Search results for 'immune self' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Bartlomiej Swiatczak (2012). Immune System, Immune Self. Introduction. Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 3 (1):12-18.
    The idea that the immune system distinguishes between self and non-self was one of the central assumptions of immunology in the second half of 20th century. This idea influenced experimental design and data interpretation. However, in the face of new evidence there is a need for a new conceptual framework in immunology.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  37
    Alfred I. Tauber (2012). From the Immune Self to Moral Agency. Comments. Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 3 (1):101-105.
    Author comments on the changes in the philosophy of immunology that have occurred since the publication of his book The Immune Self: Theory or Metaphor?, as well as on the dangers, misunderstandings and expectations in this area. Finally, he presents his account of moral agency in the context of his own works discussing this question.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Alfred I. Tauber (1994). The Immune Self Theory or Metaphor? Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    This is one of the first books in a new series that will publish the very best work in the philosophy of biology. The series will be non-sectarian in character, will extend across the broadest range of topics, and will be genuinely interdisciplinary. The Immune Self is a critical study of immunology from its origins at the end of the nineteenth century to its contemporary formulation. The book offers the first extended philosophical critique of immunology, in which the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  4. Alfred I. Tauber (1994). The Immune Self: Theory or Metaphor? Cambridge University Press.
    This is one of the first books in a new series that will publish the very best work in the philosophy of biology. The series will be non-sectarian in character, will extend across the broadest range of topics, and will be genuinely interdisciplinary. The Immune Self is a critical study of immunology from its origins at the end of the nineteenth century to its contemporary formulation. The book offers the first extended philosophical critique of immunology, in which the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5. Alfred I. Tauber (2011). The Immune Self: Theory or Metaphor? Cambridge University Press.
    This is one of the first books in a new series that will publish the very best work in the philosophy of biology. The series will be non-sectarian in character, will extend across the broadest range of topics, and will be genuinely interdisciplinary. The Immune Self is a critical study of immunology from its origins at the end of the nineteenth century to its contemporary formulation. The book offers the first extended philosophical critique of immunology, in which the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Alfred I. Tauber (1996). The Immune Self: Theory or Metaphor? Cambridge University Press.
    This is one of the first books in a new series that will publish the very best work in the philosophy of biology. The series will be non-sectarian in character, will extend across the broadest range of topics, and will be genuinely interdisciplinary. The Immune Self is a critical study of immunology from its origins at the end of the nineteenth century to its contemporary formulation. The book offers the first extended philosophical critique of immunology, in which the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  55
    Alfred I. Tauber & Scott H. Podolsky (1994). Frank Macfarlane Burnet and the Immune Self. Journal of the History of Biology 27 (3):531 - 573.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  8.  38
    Henri Atlan (1998). Paradigms in Immunology and Modern, Post-Modern, Post-Post-Modern, _ Philosophy. A Review of Alfred I. Tauber, the Immune Self: Theory or Metaphor? [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 13 (1):125-131.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  9. Alfred I. Tauber (1999). The Elusive Immune Self: A Case of Category Errors. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 42 (4):459-474.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10.  11
    David L. Hull (1997). The Immune Self. International Studies in Philosophy 29 (4):145-146.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Alfred I. Tauber & Scott H. Podolsky (1994). Frank Macfarlane Burnet and the Immune Self. Journal of the History of Biology 27 (3):531-573.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  12. Howard Schweber (1995). Alfred Tauber, The Immune Self Theory or Metaphor? Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 15 (3):216-218.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  1
    Richard L. Kradin (1994). The Immune Self: A Selectionist Theory of Recognition, Learning, and Remembering Within the Immune System. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 38 (4):605-623.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  93
    Lisa Weasel (2001). Dismantling the Self/Other Dichotomy in Science: Towards a Feminist Model of the Immune System. Hypatia 16 (1):27-44.
    : Despite the development of a vast body of literature pertaining to feminism and science, examples of how feminist philosophies might be applied to scientific theories and practice have been limited. Moreover, most scientists remain unfamiliar with how feminism pertains to their work. Using the example of the immune system, this paper applies three feminist epistemologies--feminist empiricism, feminist standpoint theory, and feminist postmodernism--to assess competing claims of immune function within a feminist context.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15.  2
    Lisa Weasel (2001). Dismantling the Self/Other Dichotomy in Science: Towards a Feminist Model of the Immune System. Hypatia 16 (1):27-44.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  2
    Barbara S. Beltz, Emily L. Cockey, Jingjing Li, Jody F. Platto, Kristina A. Ramos & Jeanne L. Benton (2015). Adult Neural Stem Cells: Long-Term Self-Renewal, Replenishment by the Immune System, or Both? Bioessays 37 (5):495-501.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  5
    Bartlomiej Swiatczak (2013). Immune Balance: The Development of the Idea and its Applications. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology (3):1-32.
    It has long been taken for granted that the immune system’s capacity to protect an individual from infection and disease depends on the power of the system to distinguish between self and nonself. However, accumulating data have undermined this fundamental concept. Evidence against the self/nonself discrimination model left researchers in need of a new overarching framework able to capture the immune system’s reactivity. Here, I highlight that along with the self/nonself model, another powerful representation of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  23
    Alfred I. Tauber (1994). A Typology of Nietzsche's Biology. Biology and Philosophy 9 (1):25-44.
    Friedrich Nietzsche''s will to power, and the philosophical ediface built on this foundation, is formulated on a biologicism that is indebted to a particular post-Darwinian vision of the organism. Of the various models that attempt to formulate a comprehensive organismal biology, Nietzsche unknowingly grasped that of Elie Metchnikoff, who authored the theoretical foundation of modern immunology. Metchnikoff regarded the organism as a disharmonious entity, in constant inner strife between competing cellular activities. Immune functions were responsible for mediating harmonization, which (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  19.  68
    Dorit Bar-On (2004). Speaking My Mind: Expression and Self-Knowledge. Oxford University Press.
    Dorit Bar-On develops and defends a novel view of avowals and self-knowledge. Drawing on resources from the philosophy of language, the theory of action, epistemology, and the philosophy of mind, she offers original and systematic answers to many long-standing questions concerning our ability to know our own minds. We are all very good at telling what states of mind we are in at a given moment. When it comes to our own present states of mind, what we say goes; (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   41 citations  
  20.  49
    Thomas Pradeu & Edgardo D. Carosella (2006). The Self Model and the Conception of Biological Identity in Immunology. Biology and Philosophy 21 (2):235-252.
    The self/non-self model, first proposed by F.M. Burnet, has dominated immunology for 60 years now. According to this model, any foreign element will trigger an immune reaction in an organism, whereas endogenous elements will not, in normal circumstances, induce an immune reaction. In this paper we show that the self/non-self model is no longer an appropriate explanation of experimental data in immunology, and that this inadequacy may be rooted in an excessively strong metaphysical conception (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  21. Uwe Steinhoff (2013). Helen Frowe’s “Practical Account of Self-Defence”: A Critique. Public Reason 5 (1):87-96.
    Helen Frowe has recently offered what she calls a “practical” account of self-defense. Her account is supposed to be practical by being subjectivist about permissibility and objectivist about liability. I shall argue here that Frowe first makes up a problem that does not exist and then fails to solve it. To wit, her claim that objectivist accounts of permissibility cannot be action-guiding is wrong; and her own account of permissibility actually retains an objectivist (in the relevant sense) element. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  20
    Thomas Pradeu & Edgardo D. Carosella (2006). The Self Model and the Conception of Biological Identity in Immunology. Biology and Philosophy 21 (2):235-252.
    The self/non-self model, first proposed by F.M. Burnet, has dominated immunology for sixty years now. According to this model, any foreign element will trigger an immune reaction in an organism, whereas endogenous elements will not, in normal circumstances, induce an immune reaction. In this paper we show that the self/non-self model is no longer an appropriate explanation of experimental data in immunology, and that this inadequacy may be rooted in an excessively strong metaphysical conception (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  23.  7
    Warwick Anderson & Ian R. Mackay (2014). Fashioning the Immunological Self: The Biological Individuality of F. Macfarlane Burnet. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 47 (1):147-175.
    During the 1940s and 1950s, the Australian microbiologist F. Macfarlane Burnet sought a biologically plausible explanation of antibody production. In this essay, we seek to recover the conceptual pathways that Burnet followed in his immunological theorizing. In so doing, we emphasize the influence of speculations on individuality, especially those of philosopher Alfred North Whitehead; the impact of cybernetics and information theory; and the contributions of clinical research into autoimmune disease that took place in Melbourne. We point to the influence of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  37
    Andrea Christofidou (2000). Self-Consciousness and the Double Immunity. Philosophy 75 (294):539-570.
    It is accepted that first-person thoughts are immune to error through misidentification. I argue that there is also immunity to error through misascription, failure to recognise which has resulted in mistaken claims that first-person thoughts involving the self-ascription of bodily states are, at best, circumstantially immune to error through misidentification relative to.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  25.  19
    Wilfried Allaerts (1999). The Biological Function Paradigm Applied to the Immunological Self-Non-Self Discrimination: Critique of Tauber's Phenomenological Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 30 (1):155-171.
    Biological self reference idioms in brain-centered or nervous-system-centered self determination of the consious Self reveal an interesting contrast with biological self-determination by immunological self/non-self discrimination. This contrast is both biological and epistemological. In contrast to the consciousness conscious of itself, the immunological self-determination imposes a protective mechanism against self-recognition (Coutinho et al. 1984), which adds to a largely unconscious achievement of the biological Self (Popper 1977; Medawar 1959). The latter viewpoint (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. James M. Dow, Shoegenstein on Self-Ascription, Immunity to Error and I-as-Subject.
    Contemporary accounts of the self-ascription of experiences are wedded to two basic dogmas. The first is that self-ascription is immune to error through misidentification relative to the first person (IEM). The second dogma is that there is distinction between awareness of oneself qua subject and awareness of oneself qua object (the SCS/SCO distinction). In this paper, I urge that these dogmas are groundless. First, I illustrate that claims about immunity to error through misidentification are usually based upon (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  22
    Thomas Pradeu (2012). The Limits of the Self: Immunology and Biological Identity. Oxford University Press.
    The Limits of the Self, will be essential reading for anyone interested in the definition of biological individuality and the understanding of the immune system.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  28.  5
    José Luis Bermúdez (2008). Self-Knowledge and the Sense of "I". In Anthony E. Hatzimoysis (ed.), Self-Knowledge. Oxford University Press
    What does an understanding of the first person pronoun “I” contribute to the understanding of a sentence involving “I”? This paper emphasizes that the first person pronoun is typically used as a tool of communication. We need to think not just about what it is to use the first person pronoun with understanding, but also what it is to understand someone else’s use of the first person pronoun. A plausible principle governing linguistic understanding via the conditions of adequacy upon reporting (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Dorit Bar-On (2004). Speaking My Mind: Expression and Self-Knowledge. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Dorit Bar-On develops and defends a novel view of avowals and self-knowledge. Drawing on resources from the philosophy of language, the theory of action, epistemology, and the philosophy of mind, she offers original and systematic answers to many long-standing questions concerning our ability to know our own minds. We are all very good at telling what states of mind we are in at a given moment. When it comes to our own present states of mind, what we say goes; (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  30.  9
    Alfred I. Tauber (2008). The Immune System and its Ecology. Philosophy of Science 75 (2):224-245.
    In biology, the ‘ecological orientation' rests on a commitment to examining systems, and the conceptual challenge of defining that system now employs techniques and concepts adapted from diverse disciplines (i.e., systems philosophy, cybernetics, information theory, computer science) that are applied to biological simulations and model building. Immunology has joined these efforts, and the question posed here is whether the discipline will remain committed to its theoretical concerns framed by the notions of protecting an insular self, an entity demarcated from (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  31.  19
    Max Seeger (2015). Immunity and Self-Awareness. Philosophers' Imprint 15 (17).
    Three pathologies of alienation have been claimed to refute the philosophical thesis that introspection-based self-ascriptions of mental states are immune to error through misidentification. In this paper, I show that this critique of the Immunity Thesis is misguided; the cases of alienation either are not self-ascriptions or do not involve misidentification. Rather, these cases undermine a widely assumed explanation of immunity, which is based on the idea that self-ascriptions of mental states are identification-free. I argue that, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  9
    Hiroaki Kitano & Kanae Oda (2006). Self-Extending Symbiosis: A Mechanism for Increasing Robustness Through Evolution. Biological Theory 1 (1):61-66.
    Robustness is a fundamental property of biological systems, observed ubiquitously across species and at different levels of organization from gene regulation to ecosystem. The theory of biological robustness argues that robustness fosters evolv-ability and that together they entail various tradeoffs as well as characteristic architectures and mechanisms. We argue that classes of biological systems have evolved to enhance their robustness by extending their system boundary through a series of symbioses with foreign biological entities . A series of major biological innovations (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  33.  25
    Andrea Christo Fidou (2000). Self-Consciousness and the Double Immunity. Philosophy 75:539.
    It is accepted that first-person thoughts are immune to error through misidentification. I argue that there is also immunity to error through misascription, failure to recognise which has resulted in mistaken claims that first-person thoughts involving the self-ascription of bodily states are, at best, circumstantially immune to error through misidentification relative to ‘I’ and, at worst, subject to error. Central to my thesis is that, first, ‘I’ is immune to error through misidentification absolutely, and that if (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  45
    Alexandre Billon (2011). My Own Truth ---Pathologies of Self-Reference and Relative Truth. In Rahman Shahid, Primiero Giuseppe & Marion Mathieu (eds.), Logic, Epistemology, and the Unity of Science, Vol. 23. Springer
    emantic pathologies of self-reference include the Liar (‘this sentence is false’), the Truth-Teller (‘this sentence is true’) and the Open Pair (‘the neighbouring sentence is false’ ‘the neighbouring sentence is false’). Although they seem like perfectly meaningful declarative sentences, truth value assignment to their uses seems either inconsistent (the Liar) or arbitrary (the Truth-Teller and the Open-Pair). These pathologies thus call for a resolution. I propose such a resolution in terms of relative-truth: the truth value of a pathological sentence (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  26
    Jeremy Cushing, Self-Knowledge in a Natural World.
    In this dissertation, I reconcile our knowledge of our own minds with philosophical naturalism. Philosophers traditionally hold that our knowledge of our own minds is especially direct and authoritative in comparison with other domains of knowledge. I introduce the subject in the first chapter. In the second and third chapters, I address the idea that we know our own minds directly. If self-knowledge is direct, it must not be grounded on anything more epistemically basic. This creates a puzzle for (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  26
    William S. Larkin, Content Skepticism and Reliable Self-Knowledge.
    Sub-Thesis 1: We should be contingent reliabilists to avoid the threat of an unacceptably strong content skeptical thesis posed by content externalism and the possibility of twin thoughts. The predominant strategy for resisting this threat has been to rely on the claim that introspective self-attributions are immune to brute error; but this claim is problematic from a naturalistic standpoint.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  7
    A. Simhony (2016). Berlin and Bosanquet: True Self and Positive Freedom. European Journal of Political Theory 15 (1):3-21.
    Is the Idealist conception of positive freedom doomed as politically dangerous? Decidedly yes, Berlin famously argues. The danger lies with manipulating positive freedom into a political tool of tyranny, coercing individuals to be free. The vehicle of manipulation is a conception of a divided self that underpins positive freedom. For, Berlin argues, conceptions of freedom derive directly from views of what constitutes a self. He cites the British Idealists as evidence for his criticism. The case for Green’s immunity (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Jim Slagle (2016). The Epistemological Skyhook: Determinism, Naturalism, and Self-Defeat. Routledge.
    Throughout philosophical history, there has been a recurring argument to the effect that determinism, naturalism, or both are self-referentially incoherent. By accepting determinism or naturalism, one allegedly acquires a reason to reject determinism or naturalism. _The Epistemological Skyhook_ brings together, for the first time, the principal expressions of this argument, focusing primarily on the last 150 years. This book addresses the versions of this argument as presented by Arthur Lovejoy, A.E. Taylor, Kurt Gödel, C.S. Lewis, Norman Malcolm, Karl Popper, (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Luara Ferracioli (2015). Immigration, Self-Determination and the Brain Drain. Review of International Studies 41 (1):99-115.
    This article focuses on two questions regarding the movement of persons across international borders: (1) do states have a right to unilaterally control their borders; and (2) if they do, are migration arrangements simply immune to moral considerations? Unlike open borders theorists, I answer the first question in the affirmative. However, I answer the second question in the negative. More specifically, I argue that states have a negative duty to exclude prospective immigrants whose departure could be expected to contribute (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Madison Powers, Ruth Faden & Yashar Saghai (2012). Liberty, Mill and the Framework of Public Health Ethics. Public Health Ethics 5 (1):6-15.
    In this article, we address the relevance of J.S. Mill’s political philosophy for a framework of public health ethics. In contrast to some readings of Mill, we reject the view that in the formulation of public policies liberties of all kinds enjoy an equal presumption in their favor. We argue that Mill also rejects this view and discuss the distinction that Mill makes between three kinds of liberty interests: interests that are immune from state interference; interests that enjoy a (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  41. Timothy Lane & Caleb Liang (2011). Self-Consciousness and Immunity. Journal of Philosophy 108 (2):78-99.
    Sydney Shoemaker, developing an idea of Wittgenstein’s, argues that we are immune to error through misidentification relative to the first-person pronoun. Although we might be liable to error when “I” (or its cognates) is used as an object, we are immune to error when “I” is used as a subject (as when one says, “I have a toothache”). Shoemaker claims that the relationship between “I” as-subject and the mental states of which it is introspectively aware is tautological: when, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  42.  43
    F. de Vignemont & P. Fourneret (2004). The Sense of Agency: A Philosophical and Empirical Review of the "Who" System. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):1-19.
    How do I know that I am the person who is moving? According to Wittgenstein (1958), the sense of agency involves a primitive notion of the self used as subject, which does not rely on any prior perceptual identification and which is immune to error through misidentification. However, the neuroscience of action and the neuropsychology of schizophrenia show the existence of specific cognitive processes underlying the sense of agency—the ‘‘Who'' system (Georgieff & Jeannerod, 1998) which is disrupted in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  43. Timothy Lane & Georg Northoff (forthcoming). Is Depressive Rumination Rational? In T. W. Hung & T. J. Lane (eds.), Rationality: Constraints and Contexts. Elsevier
    Most mental disorders affect only a small segment of the population. On the reasonable assumption that minds or brains are prone to occasional malfunction, these disorders do not seem to pose distinctive explanatory problems. Depression, however, because it is so prevalent and costly, poses a conundrum that some try to explain by characterizing it as an adaptation—a trait that exists because it performed fitness-enhancing functions in ancestral populations. Heretofore, proposed evolutionary explanations of depression did not focus on thought processes; instead, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Peter Langland-Hassan (2015). Introspective Misidentification. Philosophical Studies 172 (7):1737-1758.
    It is widely held that introspection-based self-ascriptions of mental states are immune to error through misidentification , relative to the first person pronoun. Many have taken such errors to be logically impossible, arguing that the immunity holds as an “absolute” necessity. Here I discuss an actual case of craniopagus twins—twins conjoined at the head and brain—as a means to arguing that such errors are logically possible and, for all we know, nomologically possible. An important feature of the example (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Anne Newstead (2006). Evans's Anti-Cartesian Argument: A Critical Evaluation. Ratio 19 (June):214-228.
    In chapter 7 of The Varieties of Reference, Gareth Evans claimed to have an argument that would present "an antidote" to the Cartesian conception of the self as a purely mental entity. On the basis of considerations drawn from philosophy of language and thought, Evans claimed to be able to show that bodily awareness is a form of self-awareness. The apparent basis for this claim is the datum that sometimes judgements about one’s position based on body sense are (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  46. P. B. Todd, The Numinous and the Archetypes as Timeless, Cosmic Ordering and Regulating Principles in Evolution. C. G. Jung Society of Sydney Presentations.
    Psychoanalytic self-psychology as outlined by such depth psychologists as Jung, Fordham, Winnicott and Kohut provide a framework for conceptualizing a relationship of complementarity between psychic and immune defence as well as loss of bodily and self integration in disease. Physicist Erwin Schrödinger’s thesis that the so-called “arrow of time” does not necessarily deal a mortal blow to its creator is reminiscent of the concept of timeless dimensions of the unconscious mind and the Self in Analytical Psychology, (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  18
    Eileen Crist & Alfred I. Tauber (2000). Selfhood, Immunity, and the Biological Imagination: The Thought of Frank MacFarlane Burnet. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 15 (4):509-533.
    The language of self and nonself has had a prominent place inimmunology. This paper examines Frank Macfarlane Burnet's introductionof the language of selfhood into the science. The distinction betweenself and nonself was an integral part of Burnet's biological outlook– of his interest in the living organism in its totality, itsactivities, and interactions. We show the empirical and conceptualwork of the language of selfhood in the science. The relation betweenself and nonself tied into Burnet's ecological vision of host-parasiteinteraction. The idiom (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  48. Peter Todd (2008). Unconscious Mental Factors in Hiv Infection. Mind and Matter 6 (2):193-206.
    Multiple drug resistant strains of HIV and continuing difficulties with vaccine development highlight the importance of psychologi- cal interventions which aim to in uence the psychosocial and emo- tional factors empirically demonstrated to be significant predictors of immunity, illness progression and AIDS mortality in seropositive persons. Such data have profound implications for psychological interventions designed to modify psychosocial factors predictive of enhanced risk of exposure to HIV as well as the neuroendocrine and immune mechanisms mediating the impact of such (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  60
    José Luis Bermúdez (2003). 'I'-Thoughts and Explanation: Reply to Garrett. Philosophical Quarterly 53 (212):432–436.
    Brian Garrett has criticized my diagnosis of the paradox of self-consciousness. In reply, I focus on the classification of 'I'-thoughts, and show how the notion of immunity to error through misidentification can be used to characterize 'I'-thoughts, even though an important class of 'I'-thoughts (those whose expression involves what Wittgenstein called the use of 'I' as object) are not themselves immune to error through misidentification. 'I'-thoughts which are susceptible to error through misidentification are dependent upon those which are (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  19
    Thomas Sturm (2014). ‘Kant Our Contemporary’? Kitcher on the Fruitfulness of Kant's Theory of the Cognitive Subject. Kantian Review 19 (1):135-141.
    In chapter 15 of Kant's Thinker, Patricia Kitcher claims that we can treat Kant as , and that his theory of apperception new. I question this with respect to two of her four chosen topics. First, I address her attempt to show that Kant's theory of apperceptive self-knowledge is immune to sceptical doubts of the sort Barry Stroud presents. Second, I turn to her argument that this theory is superior to current accounts of the special authority of (...)-knowledge. Over and above specific weaknesses, it seems that Kitcher's considerations generally lack sufficient reflection on how philosophical arguments of the past can be relevant to current agendas. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000