Search results for 'incorruptibility' (try it on Scholar)

31 found
Order:
  1.  8
    Sean Valentine & Anthony Johnson (2005). Codes of Ethics, Orientation Programs, and the Perceived Importance of Employee Incorruptibility. Journal of Business Ethics 61 (1):45 - 53.
    The purpose of this study was to determine the degree to which the review of corporate ethics codes is associated with individuals’ perceptions of the importance of virtue ethics, or more specifically, employee incorruptibility. A convenience sample of individuals working for a university or one of several business organizations located in the Mountain West region of the United States was compiled with a self-report questionnaire. A usable sample of 143 persons representing both the public and private industries was secured (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  2.  5
    Mary F. Rousseau (1977). Avicenna and Aquinas on Incorruptibility. New Scholasticism 51 (4):524-536.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  9
    Frederick D. Wilhelmsen (1993). A Note on Contraries and the Incorruptibility of the Human Soul In St. Thomas Aquinas. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 67 (3):333-338.
  4.  0
    Eike-Henner W. Kluge (2015). St. Thomas on the Incorruptibility of the Human Soul: A Reassessment of His Argument From Natural Desire. Review of Metaphysics 68 (4):742-757.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  7
    Marleen Rozemond (2014). The Faces of Simplicity in Descartes’s Soul. In Dominik Perler & Klaus Corcilius (eds.), Partitioning the Soul: Debates From Plato to Leibniz. De Gruyter 219-244.
    In this paper I explain several ways in which Descartes denied that the human soul or mind is composite and the role this idea played in his thought. The mind is whole in the whole and whole in the parts of the body because it has no parts. Unlike body, the mind is indivisible, and this is a different idea from the thought that mind and body are incorruptible. Descartes connects the immortality of the soul with its status as a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6.  2
    Dr Erich H. Loewy & Dr Roberta Springer Loewy (2005). Use and Abuse of Bioethics: Integrity and Professional Standing. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 13 (1):73-86.
    This paper sets out to examine the integrity and professional standing of “Bioethics.” It argues that professions have certain responsibilities that start with setting criteria for and credentialing those that have met the criteria and goes on to ultimately have social responsibilities to the community. As it now stands we claim that Bioethics—while it certainly has achieved some progress in the way medicine has developed—has failed to become a profession and has to a large extent failed in its social responsibility. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7.  13
    Michael Hurley & J. S. (1961). Born Incorruptibly: The Third Canon of the Lateran Council (A. D. 649). Heythrop Journal 2 (3):216–236.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Jordi Pamias (2012). Incorruptible Socrates?(Pi. Smp. 219e and Acus. Frag. 22). Hermes 140 (3):369-374.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  1
    Sergio Manghi (2013). Oikos, The Incorruptible: The Ecological Reasons of the Sacred. World Futures 69 (3):119-166.
    In this article, I will show how the notion of ecology of mind developed by Gregory Bateson (1972, 1979; Bateson and Bateson 1987), constitutes a third way, with respect to those two trends that I have here called naturism and realism. I will try to show how Bateson's notion of ecology of mind (that sometimes I will call briefly ecosystemic) is closely linked to notions of epistemology and of the sacred, and how it can highlight potential complementarities between the realist (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  0
    E. De Greeff (1951). Les Modes de Rattachements Instinctifs, Fonctions incorruptibLes. Dialectica 5 (3-4):376-392.
    SummaryStarting with an analysis of the respiratory function and of the way it automatically connects the living organism with the physical milieu without any conscious or voluntary effort, Dr De Greeff then asserts that, on the Psychological level, similar basic mechanisms connect the individual with the social environment, and more generally with the Cosmos.Typical disorders of these mechanisms are to be seen in melancholic depressions and in the feelings of strangeness and loneliness they bring about. These mechanisms have à neural (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  0
    E. De Greeff (1951). Les modes de rattachements instinctifs, fonctions incorruptibLes. Dialectica 5 (3‐4):376-392.
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Basanta Kumar Mallik (1967). Hindu Inheritance Incorruptible: Studies Mainly in the Philosophy of the State and Community. Published for the Basanta Kumar Mallik Trust by K.L. Mukhopadhyay.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. An Exploration Guided Merton’S. & Norms Conceived (2010). The Gray Area for Incorruptible Scientific Research. In M. Dorato M. Suàrez (ed.), Epsa Epistemology and Methodology of Science. Springer 149.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. I. Sevçenko (1949). Léon Bardales et les juges généraux ou la corruption des incorruptibles. Byzantion 19:247-59.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  20
    Dan Kaufman (2014). Cartesian Substances, Individual Bodies, and Corruptibility. Res Philosophica 91 (1):71-102.
    According to the Monist Interpretation of Descartes, there is really only one corporeal substance—the entire extended plenum. Evidence for this interpretation seems to be provided by Descartes in the Synopsis of the Meditations, where he claims that all substances are incorruptible. Finite bodies, being corruptible, would then fail to be substances. On the other hand, ‘body, taken in the general sense,’ being incorruptible, would be a corporeal substance. In this paper, I defend a Pluralist Interpretation of Descartes, according to which (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  35
    Johan E. Gustafsson (2013). Neither 'Good' in Terms of 'Better' nor 'Better' in Terms of 'Good'. Noûs 48 (1):466–473.
    In this paper, I argue against defining either of ‘good’ and ‘better’ in terms of the other. According to definitions of ‘good’ in terms of ‘better’, something is good if and only if it is better than some indifference point. Against this approach, I argue that the indifference point cannot be defined in terms of ‘better’ without ruling out some reasonable axiologies. Against defining ‘better’ in terms of ‘good’, I argue that this approach either cannot allow for the incorruptibility (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  58
    Fred Feldman (1998). Hyperventilating About Intrinsic Value. Journal of Ethics 2 (4):339-354.
    Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Brentano, Moore, and Chisholm have suggested marks or criteria of intrinsic goodness. I distinguish among eight of these. I focus in this paper on four: (a) unimprovability, (b) unqualifiedness, (c) dependence upon intrinsic natures, and (d) incorruptibility. I try to show that each of these is problematic in some way. I also try to show that they are not equivalent – they point toward distinct conceptions of intrinsic goodness. In the end it appears that none of (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18.  10
    F. Feldman (2005). Hyperventilating About Intrinsic Value. In Toni Rønnow-Rasmussen & Michael J. Zimmerman (eds.), Journal of Ethics. Springer 45--58.
    Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Brentano, Moore, and Chisholm have suggested "marks" or criteria of intrinsic goodness. I distinguish among eight of these. I focus in this paper on four: unimprovability, unqualifiedness, dependence upon intrinsic natures, and incorruptibility. I try to show that each of these is problematic in some way. I also try to show that they are not equivalent - they point toward distinct conceptions of intrinsic goodness. In the end it appears that none of them is fully satisfactory. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  11
    Patricio de Navascués Benlloch (2011). “Cuerpo” en la tradición antioquena. Augustinianum 51 (1):21-45.
    Faced with an Alexandrian (Arian) anthropology of Neoplatonic inspiration, Eustathius adopts a strong position in several statements that is similar to astoic Aristotelianism of the 4th century. Nevertheless, Eustathius's reflection is more genuinely theological, than it is reflective of any particular philosophical trend. For him, the human body is a dynamic concept which finds its full meaning in light of the history of salvation, wherein the incarnate and glorified Logos, the second Adam, brings to completion the perfection and incorruptibility (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  10
    Nancy Levene (2001). Spinoza's Bible. Philosophy and Theology 13 (1):93-142.
    My essay explores the connections between Spinoza’s theory of biblical interpretation and his conception of prophecy, linking the two through what he calls “moral certainty.” The question of what prophecy conveys is connected to the question of how to read Scripture because readers are in a similar position to both the prophets, who attain sure knowledge of some matter revealed by God, and the audience of prophecy, who have access to this knowledge only through faith. Like prophets, readers are interpreters (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  8
    Dejan Jelovac, Zeger Wal & Ana Jelovac (2011). Business and Government Ethics in the “New” and “Old” EU: An Empirical Account of Public–Private Value Congruence in Slovenia and the Netherlands. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (1):127-141.
    This study reports on the hierarchy of organizational values in public and private sector organizations in Slovenia and the Netherlands. We surveyed 400 managers in Slovenia and 382 in the Netherlands using an identical questionnaire on the importance of a selection of values in everyday decision making. In Slovenia, impartiality, incorruptibility, and transparency were rated significantly higher in the public sector, while profitability, obedience, and reliability were rated more important in business organizations. In contrast, in the Netherlands, 11 values (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  12
    Silvia Fazzo (2013). Heavenly Matter in Aristotle, Metaphysics Lambda 2. Phronesis 58 (2):160-175.
    This paper emphasizes an unnoticed connection between two lines in Aristotle, Metaphysics Λ.1, 1069a32, and Λ.2, 1069b26. It argues that the Greek text of the former has been obscured in standard editions by unnecessary emendation: if the reading of the mss. is preserved, the text here sets out a programme for research into the elements of heavenly bodies which is taken up in the second part of Λ.2. There, Aristotle distinguishes the matter of heavenly substance as if it were matter (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  7
    David Williams (2013). Plato's Noble Lie: From Kallipolis to Magnesia. History of Political Thought 34 (3):363-392.
    The tradition of the political lie infamously commences with Platos Noble Lie in the Republic. It is woven with great care into his utopian state on the premise that Philosopher-Rulers are incorruptible wielders of political power.Most treatments of the Noble Lie understand this and then proceed to dismiss Plato on the basis of his unrealistic assumptions about human nature. But when consideration is extended to the Laws, one finds a far more nuanced and relevant Plato uncomfortable with the > practice (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  5
    Cynthia Hahn (1997). Seeing and Believing: The Construction of Sanctity in Early-Medieval Saints' Shrines. Speculum 72 (4):1079-1106.
    Among sensory markers for sanctity, it was the sight of the holy that most often inspired faith in the early Middle Ages. Shouts, prayers, and hymns might have greeted a miracle, and a wondrous odor confirmed the presence of an incorrupt body; but in most miracle stories it was “things seen” that turned the heart toward faith. This primacy of the visual settled a burden of proof squarely upon the early-medieval artist : how could the body of the saint, if (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  14
    Lorelle Lamascus (2006). Aquinas and Themistius on Intellect. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 80:255-273.
    Aquinas puts forward two different, and conflicting, interpretations of Themistius’s account of the intellect. In his earlier interpretation of Themistius, Aquinas understands him to hold the position that both the possible and agent intellect are separate and incorruptible, existing apart from individual human souls but shared in by individual souls in the process of knowing. In De unitate intellectus contra averroistas, however, Aquinas radically departs from this reading, hailing Themistius as a genuine interpreter of the Peripatetic position, while decrying Averroes’s (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  15
    Edith Dudley Sylla (1998). God, Indivisibles, and Logic in the Later Middle Ages: Adam Wodeham's Response to Henry of Harclay. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 7 (01):69-87.
    As its modern edition appears in the Synthese Historical Library, Adam WodehamThis book is an important contribution to the history of philosophy.It will be of interest to all medievalists, particularly to those concerned with medieval science, philosophy, and logic. Theologians and historians of mathematics will also find it useful.Whether charity or [any] other incorruptible form is composed of indivisible forms.Because this difficulty is the same for all composite divisible things, whether intensive or extensive, which are of one and the same (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  7
    P. H. Reardon (2000). The Commerce of Human Body Parts: An Eastern Orthodox Response. Christian Bioethics 6 (2):205-213.
    The Orthodox Church teaches that the bodies of those in Christ are to be regarded as sanctified by the hearing of the Word and faithful participation in the Sacraments, most particularly the Holy Eucharist; because of the indwelling Holy Spirit the consecrated bodies of Christians do not belong to them but to Christ; with respect to the indwelling Holy Spirit there is no difference between the bodies of Christians before and after death; whether before or after death, the Christian body (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  6
    des Chene, : Facts and Texts.
    The science of the soul exceeds all other parts of philosophy not only in “dignity and exactness”, but also in “usefulness, necessity, charm, and, above all, in difficulty”.1 As the body is the subject of health and disease, so too the soul is the subject of virtue and vice; and just as the physician must devote great effort to knowing the body, anyone who treats morals “must take care to have a clear understanding of things pertaining to the scientia de (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  0
    Anne Burnett (1987). The Scrutiny of Song: Pindar, Politics, and Poetry. Critical Inquiry 13 (3):434.
    Pindar’s songs were composed for men at play, but his poetry was political in its impulse and in its function. The men in question were rich and powerful, and their games were a display of exclusive class attributes, vicariously shared by lesser mortals who responded with gratitude and loyalty . Victories were counted as princely benefactions and laid up as city treasure like the wealth deposited in the treasuries at Delphi . Athletic victory was thus both a manifestation and an (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  0
    C. J. F. Williams (1965). Aristotle and Corruptibility. Religious Studies 1 (1):95.
    In a discussion-note in Mind , Father P. M. Farrell, O.P., gave an account, in what he admitted to be an embarrassingly brief compass, of the Thomist doctrine concerning evil. There is one sentence in this discussion which at first glance appears paradoxical. Father Farrell has been arguing that a universe containing ‘corruptible good’ as well as incorruptible is better than one containing ‘incorruptible good’ only. He continues: ‘If, however, they are to manifest this corruptible good, they must be corruptible (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  0
    C. J. F. Williams (1966). Aristotle and Corruptibility: C. J. F. WILLIAMS. Religious Studies 1 (2):203-215.
    ἆρ' ∈ἰ kaì ⋯γ ∈´νητον … πρòς τò ɸθαρτόν, ⋯ϕ' ᾧΘ . Aristotle claims so far to have proved that the eternal is incorruptible and that it is ungenerated. He has still to prove the converse of each of these propositions, namely, that whatever is incorruptible is eternal and that whatever is ungenerated is eternal also. After putting the thesis in question form he gives a further definition of ⋯γ∈´νητος and ἄɸθαρτος in the parenthesis of 282 a 27–30. Unfortunately in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography