Search results for 'incorruptibility' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  8
    Sean Valentine & Anthony Johnson (2005). Codes of Ethics, Orientation Programs, and the Perceived Importance of Employee Incorruptibility. Journal of Business Ethics 61 (1):45 - 53.
    The purpose of this study was to determine the degree to which the review of corporate ethics codes is associated with individuals’ perceptions of the importance of virtue ethics, or more specifically, employee incorruptibility. A convenience sample of individuals working for a university or one of several business organizations located in the Mountain West region of the United States was compiled with a self-report questionnaire. A usable sample of 143 persons representing both the public and private industries was secured (...)
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  2.  12
    Eike-Henner W. Kluge (2015). St. Thomas on the Incorruptibility of the Human Soul: A Reassessment of His Argument From Natural Desire. Review of Metaphysics 68 (4):742-757.
    St. Thomas’s argument for the immortality of the human soul in question 75, article 6 of his Summa Theologica has historically been rejected, most famously perhaps by Duns Scotus, who said that it was inconclusive at best and question begging at worst. This article argues that Scotus’s critique may be unfair because it rests on a mistaken understanding of what St. Thomas means by the phrase “natural desire,” and that if one unpacks the ontological assumptions that underlie St. Thomas’s reasoning (...)
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  3.  11
    Mary F. Rousseau (1977). Avicenna and Aquinas on Incorruptibility. New Scholasticism 51 (4):524-536.
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  4.  10
    Frederick D. Wilhelmsen (1993). A Note on Contraries and the Incorruptibility of the Human Soul In St. Thomas Aquinas. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 67 (3):333-338.
  5. Sean Valentine & Anthony Johnson (2005). Codes of Ethics, Orientation Programs, and the Perceived Importance of Employee Incorruptibility. Journal of Business Ethics 61 (1):45-53.
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  6.  22
    Marleen Rozemond (2014). The Faces of Simplicity in Descartes’s Soul. In Dominik Perler & Klaus Corcilius (eds.), Partitioning the Soul: Debates From Plato to Leibniz. De Gruyter 219-244.
    In this paper I explain several ways in which Descartes denied that the human soul or mind is composite and the role this idea played in his thought. The mind is whole in the whole and whole in the parts of the body because it has no parts. Unlike body, the mind is indivisible, and this is a different idea from the thought that mind and body are incorruptible. Descartes connects the immortality of the soul with its status as a (...)
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  7.  2
    Dr Erich H. Loewy & Dr Roberta Springer Loewy (2005). Use and Abuse of Bioethics: Integrity and Professional Standing. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 13 (1):73-86.
    This paper sets out to examine the integrity and professional standing of “Bioethics.” It argues that professions have certain responsibilities that start with setting criteria for and credentialing those that have met the criteria and goes on to ultimately have social responsibilities to the community. As it now stands we claim that Bioethics—while it certainly has achieved some progress in the way medicine has developed—has failed to become a profession and has to a large extent failed in its social responsibility. (...)
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  8.  55
    Johan E. Gustafsson (2013). Neither 'Good' in Terms of 'Better' nor 'Better' in Terms of 'Good'. Noûs 48 (1):466–473.
    In this paper, I argue against defining either of ‘good’ and ‘better’ in terms of the other. According to definitions of ‘good’ in terms of ‘better’, something is good if and only if it is better than some indifference point. Against this approach, I argue that the indifference point cannot be defined in terms of ‘better’ without ruling out some reasonable axiologies. Against defining ‘better’ in terms of ‘good’, I argue that this approach either cannot allow for the incorruptibility (...)
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  9.  71
    Fred Feldman (1998). Hyperventilating About Intrinsic Value. Journal of Ethics 2 (4):339-354.
    Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Brentano, Moore, and Chisholm have suggested marks or criteria of intrinsic goodness. I distinguish among eight of these. I focus in this paper on four: (a) unimprovability, (b) unqualifiedness, (c) dependence upon intrinsic natures, and (d) incorruptibility. I try to show that each of these is problematic in some way. I also try to show that they are not equivalent – they point toward distinct conceptions of intrinsic goodness. In the end it appears that none of (...)
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  10.  10
    F. Feldman (2005). Hyperventilating About Intrinsic Value. In Toni Rønnow-Rasmussen & Michael J. Zimmerman (eds.), Journal of Ethics. Springer 45--58.
    Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Brentano, Moore, and Chisholm have suggested "marks" or criteria of intrinsic goodness. I distinguish among eight of these. I focus in this paper on four: unimprovability, unqualifiedness, dependence upon intrinsic natures, and incorruptibility. I try to show that each of these is problematic in some way. I also try to show that they are not equivalent - they point toward distinct conceptions of intrinsic goodness. In the end it appears that none of them is fully satisfactory. (...)
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  11.  25
    Dan Kaufman (2014). Cartesian Substances, Individual Bodies, and Corruptibility. Res Philosophica 91 (1):71-102.
    According to the Monist Interpretation of Descartes, there is really only one corporeal substance—the entire extended plenum. Evidence for this interpretation seems to be provided by Descartes in the Synopsis of the Meditations, where he claims that all substances are incorruptible. Finite bodies, being corruptible, would then fail to be substances. On the other hand, ‘body, taken in the general sense,’ being incorruptible, would be a corporeal substance. In this paper, I defend a Pluralist Interpretation of Descartes, according to which (...)
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  12.  15
    Nancy Levene (2001). Spinoza's Bible. Philosophy and Theology 13 (1):93-142.
    My essay explores the connections between Spinoza’s theory of biblical interpretation and his conception of prophecy, linking the two through what he calls “moral certainty.” The question of what prophecy conveys is connected to the question of how to read Scripture because readers are in a similar position to both the prophets, who attain sure knowledge of some matter revealed by God, and the audience of prophecy, who have access to this knowledge only through faith. Like prophets, readers are interpreters (...)
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  13.  12
    Patricio de Navascués Benlloch (2011). “Cuerpo” en la tradición antioquena. Augustinianum 51 (1):21-45.
    Faced with an Alexandrian (Arian) anthropology of Neoplatonic inspiration, Eustathius adopts a strong position in several statements that is similar to astoic Aristotelianism of the 4th century. Nevertheless, Eustathius's reflection is more genuinely theological, than it is reflective of any particular philosophical trend. For him, the human body is a dynamic concept which finds its full meaning in light of the history of salvation, wherein the incarnate and glorified Logos, the second Adam, brings to completion the perfection and incorruptibility (...)
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  14.  9
    Dejan Jelovac, Zeger Wal & Ana Jelovac (2011). Business and Government Ethics in the “New” and “Old” EU: An Empirical Account of Public–Private Value Congruence in Slovenia and the Netherlands. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (1):127-141.
    This study reports on the hierarchy of organizational values in public and private sector organizations in Slovenia and the Netherlands. We surveyed 400 managers in Slovenia and 382 in the Netherlands using an identical questionnaire on the importance of a selection of values in everyday decision making. In Slovenia, impartiality, incorruptibility, and transparency were rated significantly higher in the public sector, while profitability, obedience, and reliability were rated more important in business organizations. In contrast, in the Netherlands, 11 values (...)
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