. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 25 (4):340-342.
  6. I. J. Good (1967). On the Principle of Total Evidence. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 17 (4):319-321.
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  7.  11
    Anthony J. Lambert, Kimberly S. Good & Ian J. Kirk (2010). Testing the Repression Hypothesis: Effects of Emotional Valence on Memory Suppression in the Think – No Think Task. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):281-293.
    It has been proposed that performance in the think – no think task represents a laboratory analogue of the voluntary form of memory repression. The central prediction of this repression hypothesis is that performance in the TNT task will be influenced by emotional characteristics of the material to be remembered. This prediction was tested in two experiments by asking participants to learn paired associates in which the first item was either emotionally positive or emotionally negative . The second word was (...)
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  8.  71
    I. J. Good (1961). A Causal Calculus (I). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 11 (44):305-318.
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  9.  99
    I. J. Good (1967). The White Shoe is a Red Herring. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 17 (4):322.
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  10. I. J. Good (1961). The Paradox of Confirmation (II). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 12 (45):63-64.
  11.  3
    Charles H. Schwepker Jr & David J. Good (2011). Moral Judgment and its Impact on Business-to-Business Sales Performance and Customer Relationships. Journal of Business Ethics 98 (4):609-625.
    For many years, researchers and practitioners have sought out meaningful indicators of sales performance. Yet, as the concept of performance has broadened, the understanding of what makes up a successful seller, has become far more complicated. The complexity of buyer–seller relationships has changed therefore as the definition of sales performance has expanded, cultivating a growing interest in ethical/unethical actions since they could potentially have impacts on sales performance. Given this environment, the purpose of this study is to explore the impact (...)
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  12.  19
    Ariane Burke, Anne Kandler & David Good (2012). Women Who Know Their Place. Human Nature 23 (2):133-148.
    Differences between men and women in the performance of tests designed to measure spatial abilities are explained by evolutionary psychologists in terms of adaptive design. The Hunter-Gatherer Theory of Spatial Ability suggests that the adoption of a hunter-gatherer lifestyle (assuming a sexual division of labor) created differential selective pressure on the development of spatial skills in men and women and, therefore, cognitive differences between the sexes. Here, we examine a basic spatial skill—wayfinding (the ability to plan routes and navigate a (...)
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  13. I. J. Good (1967). Human and Machine Logic. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 18 (August):145-6.
  14.  21
    J. B. DeConinck & D. J. Good (1989). Perceptual Differences of Sales Practitioners and Students Concerning Ethical Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 8 (9):667 - 676.
    This study investigates specific behavioral perceptual differences of ethics between practitioners and students enrolled in sales classes. Respondents were asked to indicate their beliefs to issues related to ethics in sales. A highly significant difference was found between mean responses of students and sales personnel. Managers indicated a greater concern for ethical behavior and less attention to sales than did the students. Students indicated a strong desire for success regardless of ethical constraints violated.
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  15. I. J. Good (1968). Corroboration, Explanation, Evolving Probability, Simplicity and a Sharpened Razor. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 19 (2):123-143.
  16.  51
    I. J. Good (1974). A Correction Concerning Complexity. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 25 (3):289.
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  17.  52
    James Good (2000). The Historical Imagination in the Human Sciences Introduction: The Historical Imagination and the History of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 13 (4):97-101.
    The historical imagination, as Hayden White has reminded us, is not singular;\nit is manifest in many forms (White, 1973). Not surprisingly, this diversity\nis reflected within the pages of History of the Human Sciences and in the four papers that follow. Indeed, from its inception, the journal has sought to\npromote a variety of styles of writing, representing the many voices that have\nan interest in the human sciences and their history.\nIn the opening article, Roger Smith suggests that a distinctive feature of the\nhistorical (...)
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  18. I. J. Good (1990). A Suspicious Feature of the Popper/Miller Argument. Philosophy of Science 57 (3):535-536.
    The form of argument used by Popper and Miller to attack the concept of probabilistic induction is applied to the slightly different situation in which some evidence undermines a hypothesis. The result is seemingly absurd, thus bringing the form of argument under suspicion.
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  19. I. J. Good (1983). The Philosophy of Exploratory Data Analysis. Philosophy of Science 50 (2):283-295.
    This paper attempts to define Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) more precisely than usual, and to produce the beginnings of a philosophy of this topical and somewhat novel branch of statistics. A data set is, roughly speaking, a collection of k-tuples for some k. In both descriptive statistics and in EDA, these k-tuples, or functions of them, are represented in a manner matched to human and computer abilities with a view to finding patterns that are not "kinkera". A kinkus is a (...)
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  20.  26
    Sherry S. Demastes, Ronald G. Good & Patsye Peebles (1995). Students' Conceptual Ecologies and the Process of Conceptual Change in Evolution. Science Education 79 (6):637-666.
  21.  49
    I. J. Good (1968). The White Shoe Qua Herring is Pink. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 19 (2):156-157.
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  22.  99
    B. Meltzer & I. J. Good (1965). Two Forms of the Prediction Paradox. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 16 (61):50-51.
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  23. I. J. Good, Ian Hacking, R. C. Jeffrey & Håkan Törnebohm (1966). The Estimation of Probabilities: An Essay on Modern Bayesian Methods. Synthese 16 (2):234-244.
     
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  24. Paul Fairfield, James Scott Johnston, Tom Rockmore, James A. Good, Jim Garrison, Barry Allen, Joseph Margolis, Sandra B. Rosenthal, Richard J. Bernstein, David Vessey, C. G. Prado, Colin Koopman, Antonio Calcagno & Inna Semetsky (2010). John Dewey and Continental Philosophy. Southern Illinois University Press.
    _John Dewey and Continental Philosophy_ provides a rich sampling of exchanges that could have taken place long ago between the traditions of American pragmatism and continental philosophy had the lines of communication been more open between Dewey and his European contemporaries. Since they were not, Paul Fairfield and thirteen of his colleagues seek to remedy the situation by bringing the philosophy of Dewey into conversation with several currents in continental philosophical thought, from post-Kantian idealism and the work of Friedrich Nietzsche (...)
     
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  25.  11
    Joan M. McMahon & Darren J. Good (forthcoming). The Moral Metacognition Scale: Development and Validation. Ethics and Behavior:1-38.
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  26. D. Good (1988). Trust as a Commodity. In Diego Gambetta (ed.), Trust: Making and Breaking Cooperative Relations. Blackwell 31--48.
     
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  27. I. J. Good (1969). Godel's Theorem is a Red Herring. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 19 (February):357-8.
  28.  17
    Jim Good & Jim Garrison (2011). Dewey, Hegel, and Causation. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (2):101-120.
    [Cause and effect], if they are distinct, are also identical. Even in ordinary consciousness that identity may be found. We say that a cause is a cause, only when it has an effect, and vice versa. Both cause and effect are thus one and the same content: and the distinction between them is primarily only that the one lays down, and the other is laid down.1In the quote above, Hegel claims that cause and effect are only distinct from a particular (...)
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  29.  54
    I. J. Good (1962). Errata and Corrigenda. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 13 (49):88-88.
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  30.  99
    I. J. Good (1971). Free Will and Speed of Computation. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 22 (1):48-50.
  31.  23
    Natalie Clark, Sarah Hunt, Georgia Jules & Trevor Good (2010). Ethical Dilemmas in Community-Based Research: Working with Vulnerable Youth in Rural Communities. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (4):243-252.
    Ethical Dilemmas in Community-Based Research: Working with Vulnerable Youth in Rural Communities Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10805-010-9123-y Authors Natalie Clark, Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC Canada V2C 5N3 Sarah Hunt, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada Georgia Jules, Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC Canada V2C 5N3 Trevor Good, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada Journal Journal of Academic Ethics Online ISSN 1572-8544 Print ISSN 1570-1727 Journal Volume Volume 8 Journal Issue Volume 8, Number 4.
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  32. I. J. Good (1985). A Historical Comment Concerning Novel Confirmation. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 36 (2):184-185.
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  33.  14
    Peter Good (2001). Language for Those Who Have Nothing: Mikhail Bakhtin and the Landscape of Psychiatry. Kluwer Academic/Plenum.
    The aim of Language for those who have Nothing is to think psychiatry through the writings of Mikhail Bakhtin. Using the concepts of Dialogism and Polyphony, the Carnival and the Chronotope, a novel means of navigating the clinical landscape is developed. Bakhtin offers language as a social phenomenon and one that is fully embodied. Utterances are shown to be alive and enfleshed and their meanings realised in the context of given social dimensions. The organisation of this book corresponds with carnival (...)
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  34.  98
    I. J. Good (1960). The Paradox of Confirmation. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 11 (42):145-149.
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  35.  38
    I. J. Good (1961). A Causal Calculus (II). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 12 (45):43-51.
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  36.  46
    I. J. Good (1984). A Bayesian Approach in the Philosophy of Inference. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 35 (2):161-166.
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  37.  42
    Robert J. Good (1999). Why Are Chemists 'Turned Off' by Philosophy of Science? Foundations of Chemistry 1 (2):65-95.
    The most immediate reason why chemists are unenthusiastic about the philosophy of science is the historic hostility of important philosophers, to the concept of atoms. (Without atoms, discovery in chemistry would have proceeded with glacial slowness, if at all, in the last 200 years.) Other important reasons include the anti-realist influence of the philosophical dogmas of logical positivism, instrumentalism, of strict empiricism. Though (as has been said) these doctrines have recently gone out of fashion, they are still very influential.A diagram (...)
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  38. I. J. Good (1965). Speculations Concerning the First Ultraintelligent Machine. In F. Alt & M. Ruminoff (eds.), Advances in Computers, volume 6. Academic Press
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  39.  13
    J. Good (1957). An Introduction to Philosophy. Philosophical Studies 7:230-230.
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  40. Irving J. Good (1962). A Causal Calculus II. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 12:43-51.
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  41. Jim Good, Jim Garrison, Leemon McHenry, Corey McCall, Susan Dunston, Zach VanderVeen, Melvin L. Rogers, James A. Dunson Iii, Mary Magada-Ward & Michael Sullivan (2010). 1. Front Matter Front Matter. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (2).
     
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  42.  13
    Justin Good (2006). Wittgenstein and the Theory of Perception. Continuum.
    A philosphical exploration of perception explores Wittgenstein's work on visual meaning and his analysis of the concept of "seeing.".
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  43.  46
    I. J. Good (1970). A Suggested Resolution of Miller's Paradox. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 21 (3):288-289.
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  44.  6
    Byron J. Good (1997). Studying Mental Illness in Context: Local, Global, or Universal? Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 25 (2):230-248.
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  45.  4
    Howard Good (ed.) (2003). Desperately Seeking Ethics: A Guide to Media Conduct. Scarecrow Press.
    This is not just another media ethics book. Engaging and non-conventional it breaks away from the usual text practice of presenting the ethical theories of well-known philosophers in watered-down form.
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  46.  6
    Howard Good (2002). Media Ethics Goes to the Movies. Praeger.
    Uses cinema both to depict a variety of situations in which questions of media ethics arise, and to illustrate classic and contemporary ethical theories.
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  47.  15
    Mila A. Aroskar, D. Gay Moldow & Charles M. Good (2004). Nurses' Voices: Policy, Practice and Ethics. Nursing Ethics 11 (3):266-276.
    This article deals with nurses’ ethical concerns raised by the consequences of changes in governmental and institutional policies on nursing practice and patient care. The aims of this project were to explore perspectives of registered nurses who provide or manage direct patient care on policies that affect nursing and patient care, and to provide input to policy makers for the development of more patient-centred policies. Four focus groups were conducted with a total of 36 registered nurse participants. The project team (...)
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  48.  8
    Jim Good (2007). America's First Women Philosophers. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 35 (106):66-68.
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  49.  15
    James Good (2013). The Continuing Relevance of John Dewey: Reflections on Aesthetics, Morality, Science, and Society Ed. By Larry Hickman Et Al. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (3):391-394.
    It seems philosophers often feel compelled to assess the continuing relevance of their chosen fields of specialization and/or their favorite philosophers. While this volume does not set out to prove that the philosophy of John Dewey is of continuing relevance (and it is difficult to imagine how one would prove such a thing), several of the included essays explicitly argue that Dewey's work provides resources to advance contemporary philosophical debates. The collection was assembled from essays presented at a June 2009 (...)
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  50.  6
    James Good (2012). The Continuing Relevance of John Dewey: Reflections on Aesthetics, Morality, Science, and Society. Larry Hickman, Matthew Caleb Flamm, Krzysztof Piotr Skowronski, and Jennifer A. Rea (Eds). [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (3):391-394.
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