Search results for 'images' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. P. Kyle Stanford (2012). The Eyes Don’T Have It: Fracturing the Scientific and Manifest Images. Humana.Mente 21:19-44.score: 24.0
    Wilfrid Sellars famously argued that we find ourselves simultaneously presented with the scientific and manifest images and that the primary aim of philosophy is to reconcile the competing conceptions of ourselves and our place in the world they offer. I first argue that Sellars’ own attempts at such a reconciliation must be judged a failure. I then go on to point out that Sellars has invited us to join him in idealizing and constructing the manifest and scientific images (...)
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  2. Megan Delehanty (2010). Why Images? Medicine Studies 2 (3):161-173.score: 24.0
    Given that many imaging technologies in biology and medicine are non-optical and generate data that is essentially numerical, it is a striking feature of these technologies that the data generated using them are most frequently displayed in the form of semi-naturalistic, photograph-like images. In this paper, I claim that three factors underlie this: (1) historical preferences, (2) the rhetorical power of images, and (3) the cognitive accessibility of data presented in the form of images. The third of (...)
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  3. Steven F. Savitt (2012). Of Time and the Two Images. Humana.Mente - Journal of Philosophical Studies 21.score: 24.0
    In this paper I argue that the clash of the Sellars’ two images is particularly acute in the case of time. In Time and the World Order Sellars seems embarked on a quest to locate manifest time in Minkowski spacetime. I suggest that he should have argued for the replacement of manifest time with the local, path-dependent time of the “scientific image”, just as he suggests that manifest objects must be replaced by their scientific counterparts.
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  4. Earl W. Spurgin (2003). What's Wrong with Computer-Generated Images of Perfection in Advertising? Journal of Business Ethics 45 (3):257 - 268.score: 24.0
    Advertisers often use computers to create fantastic images. Generally, these are perfectly harmless images that are used for comic or dramatic effect. Sometimes, however, they are problematic human images that I call computer-generated images of perfection. Advertisers create these images by using computer technology to remove unwanted traits from models or to generate entire human bodies. They are images that portray ideal human beauty, bodies, or looks. In this paper, I argue that the use (...)
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  5. David Hodgson (2012). Identifying and Reconciling Two Images of “Man”. Humana.Mente - Journal of Philosophical Studies 21.score: 24.0
    Fifty years ago the philosopher Wilfred Sellars identified two images of “man”, which he called respectively the “manifest image” and the “scientific image”; and he considered whether and how these two images could be reconciled. In this paper, I will very briefly look at the distinction drawn by Sellars and at his suggestions for reconciliation of these images. I will suggest that a broad distinction as suggested by Sellars can indeed usefully be drawn, but that the distinction (...)
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  6. Axel Arturo Barceló Aspeitia (2012). Words and Images in Argumentation. Argumentation 26 (3):355-368.score: 24.0
    In this essay, I will argue that images can play a substantial role in argumentation: exploiting information from the context, they can contribute directly and substantially to the communication of the propositions that play the roles of premises and conclusion. Furthermore, they can achieve this directly, i.e. without the need of verbalization. I will ground this claim by presenting and analyzing some arguments where images are essential to the argumentation process.
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  7. Jay L. Garfield (2012). Sellarsian Synopsis: Integrating the Images. Humana.Mente - Journal of Philosophical Studies 21.score: 24.0
    Most discussion of Sellars’ deployment of the distinct images of “man-in-the-world” in "Philosophy and the Scientific Image of Man" focus entirely on the manifest and the scientific images. But the original image is important as well. In this essay I explore the importance of the original image to the Sellarsian project of naturalizing epistemology, connecting Sellars’ insights regarding this image to recent work in cognitive development.
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  8. Sonia Meyers (2010). Invisible Waves of Technology: Ultrasound and the Making of Fetal Images. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 2 (3):197-209.score: 24.0
    Since the introduction of ultrasound technology in the 1960s as a tool to visibly articulate the interiors of the pregnant body, feminist scholars across disciplines have provided extensive critique regarding the visual culture of fetal imagery. Central to this discourse is the position that fetal images occupy- as products of a visualizing technology that at once penetrates and severs pregnant and fetal bodies. This visual excision, feminist scholars describe, has led not only to an erasure of the female body (...)
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  9. Zhaohui Bao (2010). The Advantages, Shortcomings, and Existential Issues of Zhuangzi's Use of Images. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (2):196-211.score: 24.0
    Zhuangzi is considered a creative poet-philosopher because of his use of imaginative images. He used the imaginative images of his system to construct the world of the Dao. He left the essence of material things as they are to speak for the mystery of existence itself, and let them express both the state of and the dream for human freedom. Zhuangzi’s way of using images shows his own lack of the understanding about images, and his lack (...)
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  10. Andreea Smaranda Aldea (2013). Husserl's Struggle with Mental Images: Imaging and Imagining Reconsidered. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 46 (3):371-394.score: 24.0
    Husserl’s extensive analyses of image consciousness (Bildbewusstsein) and of the imagination (Phantasie) offer insightful and detailed structural explications. However, despite this careful work, Husserl’s discussions fail to overcome the need to rely on a most problematic concept: mental images. The epistemological conundrums triggered by the conceptual framework of mental images are well known—we have only to remember the questions regarding knowledge acquisition that plagued British empiricism. Beyond these problems, however, a plethora of important questions arise from claiming that (...)
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  11. David H. Fleming (2013). Charcoal Matter with Memory: Images of Movement, Time and Duration in the Animated Films of William Kentridge. Film-Philosophy 17 (1):402-423.score: 24.0
    In his temporal philosophy based on the writing of Henri Bergson, Gilles Deleuze describes duration ( durée ) as a becoming that endures in time. Reifications of this complex philosophical concept become artistically expressed, I argue, in the form and content of South African artist William Kentridge's series of 'charcoal drawings for projection.' These exhibited art works provide intriguing and illuminating 'philosophical' examples of animated audio-visual media, which expressively plicate distinct images of movement and time. The composition of Kentridge's (...)
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  12. Anita Strezova (2013). Overview on Iconophile and Iconoclastic Attitudes Toward Images in Early Christianity and Late Antiquity. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 12 (36):228-258.score: 24.0
    This study offers an overview of the opposing attitudes towards the image worship in the Early Christianity and the Late Antiquity. It shows that a dichotomy between creation and veneration of images on one side and iconoclastic tendencies on the other side persisted in the Christian tradition throughout the first seven centuries. While the representations of holy figures and holy events increased in number throughout theByzantine Empire, they led to a puritanical reaction by those who saw the practice of (...)
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  13. Kristine F. Hoover, Deborah A. O.’Neil & Michael Poutiatine (2014). Gender and Leadership: A Frame Analysis of University Home Web Page Images. Journal of Academic Ethics 12 (1):15-27.score: 24.0
    With calls for (business) leaders to contribute to greater global fairness and social justice (BAWB 2006; Maak and Pless Journal of Business Ethics, 88, 537–550, 2009), this paper considers gender equality on University home web page images as one means of communicating equal access to leadership roles for both men and women. Although there are many paths for leadership development, one important purpose of Universities is to create people who will potentially become leaders in our society (Shapiro 2005). We (...)
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  14. Jean Lorenceau Stéphane Buffat, Justin Plantier, Corinne Roumes (2012). Repetition Blindness for Natural Images of Objects with Viewpoint Changes. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    When stimuli are repeated in a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP), observers sometimes fail to report the second occurrence of a target. This phenomenon is referred to as “repetition blindness” (RB). We report an RSVP experiment with photographs in which we manipulated object viewpoints between the first and second occurrences of a target (0-, 45-, or 90-degree changes), and spatial frequency content. Natural images were spatially filtered to produce low, medium, or high spatial-frequency stimuli. RB was observed for all (...)
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  15. Léo Varnet, Kenneth Knoblauch, Fanny Meunier & Michel Hoen (2013). Using Auditory Classification Images for the Identification of Fine Acoustic Cues Used in Speech Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:865.score: 24.0
    An essential step in understanding the processes underlying the general mechanism of perceptual categorization is to identify which portions of a physical stimulation modulate the behavior of our perceptual system. More specifically, in the context of speech comprehension, it is still a major open challenge to understand which information is used to categorize a speech stimulus as one phoneme or another, the auditory primitives relevant for the categorical perception of speech being still unknown. Here we propose to adapt technique relying (...)
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  16. Letitia Meynell (2013). Parsing Pictures: On Analyzing the Content of Images in Science. The Knowledge Engineering Review 28 (3): 327-345.score: 24.0
    In this paper I tackle the question of what basic form an analytical method for articulating and ultimately assessing visual representations should take. I start from the assumption that scientific images, being less prone to interpretive complication than artworks, are ideal objects from which to engage this question. I then assess a recent application of Nelson Goodman's aesthetics to the project of parsing scientific images, Laura Perini's ‘The truth in pictures’. I argue that, although her project is an (...)
     
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  17. Rudolf Arnheim (1994). Consciousness: An Island of Images. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 14 (2):121-27.score: 21.0
  18. Christoph Lüthy & Alexis Smets (2009). Words, Lines, Diagrams, Images: Towards a History of Scientific Imagery. Early Science and Medicine 14 (1):398-439.score: 21.0
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  19. Tamara Melmer, Seyed A. Amirshahi, Michael Koch, Joachim Denzler & Christoph Redies (2013). From Regular Text to Artistic Writing and Artworks: Fourier Statistics of Images with Low and High Aesthetic Appeal. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 21.0
  20. Judith Keilbach (2009). Photographs, Symbolic Images, and the Holocaust: On the (Im)Possibility of Depicting Historical Truth. History and Theory 48 (2):54-76.score: 21.0
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  21. Henryk Misiak & Carl C. Lozito (1951). Latency and Duration of Monocular and Binocular After-Images. Journal of Experimental Psychology 42 (4):247.score: 21.0
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  22. C. Taylor (1944). Studies in Color Blindness: I. Negative After-Images. Journal of Experimental Psychology 34 (4):317.score: 21.0
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  23. B. R. Bugelski (1968). Images as Mediators in One-Trial Paired-Associate Learning: II. Self-Timing in Successive Lists. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (2):328.score: 21.0
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  24. Russell B. Johnson (1970). Images as Mediators in Free Recall. Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (3):523.score: 21.0
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  25. D. A. Laird (1921). Apparatus for the Study of Visual After-Images. Journal of Experimental Psychology 4 (3):218.score: 21.0
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  26. Dominic W. Massaro (1970). Preperceptual Auditory Images. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (3):411.score: 21.0
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  27. S. M. Newhall & R. Dodge (1927). Colored After-Images From Unperceived Weak Chromatic Stimulation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 10 (1):1.score: 21.0
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  28. Cristina Gavriluta (2010). Expresii şi reprezentări sociale ale femininului în practicile divinatorii/ Social Images and Representations of the Feminine in Divination Practices. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 5 (14):74-82.score: 21.0
    The purpose of this text is to analyze the social representations of feminism in divinatory practices. Our research in a few Moldavian counties has identified two main types of social representations of the relationship between magic/divination and feminism. Therefore, there are some dual representations of the feminine divinatory agents versus the masculine ones. Even though women are well represented among clairvoyants, clients, and spectators, these valorizations function as negative stereotypes and do not serve the women. Another representation of feminism in (...)
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  29. F. W. Hibler (1940). An Experimental Investigation of Negative After-Images of Hallucinated Colors in Hypnosis. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (1):45.score: 21.0
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  30. C. Leuba (1940). Images as Conditioned Sensations. Journal of Experimental Psychology 26 (3):345.score: 21.0
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  31. Dominic W. Massaro (1971). Effect of Masking Tone Duration on Preperceptual Auditory Images. Journal of Experimental Psychology 87 (1):146.score: 21.0
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  32. Gary W. Nappe & Keith A. Wollen (1973). Effects of Instructions to Form Common and Bizarre Mental Images on Retention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 100 (1):6.score: 21.0
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  33. Bao Zhaohui (2010). The Advantages, Shortcomings, and Existential Issues of Zhuangzi's Use of Images. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (2):196-211.score: 21.0
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  34. Willem deVries (2012). Ontology and the Completeness of Sellars’s Two Images. Humana.Mente - Journal of Philosophical Studies 21:1-18.score: 20.0
    Sellars claims completeness for both the “manifest” and the “scientific images” in a way that tempts one to assume that they are independent of each other, while, in fact, they must share at least one common element: the language of individual and community intentions. I argue that this significantly muddies the waters concerning his claim of ontological primacy for the scientific image, though not in favor of the ontological primacy of the manifest image. The lesson I draw is that (...)
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  35. James Elkins (2008). Six Stories From the End of Representation: Images in Painting, Photography, Astronomy, Microscopy, Particle Physics, and Quantum Mechanics, 1980-2000. Stanford University Press.score: 20.0
    James Elkins has shaped the discussion about how we—as artists, as art historians, or as outsiders—view art. He has not only revolutionized our thinking about the purpose of teaching art, but has also blazed trails in creating a means of communication between scientists, artists, and humanities scholars. In Six Stories from the End of Representation , Elkins weaves stories about recent images from painting, photography, physics, astrophysics, and microscopy. These images, regardless of origin, all fail as representations: they (...)
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  36. Liliana Albertazzi (2009). Images, Spaces, Representations. Axiomathes 19 (1):103-111.score: 20.0
    The contribution deals with some key problems of cognitive science, whose plurality transcends the boundaries of the disciplines drawn by classical epistemology. In particular, it addresses the issues of mental images, spaces of representation, and the architecture of cognitive processes in vision theory. The thesis presented is that a proper treatment of vision within psychophysics entails an analysis of a series of interconnected spaces, objects and methodologies, from psychophysics to the many virtual realities of representation.
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  37. Eduard Marbach (1984). On Using Intentionality in Empirical Phenomenology: The Problem of 'Mental Images'. Dialectica 38 (2‐3):209-230.score: 20.0
    The theory of so-called‘mental images’, which is put forward again in contemporary cognitive psychology, is criticized by way of elaborating the distinctly different intentional structures of the mental activities of‘remembering something’and‘representing something pictorially’(by means of a painting, photo, sculpture, etc.) It is suggested that psychology in its concept and theory formation could use profitably phenomenological-descriptive analyses of the different forms of intentionality as exemplified in the paper.
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  38. Robert N. Audi (1978). The Ontological Status of Mental Images. Inquiry 21 (1-4):348-61.score: 20.0
    This paper explores the question whether an adequate account of the facts about imagination and mental imagery must construe mental images as objects. Much of the paper is a study of Alastair Hannay's defense of an affirmative answer in his wide?ranging study, Mental Images ? A Defence. The paper first sets out and evaluates Hannay's case. The second part develops an alternative account of mental images, including non?visual images, which Hannay does not treat in detail. The (...)
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  39. Adrian Ratkic (2013). Images of Reflection: On the Meanings of the Word Reflection in Different Learning Contexts. [REVIEW] AI and Society 28 (3):339-349.score: 20.0
    Reflection is today a watchword in many learning contexts. Experience is said to be transformed to knowledge when we reflect on it, university students are expected to acquire the ability to reflect critically, and we want practitioners to be reflective practitioners in order to improve their professional practice. If we consider what people mean when they talk about reflection in practice, we will discover that they often mean different things. Moreover, their conceptions of reflection are guided by images rather (...)
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  40. Douglas Cromey (2010). Avoiding Twisted Pixels: Ethical Guidelines for the Appropriate Use and Manipulation of Scientific Digital Images. Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (4):639-667.score: 20.0
    Digital imaging has provided scientists with new opportunities to acquire and manipulate data using techniques that were difficult or impossible to employ in the past. Because digital images are easier to manipulate than film images, new problems have emerged. One growing concern in the scientific community is that digital images are not being handled with sufficient care. The problem is twofold: (1) the very small, yet troubling, number of intentional falsifications that have been identified, and (2) the (...)
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  41. Barbara Maria Stafford (2007). Echo Objects: The Cognitive Work of Images. University of Chicago Press.score: 20.0
    Barbara Stafford is at the forefront of a growing movement that calls for the humanities to confront the brain’s material realities. In Echo Objects she argues that humanists should seize upon the exciting neuroscientific discoveries that are illuminating the underpinnings of cultural objects. In turn, she contends, brain scientists could enrich their investigations of mental activity by incorporating phenomenological considerations—particularly the intricate ways that images focus intentional behavior and allow us to feel thought. This, then, is a book for (...)
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  42. Lilly-Marlene Russow (1980). Audi on Mental Images. Inquiry 23 (September):353-356.score: 20.0
    In an article entitled ?The Ontological Status of Mental Images?, Robert Audi rejects the view presented in Hannay's Mental Images: A Defence, and proposes ?the property account of imaging? as an alternative. Some of the strengths and weaknesses of Audi's proposal are discussed, and a more detailed and specific version of the property account offered; it is suggested that imaging ? should be described as entertaining the thought that if one were looking at (or smelling, touching, hearing, etc.) (...)
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  43. Julia Braun, Seyed Ali Amirshahi, Joachim Denzler & Christoph Redies (2013). Statistical Image Properties of Print Advertisements, Visual Artworks and Images of Architecture. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 20.0
    Most visual advertisements are designed to attract attention, often by inducing a pleasant impression in human observers. Accordingly, results from brain imaging studies show that advertisements can activate the brain’s reward circuitry, which is also involved in the perception of other visually pleasing images, such as artworks. At the image level, large subsets of artworks are characterized by specific statistical image properties, such as a high self-similarity and intermediate complexity. Moreover, some image properties are distributed uniformly across orientations in (...)
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  44. Christoph Palm, Markus Axer, David Gräßel, Jürgen Dammers, Johannes Lindemeyer, Karl Zilles, Uwe Pietrzyk & Katrin Amunts (2010). Towards Ultra-High Resolution Fibre Tract Mapping of the Human Brain - Registration of Polarised Light Images and Reorientation of Fibre Vectors. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4:9.score: 20.0
    Polarised Light Imaging (PLI) utilises the birefringence of the myelin sheaths in order to visualise the orientation of nerve fibres in microtome sections of adult human post-mortem brains at ultra-high spatial resolution. The preparation of post-mortem brains for PLI involves fixation, freezing and cutting into 100-micrometer thick sections. Hence, geometrical distortions of histological sections are inevitable and have to be removed for 3D reconstruction and subsequent fibre tracking. We here present a processing pipeline for 3D reconstruction of these sections using (...)
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  45. Chyong-Ling Lin & Jin-Tsann Yeh (2009). Comparing Society's Awareness of Women: Media-Portrayed Idealized Images and Physical Attractiveness. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (1):61 - 79.score: 18.0
    An advertiser develops visual associations of signs and symbols to create a product image that motivates consumers. Today is characterized by a solid consumer culture based on visual identity consumption that articulates and interacts with each consumer's daily actions, words, and visual perceptions. The frequent use of female role portrayals and physical attractiveness in advertising contributes to an increase in society's awareness of women. Some scholars have developed an ethical discussion out of the phenomenon of female role portrayals not matching (...)
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  46. Maneesha Deckha (2008). Disturbing Images: Peta and the Feminist Ethics of Animal Advocacy. Ethics and the Environment 13 (2):pp. 35-76.score: 18.0
    The author applies a feminist analysis to animal advocacy initiatives in which gendered and racialized representations of female sexuality are paramount. Feminists have criticized animal advocates for opposing the oppression of nonhuman animals through media images that perpetuate female objectification. These critiques are considered through a close examination of two prominent campaigns by PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals). The author argues that some representations of female sexuality may align with a posthumanist feminist ethic and need not (...)
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  47. John Kulvicki (2010). Knowing with Images: Medium and Message. Philosophy of Science 77 (2):295-313.score: 18.0
    Problems concerning scientists’ uses of representations have received quite a bit of attention recently. The focus has been on how such representations get their contents and on just what those contents are. Less attention has been paid to what makes certain kinds of scientific representations different from one another and thus well suited to this or that epistemic end. This article considers the latter question with particular focus on the distinction between images and graphs on the one hand and (...)
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  48. Daniel C. Dennett (2002). Does Your Brain Use the Images in It, and If so, How? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):189-190.score: 18.0
    The presence of spatial patterns of activity in the brain is suggestive of image-exploiting processes in vision and mental imagery, but not conclusive. Only behavioral evidence can confirm or disconfirm hypotheses about whether, and how, the brain uses images in its information-processing, and the arguments based on such evidence are still inconclusive.
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  49. David Berman & W. Lyons (2007). The First Modern Battle for Consciousness: J.B. Watson's Rejection of Mental Images. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (11):4-26.score: 18.0
    This essay investigates the influences that led J.B. Watson to change from being a student in an introspectionist laboratory at Chicago to being the founder of systematic (or radical) behaviourism. Our focus is the crucial period, 1913-1914, when Watson struggled to give a convincing behaviourist account of mental imaging, which he considered to be the greatest obstacle to his behaviourist programme. We discuss in detail the evidence for and against the view that, at least eventually, Watson rejected outright the very (...)
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  50. David Cole, Images and Thinking: Critique of Arguments Against Images as a Medium of Thought.score: 18.0
    The Way of Ideas died an ignoble death, committed to the flames by behaviorist empiricists. Ideas, pictures in the head, perished with the Way. By the time those empiricists were supplanted at the helm by functionalists and causal theorists, a revolution had taken place in linguistics and the last thing anyone wanted to do was revive images as the medium of thought. Currently, some but not all cognitive scientists think that there probably are mental images - experiments in (...)
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