Search results for 'h-consciousness' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Some Reflections From Altered Egos & Al Consciousness (1969). Editorial 253 Ideology, Ego, and Ethos: A Comment on Erickson Walter H. Capps 255. Humanitas. Journal of the Institute of Man 5 (3):251.score: 360.0
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  2. Piotr Boltuc (2010). Sloman and H-Consciousness. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 2 (01):23-26.score: 156.0
  3. Daniel L. Schacter (1989). On the Relation Between Memory and Consciousness: Dissociable Interactions and Conscious Experience. In (H. Roediger & F. In Henry L. I. Roediger & Fergus I. M. Craik (eds.), Varieties of Memory and Consciousness. Lawrence Erlbaum.score: 126.0
  4. A. M. Frazier (1977). F. H. Bradley's Analysis of Religious Consciousness. Idealistic Studies 7 (3):239-251.score: 120.0
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  5. E. F. Kaelin (1980). A Review of Henri Ey.Consciousness, Trans. John H. Floodstrom. Bloomington and London: Indiana University Press, 1978. Pp. [XXXIV], 446. $22.50. [REVIEW] Human Studies 3 (1):279-290.score: 120.0
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  6. Calvin S. Hall (1955). Book Review:Problems of Consciousness: Transactions of the Third Conference H. A. Abramson. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 22 (1):68-.score: 120.0
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  7. Calvin S. Hall (1953). Book Review:Problems of Consciousness H. A. Abramson. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 20 (3):243-.score: 120.0
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  8. Nicholas Boltuc & Peter Boltuc (2007). Replication of the Hard Problem of Consciousness in AI and Bio-AI: An Early Conceptual Framework. In Anthony Chella & Ricardo Manzotti (eds.), AI and Consciousness: Theoretical Foundations and Current Approaches. AAAI Press, Merlo Park, CA.score: 102.0
    We should eventually understand how exactly first person phenomenal consciousness is generated. When we do, we should be able to enginner one for robots. This is the engineering thesis in machine consciousness.
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  9. Brian J. Garrett (2003). Bermudez on Self-Consciousness. Philosophical Quarterly 53 (210):96-101.score: 84.0
    I argue that José Luis Bermúdez has not shown that there is a paradox in our concept of self-consciousness. The deflationary theory is not a plausible theory of self-consciousness, so its paradoxicality is irrelevant. A more plausible theory, 'the simple theory', is not paradoxical. However, I do think there is a puzzle about the connection between self-consciousness and 'I'-thoughts.
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  10. J. Smythies (2003). Space, Time and Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (3):47-56.score: 84.0
  11. John Perry (2001). Time, Consciousness and the Knowledge Argument. In The Importance of Time: Proceedings of the Philosophy of Time Society, 1995-2000. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Pub.score: 78.0
  12. C. Lehner (1997). What It Feels Like to Be in a Superposition, and Why: Consciousness and the Interpretation of Everett's Quantum Mechanics. Synthese 110 (2):191-216.score: 78.0
    This paper attempts an interpretation of Everett's relative state formulation of quantum mechanics that avoids the commitment to new metaphysical entities like ‘worlds’ or ‘minds’. Starting from Everett's quantum mechanical model of an observer, it is argued that an observer's belief to be in an eigenstate of the measurement (corresponding to the observation of a well-defined measurement outcome) is consistent with the fact that she objectively is in a superposition of such states. Subjective states corresponding to such beliefs are constructed. (...)
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  13. Gareth B. Matthews (1977). Consciousness and Life. Philosophy 52 (January):13-26.score: 78.0
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  14. Blake H. Dournaee (2010). Comments on “The Replication of the Hard Problem of Consciousness in AI and Bio-AI”. Minds and Machines 20 (2):303-309.score: 78.0
    In their joint paper entitled The Replication of the Hard Problem of Consciousness in AI and BIO-AI (Boltuc et al. Replication of the hard problem of conscious in AI and Bio- AI: An early conceptual framework 2008), Nicholas and Piotr Boltuc suggest that machines could be equipped with phenomenal consciousness, which is subjective consciousness that satisfies Chalmer’s hard problem (We will abbreviate the hard problem of consciousness as H-consciousness ). The claim is that if we knew the inner workings (...)
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  15. William M. Richards (1984). Self-Consciousness and Agency. Synthese 61 (November):149-71.score: 78.0
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  16. Kenneth R. Merrill (1970). Comments on Professor H.D. Lewis, Self-Identity and Memory. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 1 (1-2):230-236.score: 78.0
  17. James G. Hart & Tomis Kapitan (eds.) (1999). The Phenomeno-Logic of the I: Essays on Self-Consciousness. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.score: 78.0
     
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  18. Robert H. Wozniak (ed.) (1884/1993). Theoretical Roots of Early Behaviourism: Functionalism, the Critique of Introspection, and the Nature and Evolution of Consciousness. Routledge/Thoemmes Press.score: 72.0
    While John B. Watson articulated the intellectual commitments of behaviorism with clarity and force, wove them into a coherent perspective, gave the perspective a name, and made it a cause, these commitments had adherents before him. To document the origins of behaviorism, this series collects the articles that set the terms of the behaviorist debate, includes the most important pre-Watsonian contributions to objectivism, and reprints the first full text of the new behaviorism. Contents: Functionalism, the Critque of Introspection, and the (...)
     
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  19. B. D. Josephson & V. S. Ramachandran (eds.) (1980). Consciousness and the Physical World: Edited Proceedings of an Interdisciplinary Symposium on Consciousness Held at the University of Cambridge in January 1978. Pergamon Press.score: 66.0
    Edited proceedings of an interdisciplinary symposium on consciousness held at the University of Cambridge in January 1978. Includes a foreword by Freeman Dyson. Chapter authors: G. Vesey, R.L. Gregory, H.C. Longuet-Higgins, N.K. Humphrey, H.B. Barlow, D.M. MacKay, B.D. Josephson, M. Roth, V.S. Ramachandran, S. Padfield, and (editorial summary only) E. Noakes. -/- Page numbering convention: 'go to page n' accesses the pair of scanned pages 2n and 2n+1. A text-format version of the book (OCR generated with occasional errors) is available (...)
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  20. Christian Etzrodt (2008). The Foundation of an Interpretative Sociology: A Critical Review of the Attempts of George H. Mead and Alfred Schutz. [REVIEW] Human Studies 31 (2):157 - 177.score: 66.0
    George H. Mead and Alfred Schutz proposed foundations for an interpretative sociology from opposite standpoints. Mead accepted the objective meaning structure a priori. His problem became therefore the explanation of the individuality and creativity of human actors in his social behavioristic approach. In contrast, Schutz started from the subjective consciousness of an isolated actor as a result of a phenomenological reduction. He was concerned with the problem of explaining the possibility of this isolated actor’s perceiving other actors in their existence, (...)
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  21. Gabriela Silva (2012). Platón y C.H. Whiteley: El rol de la conciencia en la acción humana. Apuntes Filosóficos 20 (38).score: 66.0
    Resumen Existe la posibilidad de hallar una conexión entre las perspectivas de C. H. Whiteley y Platón en lo que se refiere a la acción humana, cuando prestamos atención a la noción de conciencia que se tanto uno como otro manejan; el primero, en su obra Mind in Action. An essay in Philosofical Psychology, y, el segundo, en su diálogo tardío Filebo. A pesar de las diferencias que naturalmente podemos encontrar entre dos autores tan lejanos uno del otro, cronológicamente hablando, (...)
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  22. John Warren White (ed.) (1974/1985). Frontiers of Consciousness: The Meeting Ground Between Inner and Outer Reality. Julian Press.score: 66.0
    Transpersonal psychology: Dean, S. R. The ultraconscious mind. Arasteh, A. R. Final integration in the adult personality.--The nature of madness: First, E. Visions, voyages, and new interpretations of madness. Van Dusen, W. Hallucinations as the world of spirits.--Biofeedback: White, J. The yogi in the lab. Kiefer, D. EEG alpha feedback and subjective states of consciousness.--Meditation research: Griffith, F. F. Meditation research: its personal and social implications. Kiefer, D. Intermeditation notes: reports from inner space.--Psychic research: Honorton, C. Tracing ESP through altered (...)
     
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  23. H. Sidky (2009). A Shaman's Cure: The Relationship Between Altered States of Consciousness and Shamanic Healing. Anthropology of Consciousness 20 (2):171-197.score: 60.0
    This study, which is based upon ethnographic data collected between 1999 and 2008 in Nepal, examines the connection between the shaman's altered states of consciousness (ASC; i.e., what goes on inside the healer's mind/brain) and therapeutic changes that take place in the patient's mind/body. Unlike other studies that primarily emphasize the shaman's internal psychological state, this article attempts to explain the role of the healer's ASC and elucidate how desired therapeutic changes depend upon patient–healer interactions. This question is explored in (...)
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  24. William H. Calvin (1998). Competing for Consciousness: A Darwinian Mechanism at an Appropriate Level of Explanation. Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (4):389-404.score: 60.0
    Treating consciousness as awareness or attention greatly underestimates it, ignoring the temporary levels of organization associated with higher intellectual function (syntax, planning, logic, music). The tasks that require consciousness tend to be the ones that demand a lot of resources. Routine tasks can be handled on the back burner but dealing with ambiguity, groping around offline, generating creative choices, and performing precision movements may temporarily require substantial allocations of neocortex. Here I will attempt to clarify the appropriate levels of explanation (...)
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  25. Piotr Boltuc (2012). The Engineering Thesis in Machine Consciousness. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 16 (2):187-207.score: 60.0
    I argue here that consciousness can be engineered. The claim that functional consciousness can be engineered has been persuasively put forth in regards to first-person functional consciousness; robots, for instance, can recognize colors, though there is still much debate about details of this sort of consciousness. Such consciousness has now become one of the meanings of the term phenomenal consciousness (e.g., as used by Franklin and Baars). Yet, we extend the argument beyond the tradition of behaviorist or functional reductive views (...)
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  26. Mark H. Bickhard (2005). Consciousness and Reflective Consciousness. Philosophical Psychology 18 (2):205-218.score: 54.0
    An interactive process model of the nature of representation intrinsically accounts for multiple emergent properties of consciousness, such as being a contentful experiential flow, from a situated and embodied point of view. A crucial characteristic of this model is that content is an internally related property of interactive process, rather than an externally related property as in all other contemporary models. Externally related content requires an interpreter, yielding the familiar regress of interpreters, along with a host of additional fatal problems. (...)
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  27. Jake H. Davis & Evan Thompson (2013). From the Five Aggregates to Phenomenal Consciousness: Toward a Cross-Cultural Cognitive Science. In Steven M. Emmanuel (ed.), A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy. John Wiley & Sons.score: 54.0
    Buddhism originated and developed in an Indian cultural context that featured many first-person practices for producing and exploring states of consciousness through the systematic training of attention. In contrast, the dominant methods of investigating the mind in Western cognitive science have emphasized third-person observation of the brain and behavior. In this chapter, we explore how these two different projects might prove mutually beneficial. We lay the groundwork for a cross-cultural cognitive science by using one traditional Buddhist model of the mind (...)
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  28. Jesús H. Aguilar & Andrei A. Buckareff (2009). Agency, Consciousness, and Executive Control. Philosophia 37 (1):21-30.score: 54.0
    On the Causal Theory of Action (CTA), internal proper parts of an agent such as desires and intentions are causally responsible for actions. CTA has increasingly come under attack for its alleged failure to account for agency. A recent version of this criticism due to François Schroeter proposes that CTA cannot provide an adequate account of either the executive control or the autonomous control involved in full-fledged agency. Schroeter offers as an alternative a revised understanding of the proper role of (...)
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  29. Gregg H. Rosenberg (2004). A Place for Consciousness: Probing the Deep Structure of the Natural World. Oxford: Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    What place does consciousness have in the natural world? If we reject materialism, could there be a credible alternative? In one classic example, philosophers ask whether we can ever know what is it is like for bats to sense the world using sonar. It seems obvious to many that any amount of information about a bat's physical structure and information processing leaves us guessing about the central questions concerning the character of its experience. A Place for Consciousness begins with reflections (...)
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  30. James H. Austin (2000). Consciousness Evolves When the Self Dissolves. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (11-12):209-230.score: 54.0
  31. Bjorn H. Merker (2005). The Liabilities of Mobility: A Selection Pressure for the Transition to Consciousness in Animal Evolution. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):89-114.score: 54.0
  32. Frank H. Durgin & Saul Sternberg (2002). The Time of Consciousness and Vice Versa. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (2):284-290.score: 54.0
  33. Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts & Carlos F. H. Neves (2013). Consciousness as a Phenomenon in the Operational Architectonics of Brain Organization: Criticality and Self-Organization Considerations. Chaos, Solitons and Fractals 55:13-31.score: 54.0
    In this paper we aim to show that phenomenal consciousness is realized by a particular level of brain operational organization and that understanding human consciousness requires a description of the laws of the immediately underlying neural collective phenomena, the nested hierarchy of electromagnetic fields of brain activity – operational architectonics. We argue that the subjective mental reality and the objective neurobiological reality, although seemingly worlds apart, are intimately connected along a unified metastable continuum and are both guided by the universal (...)
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  34. Richard H. Schlagel (1999). Why Not Artificial Consciousness or Thought? Minds and Machines 9 (1):3-28.score: 54.0
    The purpose of this article is to show why consciousness and thought are not manifested in digital computers. Analyzing the rationale for claiming that the formal manipulation of physical symbols in Turing machines would emulate human thought, the article attempts to show why this proved false. This is because the reinterpretation of designation and meaning to accommodate physical symbol manipulation eliminated their crucial functions in human discourse. Words have denotations and intensional meanings because the brain transforms the physical stimuli received (...)
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  35. Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Alexander A. Fingelkurts & Carlos F. H. Neves (2012). “Machine” Consciousness and “Artificial” Thought: An Operational Architectonics Model Guided Approach. Brain Research 1428:80-92.score: 54.0
    Instead of using low-level neurophysiology mimicking and exploratory programming methods commonly used in the machine consciousness field, the hierarchical Operational Architectonics (OA) framework of brain and mind functioning proposes an alternative conceptual-theoretical framework as a new direction in the area of model-driven machine (robot) consciousness engineering. The unified brain-mind theoretical OA model explicitly captures (though in an informal way) the basic essence of brain functional architecture, which indeed constitutes a theory of consciousness. The OA describes the neurophysiological basis of the (...)
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  36. Lawrence H. Davis (1989). Self-Consciousness in Chimps and Pigeons. Philosophical Psychology 2 (3):249-59.score: 54.0
    Chimpanzee behaviour with mirrors makes it plausible that they can recognise themselves as themselves in mirrors, and so have a 'self-concept'. I defend this claim, and argue that roughly similar behaviour in pigeons, as reported, does not in fact make it equally plausible that they also have this mental capacity. But for all that it is genuine, chimpanzee self-consciousness may differ significantly from ours. I describe one possibility I believe consistent with the data, even if not very plausible: that the (...)
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  37. James H. Fetzer (2003). Consciousness and Cognition: Semiotic Conceptions of Bodies and Minds. In Quentin Smith & Aleksandar Jokic (eds.), Consciousness: New Philosophical Perspectives. Oxford University Press. 295.score: 54.0
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  38. Ted Honderich (forthcoming). Effects, Determinism, Neither Compatibilism nor Incompatibilism, Consciousness. Philosophical Explorations.score: 54.0
    Since the rise of the theory of determinism, philosophers have argued and declared that we are diminished by it. Bishop Bramhall against Thomas Hobbes in the 17th Century, Kant against Hume in the 18th, F. H. Bradley against John Stuart Mill in the 19th, Robert Kane and Robert Nozick against such as me in the 20th Century. There must be something in this relentless tradition. It cannot, it seems to me, be the falsehood of determinism. Is it, so to speak, (...)
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  39. James M. Edie (1970). William James and Phenomenology. Review of Metaphysics 23 (March):481-526.score: 54.0
    This is a study of all the recent literature on william james written from a phenomenological perspective with the purpose of showing that william james made fundamental contributions to the phenomenological theory of the intentionality of consciousness, To the phenomenological theory of self-Identity, And to the phenomenological conception of noetic freedom as the basic concept of ethical theory.
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  40. Jack Martin (2007). Interpreting and Extending G. H. Mead's "Metaphysics" of Selfhood and Agency. Philosophical Psychology 20 (4):441 – 456.score: 54.0
    G. H. Mead developed an alternative "metaphysics" of selfhood and agency that underlies, but is seldom made explicit in discussions of, his social developmental psychology. This is an alternative metaphysics that rejects any pregiven, fixed foundations for being and knowing. It assumes the emergence of social psychological phenomena such as mind, self, and deliberative agency through the activity of human actors and interactors within their biophysical and sociocultural world. Of central importance to the emergence of self-consciousness and deliberative forms of (...)
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  41. Howard Shevrin, Jess H. Ghannam & Benjamin W. Libet (2002). A Neural Correlate of Consciousness Related to Repression. Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (2):334-41.score: 54.0
  42. J. H. van Hateren, Consciousness Results When Communication Modifies the Form of Self-Estimated Fitness.score: 54.0
    The origin and development of consciousness is poorly understood. Although it is clearly a naturalistic phenomenon evolved through Darwinian evolution, explaining it in terms of physicochemical, neural, or symbolic mechanisms remains elusive. Here I propose that two steps had to be taken in its evolution. First, living systems evolved an intrinsic goal-directedness by internalizing Darwinian fitness as a self-estimated fitness. The self-estimated fitness participates in a feedback loop that effectively produces intrinsic meaning in the organism. Second, animals with advanced nervous (...)
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  43. Michael H. Joseph & Samuel R. H. Joseph (2001). The Contents of Consciousness: From C to Shining C++. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):188-189.score: 54.0
    We suggest that consciousness (C) should be addressed as a multilevel concept. We can provisionally identify at least three, rather than two, levels: Gray's system should relate at least to the lowest of these three levels. Although it is unlikely to be possible to develop a behavioural test for C, it is possible to speculate as to the evolutionary advantages offered by C and how C evolved through succeeding levels. Disturbances in the relationships between the levels of C could underlie (...)
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  44. R. H. Bradshaw (1998). Consciousness in Nonhuman Animals: Adopting the Precautionary Principle. Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (1):108-14.score: 54.0
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  45. Howard Shevrin, Jess H. Ghannam & Benjamin W. Libet (2002). Response to Commentary on A Neural Correlate of Consciousness Related to Repression. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (2):345-346.score: 54.0
  46. Else Daniel Kondziella, Klaus Hansen R. Danielsen, Erik Carsten Thomsen & Peter Arlien-Soeborg C. Jansen (2009). 1 H Mr Spectroscopy of Gray and White Matter in Carbon Monoxide Poisoning. Journal of Neurology 256 (6).score: 54.0
    Carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication leads to acute and chronic neurological deficits, but little is known about the specific noxious mechanisms. 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may allow insight into the pathophysiology of CO poisoning by monitoring neurochemical disturbances, yet only limited information is available to date on the use of this protocol in determining the neurological effects of CO poisoning. To further examine the short-term and long-term effects of CO on the (...)
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  47. H. -H. Kögler (2009). Consciousness as Symbolic Construction: A Semiotics of Thought After Cassirer. Constructivist Foundations 4 (3):159 - 169.score: 54.0
    Purpose: In both analytic and continental philosophy, the linguistic turn jettisoned philosophical foundationalism and gave way to a new pragmatic-hermeneutic turn regarding understanding, truth, and meaning. Yet now intentional consciousness -- i.e., the relation between thought and language -- still poses an issue. At stake is the convincing reconstruction of consciousness based on symbolic mediation. Method: In order to contribute to this discussion, the paper takes up Cassirer's argument for the necessity of "symbolic forms" for thought. It introduces an ideal-typical (...)
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  48. J. H. Van Hateren (forthcoming). The Origin of Agency, Consciousness, and Free Will. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-22.score: 54.0
    Living organisms appear to have agency, the ability to act freely, and humans appear to have free will, the ability to rationally decide what to do. However, it is not clear how such properties can be produced by naturalistic processes, and there are indeed neuroscientific measurements that cast doubt on the existence of free will. Here I present a naturalistic theory of agency, consciousness, and free will. Elementary forms of agency evolved very early in the evolution of life, utilizing an (...)
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  49. Shirley Sugerman (ed.) (1976/2007). Evolution of Consciousness: Studies in Polarity. Barfield Press.score: 54.0
    Owen Barfield: a conversation with Shirley Sugerman -- To Owen Barfield -- Cecil Harwood: Owen Barfield -- Norman O. Brown: on interpretation -- Howard Nemerov: exceptions and rules -- Studies in polarity -- David Bohm: imagination, fancy, insight, and reason in the process of thought -- R.H. Barfield: darwinism -- Richard A. Hocks: "novelty" in polarity to "the most admitted truths" : tradition and the individual talent in S.T. Coleridge and T.S. Eliot -- Robert O. Preyer: the burden of culture (...)
     
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