Search results for 'illocutionary act' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  6
    Adjr Act (forthcoming). 75B of the TP Act (Gleeson CJ, Gummow, Hayne, Heydon, Cren-Nan JJ). Migration-Refugee Status-Fear of" Serious Harm" In VBAO V MIMIA [2006] HCA 60;(14 December 2006) the High Court Concluded That the Reference to the Threat of Serious. [REVIEW] Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology.
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  2.  1
    Trade Practises Act (forthcoming). ACT Administrative Appeals Tribunal Decisions. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology.
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  3. An Act (1983). The Louisiana Creationism Act (1981). In J. Peter Zetterberg (ed.), Evolution Versus Creationism: The Public Education Controversy. Oryx Press 394.
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  4.  71
    Christopher New (1988). Permissions And Illocutionary Act Taxonomy. Analysis 48 (October):209-216.
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  5.  9
    Dorota Rybarkiewicz (2002). Is Metaphor an Illocutionary Act? Bulletin of the Section of Logic 31 (1):47-57.
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  6.  3
    Paul J. Hoven (1988). Legal Argumentation as an Illocutionary Act Complex: A Critical Analysis. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 1 (1):29-45.
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  7. Steven E. Boër (1974). Meaning and Illocutionary Act-Potential. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 55 (4):344.
     
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  8.  6
    Amy Tsui (1987). Aspects of the Classification of Illocutionary Acts and the Notion of the Perlocutionary Act. Semiotica 66 (4):359-378.
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  9. G. Lanemercier (1996). Voice, Identities, Responsibilities, the Role of Illocutionary Scenarios in the Act of Reading. Semiotica 110 (3-4):231-271.
     
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  10.  6
    Mihaela Popa-Wyatt (forthcoming). Compound Figures: Priority and Speech-Act Structure. Philosophical Studies:1-21.
    Compound figures are a rich, and under-explored area for tackling fundamental issues in philosophy of language. This paper explores new ideas about how to explain some features of such figures. We start with an observation from Stern that in ironic-metaphor, metaphor is logically prior to irony in the structure of what is communicated. Call this thesis Logical-MPT. We argue that a speech-act-based explanation of Logical-MPT is to be preferred to a content-based explanation. To create this explanation we draw on Barker’s (...)
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  11. Stephen J. Barker (2007). Semantics Without the Distinction Between Sense and Force. In Savas L. Tsohatzidis (ed.), John Searle's Philosophy of Language: Force, Meaning, and Mind. Cambridge University Press
    At the heart of semantics in the 20th century is Frege’s distinction between sense and force. This is the idea that the content of a self-standing utterance of a sentence S can be divided into two components. One part, the sense, is the proposition that S’s linguistic meaning and context associates with it as its semantic interpretation. The second component is S’s illocutionary force. Illocutionary forces correspond to the three basic kinds of sentential speech acts: assertions, orders, and (...)
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  12.  32
    Maciej Witek (2013). How to Establish Authority with Words: Imperative Utterances and Presupposition Accommodation. In Anna Brożek (ed.), Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science at Warsaw University, Warszawa 2013. 145-157.
    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, it aims at providing an account of an indirect mechanism responsible for establishing one's power to issue biding directive acts; second, it is intended as a case for an externalist account of illocutionary interaction. The mechanism in question is akin to what David Lewis calls presupposition accommodation: a rule-governed process whereby the context of an utterance is adjusted to make the utterance acceptable; the main idea behind the proposed account is that (...)
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  13.  39
    Tomoyuki Yamada (2008). Logical Dynamics of Some Speech Acts That Affect Obligations and Preferences. Synthese 165 (2):295 - 315.
    In this paper, illocutionary acts of commanding will be differentiated from perlocutionary acts that affect preferences of addressees in a new dynamic logic which combines the preference upgrade introduced in DEUL (dynamic epistemic upgrade logic) by van Benthem and Liu with the deontic update introduced in ECL II (eliminative command logic II) by Yamada. The resulting logic will incorporate J. L. Austin’s distinction between illocutionary acts as acts having mere conventional effects and perlocutionary acts as acts having real (...)
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  14. Gila Sher & Cory D. Wright (2007). Truth as a Normative Modality of Cognitive Acts. In Geo Siegwart & Dirk Griemann (eds.), Truth and Speech Acts: Studies in the Philosophy of Language. Routledge 280-306.
    Attention to the conversational role of alethic terms seems to dominate, and even sometimes exhaust, many contemporary analyses of the nature of truth. Yet, because truth plays a role in judgment and assertion regardless of whether alethic terms are expressly used, such analyses cannot be comprehensive or fully adequate. A more general analysis of the nature of truth is therefore required – one which continues to explain the significance of truth independently of the role alethic terms play in discourse. We (...)
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  15.  15
    Jacques Mœschler (1992). The Pragmatic Aspects of Linguistic Negation: Speech Act, Argumentation and Pragmatic Inference. [REVIEW] Argumentation 6 (1):51-76.
    This paper is an attempt to give a general explanation of pragmatic aspects of linguistic negation. After a brief survey of classical accounts of negation within pragmatic theories (as speech act theory, argumentation theory and polyphonic theory), the main pragmatic uses of negation (illocutionary negation, external negation, lowering and majoring negation) are discussed within relevance theory. The question of the relevance of negative utterance is raised, and a general inferential schema (based on the so-called invited inference) is proposed and (...)
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  16. Maciej Witek (2010). Naturalising Illocutionary Rules. In Marcin Miłkowski & Konrad Talmont-Kaminski (eds.), Beyond Description: Naturalism and Normativity. College Publications
    In this paper I consider the concept of an illocutionary rule - i.e., the rule of the form "X counts as 7 in context C" - and examine the role it plays in explaining the nature of verbal communication and the conventionality of natural languages. My aim is to find a middle ground between John R. Searle's view, according to which every conventional speech act has to be explained in terms of illocutionary rules that underlie its performance, and (...)
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  17.  50
    Elisabeth Camp (forthcoming). Why Metaphors Make Good Insults: Perspectives, Presupposition, and Pragmatics. Philosophical Studies:1-18.
    Metaphors are powerful communicative tools because they produce ‘framing effects’. These effects are especially palpable when the metaphor is an insult that denigrates the hearer or someone he cares about. In such cases, just comprehending the metaphor produces a kind of ‘complicity’ that cannot easily be undone by denying the speaker’s claim. Several theorists have taken this to show that metaphors are engaged in a different line of work from ordinary communication. Against this, I argue that metaphorical insults are rhetorically (...)
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  18.  84
    Mari Mikkola (2011). Illocution, Silencing and the Act of Refusal. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 92 (3):415-437.
    Rae Langton and Jennifer Hornsby argue that there may be a free-speech argument against pornography, if pornographic speech has the power to illocutionarily silence women: women's locution ‘No!’ that aims to refuse unwanted sex may misfire because pornography creates communicative conditions where the locution does not count as a refusal. Central to this is the view that women's speech lacks uptake, which is necessary for illocutionary acts like that of refusal. Alexander Bird has critiqued this view by arguing that (...)
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  19.  68
    Mark Siebel (2003). Illocutionary Acts and Attitude Expression. Linguistics and Philosophy 26 (3):351-366.
    In the classic Linguistic Communication and Speech Acts,Kent Bach and Robert M. Harnish advocated the idea that to perform an illocutionary actoften just means to express certain attitudes. The underlying definition of attitudeexpression, however, gives rise to serious problems because it requires intentions of a peculiarkind. Recently, Wayne Davis has proposed a different analysis of attitude expression whichis not subject to these difficulties and thus promises a more plausible account of illocutions.It will be shown, however, that this account is (...)
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  20.  97
    Manuel Garcia-Carpintero (2007). Fiction-Making as a Gricean Illocutionary Type. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (2):203–216.
    There are propositions constituting the content of fictions—sometimes of the utmost importance to understand them—which are not explicitly presented, but must somehow be inferred. This essay deals with what these inferences tell us about the nature of fiction. I will criticize three well-known proposals in the literature: those by David Lewis, Gregory Currie, and Kendall Walton. I advocate a proposal of my own, which I will claim improves on theirs. Most important for my purposes, I will argue on this basis, (...)
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  21.  66
    Vera Peetz (1975). Ifs, Hooks and Illocutionary Acts. Analysis 36 (1):13 - 17.
    "ifs", Apart from counterfactuals, Are considered in the context of illocutionary acts. First, Austin's distinction between normal/causal "ifs" and stipulative "ifs" is amended to: normal/causal "ifs" contrapose within the context of the illocutionary act, Stipulative "ifs" do not. Using this criterion, Normal/causal "ifs" are found only in the contents of austin's classes of verdictives and expositives, And in some behabitives; stipulative "ifs" are found in exercitives and commissives and in some behabitives. But all types of illocutionary act (...)
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  22.  37
    Friedrich Christoph Dörge, Illocutionary Acts : Austin's Account and What Searle Made Out of It.
    As is shown in the introduction of the book, the notion "illocutionary act" is used with quite a number of essentially different meanings; consequently, it is quite unclear what an "illocutionary act" is actually supposed to be. This problem is the starting point of the thesis. An argument is stated, to the effect that the introduction and use of scholarly terms like, for instance, "illocutionary act", or "performative sentence", is not entirely arbitrary. It is argued that technical (...)
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  23.  8
    Edward S. Shirley (1975). The Impossibility of a Speech Act Theory of Meaning. Philosophy and Rhetoric 8 (2):114 - 122.
    I argue that john r searle's speech-Act theory of meaning violates his own requirement that such a theory specify a set of conditions for the performance of a certain illocutionary (speech) act which does not include the performance of any other illocutionary act. For the "propositional act" mentioned in searle's analysans is in actuality an illocutionary act. Then I show that any speech-Act theory must include a subsidiary speech act in the analysans. Since the analysans must not (...)
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  24.  17
    Brian Rosebury (1997). Irrecoverable Intentions and Literary Interpretation. British Journal of Aesthetics 37 (1):15-30.
    The paper explores the relevance of irrecoverable authorial intentions to the interpretation of texts. It suggests that the ways in which different conventions of discourse take account of the existence of irrecoverable intentions (i.e. of the failure of texts perfectly to represent their authors' intentions) can guide us to a criterion for distinguishing 'literary' from 'non-literary' texts, or 'literary'(aesthetically motivated) from 'non-literary' readings of texts.
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  25.  1
    Katya Mandoki (1999). Aesthetics and Pragmatics: Conversion, Constitution and the Dimensions of Illocutionary Acts. Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 7 (2):313-337.
    Illocutionary force may be qualified according to Aristotle's classical triadic distinction of logos as a degree of verity, ethos as a degree of credibility or authority and pathos as eloquence or passional intensity. Jakobson 's model of linguistic functions can be understood as operating performatively with greater advantages to pragmatic theory than Searle and Vanderveken's taxonomy of illocutionary acts. Consequently, these three dimensions can also be found in the aesthetic as in other linguistic functions proposed by Jakobson when (...)
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  26.  89
    Nellie Wieland (2007). Linguistic Authority and Convention in a Speech Act Analysis of Pornography. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (3):435 – 456.
    Recently, several philosophers have recast feminist arguments against pornography in terms of Speech Act Theory. In particular, they have considered the ways in which the illocutionary force of pornographic speech serves to set the conventions of sexual discourse while simultaneously silencing the speech of women, especially during unwanted sexual encounters. Yet, this raises serious questions as to how pornographers could (i) be authorities in the language game of sex, and (ii) set the conventions for sexual discourse - questions which (...)
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  27. Alexander Bird (2002). Illocutionary Silencing. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 83 (1):1–15.
    Rae Langton and Jennifer Hornsby have argued that pornography might create a climate whereby a woman’s ability to refuse sex is literally silenced or removed. Their central argument is that a failure of ‘uptake’ of the woman’s intention means that the illocutionary speech act of refusal has not taken place. In this paper, I challenge the claims from the Austinian philosophy of language which feature in this argument. I argue that uptake is not in general required for illocution, nor (...)
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  28.  21
    Maciej Witek (2015). An Interactional Account of Illocutionary Practice. Language Sciences 47:43-55.
    The paper aims to develop an interactional account of illocutionary practice, which results from integrating elements of Millikan's biological model of language within the framework of Austin's theory of speech acts. The proposed account rests on the assumption that the force of an act depends on what counts as its interactional effect or, in other words, on the response that it conventionally invites or attempts to elicit. The discussion is divided into two parts. The first one reconsiders Austin's and (...)
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  29.  10
    Ray S. Yeo (2014). Scripture's Practical Authority and the Response of Faith From a Speech‐Act Theoretic Perspective. Heythrop Journal 57 (4).
    This paper brings together the work of Nicholas Wolterstorff and William Alston in speech-act theory with the aim of providing a deeper understanding of the nature of divine speaking through the medium of Scripture. Despite the fecundity of Wolterstorff's seminal work on the philosophical theology of Scripture, aspects of his speech-act centric account are underdeveloped and would benefit from the contributions of William Alston. In particular, his account of divine speech-acts could be fruitfully expanded by incorporating the concept of ‘taking (...)
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  30.  20
    John R. Boatright (1977). Central Illocutionary Force and Meaning. Mind 86 (344):574-577.
    In this paper an argument by l j jost against the use of j o urmson's concept of central illocutionary force to support a speech act analysis of meaning is rejected on the grounds that jost misinterprets urmson's concept, but it is further argued that the concept correctly interpreted is still of little use because it provides no way of picking out the word whose meaning it explicates.
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  31.  13
    Antonio Blanco Salgueiro (2008). Cómo Hacer Cosas Malas Con Palabras: Actos Ilocucionarios Hostiles y Los Fundamentos de la Teoría de Los Actos de Habla (How to Do Bad Things with Words: Hostile Speech Acts and the Foundations of Speech Act Theory). Critica 40 (118):3 - 27.
    En el presente artículo se defiende que el estudio de una familia particular de actos de habla, los actos ilocucionarios hostiles, nos da la clave para reexaminar cuatro importantes cuestiones fundacionales de la teoría de los actos de habla: la distinción ilocucionario/perlocucionario, la noción de infortunio, la cuestión de la primacía de la primera sobre la tercera persona en el estudio de la fuerza, y la cuestión de la posibilidad de una teoría general y sistemática del fenómeno de la fuerza. (...)
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  32. Daniel Vanderveken (2007). Speech act theory and universal grammar/Teoria dos atos de fala e gramática universal. Manuscrito 30 (2):357-381.
    Are there universal transcendent features that any natural language must possess in order to provide for its human speakers adequate means of expression and of communication of their conceptual thoughts? As Frege, Austin and Searle pointed out, complete speech acts of the type called illocutionary acts, and not isolated propositions, are the primary units of meaning in the use and comprehension of language. Thus it is in the very performance of illocutionary acts that speakers express and communicate their (...)
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  33. Moritz Cordes & Friedrich Reinmuth, A Speech Act Calculus. A Pragmatised Natural Deduction Calculus and its Meta-Theory.
    Building on the work of Peter Hinst and Geo Siegwart, we develop a pragmatised natural deduction calculus, i.e. a natural deduction calculus that incorporates illocutionary operators at the formal level, and prove its adequacy. In contrast to other linear calculi of natural deduction, derivations in this calculus are sequences of object-language sentences which do not require graphical or other means of commentary in order to keep track of assumptions or to indicate subproofs. (Translation of our German paper "Ein Redehandlungskalkül. (...)
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  34.  6
    Denis Apothéloz, Pierre-Yves Brandt & Gustavo Quiroz (1992). Champ Et Effets de la Négation Argumentative: Contre-Argumentation Et Mise En Cause. [REVIEW] Argumentation 6 (1):99-113.
    An argument can be taken as an operation of justification or as the product of this operation. But what about a counter-argument? This article is based on the hypothesis that there exists an operation of argumentative negation, which is both the argumentative and the negative equivalent of the operation of justification. Justification and argumentative negation necessarily act on assertions, for they are active at the level of the epistemic modalities of statements. As an operation, a counter-argument can thus be described, (...)
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  35.  7
    M. Agnes Rees (1989). Conversation, Relevance, and Argumentation. Argumentation 3 (4):385-393.
    This paper deals with the explanation the maxim of relevance provides for the way utterances in argumentative discourse follow each other in an orderly and coherent fashion. Several senses are distinguished in which utterances can be considered relevant. It is argued that an utterance can be considered relevant as an interactional act, as an illocutionary act, as a propositional act, and as an elocutionary act. These four kinds of relevance manifest the rational organization of discourse, which is aimed at (...)
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  36.  63
    John Searle & Daniel Vanderveken (1985). Foundations of Illocutionary Logic. Cambridge University Press.
    This is a formal and systematic study of the logical foundations of speech act theory.
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  37.  1
    David Holdcroft (1978). Words and Deeds. Oxford University Press.
    The book presents a theory of illocutionary acts. It argues that the study of speech acts initiatied by Austin complements the truth theoretic approach to speaker meaning. It is shown that there are aspects of speaker meaning which cannot be explained by truth theoretic approaches. Though the nature of a speech act is partially determined by the semantic type of the the sentence uttered the speaker's intention and context of utterance are important also.
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  38.  50
    Aaron Sloman (1969). Transformations of Illocutionary Acts. Analysis 30 (2):56 - 59.
    Speech-Act analyses of words like 'good', 'true', 'know' and 'probable' were criticised by j.R. Searle in "speech acts". I have tried to show how his criticisms can be met by an analysis in terms of operators on speech acts which 'transform' them into other speech-Acts. I conclude, Not that speech-Act analyses are correct, But that they survive searle's criticism.
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  39.  16
    Maciej Witek (2015). Linguistic Underdeterminacy: A View From Speech Act Theory. Journal of Pragmatics 76:15-29.
    The aim of this paper is to reformulate the Linguistic Underdeterminacy Thesis by making use of Austin’s theory of speech acts. Viewed from the post-Gricean perspective, linguistic underdeterminacy consists in there being a gap between the encoded meaning of a sentence uttered by a speaker and the proposition that she communicates. According to the Austinian model offered in this paper, linguistic underdeterminacy should be analysed in terms of semantic and force potentials conventionally associated with the lexical and syntactic properties of (...)
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  40.  34
    Claudia Bianchi (2013). How to Do Things with (Recorded) Words. Philosophical Studies 167 (2):485-495.
    The aim of this paper is to evaluate which context determines the illocutionary force of written or recorded utterances—those involved in written texts, films and images, conceived as recordings that can be seen or heard in different occasions. More precisely, my paper deals with the “metaphysical” or constitutive role of context—as opposed to its epistemic or evidential role: my goal is to determine which context is semantically relevant in order to fix the illocutionary force of a speech act, (...)
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  41.  16
    James M. Arcadi (2013). A Theory of Consecration: A Philosophical Exposition of A Biblical Phenomenon. Heythrop Journal 54 (6):913-925.
    I employ William Alston’s account of speech act theory in order to analyze the concept of consecration. I describe consecrations as EXERCITIVE-type illocutionary acts, whereby objects are distinguished for God’s use. I test my reasoning and definition on the first instance of consecration in Scripture, the consecration of the Sabbath. This allows me to probe further the necessary and sufficient conditions for veridical consecrations. Finally, I describe that the speech act of consecration brings about an ownership relation between God (...)
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  42.  28
    Andreas Dorschel (1989). What is It to Understand a Directive Speech Act? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 67 (3):319 – 340.
    In this paper I want to examine the concept of 'conditions of fulfilment' or 'compliance' or 'satisfaction' which have been introduced by some authors in order to provide analyses of meaning which are just as adequate to directive speech acts as truth-conditional semantics are (claimed to be) adequate to assertive speech acts. It will be argued that this aim is missed. Most analyses (except those of some primitive cases) will remain throughout imcomplete as long as they are not supplemented by (...)
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  43.  7
    Daniel Vanderveken (forthcoming). Speech Act Theory and Universal Grammar. Manuscrito.
    I will argue that the logical form of illocutionary acts imposes certain formal constraints on the logical structure of a possible natural language as well as on the mind of competent speakers. In particular, certain syntactic, semantic and pragmatic features are universal because they are indispensable. Moreover, in order to perform and understand illocutionary acts, competent speakers and hearers must have certain mental states and abilities which are in general traditionally related to the faculty of reason. (edited).
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  44.  3
    F. B. A. Asiedu (2001). Illocutionary Acts and the Uncanny: On Nicholas Wolterstorff's Idea of Divine Discourse. Heythrop Journal 42 (3):283–310.
    Nicholas Wolterstorff's Divine Discourse attempts to give philosophical warrant to the claim that ‘God speaks’. While Wolterstorff's argument depends largely on his appropriation of J.L. Austin's speech act theory, he also uses two narratives that for him demonstrate how ‘God speaks’. The first is the story of Augustine's conversion in the Confessions and the second is a story that Wolterstorff recounts about a certain ‘Virginia’. This study argues that what Wolterstorff claims to derive from Augustine's narrative for his view of (...)
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  45. Michael Gorman (2006). Inspired Authors and Their Speech Acts. Nova Et Vetera 4:747-760.
    Employs speech-act theory (a) to support the notion that biblical authors (not just their texts) are inspired and to (b) to make some points about how we ought to react to scripture—in a nutshell, scriptural passages vary in their illocutionary force, so appropriate responses will vary as well.
     
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  46.  20
    Muffy E. A. Siegel (2006). Biscuit Conditionals: Quantification Over Potential Literal Acts. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 29 (2):167 - 203.
    In biscuit conditionals (BCs) such as If you’re hungry, there’s pizza in the fridge, the if clause appears to apply to the illocutionary act performed in uttering the main clause, rather than to its propositional content. Accordingly, previous analyses of BCs have focused on illocutionary acts, and, this, I argue, leads them to yield incorrect paraphrases. I propose, instead, that BCs involve existential quantification over potential literal acts such as assertions, questions, commands, and exclamations, the semantic objects associated (...)
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  47. Edward Hinchman (2005). Advising as Inviting to Trust. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 35 (3):355-386.
    How can you give your interlocutor a reason to act? One way is by manipulating his deliberative context through threats, flattery, or other incentives. Another is by addressing him in the way distinctive of reasoning with him. I aim to account for the possibility of this non-manipulative form of address by showing how it is realized through the performance of a specific illocutionary act, that of advising as inviting to trust. I argue that exercise of a capacity for reasonable (...)
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  48.  96
    Max Kölbel (1997). Expressivism and the Syntactic Uniformity of Declarative Sentences. Critica 29 (87):3–51.
    Expressivism is most widely known as a thesis that semantically complements non-cognitivism in meta-ethics: if there are no moral facts to be known, if moral judgements or statements are not capable of being true or false, then the meaning of morally evaluative sentences cannot centrally consist in their having a truth conditional content, expressing a truth-evaluable proposition. But since the truth conditional approach to meaning is widely accepted, non-cognitivists are called upon to offer an alternative theory of meaning for moral (...)
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  49.  29
    Kevin Dorst (2014). Can the Knowledge Norm Co‐Opt the Opt Out? Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 3 (4):273-282.
    The Knowledge Norm of Assertion claims that it is proper to assert that p only if one knows that p. Though supported by a wide range of evidence, it appears to generate incorrect verdicts when applied to utterances of “I don't know.” Instead of being an objection to KNA, I argue that this linguistic data shows that “I don't know” does not standardly function as a literal assertion about one's epistemic status; rather, it is an indirect speech act that has (...)
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  50.  38
    Friederike Moltmann (forthcoming). Cognitive Products and the Semantics of Attitude Verbs and Deontic Modals. In Friederike Moltmann & Mark Textor (eds.), Act-Based Conceptions of Propositional Content. Contemporary and Historical Perspectives. Oxford University Press
    This paper outlines a semantic account of attitude reports and deontic modals based on cognitive and illocutionary products, mental states, and modal products, as opposed to the notion of an abstract proposition or a cognitive act.
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