Search results for 'health disparities' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  8
    Andrew Courtwright (2008). Health Disparities and Autonomy. Bioethics 22 (8):431-439.
    Disparities in socioeconomic status correlate closely with health, so that the lower a person's social position, the worse his health, an effect that the epidemiologist Michael Marmot has labeled the status syndrome. Marmot has argued that differences in autonomy, understood in terms of control, underlie the status syndrome. He has, therefore, recommended that the American medical profession champion policies that improve patient autonomy. In this paper, I clarify the kind of control Marmot sees as connecting differences in (...)
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  2.  4
    Klaus Puschel, Enrico Furlan & Wim Dekkers (forthcoming). Social Health Disparities in Clinical Care: A New Approach to Medical Fairness. Public Health Ethics:phv034.
    Social health disparities are increasing in most countries around the world. During the past two decades, a large amount of evidence has emerged about the health consequences of social inequalities. Despite such evidence, the concept of medical fairness, as traditionally defined by the World Medical Association, has remained unchallenged and even reinforced by some scholars who emphasize that doctors should remain neutral to the socioeconomic status of their patients when providing clinical care. The inconsistency between public (...) and clinical care perspectives raises tension between a narrow interpretation of the ethics of justice, which stresses the importance of equality and impartiality, and the ethics of care, which highlights the importance of particularity and individuality in clinical practice. This article analyzes the concept of medical fairness using the emerging evidence that demonstrates the impact of social health disparities on clinical care. It proposes a new approach of medical fairness based on equity rather than on equality and provides a consistent ethical framework based on Paul Ricoeur’s three levels of medical judgments. This integrative framework provides a better balance between public health and clinical care in medical practice. (shrink)
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  3.  5
    Jamie Rogers & Ursula A. Kelly (2011). Feminist Intersectionality: Bringing Social Justice to Health Disparities Research. Nursing Ethics 18 (3):397-407.
    The principles of autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice are well established ethical principles in health research. Of these principles, justice has received less attention by health researchers. The purpose of this article is to broaden the discussion of health research ethics, particularly the ethical principle of justice, to include societal considerations — who and what are studied and why? — and to critique current applications of ethical principles within this broader view. We will use a feminist intersectional (...)
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  4.  17
    Peggye Dilworth-Anderson, Geraldine Pierre & Tandrea S. Hilliard (2012). Social Justice, Health Disparities, and Culture in the Care of the Elderly. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 40 (1):26-32.
    Older minority Americans experience worse health outcomes than their white counterparts, exhibiting the need for social justice in all areas of their health care. Justice, fairness, and equity are crucial to minimizing conditions that adversely affect the health of individuals and communities. In this paper, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is used as an example of a health care disparity among elderly Americans that requires social justice interventions. Cultural factors play a crucial role in AD screening, diagnosis, and (...)
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  5.  41
    Andrew M. Courtwright (2009). Justice, Stigma, and the New Epidemiology of Health Disparities. Bioethics 23 (2):90-96.
    Recent research in epidemiology has identified a number of factors beyond access to medical care that contribute to health disparities. Among the so-called socioeconomic determinants of health are income, education, and the distribution of social capital. One factor that has been overlooked in this discussion is the effect that stigmatization can have on health. In this paper, I identify two ways that social stigma can create health disparities: directly by impacting health-care seeking behaviour (...)
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  6.  11
    Christian Simon & Maghboeba Mosavel (2010). Exploratory Health Disparities Research: The Need to Provide a Tangible Benefit to Vulnerable Respondents. Ethics and Behavior 20 (1):1-9.
    This article examines the responsibilities of researchers who conduct exploratory research to provide a service to vulnerable respondents. The term “service” is used to denote the provision of a tangible benefit in relation to the research question that is apart from the altruistic research benefits. This article explores what this “service” could look like, who might be responsible for providing it, and the challenges associated with such a service. The article argues that not providing a tangible benefit to vulnerable research (...)
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  7.  45
    Daniel S. Goldberg (2009). In Support of a Broad Model of Public Health: Disparities, Social Epidemiology and Public Health Causation. Public Health Ethics 2 (1):70-83.
    Corresponding Author, Health Policy & Ethics Fellow, Chronic Disease Prevention & Control Research Center, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, 1709 Dryden, Suite 1025, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Tel.: 713.798.5482; Fax: 713 798 3990; Email: danielg{at}bcm.edu ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> . Abstract This article defends a broad model of public health, one that specifically addresses the social epidemiologic research suggesting that social conditions are primary determinants of health. The article proceeds (...)
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  8.  7
    Cynthia Baur (2008). An Analysis of Factors Underlying E-Health Disparities. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (4):417-428.
    The potential public and individual health consequences of unequal access to digital technologies have been recognized in the United States for at least a decade. Unequal access to the Internet and related technologies has been characterized as a ; naturalistic trends toward broader access across the population and targeted intervention to increase access are described as progress toward The problem of the digital divide has been characterized as one of healthcare justice. The idea that everyone should have access to (...)
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  9.  8
    Jonathan Michael Kaplan (2010). When Socially Determined Categories Make Biological Realities: Understanding Black/White Health Disparities in the U.S. The Monist 93 (2):281-297.
  10. Peggye Dilworth-Anderson, Geraldine Pierre & Tandrea S. Hilliard (2012). Social Justice, Health Disparities, and Culture in the Care of the Elderly. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (1):26-32.
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  11.  1
    Celia B. Fisher & Brian Mustanski (2014). Reducing Health Disparities and Enhancing the Responsible Conduct of Research Involving LGBT Youth. Hastings Center Report 44 (s4):S28-S31.
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  12. Inmaculada de Melo-Martin & Kristen Intemann (2007). Can Ethical Reasoning Contribute to Better Epidemiology? A Case Study in Research on Racial Health Disparities. European Journal of Epidemiology 22 (4):215-21.
     
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  13.  20
    Howard Brody, Jason E. Glenn & Laura Hermer (2012). Racial/Ethnic Health Disparities and Ethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (03):309-319.
  14.  13
    Simon J. Craddock Lee (2005). The Risks of Race in Addressing Health Disparities. Hastings Center Report 35 (4):c3-c3.
  15.  7
    Dorothy Roberts (2012). Debating the Cause of Health Disparities. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (03):332-341.
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  16.  3
    Pamela Valera, Stephanie Cook, Ruth Macklin & Yvonne Chang (2014). Conducting Health Disparities Research with Criminal Justice Populations: Examining Research, Ethics, and Participation. Ethics and Behavior 24 (2):164-174.
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  17.  5
    Jaime S. King, Mark H. Eckman & Benjamin W. Moulton (2011). The Potential of Shared Decision Making to Reduce Health Disparities. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 39 (s1):30-33.
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  18. Edward J. Callahan, Shea Hazarian, Mark Yarborough & John Paul Sánchez (2014). Eliminating LGBTIQQ Health Disparities:The Associated Roles of Electronic Health Records and Institutional Culture. Hastings Center Report 44 (s4):S48-S52.
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  19. Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen Stich (2008). The Innate Mind: Health Disparities Affecting Gay and Bisexual Men in the United States. Oxford University Press Usa.
    This is the third volume of a three-volume set on The Innate Mind. The extent to which cognitive structures, processes, and contents are innate is one of the central questions concerning the nature of the mind, with important implications for debates throughout the human sciences. By bringing together the top nativist scholars in philosophy, psychology, and allied disciplines these volumes provide a comprehensive assessment of nativist thought and a definitive reference point for future nativist inquiry. The Innate Mind: Volume 3: (...)
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  20. Mary Beth Foglia & Karen I. Fredriksen-Goldsen (2014). Health Disparities Among LGBT Older Adults and the Role of Nonconscious Bias. Hastings Center Report 44 (s4):S40-S44.
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  21. Jaime S. King, Mark H. Eckman & Benjamin W. Moulton (2011). The Potential of Shared Decision Making to Reduce Health Disparities. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39:30-33.
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  22.  5
    Simon M. Outram & George T. H. Ellison (2006). Anthropological Insights Into the Use of Race/Ethnicity to Explore Genetic Contributions to Disparities in Health. Journal of Biosocial Science 38 (1):83-102.
    Anthropological insights into the use of race/ethnicity to explore genetic contributions to disparities in health were developed using in-depth qualitative interviews with editorial staff from nineteen genetics journals, focusing on the methodological and conceptual mechanisms required to make race/ethnicity a genetic variable. As such, these analyses explore how and why race/ethnicity comes to be used in the context of genetic research, set against the background of continuing critiques from anthropology and related human sciences that focus on the social (...)
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  23.  9
    Marsha Lillie-Blanton, Saqi Maleque & Wilhelmine Miller (2008). Reducing Racial, Ethnic, and Socioeconomic Disparities in Health Care: Opportunities in National Health Reform. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 36 (4):693-702.
    Policy often focuses on reducing health care disparities through interventions at the patient and provider level. While unquestionably important, system-wide reforms to reduce uninsurance, improve geographic availability of services, increase workforce diversity, and promote clinical best practices are essential for progress in reducing disparities.
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  24.  4
    John McKinlay, Rebecca Piccolo & Lisa Marceau (2013). An Additional Cause of Health Care Disparities: The Variable Clinical Decisions of Primary Care Doctors. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (4):664-673.
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  25. A. B. Cohen & J. M. Breny (2012). Book Review: Remedy and Reaction: The Peculiar American Struggle Over Health Care Reform: Healthcare Disparities at the Crossroads with Healthcare Reform. [REVIEW] Inquiry: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing 49 (2):176-179.
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  26. Nicole M. Stephens, Hazel Rose Markus & Stephanie A. Fryberg (2012). Social Class Disparities in Health and Education: Reducing Inequality by Applying a Sociocultural Self Model of Behavior. Psychological Review 119 (4):723-744.
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  27.  1
    Jennifer Haas & Katherine Swartz (2007). The Relative Importance of Worker, Firm, and Market Characteristics for Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance. Inquiry 44 (3):280-302.
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  28.  35
    Lundy Braun (2002). Race, Ethnicity, and Health: Can Genetics Explain Disparities? Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 45 (2):159-174.
  29.  25
    Katherine Baicker, Amitabh Chandra & Jonathan Skinner (2005). Geographic Variation in Health Care and the Problem of Measuring Racial Disparities. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 48 (1):42-S53.
  30.  30
    Alix Weisfeld & Robert L. Perlman (2005). Disparities and Discrimination in Health Care: An Introduction. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 48 (1):1-S9.
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  31.  4
    Richard Allen Epstein (2005). Disparities and Discrimination in Health Care Coverage: A Critique of The Institute of Medicine Study. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 48 (1):26-S41.
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  32.  4
    Connie Price & Stephen Sodeke (2006). Letter to the Editor: End-of-Life Care and Racial Disparities: All Social and Health Care Sectors Must Respond! American Journal of Bioethics 6 (5):W33-W34.
  33. Marsha Lillie-Blanton, Saqi Maleque & Wilhelmine Miller (2008). Reducing Racial, Ethnic, and Socioeconomic Disparities in Health Care: Opportunities in National Health Reform. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (4):693-702.
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  34. I. Lowy (2003). Intervention and Representation-Health Campaigns and Geographic Disparities Relative Hookworm Infections. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 25 (3):337-362.
     
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  35. Sally L. Satel & Jonathan Klick (2005). Disparities in Health Care: Perspectives on the Institute of Medicine Report,“Unequal Treatment.”. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 48:S15 - S25.
     
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  36.  13
    Solomon R. Benatar (2013). Global Health and Justice: Re‐Examining Our Values. Bioethics 27 (6):297-304.
    Widening disparities in health within and between nations reflect a trajectory of ‘progress’ that has ‘run its course’ and needs to be significantly modified if progress is to be sustainable. Values and a value system that have enabled progress are now being distorted to the point where they undermine the future of global health by generating multiple crises that perpetuate injustice. Reliance on philanthropy for rectification, while necessary in the short and medium terms, is insufficient to address (...)
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  37.  20
    Benjamin Hale (2009). Is Justice Good for Your Sleep? (And Therefore, Good for Your Health?). Social Theory and Health 7 (4):354-370.
    In this paper, we present an argument strengthening the view of Norman Daniels, Bruce Kennedy and Ichiro Kawachi that justice is good for one's health. We argue that the pathways through which social factors produce inequalities in sleep more strongly imply a unidirectional and non-voluntary causality than with most other public health issues. Specifically, we argue against the 'voluntarism objection' – an objection that suggests that adverse public health outcomes can be traced back to the free and (...)
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  38.  14
    Ken Fox (2002). Hotep's Story: Exploring the Wounds of Health Vulnerability in the US. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (6):471-497.
    A wide variety of forms of domination hasresulted in a highly heterogeneous health riskcategory, ``the vulnerable.'''' The study of healthinequities sheds light on forces thatgenerate, sustain, and alter vulnerabilities toillness, injury, suffering and death. Thispaper analyzes the case of a high-risk teenfrom a Boston ghetto that illuminatesintersections between ``race'''' and class in theconstruction of vulnerability in the US.Exploration of his ``wounds'''' helps specify howlarge-scale social and cultural forces becomeembodied as individual experience of disparatehealth risk. The case demonstrates that healthinequities (...)
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  39.  18
    John Stone (2002). Race and Healthcare Disparities: Overcoming Vulnerability. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (6):499-518.
    The paper summarizes recently published dataand recommendations about healthcaredisparities experienced by African Americanswho have Medicare or other healthcare coverage.Against this background the paper addresses theethics of such disparities and howdisadvantages of vulnerable populations likeAfrican Americans are typically maintained indecision making about how to respond to suchdisparities. Considering how to respond todisparities reveals much that vulnerablepopulations would bring to the policy-makingtable, if they can also be heard when they getthere. The paper argues that vulnerablepopulations like African Americans need fairrepresentation in (...)
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  40.  24
    Rebecca J. Hester (2012). The Promise and Paradox of Cultural Competence. HEC Forum 24 (4):279-291.
    Cultural competence has become a ubiquitous and unquestioned aspect of professional formation in medicine. It has been linked to efforts to eliminate race-based health disparities and to train more compassionate and sensitive providers. In this article, I question whether the field of cultural competence lives up to its promise. I argue that it does not because it fails to grapple with the ways that race and racism work in U.S. society today. Unless we change our theoretical apparatus for (...)
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  41.  25
    David B. Resnik & Gerard Roman (2007). Health, Justice, and the Environment. Bioethics 21 (4):230–241.
  42.  32
    S. R. Benatar & Gillian Brock (eds.) (2011). Global Health and Global Health Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Introduction; Part I. Global Health, Definitions and Descriptions: 1. What is global health? Solly Benatar and Ross Upshur; 2. The state of global health in a radically unequal world: patterns and prospects Ron Labonte and Ted Schrecker; 3. Addressing the societal determinants of health: the key global health ethics imperative of our times Anne-Emmanuelle Birn; 4. Gender and global health: inequality and differences Lesley Doyal and Sarah Payne; 5. Heath (...)
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  43.  39
    David Shaw, Lorna Macpherson & David Conway (2009). Tackling Socially Determined Dental Inequalities: Ethical Aspects of Childsmile, the National Child Oral Health Demonstration Programme in Scotland. Bioethics 23 (2):131-139.
    Many ethical issues are posed by public health interventions. Although abstract theorizing about these issues can be useful, it is the application of ethical theory to real cases which will ultimately be of benefit in decision-making. To this end, this paper will analyse the ethical issues involved in Childsmile, a national oral health demonstration programme in Scotland that aims to improve the oral health of the nation's children and reduce dental inequalities through a combination of targeted and (...)
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  44.  24
    Faith E. Fletcher, Paul Ndebele & Maureen C. Kelley (2008). Infant Feeding and Hiv in Sub-Saharan Africa: What Lies Beneath the Dilemma? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (5):307-330.
    The debate over how to best guide HIV-infected mothers in resource-poor settings on infant feeding is more than two decades old. Globally, breastfeeding is responsible for approximately 300,000 HIV infections per year, while at the same time, UNICEF estimates that not breastfeeding (formula feeding with contaminated water) is responsible for 1.5 million child deaths per year. The largest burden of these infections and deaths occur in Sub-Saharan Africa. Using this region as an example of the burden faced more generally in (...)
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  45.  14
    Lisa Campo-Engelstein & Karen Meagher (2011). Costa Rica's 'White Legend': How Racial Narratives Undermine its Health Care System. Developing World Bioethics 11 (2):99-107.
    A dominant cultural narrative within Costa Rica describes Costa Ricans not only as different from their Central American neighbours, but it also exalts them as better: specifically, as more white, peaceful, egalitarian and democratic. This notion of Costa Rican exceptionalism played a key role in the creation of their health care system, which is based on the four core principles of equity, universality, solidarity and obligation. While the political justification and design of the current health care system does, (...)
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  46.  3
    Ashish K. Jha, David W. Bates, Chelsea Jenter, E. John Orav, Jie Zheng, Paul Cleary & Steven R. Simon (2009). Electronic Health Records: Use, Barriers and Satisfaction Among Physicians Who Care for Black and Hispanic Patients. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (1):158-163.
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  47.  10
    Rabee Toumi (forthcoming). Globalization and Health Care: Global Justice and the Role of Physicians. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-10.
    In today’s globalized world, nations cannot be totally isolated from or indifferent to their neighbors, especially in regards to medicine and health. While globalization has brought prosperity to millions, disparities among nations and nationals are growing raising once again the question of justice. Similarly, while medicine has developed dramatically over the past few decades, health disparities at the global level are staggering. Seemingly, what our humanity could achieve in matters of scientific development is not justly distributed (...)
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  48.  6
    Bridget Pratt, Deborah Zion, Khin M. Lwin, Phaik Y. Cheah, Francois Nosten & Bebe Loff (2014). Linking International Clinical Research with Stateless Populations to Justice in Global Health. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):49.
    In response to calls to expand the scope of research ethics to address justice in global health, recent scholarship has sought to clarify how external research actors from high-income countries might discharge their obligation to reduce health disparities between and within countries. An ethical framework—‘research for health justice’—was derived from a theory of justice (the health capability paradigm) and specifies how international clinical research might contribute to improved health and research capacity in host communities. (...)
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  49.  4
    Michael J. DiStefano & Jennifer Prah Ruger (forthcoming). Reflective Solidarity as to Provincial Globalism and Shared Health Governance. Diametros 46:151-158.
    There is a special need for solidarity at the global level to address global health disparities. Ter Meulen argues that solidarity must complement justice, and is, in fact, more fundamental than justice to the arrangement of health care practices. We argue that PG/SHG, though a theory of justice, is fundamentally synergistic with solidarity. We relate PG/SHG to Jodi Dean’s conceptual work on reflective solidarity, contrasted with conventional solidarity, as an approach to transnational solidarity that dovetails with PG/SHG. (...)
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  50.  11
    Agnes Meershoek & Anja Krumeich (2009). Multiculturalism and the Construction of Ethnic Identities in Labour and Health Practices: Avoiding the Culturalistic Fallacy in Applied Research. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 17 (3):173-197.
    In applied health care research, an essentialised notion of culture is often used when studying ethnic disparities in health and health care access between the majority populations of Western countries and migrants, with ethnic backgrounds that differ from majority population. This notion of culture, however, is considered highly problematic in anthropology and ethnic studies. Therefore, in our research on Dutch illness certification practices, we employed a dynamic conceptualisation of culture. Our research shows that, in practice, when (...)
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