Search results for 'historic injustice' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Daniel Butt (2006). Nations, Overlapping Generations and Historic Injustice. American Philosophical Quarterly 43 (4):357-367.score: 90.0
    This article considers the question of the responsibility that present day generations bear as a result of the actions of their ancestors. Is it morally significant that we share a national identity with those responsible for the perpetration of historic injustice? The article argues that we can be guilty of wrongdoing stemming from past wrongdoing if we are members of nations that are responsible for an ongoing failure to fulfil rectificatory duties. This rests upon three claims: that the (...)
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  2. Daniel Butt (2009). ‘Victors’ Justice’? Historic Injustice and the Legitimacy of International Law. In Lukas H. Meyer (ed.), Legitimacy, Justice and Public International Law. Cambridge Univeristy Press. 163.score: 75.0
  3. Jeremy Waldron (1992). Superseding Historic Injustice. Ethics 103 (1):4-28.score: 57.0
    Analyzes the historic correlation of injustice and moral judgments. Universalizability in analyzing moral judgments; Role of payment of money in the embodiment of communal remembrance; Symbolic reparation.
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  4. Daniel Butt (2009). Rectifying International Injustice: Principles of Compensation and Restitution Between Nations. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    The history of international relations is characterized by widespread injustice. What implications does this have for those living in the present? Should contemporary states pay reparations to the descendants of the victims of historic wrongdoing? Many writers have dismissed the moral urgency of rectificatory justice in a domestic context, as a result of their forward-looking accounts of distributive justice. Rectifying International Injustice argues that historical international injustice raises a series of distinct theoretical problems, as a result (...)
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  5. Daniel Butt (2013). 3 Historic Injustice and the Inheritance of Rights and Duties in East Asia. In Jun-Hyeok Kwak (ed.), Inherited Responsibility and Historical Reconciliation in East Asia. Routledge. 1--38.score: 46.0
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  6. Cara Nine (2008). Superseding Historic Injustice and Territorial Rights. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 11 (1):79-87.score: 45.0
    Emotions situate actors in relationships and shape their social interactions. Culture defines both the qualities of individual identity and the constitution of social groups with distinctive values and practices. Emotions, then, are necessarily experienced and acted upon in culturally inflected forms that define not only the conventions of their articulation through individual and collective action, but also the very words that name them. This article develops theoretical arguments to support these claims and illustrates their application in a description of differing (...)
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  7. Michael Murphy (2011). Apology, Recognition, and Reconciliation. Human Rights Review 12 (1):47-69.score: 45.0
    The article examines the role of apology in a process of reconciling with historic injustice. As with so many other facets of the politics of reconciliation, official apologies are controversial, at times strenuously resisted, and their purpose and significance not always well understood. The article, therefore, seeks to articulate the key moral and practical resources that official apologies can bring to bear in a process of national reconciliation and to defend these symbolic acts against some of the more (...)
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  8. Waldron Jeremy (1993). Superseding Historic Injustice. Ethics 103.score: 45.0
     
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  9. Platz Jeppe von & Reidy David A. (2006). The Structural Diversity of Historical Injustices. Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (3):360-376.score: 36.0
    Driven by a sharp increase in claims for reparations, reparative justice has become a topic of academic debate. To some extent this debate has been marred by a failure to realize the complexity of reparative justice. In this essay we try to amend this shortcoming. We do this by developing a taxonomy of different kinds of wrongs that can underwrite claims to reparations. We identify four kinds of wrongs: entitlement violations, unjust exclusions from an otherwise acceptable system of entitlements, and (...)
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  10. Bashir Bashir (2012). Reconciling Historical Injustices: Deliberative Democracy and the Politics of Reconciliation. [REVIEW] Res Publica 18 (2):127-143.score: 34.0
    Deliberative democracy is often celebrated and endorsed because of its promise to include, empower, and emancipate otherwise oppressed and excluded social groups through securing their voice and granting them impact in reasoned public deliberation. This article explores the ability of Habermas’ theory of deliberative democracy to accommodate the demands of historically excluded social groups in democratic plural societies. It argues that the inclusive, transformative, and empowering potential of Habermas’ theory of deliberative democracy falters when confronted with particular types of historical (...)
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  11. Annabelle Lever, Is Judicial Review Undemocratic?score: 29.0
    This paper examines Jeremy Waldron’s ‘core case’ against judicial review. Waldron’s arguments, it shows, exaggerate the importance of voting to our judgements about the legitimacy and democratic credentials of a society and its government. Moreover, Waldron is insufficiently sensitive to the ways that judicial review can provide a legitimate avenue of political activity for those seeking to rectify historic injustice. While judicial review is not necessary for democratic government, the paper concludes that Waldron is wrong to believe that (...)
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  12. Janna Thompson (2006). Collective Responsibility for Historic Injustices. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 30 (1):154–167.score: 28.0
    The article presents critical examination of theories about collective responsibility attempting to cover responsibility for historic injustices. The author will also try to establish the possibility of collective responsibility for the present members of the group to make recompense for the injustices committed by their ancestors depending on two factors expounded in the article.
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  13. Mathias Thaler (2012). Just Pretending: Political Apologies for Historical Injustice and Vice's Tribute to Virtue. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (3):259-278.score: 28.0
    Should we be concerned with, or alarmed or outraged by, the insincerity and hypocrisy of politicians who apologize for historical injustice? This paper argues that the correct reply to this question is: sometimes, but not always. In order to establish what types of insincerity must be avoided, Judith Shklar?s hierarchy of ordinary vices is critically revisited. Against Shklar?s overly benign account of hypocrisy, the paper then tries to demonstrate that only institutional and harmful forms of hypocrisy must be rejected (...)
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  14. Duncan Ivison, Historical Injustice.score: 28.0
    Historical injustice is ubiquitous in human history. The origins of just about every institution relevant to human political life has a pedigree stained by injustices of various magnitudes. Slavery, genocide, mass expropriation of property, mass internment, indiscriminate killings of civilians and massive political repression are all depressingly familiar features of human history, both in the distant and more recent past. Should any of them be redressed? Can historical injustice be redressed? Should states be held accountable for their bloody (...)
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  15. Jeff Spinner-Halev (2007). From Historical to Enduring Injustice. Political Theory 35 (5):574 - 597.score: 25.0
    Advocates of remedying historical injustices urge political communities to take responsibility for their past, but their arguments are ambiguous about whether all past injustices need remedy, or just those regarding groups that suffer from current injustice. This ambiguity leaves unanswered the challenge of critics who argue that contemporary injustices matter, not those in the past. I argue instead for a focus on injustices that have roots in the past, and continue to the present day, what I call enduring (...). Instead of focusing on finding the party responsible for the injustice, I argue that we use history to help us understand why some injustices endure, which I suggest is partly due to the limitations of liberal justice. I conclude with a conception of responsibility for repairing enduring injustice that deemphasizes searching for the causal agent, and instead focuses on how to repair the injustice, which I explain through an expansive conception of shared space. (shrink)
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  16. Ori J. Herstein (2008). Historic Justice and the Non-Identity Problem: The Limitations of the Subsequent-Wrong Solution and Towards a New Solution. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 27 (5):505 - 531.score: 24.0
    The "non-identity argument" has been applied to reject the validity of claims for historic justice, often generating highly unintuitive conclusions. George Sher has suggested a solution to this problem, explaining the harm to descendants of historically wronged peoples as deriving not from the historic wrongs but from the failure to provide rectification to the previous generation for harm they suffered. That generation was likewise owed rectification for harm they suffered from failure to provide rectification to the generation preceding (...)
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  17. Nahshon Perez (2011). On Compensation and Return: Can The 'Continuing Injustice Argument' for Compensating for Historical Injustices Justify Compensation for Such Injustices or the Return of Property? Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (2):151-168.score: 24.0
    This paper offers a critique of recent attempts, by George Sher and others to justify compensation to be paid to descendants of deceased victims of past wrongs. This recent attempt (the ‘continuing injustice argument’) is important as it endeavours to avoid some well-known critiques of previous attempts, such as the non-identity problem. Furthermore, this new attempt is grounded in individual rights, without invoking a more controversial collectivist assumption. The first step in this critique is to differentiate between compensation and (...)
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  18. Juan Espindola & Moises Vaca (forthcoming). The Problem of Historical Rectification for Rawlsian Theory. Res Publica:1-17.score: 24.0
    In this paper we claim that Rawls’s theory is compatible with the absence of rectification of extremely important historical injustices within a given society. We hold that adding a new principle to justice-as-fairness may amend this problem. There are four possible objections to our claim: First, that historical rectification is not required by justice. Second, that, even when historical rectification is a matter of justice, it is not a matter of distributive justice, so that Rawls’s theory is justified in leaving (...)
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  19. Berber Bevernage (2008). Time, Presence, and Historical Injustice. History and Theory 47 (2):149–167.score: 21.0
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  20. Janna Thompson (2001). Historical Injustice and Reparation: Justifying Claims of Descendants. Ethics 112 (1):114-135.score: 21.0
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  21. Andrew I. Cohen (2009). Compensation for Historic Injustices: Completing the Boxill and Sher Argument. Philosophy and Public Affairs 37 (1):81-102.score: 21.0
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  22. Duncan Ivison, Deliberative Democracy and the Politics of Reconciliation.score: 21.0
    The problem of historical injustice presents a deep challenge to the aspirations of deliberative democrats, especially to those “deliberative activists” who seek to advance deliberation in deeply unjust circumstances (Fung 2005, 399). But the debate over historical injustice can itself benefi t from taking a “democratic turn.” Much of the literature is dominated by arguments over historical entitlement theories of justice or by a legalistic focus on the possibilities for compensation and reparation.1 That much of it is deeply (...)
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  23. Duncan Ivison (2000). Political Community and Historical Injustice. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 78 (3):360 – 373.score: 21.0
  24. Göran Collste (2012). Rectifying Historical Injustice: Principles of Compensation and Restitution Between Nations. Ethical Perspectives 19 (1):167-169.score: 21.0
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  25. Elof Axel Carlson (1980). Commentary: R. L. Dugdale and the Jukes Family: A Historical Injustice Corrected. Bioscience 30 (8):535-539.score: 21.0
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  26. J. Angelo Corlett (2003). Janna Thompson, Taking Responsibility for the Past: Reparation and Historical Injustice Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (4):291-293.score: 21.0
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  27. A. Noble (2010). Recognizing Historical Injustice Through Photography: Mexico 1968. Theory, Culture and Society 27 (7-8):184-213.score: 21.0
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  28. Geoffrey Scarre (2011). Apologising for Historic Injustices. In Christel Fricke (ed.), The Ethics of Forgiveness: A Collection of Essays. Routledge.score: 21.0
     
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  29. Jeff Spinner-Halev (2012). Historical Injustice. In David Estlund (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press, Usa. 319.score: 21.0
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  30. Rael Strous (2011). 10 Historical Injustice in Psychiatry with Examples From Nazi Germany and Others–Ethical Lessons for the Modern Professional. In Thomas W. Kallert, Juan E. Mezzich & John Monahan (eds.), Coercive Treatment in Psychiatry: Clinical, Legal and Ethical Aspects. Wiley-Blackwell. 161.score: 21.0
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  31. Janna Thompson, Taking Responsibility for the Past: Reparation and Historical Injustice.score: 21.0
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  32. Yvonne Chiu (2011). Liberal Lustration. Journal of Political Philosophy 19 (4):440-464.score: 19.0
    After a regime-changing war, a state often engages in lustration—condemnation and punishment of dangerous, corrupt, or culpable remnants of the previous system—e.g., de-Nazification or the more recent de-Ba’athification in Iraq. This common practice poses an important moral dilemma for liberals because even thoughtful and nuanced lustration involves condemning groups of people, instead of treating each case individually. It also raises important questions about collective agency, group treatment, and rectifying historical injustices. Liberals often oppose lustration because it denies moral individualism and (...)
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  33. Gaile Pohlhaus (2011). Relational Knowing and Epistemic Injustice: Toward a Theory of Willful Hermeneutical Ignorance. Hypatia 27 (3):715 - 735.score: 18.0
    I distinguish between two senses in which feminists have argued that the knower is social: 1. situated or socially positioned and 2. interdependent. I argue that these two aspects of the knower work in cooperation with each other in a way that can produce willful hermeneutical ignorance, a type of epistemic injustice absent from Miranda Fricker's Epistemic Injustice. Analyzing the limitations of Fricker's analysis of the trial of Tom Robinson in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird with attention (...)
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  34. L. U. Catherine (2011). Colonialism as Structural Injustice: Historical Responsibility and Contemporary Redress. Journal of Political Philosophy 19 (3):261-281.score: 18.0
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  35. Rodney C. Roberts (2007). Another Look at a Moral Statute of Limitations on Injustice. Journal of Ethics 11 (2):177 - 192.score: 18.0
    This paper addresses the question of whether a statute of limitations on injustice is morally justified. Rectificatory justice calls for the ascription of a right to rectification once an injustice has been perpetrated. To claim a moral statute of limitations on injustice is to claim a temporal limit on the moral legitimacy of rights to rectification. A moral statute of limitations on injustice (hereafter MSOL) establishes an amount of time following injustice after which claims of (...)
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  36. Rodney C. Roberts (2003). The Morality of a Moral Statute of Limitations on Injustice. Journal of Ethics 7 (1):115-138.score: 18.0
    This paper addresses the question of whether astatute of limitations on injustice is morallyjustified. Rectificatory justice calls for theascription of a right to rectification once aninjustice has been perpetrated. To claim amoral statute of limitations on injustice is toclaim a temporal limit on the moral legitimacyof rights to rectification. A moral statute oflimitations on injustice establishes an amountof time following injustice after which claimsof rectification can no longer be valid. Such astatute would put a time limit (...)
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  37. Patrick Bondy (2010). Argumentative Injustice. Informal Logic 30 (3):263-278.score: 18.0
    The aim of this paper is to adapt Miranda Fricker’s concept of testimonial injustice to cases of what I call “argumentative injustice”: those cases where an arguer’s social identity brings listeners to place too much or little credibility in an argument. My recommendation is to adopt a stance of “metadistrust”—we ought to distrust our inclinations to trust or distrust members of stereotyped groups.
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  38. Manfred Berg & Bernd Schäfer (eds.) (2009). Historical Justice in International Perspective: How Societies Are Trying to Right the Wrongs of the Past. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This book makes a valuable contribution to recent debates on redress for historical injustices by offering case studies from nine countries on five continents.
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  39. Paul Bou-Habib (2011). Racial Profiling and Background Injustice. Journal of Ethics 15 (1/2):33 - 46.score: 18.0
    Racial profiling appears to be morally more troubling when the racial group that is the object of the profile suffers from background injustice. This article examines two accounts of this intuition. The responsibility-based account maintains that racial profiling is morally more problematic if the higher offender rate within the profiled group is the result of social injustices for which other groups in society are responsible. The expressive harm based account maintains that racial profiling is more problematic if it makes (...)
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  40. Endla Lõhkivi, Katrin Velbaum & Jaana Eigi (2013). Epistemic Injustice in Research Evaluation: A Cultural Analysis of the Humanities and Physics in Estonia. Studia Philosophica Estonica 5 (2):108-132.score: 18.0
    This paper explores the issue of epistemic injustice in research evaluation. Through an analysis of the disciplinary cultures of physics and humanities, we attempt to identify some aims and values specific to the disciplinary areas. We suggest that credibility is at stake when the cultural values and goals of a discipline contradict those presupposed by official evaluation standards. Disciplines that are better aligned with the epistemic assumptions of evaluation standards appear to produce more "scientific" findings. To restore epistemic justice (...)
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  41. Natàlia Cugueró-Escofet, Marion Fortin & Miguel-Angel Canela (2013). Righting the Wrong for Third Parties: How Monetary Compensation, Procedure Changes and Apologies Can Restore Justice for Observers of Injustice. Journal of Business Ethics:1-16.score: 18.0
    People react negatively not only to injustices they personally endure but also to injustices that they observe as bystanders at work—and typically, people observe more injustices than they personally experience. It is therefore important to understand how organizations can restore observers’ perceptions of justice after an injustice has occurred. In our paper, we employ a policy capturing design to test and compare the restorative power of monetary compensation, procedure changes and apologies, alone and in combination, from the perspective of (...)
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  42. Stephanie E. Hastings & Joan E. Finegan (2011). The Role of Ethical Ideology in Reactions to Injustice. Journal of Business Ethics 100 (4):689 - 703.score: 18.0
    Forsyth (J Pers Soc Psychol 39(1): 175-184, 1980) argued that ethical ideology includes the two orthogonal dimensions of relativism and idealism. Relativists determine morality by looking at the complexities of the situation rather than relying on universal moral rules, while idealists believe that positive consequences can always be obtained without harming others. This study examined the role of ethical ideology as a moderator between justice and constructive and deviant reactions to injustice. Students with work experience (N = 200) completed (...)
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  43. Spinner-Halev Jeff (2007). From Historical to Enduring Injustice. Political Theory 35 (5).score: 18.0
     
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  44. Yan Liu & Christopher M. Berry (2013). Identity, Moral, and Equity Perspectives on the Relationship Between Experienced Injustice and Time Theft. Journal of Business Ethics 118 (1):73-83.score: 18.0
    Time theft is a costly burden on organizations. However, there is limited knowledge about why time theft occurs. To advance this line of research, this conceptual paper looks at the association between organizational injustice and time theft from identity, moral, and equity perspectives. This paper proposes that organizational injustice triggers time theft through decreased organizational identification. It also proposes that moral disengagement and equity sensitivity moderate this process such that organizational identification is less likely to mediate among employees (...)
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  45. Catherine Lu (2011). Colonialism as Structural Injustice: Historical Responsibility and Contemporary Redress. Journal of Political Philosophy 19 (3):261-281.score: 18.0
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  46. Jon Miller & Rahul Kumar (eds.) (2007). Reparations: Interdisciplinary Inquiries. Oxford University Press.score: 17.0
    Reparations is an idea whose time has come. From civilian victims of war in Iraq and South America to descendents of slaves in the US to citizens of colonized nations in Africa and south Asia to indigenous peoples around the world--these groups and their advocates are increasingly arguing for the importance of addressing historical injustices that have long been either ignored or denied. This volume contributes to these debates by focusing the attention of a group of highly distinguished international experts (...)
     
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  47. Judith Schrempf & Guido Palazzo (2012). Historic Corporate Responsibility. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 23:26-37.score: 16.0
    During the last years, historic injustices have been on top of the public agenda revolving around the question of how to deal with difficult pasts. This applies togovernments but also to corporations. We aim at addressing this trend of historic corporate responsibility. We examine corporations as intergenerational moral agents, introduce the problem of historic complicity, and propose a concept of historic corporate responsibility.
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  48. José Medina (2011). The Relevance of Credibility Excess in a Proportional View of Epistemic Injustice: Differential Epistemic Authority and the Social Imaginary. Social Epistemology 25 (1):15-35.score: 15.0
    This paper defends a contextualist approach to epistemic injustice according to which instances of such injustice should be looked at as temporally extended phenomena (having developmental and historical trajectories) and socially extended phenomena (being rooted in patterns of social relations). Within this contextualist framework, credibility excesses appear as a form of undeserved epistemic privilege that is crucially relevant for matters of testimonial justice. While drawing on Miranda Fricker's proportional view of epistemic justice, I take issue with its lack (...)
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  49. Makoto Usami (2011). The Non-Identity Problem, Collective Rights, and the Threshold Conception of Harm. Tokyo Institute of Technology Department of Social Engineering Discussion Paper (2011-04):1-17.score: 15.0
    One of the primary views on our supposed obligation towards our descendants in the context of environmental problems invokes the idea of the rights of future generations. A growing number of authors also hold that the descendants of those victimized by historical injustices, including colonialism and slavery, have the right to demand financial reparations for the sufferings of their distant ancestors. However, these claims of intergenerational rights face theoretical difficulties, notably the non-identity problem. To circumvent this problem in a relationship (...)
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  50. Makoto Usami (2005). World Poverty and Justice Beyond Borders. Tokyo Institute of Technology Department of Social Engineering Discussion Paper (05-04):1-18.score: 15.0
    Most cosmopolitans who are concerned about world poverty assume that for citizens of affluent societies, justice beyond national borders is a matter of their positive duty to provide aid to distant people suffering from severe poverty. This assumption is challenged by some authors, notably Tomas Pogge, who maintains that these citizens are actively involved in the incidence of poverty abroad and therefore neglect their negative duty of refraining from harming others. This paper examines the extent to which it is pertinent (...)
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