Search results for 'iconic sign' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  98
    T. Kowzan (1985). Theatrical Iconography/Iconology: The Iconic Sign and Its Referent. Diogenes 33 (130):53-70.
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  2.  30
    Joseph Ransdell, On Peirce's Conception of the Iconic Sign.
    The changes from the original version are relatively minor, but enough to make it necessary to treat the present version as a distinct text for purposes of exact reference. Since there is no normal pagination on a web page, I assign in lieu of that paragraph numbers, included in brackets and placed flush right, just above the paragraph, for purposes of scholarly reference.
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  3.  14
    Clifford Amyx (1947). The Iconic Sign in Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 6 (1):54-60.
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  4.  2
    Victoria Nyst (2016). Size and Shape Depictions in the Manual Modality: A Taxonomy of Iconic Devices in Adamorobe Sign Language. Semiotica 2016 (210):75-104.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Semiotica Jahrgang: 2016 Heft: 210 Seiten: 75-104.
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  5.  24
    Carol Padden, So‐One Hwang, Ryan Lepic & Sharon Seegers (2015). Tools for Language: Patterned Iconicity in Sign Language Nouns and Verbs. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):81-94.
    When naming certain hand-held, man-made tools, American Sign Language signers exhibit either of two iconic strategies: a handling strategy, where the hands show holding or grasping an imagined object in action, or an instrument strategy, where the hands represent the shape or a dimension of the object in a typical action. The same strategies are also observed in the gestures of hearing nonsigners identifying pictures of the same set of tools. In this paper, we compare spontaneously created gestures (...)
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  6. Catherine Legg (2013). What is a Logical Diagram? In Sun-Joo Shin & Amirouche Moktefi (eds.), Visual Reasoning with Diagrams. Springer 1-18.
    Robert Brandom’s expressivism argues that not all semantic content may be made fully explicit. This view connects in interesting ways with recent movements in philosophy of mathematics and logic (e.g. Brown, Shin, Giaquinto) to take diagrams seriously - as more than a mere “heuristic aid” to proof, but either proofs themselves, or irreducible components of such. However what exactly is a diagram in logic? Does this constitute a semiotic natural kind? The paper will argue that such a natural kind does (...)
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  7.  37
    Philippe Schlenker, Jonathan Lamberton & Mirko Santoro (2013). Iconic Variables. Linguistics and Philosophy 36 (2):91-149.
    We argue that some sign language loci (i.e. positions in signing space that realize discourse referents) are both formal variables and simplified representations of what they denote; in other words, they are simultaneously logical symbols and pictorial representations. We develop a 'formal semantics with iconicity' that accounts for their dual life; the key idea ('formal iconicity') is that some geometric properties of signs must be preserved by the interpretation function. We analyze in these terms three kinds of iconic (...)
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  8.  25
    Pamela Perniss & Asli Özyürek (2015). Visible Cohesion: A Comparison of Reference Tracking in Sign, Speech, and Co‐Speech Gesture. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):36-60.
    Establishing and maintaining reference is a crucial part of discourse. In spoken languages, differential linguistic devices mark referents occurring in different referential contexts, that is, introduction, maintenance, and re-introduction contexts. Speakers using gestures as well as users of sign languages have also been shown to mark referents differentially depending on the referential context. This article investigates the modality-specific contribution of the visual modality in marking referential context by providing a direct comparison between sign language and co-speech gesture with (...)
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  9.  50
    Ernst Thoutenhoofd (2000). Philosophy's Real-World Consequences for Deaf People: Thoughts on Iconicity, Sign Language and Being Deaf. Human Studies 23 (3):261-279.
    The body of philosophical knowledge concerning the relations among language, the senses, and deafness, interpreted as a canon of key ideas which have found their way into folk metaphysics, constitutes one of the historically sustained conditions of the oppression of deaf people. Jonathan Rée, with his book I see a voice, makes the point that a philosophical history, grounded in a phenomenological and causal concern with philosophical thought and social life, can offer an archaeology of philosophy's contribution to the social (...)
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  10.  7
    Philippe Schlenker (2014). Iconic Features. Natural Language Semantics 22 (4):299-356.
    Sign languages are known to display the same general grammatical properties as spoken languages, but also to make greater use of iconic mechanisms. In Schlenker et al.’s ‘Iconic Variables’ :91–149, 2013), it was argued that loci can have an iconic semantics, in the sense that certain geometric relations among loci are preserved by the interpretation function. Here we ask whether plural and height specifications of loci display the formal behavior of phi-features in remaining uninterpreted in focus- (...)
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  11.  2
    Robin Paul Malloy (2009). Place, Space, and Time in the Sign of Property. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 22 (3):265-277.
    Property is a complex sign in semiotics. It is also the source of tension and conflict in law. This paper examines property in triadic terms consisting of what Charles S. Peirce would identify as the icon (firstness), the index (secondness), and the symbol (thirdness). From this perspective the paper explores the ideas of place, space, and time at the iconic level of the sign of property. Discussion addresses the way in which property serves as a coded system (...)
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  12.  1
    Timo Maran (2011). Becoming a Sign: The Mimic's Activity in Biological Mimicry. Biosemiotics 4 (2):243-257.
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  13.  19
    Kathryn Davidson (2015). Quotation, Demonstration, and Iconicity. Linguistics and Philosophy 38 (6):477-520.
    Sometimes form-meaning mappings in language are not arbitrary, but iconic: they depict what they represent. Incorporating iconic elements of language into a compositional semantics faces a number of challenges in formal frameworks as evidenced by the lengthy literature in linguistics and philosophy on quotation/direct speech, which iconically portrays the words of another in the form that they were used. This paper compares the well-studied type of iconicity found with verbs of quotation with another form of iconicity common in (...)
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  14.  28
    Diane Brentari, Alessio Di Renzo, Jonathan Keane & Virginia Volterra (2015). Cognitive, Cultural, and Linguistic Sources of a Handshape Distinction Expressing Agentivity. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):95-123.
    In this paper the cognitive, cultural, and linguistic bases for a pattern of conventionalization of two types of iconic handshapes are described. Work on sign languages has shown that handling handshapes and object handshapes express an agentive/non-agentive semantic distinction in many sign languages. H-HSs are used in agentive event descriptions and O-HSs are used in non-agentive event descriptions. In this work, American Sign Language and Italian Sign Language productions are compared as well as the corresponding (...)
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  15.  27
    Susan Goldin‐Meadow (2015). The Impact of Time on Predicate Forms in the Manual Modality: Signers, Homesigners, and Silent Gesturers. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):169-184.
    It is difficult to create spoken forms that can be understood on the spot. But the manual modality, in large part because of its iconic potential, allows us to construct forms that are immediately understood, thus requiring essentially no time to develop. This paper contrasts manual forms for actions produced over three time spans—by silent gesturers who are asked to invent gestures on the spot; by homesigners who have created gesture systems over their life spans; and by signers who (...)
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  16.  45
    Göran Sonesson (2010). From Mimicry to Mime by Way of Mimesis. Sign Systems Studies 38 (1-4):18-65.
    Practically all theories of iconicity are denunciations of its subject matter (for example, those of Goodman, Bierman and the early Eco). My own theory of iconicity was developed in order to save a particular kind of iconicity, pictoriality, from such criticism. In this interest, I distinguished pure iconicity, iconic ground, and iconic sign, on one hand, and primary and secondary iconic signs, on the other hand. Since then, however, several things have happened. The conceptual tools that (...)
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  17.  21
    Tommi Vehkavaara (2003). Natural Self-Interest, Interactive Representation, and the Emergence of Objects and Umwelt. Sign Systems Studies 31 (2):547-586.
    In biosemiotics, life and living phenomena are described by means of originally anthropomorphic semiotic concepts. This can be justified if we can show that living systems as self-maintaining far from equilibrium systems create and update some kind of representation about the conditions of their self-maintenance. The point of view is the one of semiotic realism where signs and representations are considered as real and objective natural phenomena without any reference to the specifically human interpreter. It is argued that the most (...)
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  18.  7
    Peder Voetmann Christiansen (2002). Habit Formation as Symmetry Breaking in the Early Universe. Sign Systems Studies 30 (1):347-359.
    This paper tries to combine Peirce’s cosmology and metaphysics with current understanding in physics of the evolution of the universe, regarded as an ongoing semiotic process in a living cosmos. While the basic property of Life is viewed as an unexplainable Firstness inherent in the initial iconic state of the vacuous continuum we shall consider and exemplify two sign developing processes: (a) the transition from icon to index is considered as a symmetry breaking emergence of order actualising one (...)
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  19.  27
    Felix Ahlner & Jordan Zlatev (2010). Cross-Modal Iconicity. Sign Systems Studies 38 (1-4):298-346.
    It is being increasingly recognized that the Saussurean dictum of “the arbitrariness of the linguistic sign” is in conflict with the pervasiveness of the phenomenon commonly known as “sound symbolism”. After first presenting a historical overview of the debate, however, we conclude that both positions have been exaggerated, and that an adequate explanation of sound symbolism is still lacking. How can there, for example, be (perceived) similarity between expressionsand contents across different sensory modalities? We offer an answer, based on (...)
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  20.  21
    Bruno Osimo (2008). Jakobson. Sign Systems Studies 36 (2):315-338.
    Jakobson, in his essays, has tried to insert Peirce’s typology of signs (icon, index, symbol) in his own binary logic, in which every feature of a text may be considered or dismissed either with a 0 or with a 1 (absent, present). In so doing, he used the features “similarity versus contiguity” and “imputed versus factual”, and discovered that the notion of “imputed similarity” was not covered by Peirce’s triad. Hence the search for it. In this article, whose ideological basis (...)
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  21.  19
    Felice Cimatti (2000). The Circular Semiosis of Giorgio Prodi. Sign Systems Studies 28:351-378.
    Prodi's semiotics theory comes into being to answer a radical question: if a sign is a cross-reference, what guarantees the relation between the sign and the object to which it is referring? Prodi rebukes all traditional solutions: a subject's voluntary intention, a convention, the iconic relation between sign and object. He refutes the fIrst answer because the notion of intention, upon which it is based, is, indeed, a fully mysterious entity. The conventionalist answer is just as (...)
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  22.  29
    Joseph Ransdell, The Epistemic Function of Iconicity in Perception.
    The claim of this paper is that Peirce's conception of the iconic sign provides the key conceptual element required to solve the major problem traditionally associated with the doctrine of representative perception, according to which all perceptual awareness of things is mediated through representations or "ideas" of them. The problem this has generated in the philosophical tradition is based on construing the representation not merely as..
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  23.  11
    Francesco Paparella (2008). Immagine mimetica e immagine simbolica. Il valore delle agalmata tra Tarda-antichità e Alto Medioevo. Chôra 6:101-124.
    The expression "image" is characterized, starting with the Greek language, by a certain ambiguity, since it can point to an iconic sign or to an allegoric-figurative sign. However it is possible to find out in the history of ancient thought an acceptation of "image" where these features are both present, that is agalma whose first meaning in the lexicon of classic Greek is "sacred image". Neoplatonism particularly uses this expression as one of the key term of its (...)
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  24.  10
    Ivan Mladenov (2001). Unlimited Semiosis and Heteroglossia (C. S. Peirce and M. M. Bakhtin). Sign Systems Studies 29 (2):441-460.
    The article draws paralles between Bakhtin's literary theory and some of the Peirce's philosophical concepts. The comparisons with Bakhtin go beyond the theory of heteroglossia and reveal that related notions were implicitly originated by Dostoevsky. The elaboration of the concepts of dialogue, "self" and "other" continue into the ideas of consciousness, iconic effects in literature, and the semiotic aspect of thought. Especially important in this chapter is the aspect of Peirce's theory concerned with the endless growth of interpretation and (...)
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  25.  9
    Guido Ferraro (2010). Analogical Associations in the Frame of a “Neoclassical” Semiotic Theory. Sign Systems Studies 38 (1-4):67-89.
    It has been a long time since the concept of iconic signs was proposed by C. S. Peirce. From that time on, we have been increasingly realizing that semiotic systems are for the most part established just on some type of similarity. But the more we see the sphere of analogical signification expanding its realm, themore we become aware of how inadequate is the notion of a simple relationship connecting locally a physical object with a second object, or with (...)
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  26.  8
    Marcello Barbieri (2009). Three Types of Semiosis. Biosemiotics 2 (1):19-30.
    The existence of different types of semiosis has been recognized, so far, in two ways. It has been pointed out that different semiotic features exist in different taxa and this has led to the distinction between zoosemiosis, phytosemiosis, mycosemiosis, bacterial semiosis and the like. Another type of diversity is due to the existence of different types of signs and has led to the distinction between iconic, indexical and symbolic semiosis. In all these cases, however, semiosis has been defined by (...)
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  27.  24
    Chloë R. Marshall & Gary Morgan (2015). From Gesture to Sign Language: Conventionalization of Classifier Constructions by Adult Hearing Learners of British Sign Language. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):61-80.
    There has long been interest in why languages are shaped the way they are, and in the relationship between sign language and gesture. In sign languages, entity classifiers are handshapes that encode how objects move, how they are located relative to one another, and how multiple objects of the same type are distributed in space. Previous studies have shown that hearing adults who are asked to use only manual gestures to describe how objects move in space will use (...)
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  28.  25
    Philippe Schlenker (2011). Donkey Anaphora: The View From Sign Language (ASL and LSF). [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 34 (4):341-395.
    There are two main approaches to the problem of donkey anaphora (e.g. If John owns a donkey , he beats it ). Proponents of dynamic approaches take the pronoun to be a logical variable, but they revise the semantics of quantifiers so as to allow them to bind variables that are not within their syntactic scope. Older dynamic approaches took this measure to apply solely to existential quantifiers; recent dynamic approaches have extended it to all quantifiers. By contrast, proponents of (...)
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  29.  63
    Guy Bouchard (1983). The Pseudo-Metaphysics of the Sign. Semiotics:447-461.
    The sign is often defined as a thing standing for another, the first one being sensible, and the second, intelligible. Authors like Derrida and Kristeva link this definition to a "métaphysique de la présence". This paper shows that they are quite mistaken, and all the more so when one distinguishes the constitutive and factorial definitions of the sign: "rather than the sign being an index of 'the' Occidental metaphysics, it is the so-called Occidental metaphysics that is an (...)
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  30. Catherine Legg (2006). Review of Anne Freadman. The Machinery of Talk: Charles Peirce and the Sign Hypothesis. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (4):642-645.
    This book, officially a contribution to the subject area of Charles Peirce’s semiotics, deserves a wider readership, including philosophers. Its subject matter is what might be termed the great question of how signification is brought about (what Peirce called the ‘riddle of the Sphinx’, who in Emerson’s poem famously asked, ‘Who taught thee me to name?’), and also Peirce’s answer to the question (what Peirce himself called his ‘guess at the riddle’, and Freadman calls his ‘sign hypothesis’).
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  31. Catherine Legg, What Achilles Did and the Tortoise Wouldn't.
    This paper offers an expressivist account of logical form, arguing that in order to fully understand it one must examine what valid arguments make us do (or: what Achilles does and the Tortoise doesn’t, in Carroll’s famed fable). It introduces Charles Peirce’s distinction between symbols, indices and icons as three different kinds of signification whereby the sign picks out its object by learned convention, by unmediated indication, and by resemblance respectively. It is then argued that logical form is represented (...)
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  32.  4
    David Vinson, Pamela Perniss, Neil Fox & Gabriella Vigliocco (2016). Comprehending Sentences With the Body: Action Compatibility in British Sign Language? Cognitive Science 40 (8).
    Previous studies show that reading sentences about actions leads to specific motor activity associated with actually performing those actions. We investigate how sign language input may modulate motor activation, using British Sign Language sentences, some of which explicitly encode direction of motion, versus written English, where motion is only implied. We find no evidence of action simulation in BSL comprehension, but we find effects of action simulation in comprehension of written English sentences by deaf native BSL signers. These (...)
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  33.  26
    Pamela Perniss, Asli Özyürek & Gary Morgan (2015). The Influence of the Visual Modality on Language Structure and Conventionalization: Insights From Sign Language and Gesture. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (1):2-11.
    For humans, the ability to communicate and use language is instantiated not only in the vocal modality but also in the visual modality. The main examples of this are sign languages and gestures. Sign languages, the natural languages of Deaf communities, use systematic and conventionalized movements of the hands, face, and body for linguistic expression. Co-speech gestures, though non-linguistic, are produced in tight semantic and temporal integration with speech and constitute an integral part of language together with speech. (...)
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  34.  35
    Ivano Caponigro & Kathryn Davidson (2011). Ask, and Tell as Well: Question–Answer Clauses in American Sign Language. Natural Language Semantics 19 (4):323-371.
    A construction is found in American Sign Language that we call a Question–Answer Clause. It is made of two parts: the first part looks like an interrogative clause conveying a question, while the second part resembles a declarative clause answering that question. The very same signer has to sign both, the entire construction is interpreted as truth-conditionally equivalent to a declarative sentence, and it can be uttered only under certain discourse conditions. These and other properties of Question–Answer Clauses (...)
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  35.  15
    Emmanuel Alloa (2010). Bildwissenschaft in Byzanz. Ein iconic turn avant la lettre? Studia Philosophica 69:11-36.
    As Hegel once said, in Byzantium, between homoousis and homoiousis, the difference of one letter could decide over the life and death of thousands. As the present essay would like to argue, Byzantine thinking was not only attentive to conceptual, but also to iconic differences. The iconoclastic controversy arose from two different interpretations of the nature of images: whereas iconoclastic philosophy is based on the assumption of a fundamental ‘iconic identity’, iconophile philosophy defends the idea of ‘iconic (...)
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  36.  19
    Steven M. Rosen (2014). How Can We Signify Being? Semiotics and Topological Self-Signification. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 10 (2):250-277.
    The premise of this paper is that the goal of signifying Being central to ontological phenomenology has been tacitly subverted by the semiotic structure of conventional phenomenological writing. First it is demonstrated that the three components of the signsign-vehicle, object, and interpretant (C. S. Peirce)—bear an external relationship to each other when treated conventionally. This is linked to the abstractness of alphabetic language, which objectifies nature and splits subject and object. It is the subject-object divide that phenomenology must (...)
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  37.  32
    Hannah Anglin-Jaffe (2013). Signs of Resistance: Peer Learning of Sign Languages Within 'Oral' Schools for the Deaf. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (3):261-271.
    This article explores the role of the Deaf child as peer educator. In schools where sign languages were banned, Deaf children became the educators of their Deaf peers in a number of contexts worldwide. This paper analyses how this peer education of sign language worked in context by drawing on two examples from boarding schools for the deaf in Nicaragua and Thailand. The argument is advanced that these practices constituted a child-led oppositional pedagogy. A connection is drawn to (...)
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  38.  47
    Ludovic De Cuypere & Klaas Willems (2008). Meaning and Reference in Aristotle's Concept of the Linguistic Sign. Foundations of Science 13 (3-4):307-324.
    To Aristotle, spoken words are symbols, not of objects in the world, but of our mental experiences related to these objects. Presently there are two major strands of interpretation of Aristotle’s concept of the linguistic sign. First, there is the structuralist account offered by Coseriu (Geschichte der Sprachphilosophie. Von den Anfängen bis Rousseau, 2003 [1969], pp. 65–108) whose interpretation is reminiscent of the Saussurean sign concept. A second interpretation, offered by Lieb (in: Geckeler (Ed.) Logos Semantikos: Studia Linguistica (...)
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  39.  47
    Felicia Kruse (2007). Is Music a Pure Icon? Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (4):626 - 635.
    : In his landmark book, Peirce's Theory of Signs, T. L. Short argues that music signifies as a pure icon. A pure icon, according to Peirce, is not a likeness. It "does not draw any distinction between itself and its object" (EP2:163), and it "serves as a sign solely and simply by exhibiting the quality it serves to signify" (EP2:306). In music, this quality consists of the specifically musical feelings or ideas contained in the piece in question, and such (...)
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  40.  8
    Wan‐chi Wong (2015). The Role of Cultural Sign in Cultivating the Dialogical Self: The Case of The Ox‐Herding Pictures. Anthropology of Consciousness 26 (1):28-59.
    Based on a newly conceptualized notion of the dialogical self, achieved by integrating Bakhtin's philosophical anthropology and Karmiloff-Smith's Representational Redescription model into the existing notion proposed by Hermans and colleagues, the present study focuses on examining the role of The Ox-Herding Pictures in cultivating the dialogical self. Methodologically, this study adopted the cultural-historical perspective and microdevelopmental approach of Vygotsky. In-depth case studies consisting of six interrelated phases of interviews and written responses were conducted. The results show that such a unique (...)
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  41.  30
    Bencie Woll & Jechil S. Sieratzki (1998). Echo Phonology: Signs of a Link Between Gesture and Speech. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):531-532.
    This commentary supports MacNeilage's dismissal of an evolutionary development from sign language to spoken language but presents evidence of a feature in sign language (echo phonology) that links iconic signs to abstract vocal syllables. These data provide an insight into possible mechanism by which iconic manual gestures accompanied by vocalisation could have provided a route for the evolution of spoken language with its characteristically arbitrary form–meaning relationship.
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  42.  4
    Mark A. Sicoli (2014). Ideophones, rhemes, interpretants. Pragmatics and Society 5 (3):445-454.
    This commentary considers the depictive quality of ideophones within the context of a general semiotic. I seek to expand the limited uptake of iconicity in linguistic theory from a resemblance between sign and object along Peirce’s second trichotomy (icon, index, symbol) to discuss iconicity from the often overlooked perspective of Peirce’s third trichotomy (rheme, dicent, argument). I examine ideophones as semiotic rhemes that affect iconic interpretants and suggest this shift in understanding iconicity unites lexical iconicity with depictive processes (...)
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  43.  5
    Vadim Verenich (2012). Charles Sanders Peirce, A Mastermind of (Legal) Arguments. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 25 (1):31-55.
    In this article, we try to trace the relationship between semiotics and theory of legal reasoning using Peirce’s idea that all reasoning must be necessarily in signs: every act of reasoning/argumentation is a sign process, leading to “the growth of knowledge. The broad scope and universal character of Peirce’s sign theory of reasoning allows us to look for new conciliatory paradigms, which must be presented in terms of possible synthesis between the traditional approaches to argumentation. These traditional approaches (...)
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  44.  2
    Derek Pigrum (2014). Deixis and Desire: Transitional Notation and Semiotic Philosophy of Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (4):574-590.
    The philosophical underpinnings of this article are the Peircian notion of the triadic nature of the sign as iconic, linguistic and indexical, and the use of the sign as a ‘Zeug’ or thing as a means of pointing to or deixis in the context of creative activity in the classroom. This involves Lyotard's conception of desire as the generation of a space where the pupil can be affected by what the world donates. Both deixis and desire take (...)
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  45.  16
    Ralph Norman Haber (1983). The Impending Demise of the Icon: A Critique of the Concept of Iconic Storage in Visual Information Processing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (1):1.
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  46.  9
    J. P. Morford, E. Wilkinson, A. Villwock, P. Piñar & J. F. Kroll (2011). When Deaf Signers Read English: Do Written Words Activate Their Sign Translations? Cognition 118 (2):286-292.
  47.  2
    D. J. Mewhort, P. M. Merikle & M. P. Bryden (1969). On the Transfer From Iconic to Short-Term Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (1):89.
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  48.  21
    Mats Bergman (2005). C. S. Peirce’s Dialogical Conception of Sign Processes. Studies in Philosophy and Education 24 (3-4):213-233.
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  49.  8
    K. W. Spence & R. Lippitt (1946). An Experimental Test of the Sign-Gestalt Theory of Trial and Error Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 36 (6):491.
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    Kalevi Kull (2002). A Sign is Not Alive — a Text Is. Sign Systems Studies 30 (1):327-335.
    The article deals with the relationships between the concepts of life process and sign process, arguing against the simplified equation of these concepts. Assuming that organism (and its particular case — cell) is the carrier of what is called ‘life’, we attempt to find a correspondent notion in semiotics that can be equalled to the feature of being alive. A candidate for this is the textual process as a multiple sign action. Considering that biological texts are generally non-linguistic, (...)
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