Search results for 'human good' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  52
    James Good (2000). The Historical Imagination in the Human Sciences Introduction: The Historical Imagination and the History of the Human Sciences. History of the Human Sciences 13 (4):97-101.
    The historical imagination, as Hayden White has reminded us, is not singular;\nit is manifest in many forms (White, 1973). Not surprisingly, this diversity\nis reflected within the pages of History of the Human Sciences and in the four papers that follow. Indeed, from its inception, the journal has sought to\npromote a variety of styles of writing, representing the many voices that have\nan interest in the human sciences and their history.\nIn the opening article, Roger Smith suggests that a distinctive feature (...)
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  2. I. J. Good (1967). Human and Machine Logic. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 18 (August):145-6.
  3.  17
    Arthur Still & James M. M. Good (1992). Mutualism in the Human Sciences: Towards the Implementation of a Theory. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 22 (2):105–128.
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  4.  10
    Gösta Grönroos (2015). Wish, Motivation and the Human Good in Aristotle. Phronesis 60 (1):60-87.
    _ Source: _Volume 60, Issue 1, pp 60 - 87 Aristotle invokes a specifically human desire, namely wish, to provide a teleological explanation of the pursuit of the specifically human good in terms of virtuous activity. Wish is a basic, unreasoned desire which, independently of other desires, or evaluative attitudes, motivates the pursuit of the human good. Even a person who pursues what she mistakenly believes to be good is motivated by wish for (...)
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  5.  21
    Gösta Grönroos (2015). Wish, Motivation and the Human Good in Aristotle. Phronesis-a Journal for Ancient Philosophy 60 (1):60-87.
    Aristotle invokes a specifically human desire, namely wish (boulēsis), to provide a teleological explanation of the pursuit of the specifically human good in terms of virtuous activity. Wish is a basic, unreasoned desire which, independently of other desires, or evaluative attitudes, motivates the pursuit of the human good. Even a person who pursues what she mistakenly believes to be good is motivated by wish for what in fact is good, although she is oblivious (...)
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  6.  21
    Felix Martin (2011). Human Development and the Pursuit of the Common Good: Social Psychology or Aristotelian Virtue Ethics? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 100 (S1):89-98.
    The encyclical proclaims the centrality of human development, which includes acting with gratuitousness and solidarity in pursuing the common good. This paper considers first whether such relationships of gratuitousness and solidarity can be analysed through the prism of traditional theories of social psychology, which are highly influential in current management research, and concludes that certain aspects of those theories may offer useful tools for analysis at the practical level. This is contrasted with the analysis of such relationships through (...)
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  7.  72
    Marek Piechowiak (2011). W sprawie aksjologicznej spójności Konstytucji RP. Dobro wspólne czy godność człowieka? [Axiological Consistency of the Polish Constitution: Common Good or Human Dignity?]. In Stanisław Leszek Stadniczeńko (ed.), Jednolitość aksjologiczna systemu prawa w rozwijających się państwach demokratycznych Europy. Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Opolskiego 111-124.
    The author poses a question: which of the two fundamental, constitutional values – common good or human dignity – can be considered to be the cornerstone, the unifying value in the Constitution of the Republic of Poland from 1997. The paper shows the crucial reasons for accepting each of these values as primary and also presents the underlying relationships between these values . The prominence of a given value for defining the aim of the constitution and the legal (...)
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  8.  17
    Blaine J. Fowers (2012). Placing Virtue and the Human Good in Psychology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 32 (1):1-9.
    This article contextualizes and critiques the recent increase in interest in virtue ethics and the good life in psychology. Theoretically, psychologists' interests in virtue and eudaimonia have followed the philosophical revival of these topics, but this work has been subject to persistent, disguised commitments to the ideologies of individualism and instrumentalism. Moreover, psychologists' tendency to separate the topics of virtue and eudaimonia is described and critiqued as theoretically misguided, particularly because Aristotle, the originator of these concepts, saw them as (...)
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  9.  7
    Wilson Muoha Maina (2011). The Common Good and/or the Human Rights: Analysis of Some Papal Social Encyclicals and Their Contemporary Relevance. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 10 (29):3-25.
    It is notable how some papal social encyclicals have interchangeably used the terms ' common good ' and 'human rights.' This article analyzes the papal common good teaching and its contemporary shift to include human rights. I also explore the differential nuances between the common good and the human rights. Human rights as advocated by civil societies are understood as arising from a conception of the nature of the human person. The common (...)
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  10.  4
    June O'Connor (2002). Making a Case for the Common Good in a Global Economy: The United Nations "Human Development Reports" [1990-2001]. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 30 (1):155 - 173.
    Whereas the chief development question of the past has been "how much is a nation producing?" the human development perspective that characterizes the United Nations Human Development Reports shifts the question to "how are its people faring?" This shift reflects the fundamental moral orientation of the human development perspective which makes a case for the common good in a global economy. Relating the themes and claims of the human development reports to Brian Stiltner's recent study (...)
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  11.  26
    Paolo Silvestri & Paolo Heritier (eds.) (2012). Good Government, Governance and Human Complexity. Luigi Einaudi’s Legacy and Contemporary Society. Olschki.
    The book presents an interdisciplinary exploration aimed at renewing interest in Luigi Einaudi’s search for “good government”, broadly understood as “good society”. Prompted by the Einaudian quest, the essays - exploring philosophy of law, economics, politics and epistemology - develop the issue of good government in several forms, including the relationship between public and private, public governance, the question of freedom and the complexity of the human in contemporary societies.
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  12.  12
    Stephen Clark & R. Kraut (1993). Aristotle on the Human Good. Journal of Hellenic Studies 113 (3):193.
    Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, which equates the ultimate end of human life with happiness, is thought by many readers to argue that this highest goal consists in the largest possible aggregate of intrinsic goods. Richard Kraut proposes instead that Aristotle identifies happiness with only one type of good: excellent activity of the rational soul. In defense of this reading, Kraut discusses Aristotle's attempt to organize all human goods into a single structure, so that each subordinate (...)
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  13. Richard Kraut (1994). Desire and the Human Good. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 68 (2):315.
    When wc compare contemporary moral philosophy with thc wcll-known moral systems of earlier centuries, wc should bc struck by thc fact that a certain assumption about human well being that is now widely taken for granted was universally rcjcctcd in thc past. The contemporary moral climate prcdisposcs us to bc pluralistic about thc human good, whcrcas earlier systems of ethics embraced a conception of wcll being that wc would now call narrow and restrictive. One way to convey (...)
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  14.  30
    Jonathan Wolff (2002). Addressing Disadvantage and the Human Good. Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (3):207–218.
    This paper sets out a framework in which we can distinguish between four types of redistributive attention to the disadvantaged: compensation; personal enhancement; targeted resource enhancement; and status enhancement. It is argued that in certain cases many of us will have strong intuitions in favour or against one or more strategies for addressing disadvantage, and it is further argued that in such cases it is likely that our reactions are based on assumptions about the human good. Hence the (...)
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  15.  22
    Blaine J. Fowers (2012). An Aristotelian Framework for the Human Good. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 32 (1):10-23.
    A robust critical literature argues that psychology is animated by powerful, but unacknowledged commitments to a culturally based vision of the human good in spite of its ideal of value neutrality. Inasmuch as such commitments seem ineliminable, it seems preferable to address questions of the good directly rather than by tacitly absorbing cultural views. This article explores the human good directly and explicitly within an Aristotelian framework to foster a critical conversation on the good (...)
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  16.  46
    James Griffin (1992). The Human Good and the Ambitions of Consequentialism. Social Philosophy and Policy 9 (2):118.
    I want to look at one aspect of the human good: how it serves as the basis for judgments about the moral right. One important view is that the right is always derived from the good. I want to suggest that the more one understands the nature of the human good, the more reservations one has about that view. I. One Route to Consequentialism Many of us think that different things make a life good, (...)
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  17. Michael Weston (2001). Philosophy, Literature and the Human Good. Routledge.
    In this provocative new examination of the philosophical, moral and religious significance of literature, Michael Weston explores the role of literature in both analytic and continental traditions. He initiates a dialogue between them and investigates the growing importance of these issues for major contemporary thinkers. Each chapter explores a philosopher or literary figure who has written on the relation between literature and the good life, such as Derrida, Kierkegaard, Murdoch and Blanchot. Challenging and insightful, Philosophy, Literature and the (...) Good is ideal for all students of philosophy and literature. (shrink)
     
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  18.  4
    David B. Resnik (2008). Review of Biotechnology and the Human Good. [REVIEW] Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 2 (1).
    Biotechnology and the Human Good by C. Ben Mitchell, Edmund D. Pellegrino, Jean Bethke Elshstain, and Scott B. Rae is a thoughtful, carefully argued perspective on the ethics of new developments in biotechnology, such as human enhancement, human germ-line engineering, cloning, nanotechnology, and cybernetics.
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  19. Ellen Frankel Paul, Fred Dycus Miller & Jeffrey Paul (eds.) (1992). The Good Life and the Human Good. Cambridge University Press.
    What is the good life? This question captured the attention of ancient philosophers and it remains with us today, because it compels us to consider what it is to be human. To inquire about the good life is to ask, not about the proper conduct in one specific situation, but about the proper course of an entire life. It is to ask what we ought to make of ourselves as moral beings, what standards we ought to follow, (...)
     
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  20. Michael Weston (2003). Philosophy, Literature and the Human Good. Routledge.
    In this provocative new examination of the philosophical, moral and religious significance of literature, Michael Weston explores the role of literature in both analytic and continental traditions. He initiates a dialogue between them and investigates the growing importance of these issues for major contemporary thinkers. Each chapter explores a philosopher or literary figure who has written on the relation between literature and the good life, such as Derrida, Kierkegaard, Murdoch and Blanchot. Challenging and insightful, _Philosophy, Literature and the (...) Good_ is ideal for all students of philosophy and literature. (shrink)
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  21.  13
    Inder Marwah (2013). Elateres Motiva: From the Good Will to the Good Human Being. Kantian Review 18 (3):413-437.
    Kant's ethics has long been bedevilled by a peculiar tension. While his practical philosophy describes the moral obligations incumbent on all free, rational beings, Kant also understands moral anthropology as addressing to our moral advancement. How are we to reconcile Kant's Critical account of a transcendentally free human will with his developmental view of anthropology, history and education as assisting in our collective progress towards moral ends? I argue that Kant in fact distinguishes between the objective determination of moral (...)
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  22.  21
    Raimond Gaita (1983). Ii. Virtues, Human Good, and the Unity of a Life. Inquiry 26 (4):407 – 424.
    Maclntyre's ?disquieting suggestion? concerning the apparently irretrievably anarchic state of contemporary moral discourse begs the crucial questions in any argument over the notion of ?incoherence? in moral thought and practice. Thus his attempt to establish the canonical authority of Aristotelianism fails. Nonetheless, the attempt to reconstruct a plausible Aristotelianism is of independent interest. Maclntyre introduces the quasi?technical notion of a ?practice? to locate a non?reductive teleology of the virtues. Though certain teleological expressions come naturally in a deepened understanding of the (...)
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  23. Michael A. Smith (1995). Human Dignity and the Common Good in the Aristotelian-Thomistic Tradition. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  24.  55
    S. Matthew Liao (forthcoming). Human Rights as Fundamental Conditions for a Good Life. In Rowan Cruft, S. Matthew Liao & Massimo Renzo (eds.), The Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights. Oxford University Press
    What grounds human rights? How do we determine that something is a genuine human right? In this paper, I offer a new answer: human beings have human rights to what I call the fundamental conditions for pursuing a good life. These are certain goods, capacities and options that human beings qua human beings need whatever else they (qua individuals) might need in order to pursue a characteristically (...) human life. I call this the Fundamental Conditions Approach. Among other things, I explain how this way of grounding human rights is better than James Griffin’s Agency Approach and Martha Nussbaum’s Central Capabilities Approach, and I also show how it can be compatible with the increasingly popular Political Conceptions of human rights defended by John Rawls, Charles Beitz and Joseph Raz. (shrink)
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  25. Denis J. M. Bradley (1997). Aquinas on the Twofold Human Good Reason and Human Happiness in Aquinas's Moral Science.
     
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  26.  35
    Micah Lott (2014). Why Be a Good Human Being? Natural Goodness, Reason, and the Authority of Human Nature. Philosophia 42 (3):761-777.
    The central claim of Aristotelian naturalism is that moral goodness is a kind of species-specific natural goodness. Aristotelian naturalism has recently enjoyed a resurgence in the work of philosophers such as Philippa Foot, Rosalind Hursthouse, and Michael Thompson. However, any view that takes moral goodness to be a type of natural goodness faces a challenge: Granting that moral goodness is natural goodness for human beings, why should we care about being good human beings? Given that we are (...)
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  27. Warren Quinn (1992). Rationality and the Human Good. Social Philosophy and Policy 9 (2):81.
    In this essay I want to look at some questions concerning the relation between morality and rationality in the recommendations they make about the best way to live our lives and achieve our good. Specifically, I want to examine ways in which the virtue of practical rationality and the various moral virtues might be thought to part company, giving an agent conflicting directives regarding how best to live his life. In conducting this enquiry, I shall at some crucial points (...)
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  28.  48
    Gerald Doppelt & Richard Arneson, Justice and Human Good.
    Contemporary theories of justice frequently suppose that a legitimate state does not coerce people to comply with values or principles that they could reasonably reject. This ideal of legitimacy is thought to imply neutrality on the good: The State should not coerce people to comply with controversial conceptions of the good (which people could reasonably reject). As Ronald Dworkin puts the point, the government's policies should “be neutral on the question of the good life, or of what (...)
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  29.  15
    Richard Arneson, Justice and Human Good Philosophy 224 Gerald Doppelt and Richard Arneson Spring, 2002 Wednesdays 2:30-5:20 in the Phil Dept Seminar Room, Hss 7077. [REVIEW]
    Contemporary theories of justice frequently suppose that a legitimate state does not coerce people to comply with values or principles that they could reasonably reject. This ideal of legitimacy is thought to imply neutrality on the good: The State should not coerce people to comply with controversial conceptions of the good (which people could reasonably reject). As Ronald Dworkin puts the point, the government's policies should “be neutral on the question of the good life, or of what (...)
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  30.  10
    Fred Lawrence (2010). Money, Institutions, and the Human Good. The Lonergan Review 2 (1):175-197.
    Each human being is the best judge of what is most conducive to his or her own self-preservation, whether this be considered strictly as security of mere life, or as comfortable self-preservation, or as the pursuit of happiness. Liberty is just a means to this end, but a means so necessary, so pervasive, so paramount, that it most resembles an end in itself. The ambiguity of modern liberty—this oscillation between end and means—may be a theoretical liability or weakness, but (...)
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  31.  3
    Jan Narveson (2001). Communication and Human Good. Social Philosophy Today 17:91-102.
    The invention of computers, and especially their communication capabilities is revolutionary in several ways. They show the paramount importance of communication in human life, as well as facilitating revolutionary improvements in virtually all areas of social life: business, the arts, agriculture, and others. They put in perspective the erroneous outlook of "materialism" -the idea that human well-being is a matter of accumulating material objects, with a corollary that we must be using up the material resources that make such (...)
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  32.  37
    John M. Cooper (1975). Reason and Human Good in Aristotle. Harvard University Press.
    I Deliberation, Practical Syllogisms , and Intuition. Introduction Aristotle's views on moral reasoning are a difficult and much disputed subject. ...
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  33.  67
    A. Caspary (2009). Book Review: C. Ben Mitchell, Edmund D. Pellegrino, Jean Bethke Elshtain, John F. Kilner and Scott B. Rae, Biotechnology and the Human Good (Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press, 2007). Xiv + 210 Pp. US$24.95/ 14.75 (Pb), ISBN 978--1--58901--138--. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 22 (2):239-242.
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  34.  5
    Lisa Shapiro (2011). Descartes on Human Nature and the Human Good. In Smith Justin & Fraenkel Carlos (eds.), The Rationalists. Springer/Synthese 13--26.
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  35.  11
    Douglas N. Morgan (1949). The Source of Human Good. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 46 (6):161-162.
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  36.  7
    Henry Nelson Wieman (1946/1964). The Source of Human Good. Edwardsville, Southern Illinois Univ. Press.
    This is a facsimile edition of a 1946 work of the American pragmatic theologian Henry Nelson Wieman (1884-1975).
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  37.  98
    J. Porter (1999). Book Reviews : Aquinas on the Twofold Human Good: Reason and Happiness in Aquinas' Moral Science, by Denis J. M. Bradley. Washington, DC: Catholic University of America Press (London: Eurospan), 1966. 472 Pp. Hb. 39.95. ISBN 0-8132-0861-. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 12 (1):88-90.
  38.  8
    Matthew J. O.’Connell (1947). The Source of Human Good. Modern Schoolman 24 (3):191-192.
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  39.  2
    William A. Galston (1980). Justice and the Human Good. University of Chicago Press.
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  40.  43
    Christopher Friel (2013). The Evolution of Lonergan's Structure of The Human Good. Heythrop Journal 54 (5):756-766.
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  41.  33
    T. H. Irwin (1991). The Structure of Aristotelian Happiness:Aristotle on the Human Good. Richard Kraut. Ethics 101 (2):382-.
  42.  76
    Ronald Hepburn (2002). Philosophy, Literature and the Human Good. British Journal of Aesthetics 42 (3):328-331.
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  43.  18
    Matthew J. O.’Connell (1947). The Source of Human Good. Modern Schoolman 24 (3):191-192.
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  44.  6
    David J. Depew (1993). Aristotle on the Human Good. Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (1):127-129.
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  45.  53
    Richard Arneson (2006). Desire Formation and Human Good. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 81 (59):9-.
    In Wuthering Heights a man and a woman fall in love and their passion for each other wreaks havoc on several lives, theirs included.1 Long after his beloved is dead, Heathcliff’s life revolves entirely around his love for her. Frustrated by events, his grand romantic passion expresses itself in destructive spasms of antisocial behavior. Catherine, the object of this passion, marries another man on a whim, but describes her feelings for him as like superficial foliage, whereas “her love for Heathcliff (...)
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  46.  43
    John M. Cooper (1977). Plato's Theory of Human Good in the Philebus. Journal of Philosophy 74 (11):714-730.
  47.  3
    Maja Hudoletnjak Grgić (2008). Human Good in the Nicomachean Ethics I. Filozofska Istrazivanja 27 (4):791-807.
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  48.  36
    Bernard Hoose (1992). Proportionalists, Deontologists and the Human Good. Heythrop Journal 33 (2):175–191.
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  49.  9
    Kevin M. Staley (1995). Aristotle, Augustine, and Aquinas on the Good and the Human Good. Modern Schoolman 72 (4):311-322.
  50.  35
    Julia Annas (2005). Review of Gabriel Richardson Lear, Happy Lives and the Human Good: An Essay on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (1).
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