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  1. Instrumental Good, Study Guide for Final Bokulich PH 100.
    You should be specific, but also explain the context and relevance of the term. (Each ID is worth 5 points).
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  2. Joan M. McMahon & Darren J. Good (forthcoming). The Moral Metacognition Scale: Development and Validation. Ethics and Behavior:150317092454007.
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  3. Gregory A. Good (2014). Tales of a Magnetic Planet. Metascience 23 (2):327-329.
    This book joins a small number of efforts in the last decade to present the complex scientific issues of geomagnetism to a broader, semi-technical audience. The author approaches this goal more closely than most scientists and science writers. He specifically eschews mathematical equations knowing that even one equation leads some readers to give up trying. He offers instead a mix of description and story-telling, the former directed at phenomena and procedures, the latter drawn mostly from personal experience.As Merrill notes, his (...)
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  4. Jim Mackenzie, Ron Good & James Robert Brown (2014). Postmodernism and Science Education: An Appraisal. In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. 1057-1086.
    Over the past 50 years, postmodernism has been a progressively growing and influential intellectual movement inside and outside the academy. Postmodernism is characterised by rejection of parts or the whole of the Enlightenment project that had its roots in the birth and embrace of early modern science. While Enlightenment and ‘modernist’ ideas of universalism, of intellectual and cultural progress, of the possibility of finding truths about the natural and social world and of rejection of absolutism and authoritarianism in politics, philosophy (...)
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  5. James Good (2013). Faith in Life: John Dewey's Early Philosophy by Donald J. Morse (Review). [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy 49 (2):250-257.
    Presumably, great men, including John Dewey, have great flaws. For decades, Dewey scholars assumed that the Hegelian cast of his early philosophy proved, prima facie, that it was merely derivative and hopelessly metaphysical in the worst possible sense of that term, as though nothing original or practically applicable to real life could possibly come from studying Hegel. I believe it is fair to say that, among Dewey scholars, the term “Hegelian” became an ossified pejorative that required little, if any, explanation. (...)
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  6. James Good (2013). The Continuing Relevance of John Dewey: Reflections on Aesthetics, Morality, Science, and Society Ed. By Larry Hickman Et Al. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (3):391-394.
    It seems philosophers often feel compelled to assess the continuing relevance of their chosen fields of specialization and/or their favorite philosophers. While this volume does not set out to prove that the philosophy of John Dewey is of continuing relevance (and it is difficult to imagine how one would prove such a thing), several of the included essays explicitly argue that Dewey's work provides resources to advance contemporary philosophical debates. The collection was assembled from essays presented at a June 2009 (...)
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  7. James A. Good (2013). Faith in Life: John Dewey's Early Philosophy By Donald J. Morse. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 49 (2):250-257.
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  8. Ariane Burke, Anne Kandler & David Good (2012). Women Who Know Their Place. Human Nature 23 (2):133-148.
    Differences between men and women in the performance of tests designed to measure spatial abilities are explained by evolutionary psychologists in terms of adaptive design. The Hunter-Gatherer Theory of Spatial Ability suggests that the adoption of a hunter-gatherer lifestyle (assuming a sexual division of labor) created differential selective pressure on the development of spatial skills in men and women and, therefore, cognitive differences between the sexes. Here, we examine a basic spatial skill—wayfinding (the ability to plan routes and navigate a (...)
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  9. Byron J. Good (2012). Phenomenology, Psychoanalysis, and Subjectivity in Java. Ethos 40 (1):24-36.
  10. Byron J. Good & Mary-Jo DelVecchio Good (2012). "To Make a Difference . . .": Narrative Desire in Global Medicine. Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 2 (2):121-124.
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  11. James Good (2012). The Continuing Relevance of John Dewey: Reflections on Aesthetics, Morality, Science, and Society. Larry Hickman, Matthew Caleb Flamm, Krzysztof Piotr Skowronski, and Jennifer A. Rea (Eds). [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy 48 (3):391-394.
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  12. Amalia Muhaimin, Mary-Jo Delvecchio Good, Yati Soenarto & Retna Siwi Padmawati (2012). Communication Barriers Among Physicians in Care at the End of Life: Experience From a Postgraduate Residency Training in Java, Indonesia. Asian Bioethics Review 4 (2):102-114.
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  13. James A. Good (2011). Neil Gross's Deweyan Account of Rorty's Intellectual Development. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 47 (1):38-45.
    Writing about the intellectual development of a philosopher is a delicate business. My own endeavor to reinterpret the influence of Hegel on Dewey troubles some scholars because, they believe, I make Dewey seem less original.1 But if, like Dewey, we overcome Cartesian dualism, placing the development of the self firmly within a complex matrix of social processes, we are forced to reexamine, without necessarily surrendering, the notion of individual originality, or what Neil Gross calls “discourse[s] of creative genius.”2 To use (...)
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  14. Jim Good & Jim Garrison (2011). Dewey, Hegel, and Causation. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (2):101-120.
    [Cause and effect], if they are distinct, are also identical. Even in ordinary consciousness that identity may be found. We say that a cause is a cause, only when it has an effect, and vice versa. Both cause and effect are thus one and the same content: and the distinction between them is primarily only that the one lays down, and the other is laid down.1In the quote above, Hegel claims that cause and effect are only distinct from a particular (...)
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  15. Peter Hare, Joseph M. Bryant, Alan Sica, Bruce Kuklick, James A. Good, Neil Gross & Elizabeth F. Cooke (2011). 3.“What Can I Do for the Cause Today Which I Never Did Before?”: Situating Josiah Royce's Pittsburgh Lectures on Loyalty “What Can I Do for the Cause Today Which I Never Did Before?”: Situating Josiah Royce's Pittsburgh Lectures on Loyalty (Pp. 87-108). [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 47 (1).
     
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  16. Charles H. Schwepker Jr & David J. Good (2011). Moral Judgment and its Impact on Business-to-Business Sales Performance and Customer Relationships. Journal of Business Ethics 98 (4):609-625.
    For many years, researchers and practitioners have sought out meaningful indicators of sales performance. Yet, as the concept of performance has broadened, the understanding of what makes up a successful seller, has become far more complicated. The complexity of buyer–seller relationships has changed therefore as the definition of sales performance has expanded, cultivating a growing interest in ethical/unethical actions since they could potentially have impacts on sales performance. Given this environment, the purpose of this study is to explore the impact (...)
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  17. J. Shook & J. Good (2011). John Dewey’s Philosophy of Spirit, with the 1897 Lecture on Hegel, Fordham University Press, New York 2010, Pp. 197, by Roberto Gronda. [REVIEW] European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 3:305-315.
     
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  18. Natalie Clark, Sarah Hunt, Georgia Jules & Trevor Good (2010). Ethical Dilemmas in Community-Based Research: Working with Vulnerable Youth in Rural Communities. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (4):243-252.
    Ethical Dilemmas in Community-Based Research: Working with Vulnerable Youth in Rural Communities Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10805-010-9123-y Authors Natalie Clark, Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC Canada V2C 5N3 Sarah Hunt, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada Georgia Jules, Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC Canada V2C 5N3 Trevor Good, University of Victoria, Victoria, Canada Journal Journal of Academic Ethics Online ISSN 1572-8544 Print ISSN 1570-1727 Journal Volume Volume 8 Journal Issue Volume 8, Number 4.
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  19. Paul Fairfield, James Scott Johnston, Tom Rockmore, James A. Good, Jim Garrison, Barry Allen, Joseph Margolis, Sandra B. Rosenthal, Richard J. Bernstein, David Vessey, C. G. Prado, Colin Koopman, Antonio Calcagno & Inna Semetsky (2010). John Dewey and Continental Philosophy. Southern Illinois University Press.
     
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  20. Byron J. Good (2010). Emil Kraepelin on Pathologies of the Will. In Keith M. Murphy & C. Jason Throop (eds.), Toward an Anthropology of the Will. Stanford University Press.
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  21. James A. Good (2010). Rereading Dewey's "Permanent Hegelian Deposit". In John R. Shook (ed.), John Dewey's Philosophy of Spirit: With the 1897 Lecture on Hegel. Fordham University Press.
     
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  22. Jim Good, Jim Garrison, Leemon McHenry, Corey McCall, Susan Dunston, Zach VanderVeen, Melvin L. Rogers, James A. Dunson Iii, Mary Magada-Ward & Michael Sullivan (2010). 1. Front Matter Front Matter. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (2).
     
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  23. Anthony J. Lambert, Kimberly S. Good & Ian J. Kirk (2010). Testing the Repression Hypothesis: Effects of Emotional Valence on Memory Suppression in the Think – No Think Task. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):281-293.
    It has been proposed that performance in the think – no think task represents a laboratory analogue of the voluntary form of memory repression. The central prediction of this repression hypothesis is that performance in the TNT task will be influenced by emotional characteristics of the material to be remembered. This prediction was tested in two experiments by asking participants to learn paired associates in which the first item was either emotionally positive or emotionally negative . The second word was (...)
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  24. Jonathan Good (2009). Ben Dodds, Peasants and Production in the Medieval North-East: The Evidence From Tithes, 1270–1536.(Regions and Regionalism in History, 7.) Woodbridge, Eng., and Rochester, NY: Boydell and Brewer, 2007. Pp. Xii, 205; 20 Black-and-White Figures, 25 Tables, and 3 Maps. [REVIEW] Speculum 84 (3):698-699.
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  25. Nathan Crilly, David Good, Derek Matravers & P. John Clarkson, Design as Communication: Exploring the Validity and Utility of Relating Intention to Interpretation.
    This explores the role of intention in interpreting designed artefacts. The relationship between how designers intend products to be interpreted and how they are subsequently interpreted has often been represented as a process of communication. However, such representations are attacked for allegedly implying that designers' intended meanings are somehow ‘contained’ in products and that those meanings are passively received by consumers. Instead, critics argue that consumers actively construct their own meanings as they engage with products, and therefore that designers' intentions (...)
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  26. James Good (2008). Dewey's “Permanent Hegelian Deposit”: A Reply to Hickman and Alexander. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (4):pp. 577-602.
    I respond to the comments by Larry Hickman and Thomas Alexander about my book, A Search for Unity in Diversity: The “Permanent Hegelian Deposit” in the Philosophy of John Dewey . I focus on four issues: 1) Precisely how do I prefer to characterize Dewey’s debt to Hegel? 2) How do I justify my admittedly controversial reading of Dewey’s World War I criticisms of Hegel? 3) Where do I believe Dewey found ideas in Hegel that led him to articulate the (...)
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  27. James Good (2008). Jean de Groot, Ed., Nature in American Philosophy. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles s Peirce Society 44 (3):541-547.
     
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  28. James Good (2008). Review: Nature in American Philosophy. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (3):pp. 541-547.
    Although he had intermittently toiled over his translation of Hegel's Science of Logic for nearly half a century without finding a publisher, Henry Conrad Brokmeyer, the petulant visionary of St. Louis Hegelian fame, concluded it was naive to expect an infant nation to devote itself to philosophical reflection while it was "carving civilization out of wilderness." Brokmeyer's difficulties may have had more to do with his disdain for the grammatical and spelling conventions of the English language than he cared to (...)
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  29. James Good (2008). Nature in American Philosophy (Review). Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society: A Quarterly Journal in American Philosophy 44 (3):541-547.
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  30. Jonathan Good (2008). Douglas Biggs, Three Armies in Britain: The Irish Campaign of Richard II and the Usurpation of Henry IV, 1397–1399.(History of Warfare, 39.) Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2006. Pp. Xv, 295; 12 Black-and-White Figures, Tables, and 4 Maps.€ 105. [REVIEW] Speculum 83 (1):171-172.
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  31. James A. Good (2007). Thoughts on Randall E. Auxier, "Royce's 'Conservatism'". The Pluralist 2 (2):56 - 62.
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  32. Jim Good (2007). America's First Women Philosophers. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 35 (106):66-68.
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  33. Frances Good (2006). Setting Common Examination Papers That Differentiate. Educational Studies 15 (1):67-82.
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  34. G. Good (2006). Sick to Death. Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (1):80.
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  35. James A. Good (2006). A Search for Unity in Diversity : The "Permanent Hegelian Deposit" in the Philosophy of John Dewey. Lexington Books.
    This study demonstrates that Dewey did not reject Hegelianism during the 1890s, as scholars maintain, but developed a humanistic/historicist reading that was indebted to an American Hegelian tradition. Scholars have misunderstood the "permanent Hegelian deposit" in Dewey's thought because they have not fully appreciated this American Hegelian tradition and have assumed that his Hegelianism was based primarily on British neo-Hegelianism. ;The study examines the American reception of Hegel in the nineteenth-century by intellectuals as diverse as James Marsh and Frederic Henry (...)
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  36. James A. Good (2006). Beyond "Sushiology": John Dewey on Diversity. The Pluralist 1 (2):123 - 132.
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  37. James A. Good (2006). John Dewey's "Permanent Hegelian Deposit" and the Exigencies of War. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (2):293-313.
    : From 1882 to 1903, Dewey explicitly espoused a Hegelian philosophy. Until recently, scholars agreed that he broke from Hegel no later than 1903, but never adequately accounted for what he called the "permanent deposit" that Hegel left in his mature thought. I argue that Dewey never made a clean break from Hegel. Instead, he drew on the work of the St. Louis Hegelians to fashion a non-metaphysical reading of Hegel, similar to that championed by Klaus Hartmann and other Hegel (...)
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  38. James Allan Good (2006). John Dewey's "Permanent Hegelian Deposit" and the Exigencies of War. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (2):293-313.
    From 1882 to 1903, Dewey explicitly espoused a Hegelian philosophy. Until recently, scholars agreed that he broke from Hegel no later than 1903, but never adequately accounted for what he called the "permanent deposit" that Hegel left in his mature thought. I argue that Dewey never made a clean break from Hegel. Instead, he drew on the work of the St. Louis Hegelians to fashion a non-metaphysical reading of Hegel, similar to that championed by Klaus Hartmann and other Hegel scholars (...)
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  39. Justin Good (2006). Wittgenstein and the Theory of Perception. Continuum.
    A philosphical exploration of perception explores Wittgenstein's work on visual meaning and his analysis of the concept of "seeing.".
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  40. E. M. Robinson, G. Good & S. Burke (2006). Talking with Lorraine's Mother and Sister, Five Months After Her Death. Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (1):94.
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  41. Mila A. Aroskar, D. Gay Moldow & Charles M. Good (2004). Nurses' Voices: Policy, Practice and Ethics. Nursing Ethics 11 (3):266-276.
    This article deals with nurses’ ethical concerns raised by the consequences of changes in governmental and institutional policies on nursing practice and patient care. The aims of this project were to explore perspectives of registered nurses who provide or manage direct patient care on policies that affect nursing and patient care, and to provide input to policy makers for the development of more patient-centred policies. Four focus groups were conducted with a total of 36 registered nurse participants. The project team (...)
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  42. James Good (2004). The Value of Thomas Davidson. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 40 (2):289 - 318.
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  43. Deborah Giaschi, James E. Jan, Bruce Bjornson, Simon Au Young, Matthew Tata, Christopher J. Lyons, William V. Good & Peter K. H. Wong (2003). Conscious Visual Abilities in a Patient with Early Bilateral Occipital Damage. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology 45 (11):772-781.
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  44. Howard Good (2003). Created Equal": The Press and Hate Speech. In , Desperately Seeking Ethics: A Guide to Media Conduct. Scarecrow Press. 87.
  45. Howard Good (ed.) (2003). Desperately Seeking Ethics: A Guide to Media Conduct. Scarecrow Press.
    This is not just another media ethics book. Engaging and non-conventional it breaks away from the usual text practice of presenting the ethical theories of well-known philosophers in watered-down form.
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  46. James A. Good (2003). The "Eclipse" of Pragmatism: A Reply to John Capps. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 39 (1):77 - 86.
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  47. Howard Good (2002). Media Ethics Goes to the Movies. Praeger.
    Uses cinema both to depict a variety of situations in which questions of media ethics arise, and to illustrate classic and contemporary ethical theories.
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  48. James A. Good & Frederick A. Rauch (2002). The Early American Reception of German Idealism. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  49. Graham Good (2001). Humanism Betrayed: Theory, Ideology and Culture in the Contemporary University. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Political correctness in Canada: the McEwen report on the political science department at UBC -- The new sectarianism: gender, race, sexual orientation -- Theory 1: Marx, Freud, Nietzsche -- Theory 2: Constructionism, ideology, textuality -- Presentism: postmodernism, poststructuralism, postcolonialism -- The carceral vision: Geertz, Greenblatt, Foucault, and culture as constraint -- The liberal humanist vision: Northrup Frye and culture as freedom -- Conclusion: the hegemony of theory and the managerial university.
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  50. Peter Good (2001). Language for Those Who Have Nothing: Mikhail Bakhtin and the Landscape of Psychiatry. Kluwer Academic/Plenum.
    The aim of Language for those who have Nothing is to think psychiatry through the writings of Mikhail Bakhtin. Using the concepts of Dialogism and Polyphony, the Carnival and the Chronotope, a novel means of navigating the clinical landscape is developed. Bakhtin offers language as a social phenomenon and one that is fully embodied. Utterances are shown to be alive and enfleshed and their meanings realised in the context of given social dimensions. The organisation of this book corresponds with carnival (...)
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