Search results for 'historicism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. of Walter Benjamin'S. Deconstruction & Of Historicism (2009). Bruce Ross. In Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka (ed.), Existence, Historical Fabulation, Destiny. Springer Verlag. 231.score: 30.0
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  2. Guy S. Axtell (1993). In the Tracks of the Historicist Movement: Re-Assessing the Carnap-Kuhn Connection. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 24 (1):119-146.score: 24.0
    Thirty years after the publication of Thomas Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, sharp disagreement persists concerning the implications of Kuhn’s "historicist" challenge to empiricism. I discuss the historicist movement over the past thirty years, and the extent to which the discourse between two branches of the historical school has been influenced by tacit assumptions shared with Rudolf Carnap’s empiricism. I begin with an examination of Carnap’s logicism --his logic of science-- and his 1960 correspondence with Kuhn. I focus on (...)
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  3. Nathaniel Jason Goldberg (2009). Historicism, Entrenchment, and Conventionalism. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 40 (2):259 - 276.score: 24.0
    W. V. Quine famously argues that though all knowledge is empirical, mathematics is entrenched relative to physics and the special sciences. Further, entrenchment accounts for the necessity of mathematics relative to these other disciplines. Michael Friedman challenges Quine’s view by appealing to historicism, the thesis that the nature of science is illuminated by taking into account its historical development. Friedman argues on historicist grounds that mathematical claims serve as principles constitutive of languages within which empirical claims in physics and (...)
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  4. Frank Ankersmit (2010). The Necessity of Historicism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (2):226-240.score: 24.0
    Rankean historicism is ordinarily seen nowadays as an outdated nineteenth century fashion and that we could not possibly tolerate in our modern intellectual homes. In opposition to this common wisdom I argue that historicism - i.e. the claim that the nature of a thing is to be found in is history - is no less true for all writing of history as it was in the days of Ranke. So Ranke was right, after all. I shall argue my (...)
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  5. David Zimmerman (2002). Reasons-Responsiveness and Ownership-of-Agency: Fischer and Ravizza's Historicist Theory of Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 6 (3):199-234.score: 24.0
    No one has done more than John Martin Fischer and Mark Ravizza toadvance our understanding of the important dispute in the theoryof responsibility between structuralists and historicists.This makes it all the more important to take the measure of Responsibility and Control, their mostrecent contribution to the historicist side of the discussion. In this paper I examine some novelfeatures of their most recent version of responsiblity-historicism,especially their new notions of ``moderate reasons-responsiveness'''' and ``ownership-of-agency.'''' Fischer and Ravizza intend these newelements to (...)
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  6. Jaap den Hollander (2010). Beyond Historicism: From Leibniz to Luhmann. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (2):210-225.score: 24.0
    The phrase 'beyond historicism' is usually associated with Bielefeld historians like Hans Ulrich Wehler and Jürgen Kocka, who attempted to turn the study of history into a social science, but a better candidate would be the sociologist Niklas Luhmann, who happened to teach as well in Bielefeld during the 1970's and 1980's. Luhmann had little affinity with the project of his colleagues from the history department. He took the opposite view that the social sciences suffered from a naive enlightenment (...)
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  7. Frederick C. Beiser (2011). The German Historicist Tradition. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This is the first full study in English of the German historicist tradition.
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  8. Reinbert A. Krol (2010). Friedrich Meinecke: Panentheism and the Crisis of Historicism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (2):195-209.score: 24.0
    Friedrich Meinecke's Die Idee der Staatsräson (1924) is generally seen as the study in which he replaced his monistic-idealistic philosophy of history - as articulated in Weltbürgertum und Nationalstaat - by a dualistic worldview. In this article I will argue against this view. I will do so on the basis of a brief analysis of Meinecke's Staatsräson -study. I will show that Meinecke succeeded in combining his monism and his dualism within a so-called (harmonious) 'panentheistic' philosophy. Next, when discussing Meinecke's (...)
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  9. Ishtiyaque Haji (2013). Historicism, Non-Historicism, or a Mix? Journal of Ethics 17 (3):185-204.score: 24.0
    This paper revisits the issue of whether responsibility is essentially historical. Roughly, the leading question here is this: Do ways in which we can acquire pertinent antecedents of action, such as beliefs, desires, and values, have an essential bearing on whether we are responsible for actions that are suitably related to these antecedents? I argue, first, that Michael McKenna’s interesting case for nonhistoricism is indecisive, and, second, his brand of modest historicism, while highly insightful, yields results concerning responsibility that (...)
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  10. Peter Woodford (2012). Specters of the Nineteenth Century: Charles Taylor and the Problem of Historicism. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (1):171-192.score: 24.0
    This paper identifies and analyzes the problem of historicism in Charles Taylor's work overall, but with particular emphasis on his most recent publication, A Secular Age. I circumscribe the problem of historicism through reference to the nineteenth-century German philosophical tradition in which it developed, in particular in the thought of Wilhelm Dilthey. I then trace the structural similarities between the notions of history to be found in the thought of Taylor and Dilthey and how these structural similarities raise (...)
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  11. Colin Koopman (2010). Historicism in Pragmatism: Lessons in Historiography and Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 41 (5):690-713.score: 24.0
    Abstract: Pragmatism involves simultaneous commitments to modes of inquiry that are philosophical and historical. This article begins by demonstrating this point as it is evidenced in the historicist pragmatisms of William James and John Dewey. Having shown that pragmatism focuses philosophical attention on concrete historical processes, the article turns to a discussion of the specific historiographical commitments consistent with this focus. This focus here is on a pragmatist version of historical inquiry in terms of the central historiographical categories of the (...)
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  12. Wenxi Zhang (2006). The Concept of Nature and Historicism in Marx. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (4):630-642.score: 24.0
    Scholars of Marx often spend much effort to emphasize the socio-historical characteristics of Marx's concept of nature. At the same time, from this concept of nature, one seems to be able to deduce a strong sense of historical anthropocentricism and relativism. But through an exploration of the results of Rorty's discarding the distinction between "natural" and "man-made" and Strauss' clearing up value relativism in terms of the concept of nature, people will find that historicism is a world outlook that (...)
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  13. Mark Bevir (2012). In Defence of Historicism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (1):111-114.score: 24.0
    Abstract This paper defends a historicist approach to the history of ideas. A historicist ontology implies that texts have meaning only for specific people, whether these be individual authors, particular readers, or the intersubjective beliefs of social groups. Texts do not have intrinsic meanings in themselves.
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  14. Herman J. Paul (2008). A Collapse of Trust: Reconceptualizing the Crisis of Historicism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (1):63-82.score: 24.0
    This essay redefines the crisis of historicism as a collapse of trust. Following Friedrich Jaeger, it suggests that this crisis should be understood, not as a crisis caused by historicist methods, but as a crisis faced by the classical historicist tradition of Ranke. The "nihilism" and "moral relativism" feared by Troeltsch's generation did not primarily refer to the view that moral universals did not exist; rather, they expressed that the historical justification of bildungsbürgerliche values offered by classical historicism (...)
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  15. Herman Paul (2010). Religion and the Crisis of Historicism: Protestant and Catholic Perspectives. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (2):172-194.score: 24.0
    This paper raises the question to what extent the crisis of historicism is to be seen as a religious problem. There is, of course, no need to argue that religion in a broad sense of the word - ultimate concerns and fundamental values - played major roles in the debates over historicism. However, virtually no studies have been conducted on how the crisis of historicism can be "mapped" on the religious landscape in a more specific sense. Which (...)
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  16. Peter Vogt (2010). Why We Cannot Make History. Some Remarks on a Lesson From Early Historicism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (2):121-137.score: 24.0
    There are various perspectives from which the meaning of historicism can be understood. Historically, the interpretation of historicism has predominantly been interested in either questions concerning historical methodology, or the relationship between the natural and human sciences, or the normative consequences of historicism. My intention is not to cast doubt upon the legitimacy of these different research approaches, but rather to supplement them by confronting the meaning of historicism from the perspective of a different question. Did (...)
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  17. David Henderson (2012). Neuraths Boat Will Take You Where You Want to Go: On Naturalized Epistemology and Historicism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (3):389-414.score: 24.0
    Naturalized epistemology is not a recent invention, nor is it a philosophical invention. Rather, it is a cognitive phenomena that is pervasive and desirable in the way of human epistemic engagement with their world. It is a matter of the way that one’s cognitive processes can be modulated by information gotten from those same or wider cognitive processes. Such modulational control enhances the reliability of one’s cognitive processes in many ways ‐ and judgments about objective epistemic justification consistently evince a (...)
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  18. Carla Mazzio & Douglas Trevor (eds.) (2000). Historicism, Psychoanalysis, and Early Modern Culture. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Did people in early modern Europe have a concept of an inner self? Carla Mazzio and Douglas Trevor have brought together an outstanding group of literary, cultural, and history scholars to answer this intriguing question. Through a synthesis of historicism and psychoanalytic criticism, the contributors explore the complicated, nuanced, and often surprising union of history and subjectivity in Europe centuries before psychoanalytic theory. Addressing such topics as "fetishes and Renaissances," "the cartographic unconscious," and "the topographic imaginary," these essays move (...)
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  19. Thomas A. Howard (2000). Religion and the Rise of Historicism: W.M.L. De Wette, Jacob Burckhardt, and the Theological Origins of Nineteenth-Century Historical Consciousness. [REVIEW] Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    This book offers an interpretation of the rise of secular historical thought in nineteenth-century Europe. Instead of characterizing 'historicism' and 'secularization' as fundamental breaks with Europe's religious heritage, they are presented as complex cultural permutations with much continuity; for inherited theological patterns of interpreting experience determined to a large degree the conditions, possibilities, and limitations of the forms of historical imagination realizable by nineteenth-century secular intellectuals. This point is made by examining the thought of the German theologian W. M. (...)
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  20. Herman Paul (2012). Weak Historicism: On Hierarchies of Intellectual Virtues and Goods. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (3):369-388.score: 24.0
    This article seeks to reconcile a historicist sensitivity to how intellectually virtuous behavior is shaped by historical contexts with a non-relativist account of historical scholarship. To that end, it distinguishes between hierarchies of intellectual virtues and hierarchies of intellectual goods . The first hierarchy rejects a one-size-fits-all model of historical virtuousness in favor of a model that allows for significant varieties between the relative weight that historians must assign to intellectual virtues in order to acquire justified historical understanding. It grounds (...)
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  21. Mark Bevir (2009). Contextualism: From Modernist Method to Post-Analytic Historicism? Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (3):211-224.score: 21.0
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  22. John E. Grumley (1989). History and Totality: Radical Historicism From Hegel to Foucault. Routledge.score: 21.0
    Introduction Philosophy, Georg Lukacs once observed, originally arose as a cultural response to loss. The unified totality of immediate, meaningful social ...
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  23. Massimiliano Tomba (2009). Historical Temporalities of Capital: An Anti-Historicist Perspective. Historical Materialism 17 (4):44-65.score: 21.0
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  24. Gustav Bergmann (1944). Holism, Historicism, and Emergence. Philosophy of Science 11 (March):209-21.score: 21.0
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  25. Peter Hanns Reill (1975). The German Enlightenment and the Rise of Historicism. University of California Press.score: 21.0
    Introduction i In an important study of the German Enlightenment, Max Wundt wryly observed that the term "Enlightenment" shed very little enlightenment upon ...
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  26. Herman Paul (2010). Who Suffered From the Crisis of Historicism? A Dutch Example. History and Theory 49 (2):169-193.score: 21.0
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  27. Charles R. Bambach (1995). Heidegger, Dilthey, and the Crisis of Historicism. Cornell University Press.score: 21.0
  28. Robert D'Amico (1989). Historicism and Knowledge. Routledge.score: 21.0
  29. Arnaldo Momigliano (1974). Historicism Revisited. North-Holland Pub. Co..score: 21.0
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  30. Fulvio Tessitore (2011). A Taking Leave or a Renaissance of Historicism? Rivista di Filosofia 102 (3):445-476.score: 21.0
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  31. Zhang Wenxi (2006). The Concept of Nature and Historicism in Marx. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (4):630-642.score: 21.0
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  32. Andrew Reynolds (1999). What is Historicism? International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 13 (3):275 – 287.score: 18.0
    Historicism” has become a ubiquitous and equivocal term. A classification is given here of five separate uses of the term currently in vogue, each provided with a unique qualifying adjective to help keep them distinct. I then offer a few objections to some of the more radical conclusions which have been drawn by proponents of a specific version of historicism, one associated with “postmodernism “. The positions of Rorty and Putnam are contrasted as examples of strong and weak (...)
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  33. W. A. Suchting (1972). Marx, Popper, and 'Historicism'. Inquiry 15 (1-4):235 – 266.score: 18.0
    According to Sir Karl Popper, there is a harmful approach to the social sciences called 'historicism'. This takes their principal aim to be historical prediction of an unconditional sort and the chief means to this the discovery of laws of historical development. The chief exemplar is held to be Marx. This paper distinguishes two possible sorts of laws of historical development. Popper's arguments against each are rejected. Which sort it is most plausible to ascribe to Marx is considered. Four (...)
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  34. Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (2011). Black Orpheus and Aesthetic Historicism: On Vico and Negritude. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 19 (2):121-135.score: 18.0
    This essay offers a novel approach for understanding the poetry of negritude and its role in the struggle for black liberation by appealing to Giambattista Vico’s insights on the historical, cultural, and myth-making function of poetry and of the mythopoetic imagination. The essay begins with a discussion of Vico’s aesthetic historicism and of his ideas regarding the role of imagination, poetry, and myth-making and then brings these ideas to bear on the discussion of the function of negritude poetry, focusing (...)
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  35. T. Rockmore (2009). Remarks on Russian Philosophy, Soviet Philosophy, and Historicism. Diogenes 56 (2-3):84-94.score: 18.0
    This paper concerns two themes: my personal experience of Russian philosophy and Russian philosophers on the one hand, and historicism on the other. My account of my limited experience of Russian philosophers and philosophy will be mainly autobiographical. My remarks about historicism will concern a single aspect of the philosophical consequences of the Soviet experience for Russian philosophy. When I come to Russia, I am always surprised by the degree of interest in a historical approach to knowledge, an (...)
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  36. Stephen Bann (2010). Two Kinds of Historicism: Resurrection and Restoration in French Historical Painting. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (2):154-171.score: 18.0
    The historicist approach is rarely challenged by art historians, who draw a clear distinction between art history and the present-centred pursuit of art criticism. The notion of the 'period eye' offers a relevant methodology. Bearing this in mind, I examine the nineteenth-century phase in the development of history painting, when artists started to take trouble over the accuracy of historical detail, instead of repeating conventions for portraying classical and biblical subjects. This created an unprecedented situation at the Paris Salon, where (...)
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  37. Daniel Fulda (2010). Historicism as a Cultural Pattern: Practising a Mode of Thought. Journal of the Philosophy of History 4 (2):138-153.score: 18.0
    What is the basis for the enormous success of Historicism? In my paper I attempt to answer this question by deploying the concept of the cultural pattern. A 'cultural pattern' may be defined as the connection of concepts and practices which have gained a relative perpetuity through cultural habitualization. Cultural patterns include a combination of interpretative schemes according to which the world can be categorized, structured and interpreted with individual or social practices which either develop out of, or follow (...)
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  38. James Newlin (2013). The Touch of the Real in New Historicism and Psychoanalysis. Substance 42 (1):82-101.score: 18.0
    "poor Lear...""Well, well; the event."Let us begin, as the New Historicist Stephen Greenblatt does in his essay "Marlowe, Marx, and Anti-Semitism,"1 with a fantasy. Consider the highly unlikely scenario of a graduate student in English, well versed in the methods of psychoanalysis, Lacanian methods in particular, yet wholly unaware of the New Historicism and its occasional skirmishes with psychoanalytic reading. Then, what if this theoretical student somehow stumbled upon Greenblatt's famous phrase and formulation for the New Historicist ideal, The (...)
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  39. Kurt C. M. Mertel (2014). Historicism and Critique in Herder's Another Philosophy of History: Some Hermeneutic Reflections. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (3).score: 18.0
    In Another Philosophy of History, J.G. Herder claims that his aim is not to compare and judge different cultures, but merely to describe and explain how each came into being and thus to adopt the standpoint of an impartial observer. I argue, however, that there is a tension between Herder's understanding of his own project—his stated doctrine of historicism and cultural relativism—and the way in which it is actually put into practice. That is, despite Herder's stated aims, he is (...)
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  40. Robert E. Foelber (1994). Can an Historicist Sustain a Diehard Commitment to Liberal Democracy? The Case of Rorty's Liberal Ironist'. Southern Journal of Philosophy 32 (1):19-48.score: 18.0
    Traditional liberals have questioned whether Richard Rorty's postmodern hero--the "ironist"--can be a committed liberal democrat, as Rorty maintains. The article examines Rorty's argument for liberal historicism in _Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity and concludes that postmodern historicists can indeed be diehard liberals because historicists cannot philosophically question their moral-political beliefs. As Rorty shows, historicism is theoretically incoherent. It reduces to a practical stance: at the end of our historicist musings we return to where we were before we began to (...)
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  41. Mark Bevir (forthcoming). Historicism and Critique. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114531370.score: 18.0
    This paper argues that historicism can provide substantive philosophical grounds for critical theory and various modes of critique. Unlike the developmental historicism that dominated the nineteenth century, we start from a radical historicism tied to nominalism, contingency, and contestability. This radical historicism is compatible with a commitment to truth claims, including the truth of historicism and the truth of particular genealogies and other accounts of the world. Genealogy can be viewed as radical historicism in (...)
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  42. Michael Keaney (1997). The Poverty of Rhetoricism: Popper, Mises and the Riches of Historicism. History of the Human Sciences 10 (1):1-22.score: 18.0
    The attacks on historicism by radical individualists such as Popper and Mises have had lasting repercussions in the social sciences. Specifically, the term is used to connote deterministic, teleological theories of history, associated with Hegelian notions of destiny and positivist ideas of historical laws. This article argues that historicism is very different in character, in that it essentially amounts to the belief that social science and history are one and the same, whilst emphasizing the separate epis temology of (...)
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  43. Mark Bevir (forthcoming). What Is Radical Historicism? Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114531374.score: 18.0
    This article responds to Stephen Turner’s discussion of my article, “Historicism and Critique.” I emphasize that radical historicism consists of substantive philosophical commitments. One commitment is to a historicized epistemology that presents objective knowledge as a product of a comparison between rival webs of belief. Another commitment is to a historical ontology that presents aggregate concepts in the social sciences as inherently pragmatic. These substantive commitments provide a plausible basis for various forms of critique. They lead to analyses (...)
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  44. B. H. Mclean (2012). The Crisis of Historicism: And the Problem of Historical Meaning in New Testament Studies. Heythrop Journal 53 (2):217-240.score: 18.0
    The rapid rise of varieties of historicism in Germany, during the mid- to late-nineteenth century, and subsequently in England and America, resulted in a radical transformation of the principles of coherence and methods of analysis within biblical studies.1This paper will argue that the foundational ‘subject/object’ metaphysics of historicism has been subverted over the past century. For this reason, historical positivism should no longer be accorded the status of ‘normative paradigm’ and ‘gatekeeper’ over and against other interpretive approaches. This (...)
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  45. G. H. Merrill (1980). Moderate Historicism and the Empirical Sense of 'Good Science'. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1980:223 - 235.score: 18.0
    Unlike the radical historicist and the radical logicist, the moderate historicist in the philosophy of science adopts the position that neither purely a priori (i.e., logical or philosophical) nor purely historical considerations alone determine the acceptability of a philosophical analysis of science. A dilemma arising from the nature of this position is first described and then it is argued that what is perhaps the most plausible way of avoiding this dilemma is doomed to failure. A particular example of this attempt (...)
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  46. Stephen Turner (forthcoming). Not So Radical Historicism. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393114531372.score: 18.0
    Mark Bevir raises the question of how genealogy, understood as a technique-based radical historicism, and the notion of the contingency of ideas, ground “critique.” His problem is to avoid the relativism of radical historicism in a way that allows for “critique” without appealing to non-radical historicist absolutisms of the kind that ground the notion of false consciousness. He does so by appealing to the notion of motivated irrationality, which he claims avoids the problem of relativism and the problems (...)
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  47. Demian Wheeler (2013). Big History and the Size of God: Holistic Historicism as a Pathway to Religious Naturalism. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 34 (3):226-247.score: 18.0
    A great irony abounds in much of the current literature on historicism.1 As William Dean began to detect over two decades ago, a good majority of historicists, although placing an ontological and epistemological premium on historicity, promulgates a historicism that ignores most of history, the history of nature. In particular, today’s historicist theologies, especially those of the postmodern and postliberal variety, are so fixated on human histories—and, even more narrowly, on the socially, linguistically, and narrativally constituted particularities of (...)
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  48. Jack A. Bonsor (1990). An Orthodox Historicism? Philosophy and Theology 4 (4):335-350.score: 18.0
    This essay suggests the possible form of an orthodox historicism. The essay begins by examining the historicism of Heidegger and Gadamer. It then proposes how a theology might appear which places the faith in conversation with this historicism.
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  49. Wayne Hudson (2013). Theology and Historicism. Thesis Eleven 116 (1):19-39.score: 18.0
    This paper discusses attempts to think historicity in the work of the theologian Rudolf Bultmann and the German philosopher Hans Blumenberg. It then draws on the work of the Jesuit theologian Robert Doran in order to suggest how an historical pragmatics without historicism might be relevant to a future theology with social import.
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  50. Tom Rockmore (2005). A New Look at Croce's Historicism. Idealistic Studies 35 (1):49-60.score: 18.0
    The aim of this informal paper is to direct (or redirect) attention to the importance of Croce’s historicism. Though he is sometimes described as the best known Italian intellectual since Galileo, and though his influence remains strong in Italy, his impact outside Italy is not as important as it should be. Other than through Collingwood, his only well known English-language disciple, Croce has had very little influence on those writing in English. His theories, including his historicism, on which (...)
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