Search results for 'immigration' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Proper Immigration (1998). Immigration Into Afree Society. Journal of Libertarian Studies 13 (2):199-204.score: 180.0
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  2. Bas van der Vossen (forthcoming). Immigration and Self-Determination. Politics, Philosophy and Economics:1470594-14533167.score: 24.0
    This article asks whether states have a right to close their borders because of their right to self- determination, as proposed recently by Christopher Wellman, Michael Walzer, and others. It asks the fundamental question whether self-determination can, in even its most unrestricted form, support the exclusion of immigrants. I argue that the answer is no. To show this, I construct three different ways in which one might use the idea of self-determination to justify immigration restrictions, and show that each (...)
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  3. Mason Richey (2010). Towards a Non-Positivist Approach to Cosmopolitan Immigration: A Critique of the Inclusion/Exclusion Dialectic and an Analysis of Selected European Immigration Policies. Journal of International and Area Studies 17 (1):55-74.score: 24.0
    This interdisciplinary paper identifies principles of an affluent country (im)migration policy that avoids: (1) the positivist inclusion/exclusion mechanism of liberalism and communitarianism; and (2) the idealism of most cosmopolitan (im)migration theories. First, I: (a) critique the failure of liberalism and communitarianism to consider (im)migration under distributive justice; and (b) present cosmopolitan (im)migration approaches as a promising alternative. This paper’s central claim is that cosmopolitan (im)migration theory can determine normative shortcomings in (im)migration policy by coupling elements of Frankfurt School methodology to (...)
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  4. John Exdell (2009). Immigration, Nationalism, and Human Rights. Metaphilosophy 40 (1):131-146.score: 24.0
    Abstract: Michael Walzer and David Miller defend the authority of democratic states to determine who will be allowed entry and membership. In support of this view they have claimed that the domestic solidarity necessary for social justice is threatened by the unregulated influx of outsiders. This empirical thesis proves to be false when applied to the United States, where heavy Latino and Latina immigration is more likely to increase civic solidarity than to diminish it. Seen in this light, the (...)
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  5. Sir Michael Dummett (2004). Immigration. Res Publica 10 (2):115-122.score: 24.0
    It is not a fundamental human right to live wherever one would most like to be. We have to ask when a state should admit people not its citizens wishing to enter and settle within its territory. To exclude someone from entry to a country where he wishes to settle infringes his liberty. When anybody's liberty is infringed or curtailed the onus of proof lies upon those who claim a right to infringe or curtail it, other things being equal. This (...)
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  6. Kieran Oberman (2011). Immigration, Global Poverty and the Right to Stay. Political Studies 59 (2):253-268.score: 24.0
    This article questions the use of immigration as a tool to counter global poverty. It argues that poor people have a human right to stay in their home state, which entitles them to receive development assistance without the necessity of migrating abroad. The article thus rejects a popular view in the philosophical literature on immigration which holds that rich states are free to choose between assisting poor people in their home states and admitting them as immigrants when fulfilling (...)
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  7. Ian Davies (2009). Latino Immigration and Social Change in the United States: Toward an Ethical Immigration Policy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (2):377 - 391.score: 24.0
    Approximately 47 million Latinos currently live in the United States, and nearly 25 percent of them are undocumented. The USA is a very different country from just a generation ago – culturally, socially, and demographically. Its presumed core values have been transformed largely by the changes wrought by immigration and ethnicity. A multicultural society has, in 2008, elected a multicultural president. This article examines immigration discourse, framed in terms of fear and security, and the evolution of the US (...)
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  8. Peter Higgins (2008). Open Borders and the Right to Immigration. Human Rights Review 9 (4):525-535.score: 24.0
    This paper argues that the relevant unit of analysis for assessing the justice of an immigration policy is the socially-situated individual (as opposed to the individual simpliciter or the nation-state, for example). This methodological principle is demonstrated indirectly by showing how some liberal, cosmopolitan defenses of "open borders" and the alleged right of immigration fail by their own standards, owing to the implicit adoption of an inappropriate unit of analysis.
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  9. Chaim Gans (1998). Nationalism and Immigration. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1 (2):159-180.score: 24.0
    Can states' immigration policies favor groups with whom they are culturally and historically tied? I shall answer this question here positively, but in a qualified manner. My arguments in support of this answer will be of distributive justice, presupposing a globalist rather than a localist approach to justice. They will be based on a version of liberal nationalism according to which individuals can have fundamental interests in their national culture, interests which are rooted in freedom, identity, and especially in (...)
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  10. Nicolas Maloberti (2011). Government by Choice: Classical Liberalism and the Moral Status of Immigration Barriers. The Independent Review 15 (4):540-561.score: 24.0
    Could we plausibly believe in the fundamental tenets of classical liberalism and, at the same time, support the state’s raising of immigration barriers? The thesis of this paper is that if we accept the main tenets of classical liberalism as essentially correct, we should regard immigration barriers as essentially illegitimate. Considered under ideal conditions, immigration barriers constitute an unjustified infringement on individuals’ ownership rights, since it is difficult to identify a purpose that such an infringement could have (...)
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  11. José Jorge Mendoza (2011). The Political Philosophy of Unauthorized Immigration. APA Newsletter on Hispanic/Latino Issues in Philosophy 10 (2):2-6.score: 24.0
    In this article, I broadly sketch out the current philosophical debate over immigration and highlight some of its shortcomings. My contention is that the debate has been too focused on border enforcement and therefore has left untouched one of the more central issue of this debate: what to do with unauthorized immigrants who have already crossed the border and with the “push and pull” factors that have created this situation. After making this point, I turn to the work of (...)
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  12. Yusuf Yuksekdag (2012). Moral Cosmopolitanism and the Right to Immigration. Public Reason 4 (1-2):262-272.score: 24.0
    This study is devoted to the ways and means to justify a ‘more’ cosmopolitan realization of certain policy implications, in the case of immigration. The raison d’être of this study is the idea that the contemporary debate over open borders suffers from indeterminate discussions on whether liberal states are entitled to restrict immigration. On the other hand, most of the liberal cosmopolitan accounts neglect the detrimental consequences of their open borders argument – which take it as a means (...)
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  13. José Jorge Mendoza (2012). Immigration: The Missing Requirement for an Ethics of Race. Radical Philosophy Review 15 (2):359-364.score: 24.0
    In her book, The Ethics and Mores of Race, Naomi Zack offers her readers a critical and historical examination of philosophical ethics. This comprehensive and illuminating examination of philosophical ethics concludes by yielding twelve requirements for an ethics of race. While these twelve requirements are not in-themselves an ethics of race, the hope is that these requirements will be sufficient to finally allow us to explicitly engage in ethical treatments of race. My view is that Zack’s argument is basically on (...)
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  14. Matthew J. Lister (2007). A Rawlsian Argument for Extending Family-Based Immigration Benefits to Same-Sex Couples. University of Memphis Law Review 37 (Summer).score: 24.0
    In this paper I argue that anyone who accepts a Rawlsian account of justice should favor granting family-based immigration benefit to same-sex couples. I first provide a brief over-view of the most relevant aspects of Rawls's position, Justice as Fairness. I then explain why family-based immigration benefits are an important topic and one that everyone interested in immigration and justice must consider. I then show how same-sex couples are currently systematically excluded from the benefits that flow from (...)
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  15. Eleni Andreouli & Caroline Howarth (2013). National Identity, Citizenship and Immigration: Putting Identity in Context. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 43 (3):361-382.score: 24.0
    In this paper we suggest that there is a need to examine what is meant by “context” in Social Psychology and present an example of how to place identity in its social and institutional context. Taking the case of British naturalisation, the process whereby migrants become citizens, we show that the identity of naturalised citizens is defined by common-sense ideas about Britishness and by immigration policies. An analysis of policy documents on “earned citizenship” and interviews with naturalised citizens shows (...)
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  16. Peter Higgins (2013). Immigration Justice. Edinburgh University Press.score: 24.0
    By what moral standards must nation-states select immigration policies? A central contention of Immigration Justice is that the justice of an immigration policy can be ascertained only through consideration of the pervasive, systematic, and unjust inequalities engendered by the institutions that constitute our social world. Immigration policies affect people primarily as members of social groups demarcated from each other by members’ gender, race, and class. For this reason, this book argues that states’ selection of immigration (...)
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  17. Lubomira Radoilska (2014). Immigration, Interpersonal Trust and National Culture. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 17 (1):111-128.score: 24.0
    This article offers a critical analysis of David Miller’s proposal that liberal immigration policies should be conceptualized in terms of a quasi-contract between receiving nations and immigrant groups, designed to ensure both that cultural diversity does not undermine trust among citizens and that immigrants are treated fairly. This proposal fails to address sufficiently two related concerns. Firstly, an open-ended, quasi-contractual requirement for cultural integration leaves immigrant groups exposed to arbitrary critique as insufficiently integrated and unworthy of trust as citizens. (...)
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  18. Richard Nunan (2008). Open Immigration Policies and Liberal Discomfort. Human Rights Review 9 (4):537-541.score: 24.0
    Consequentialist cosmopolitanism, Peter Higgins argues, enables closed border liberals to evade charges of moral hypocrisy despite their commitment to moral equality of individuals, once we recognize that open border arguments rely on cosmopolitanism’s individualism requirement, which ignores social realities relevant to a realistic assessment of the social consequences of an open immigration policy. Higgins is mistaken, however, in contending that cosmopolitan individualism entails attention to people only in their capacity as the abstract atomic individuals populating Charles Mills’ idealized social (...)
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  19. Eike-Henner W. Kluge (2010). The Ethics of Health Barriers to Immigration: Morality Among Neighbours. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 18 (4):342-357.score: 24.0
    Many countries encourage immigration, yet almost without exception they impose medical conditions on the admissibility of prospective immigrants. This paper examines the ethical defensibility of this practice. It argues that the neighbourhood principle, which states that we owe a greater duty to neighbours than to strangers, when properly understood, extends to all human beings, that economic and safety considerations play only a limited role in ethically underwriting an exclusionary policy, and that medical immigration criteria should be harmonized with (...)
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  20. James Franklin (2002). Immigration Vs Democracy. IPA Review 54 (2):29.score: 22.0
    Democracy has difficulties with the rights on non-voters (children, the mentally ill, foreigners etc). Democratic leaders have sometimes acted ethically, contrary to the wishes of voters, e.g. in accepting refugees as immigrants.
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  21. Luara Ferracioli (forthcoming). Immigration, Self-Determination and the Brain Drain. Review of International Studies.score: 22.0
    This article focuses on two questions regarding the movement of persons across international borders: (1) do states have a right to unilaterally control their borders; and (2) if they do, are migration arrangements simply immune to moral considerations? Unlike open borders theorists, I answer the first question in the affirmative. However, I answer the second question in the negative. More specifically, I argue that states have a negative duty to exclude prospective immigrants whose departure could be expected to contribute to (...)
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  22. Christian Barry (2011). Immigration and Global Justice. Global Justice Theory Practice Rhetoric 4 (1):30-38.score: 21.0
  23. Adam Hosein & Adam Cox, Immigration and Equality.score: 21.0
  24. Javier Hidalgo (2013). Associative Duties and Immigration. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (6):697-722.score: 21.0
  25. Miguel Martínez Lucio & Heather Connolly (2010). Contextualizing Voice and Stakeholders: Researching Employment Relations, Immigration and Trade Unions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 97 (S1):19-29.score: 21.0
    This article aims to outline some of the ways in which issues of migration and employment relations have been studied in the European context, cross referencing recent interventions in the USA. The argument is a discussion of some of the different dimensions of migration and the way debates within Industrial Relations have been shaped. More specifically, the article will look at the way trade unions have made the ethical turn towards questions of migration and equality. The article will observe the (...)
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  26. Angelo Corlett & Kimberly Unger (2013). How Not to Argue About Immigration. Filozofija I Drustvo 24 (2):277-288.score: 21.0
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  27. Sune Lægaard (2013). Territorial Rights, Political Association, and Immigration. Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (5):645-670.score: 21.0
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  28. Marie-Sylvie Poli & Linda Idjéraoui-Ravez (2011). Des Musées Et des Expositions Dans le Débat Sur l'Immigration En France. Hermès 61:, [ p.].score: 21.0
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  29. Robert W. Glover (2011). Eyes Wide Shut: The Curious Silence of The Law of Peoples on Questions of Immigration and Citizenship. Eidos 14:10-49.score: 21.0
    In an interdependent world of overlapping political memberships and identities, states and democratic citizens face difficult choices in responding to large-scale migration and the related question of who ought to have access to citizenship. In an influential attempt to provide a normative framework for a more just global order, The Law of Peoples , John Rawls is curiously silent regarding what his framework would mean for the politics of migration. In this piece, I consider the complications Rawls’s inattention to these (...)
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  30. Nancy L. Green (2011). Construire Une Collection, Représenter l'Immigration : La Cité Nationale de l'Histoire de l'Immigration. Hermès 61:, [ p.].score: 21.0
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  31. Miguel Martínez Lucio & Heather Connolly (2010). Contextualizing Voice and Stakeholders: Researching Employment Relations, Immigration and Trade Unions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 97 (1):19 - 29.score: 21.0
    This article aims to outline some of the ways in which issues of migration and employment relations have been studied in the European context, cross referencing recent interventions in the USA. The argument is a discussion of some of the different dimensions of migration and the way debates within Industrial Relations have been shaped. More specifically, the article will look at the way trade unions have made the ethical turn towards questions of migration and equality. The article will observe the (...)
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  32. Mohamed Madoui (2008). Enquête sur les petits entrepreneurs issus de l'immigration maghrébine. Cahiers Internationaux de Sociologie 2 (2):289-312.score: 21.0
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  33. Michael Blake & Mathias Risse (2009). Is There a Human Right to Free Movement? Immigration and Original Ownership of the Earth. Notre Dame Journal of Law Ethics and Public Policy 23 (133):166.score: 18.0
    1. Among the most striking features of the political arrangements on this planet is its division into sovereign states.1 To be sure, in recent times, globalization has woven together the fates of communities and individuals in distant parts of the world in complex ways. It is partly for this reason that now hardly anyone champions a notion of sovereignty that would entirely discount a state’s liability the effects that its actions would have on foreign nationals. Still, state sovereignty persists as (...)
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  34. Shelley Wilcox (2009). The Open Borders Debate on Immigration. Philosophy Compass 4 (5):813-821.score: 18.0
    Global migration raises important ethical issues. One of the most significant is the question of whether liberal democratic societies have strong moral obligations to admit immigrants. Historically, most philosophers have argued that liberal states are morally free to restrict immigration at their discretion, with few exceptions. Recently, however, liberal egalitarians have begun to challenge this conventional view in two lines of argument. The first contends that immigration restrictions are inconsistent with basic liberal egalitarian values, including freedom and moral (...)
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  35. Mathias Risse (2008). On the Morality of Immigration. Ethics and International Affairs 22 (1):25–33.score: 18.0
    My goal here is twofold: First, I wish to make a plea for the relevance of moral considerations in debates about immigration. Too often, immigration debates are conducted solely from the standpoint of ‘‘what is good for us,’’ without regard for the justifiability of immigration policies to those excluded. Second, I wish to offer a standpoint that demonstrates why one should think of immigration as a moral problem that must be considered in the context of global (...)
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  36. Frank van Dun, Not Really a Libertarian Case Against Open Immigration.score: 18.0
    Speaking at the third annual meeting of The Property and Freedom Society in Bodrum on Friday, May 23, financial journalist Peter Brimelow1 presented his views on immigration under the title “Immigration is the Viagra of the State—A libertarian case against Immigration.” However, his argument had little concern for the controversies that divide libertarians on the issue of immigration.2 After a brief look at Brimelow’s comments, I shall consider the requirements an argument should meet if it is (...)
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  37. Eric Cavallero (2006). An Immigration-Pressure Model of Global Distributive Justice. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 5 (1):97-127.score: 18.0
    International borders concentrate opportunities in some societies while limiting them in others. Borders also prevent those in the less favored societies from gaining access to opportunities available in the more favored ones. Both distributive effects of borders are treated here within a comprehensive framework. I argue that each state should have broad discretion under international law to grant or deny entry to immigration seekers; but more favored countries that find themselves under immigration pressure should be legally obligated to (...)
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  38. Diana Virginia Todea, “Libertarianism and Immigration”.score: 18.0
    In this paper I investigate the libertarian account of immigration. In the first section I distinguish between right-libertarianism and left-libertarianism. In the second section I analyze the arguments focused on immigration from the perspective of self-ownership focused on Nozick’s case and Steiner’s analogy. In the third section I discuss the [...].
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  39. Matthew Lister (2010). Immigration, Association, and the Family. Law and Philosophy 29 (6):717-745.score: 18.0
    In this paper I provide a philosophical analysis of family-based immigration. This type of immigration is of great importance, yet has received relatively little attention from philosophers and others doing normative work on immigration. As family-based immigration poses significant challenges for those seeking a comprehensive normative account of the limits of discretion that states should have in setting their own immigration policies, it is a topic that must be dealt with if we are to have (...)
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  40. Celia Bardwell-Jones (2011). The Space Between: The Politics of Immigration in Asian/Pacific Islander America. The Pluralist 5 (3):49-55.score: 18.0
    I would like to thank Dr. Gabaccia for her intriguing essay on the origins of the term "nation of immigrants." It really has helped me think about immigration with more historical richness. In my own work, I examine what goes into transnational and diasporic identities. I understand transnational identities as those operating between the loyalties of two or more countries. Going against perhaps unidirectional ways of understanding the immigrant as a foreigner entering into a country, I understand the immigrant (...)
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  41. Uma Narayan (1995). "Male-Order" Brides: Immigrant Women, Domestic Violence and Immigration Law. Hypatia 10 (1):104 - 119.score: 18.0
    This essay analyzes why women whose immigration status is dependent on their marriage face higher risks of domestic violence than women who are citizens and explores the factors that collude to prevent acknowledgment of their greater susceptibility to battering. It criticizes elements of current U.S. immigration policy that are detrimental to the welfare of battered immigrant women, and argues for changes that would make immigration policy more sensitive to their plight.
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  42. Peter Higgins (2009). Immigration Justice: A Principle for Selecting Just Admissions Policies. Social Philosophy Today 25:149-162.score: 18.0
    This paper is addressed to those who hold that states’ immigration policies are subject to cosmopolitan principles of justice. I have a very limited goal in the paper, and that is to offer a condensed explication of a principle for determining whether states’ immigration policies are just. That principle is that just immigration policies may not avoidably harm disadvantaged social groups (whether domestic or foreign). This principle is inspired by the failure, among many extant cosmopolitan proposals for (...)
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  43. Alex Sager (2007). Culture and Immigration. Social Philosophy Today 23:69-86.score: 18.0
    A number of prominent political philosophers, including Will Kymlicka and Joseph Carens, have suggested that one reason for limiting immigration is to protect culture, particularly what Kymlicka calls “societal culture”: “a territorially-concentrated culture, centered on a shared language which is used in a wide range of societal institutions, in both public and private life (schools, media, law, economy, government, etc.).” I situate this claim in the context of liberal nation-building and suggest that the arguments for the protection of culture (...)
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  44. Philip Cafaro & Winthrop Staples Iii (2009). The Environmental Argument for Reducing Immigration Into the United States. Environmental Ethics 31 (1):5-30.score: 18.0
    A serious commitment to environmentalism entails ending America’s population growth and hence a more restrictive immigration policy. The need to limit immigration necessarily follows when we combine a clear statement of our main environmental goals—living sustainably and sharing the landscape generously with nonhuman beings—with uncontroversial accounts of our current demographic trajectory and of the negative environmental effects of U.S. population growth, nationally and globally. Standard arguments for the immigration status quo or for an even more permissive (...) policy are without merit. Americans must choose between allowing continued high levels of immigration and creating a sustainable society. (shrink)
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  45. Annette C. Baier (1995). A Note on Justice, Care, and Immigration Policy. Hypatia 10 (2):150 - 152.score: 18.0
    Should a "caring" immigration policy give special treatment to would-be immigrants who are near neighbors? It is argued that, while those on our borders requesting entry have some special claim, it should not drown out the claims of more distant applicants for citizenship.
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  46. G. Tulud Cruz (2011). Toward an Ethic of Risk: Catholic Social Teaching and Immigration Reform. Studies in Christian Ethics 24 (3):294-310.score: 18.0
    Immigration reform is a highly complex and multifaceted task with significant economic, political and religio-cultural repercussions thereby bringing tremendous ethical challenges and implications. This article explores the possible contribution of modern Catholic Social Teaching in addressing the ethical challenges of immigration reform, particularly in the United States, by examining key themes that could address critical issues in the current debate on immigration reform and arguing how an ethic of risk which, the author submits, runs through the key (...)
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  47. Kieran Oberman (2013). Can Brain Drain Justify Immigration Restrictions. Ethics 123 (1):427-455.score: 18.0
    This article considers one seemingly compelling justification for immigration restrictions: that they help restrict the brain drain of skilled workers from poor states. For some poor states, brain drain is a severe problem, sapping their ability to provide basic services. Yet this article finds that justifying immigration restrictions on brain drain grounds is far from straightforward. For restrictions to be justified, a series of demanding conditions must be fulfilled. Brain drain does provide a successful argument for some (...) restrictions, but it is an argument that fails to justify restrictions beyond a small minority of cases. (shrink)
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  48. Brian M. Stern (2005). Immigration Restriction in a Liberal Democracy. Social Philosophy Today 21:125-135.score: 18.0
    This paper analyzes the case for justifiable immigration restriction in a liberal democratic state. A number of candidates for such justifications have been put forth, but many of them depend for their plausibility on the confirmation of highly disputed empirical evidence. Others are more philosophical in nature, and so are less dependent on, and vulnerable to defeat from, empirical study. These justifications are the focus of this paper. It is first briefly established that justifications for immigration restriction in (...)
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  49. Joseph Carens (2013). The Ethics of Immigration. Oup Usa.score: 18.0
    Eminent political theorist Joseph Carens tests the limits of democratic theory in the realm of immigration, arguing that any acceptable immigration policy must be based on moral principles even if it conflicts with the will of the majority.
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  50. José-Antonio Orosco (2007). Pilgrimage, Penitence, and Revolution: Immigration and the Building of American Culture. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 14 (1):38-49.score: 18.0
    In this essay, l examine Cesar Chavez’s thoughts on the effects of Mexican immigration on the United States. I argue that neo-nativist authors are wrong in thinking that a growing Latino population will develop into a distinct political bloc that will destabilize the nation. Instead, I maintain that Chavez suggests how a strong Latino presence might occasion a shift of values in the United States toward a culture ofpeace. I argue that Chavez develops a logic of nonviolent practice, drawing (...)
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