Search results for 'intensional logic' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Intensional Logic (1998). 1.1. The Logistic Method. Church's Writings on Philosophical Matters Ex-Hibit an Unwavering Commitment to What He Called the “Logistic Method”. 3 The Term Did Not Catch on and Now One Would Just Speak of “Formalization”. The Use of These Ideas is Now so Common and Familiar Among Logicians. [REVIEW] Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 4 (2).score: 300.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Christopher Menzel (1993). The Proper Treatment of Predication in Fine-Grained Intensional Logic. Philosophical Perspectives 7:61-87.score: 180.0
    In this paper I rehearse two central failings of traditional possible world semantics. I then present a much more robust framework for intensional logic and semantics based liberally on the work of George Bealer in his book Quality and Concept. Certain expressive limitations of Bealer's approach, however, lead me to extend the framework in a particularly natural and useful way. This extension, in turn, brings to light associated limitations of Bealer's account of predication. In response, I develop a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Bjørn Jespersen (forthcoming). Structured Lexical Concepts, Property Modifiers, and Transparent Intensional Logic. Philosophical Studies:1-25.score: 180.0
    In a 2010 paper Daley argues, contra Fodor, that several syntactically simple predicates express structured concepts. Daley develops his theory of structured concepts within Tichý’s Transparent Intensional Logic (TIL). I rectify various misconceptions of Daley’s concerning TIL. I then develop within TIL an improved theory of how structured concepts are structured and how syntactically simple predicates are related to structured concepts.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jiří Raclavský (2013). On the Interaction of Semantics and Deduction in Transparent Intensional Logic (Is Tichý's Logic a Logic?). Logic and Logical Philosophy 23 (1):57-68.score: 162.0
    It is sometimes objected that Tichý’s logic is not a logic because it underestimates deduction, providing only logical analyses of expressions. I argue that this opinion is wrong. First of all, to detect valid arguments, which are formulated in a language, there needs to be logical analysis to ascertain which semantical entities (Tichý’s so-called constructions) are involved. Entailment is defined as an extralinguistic affair relating those constructions. The validity of an argument, composed of propositional constructions, stems from the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Edward N. Zalta (1988). Intensional Logic and the Metaphysics of Intentionality. The MIT Press.score: 124.0
    This book tackles the issues that arise in connection with intensional logic -- a formal system for representing and explaining the apparent failures of certain important principles of inference such as the substitution of identicals and existential generalization-- and intentional states --mental states such as beliefs, hopes, and desires that are directed towards the world. The theory offers a unified explanation of the various kinds of inferential failures associated with intensional logic but also unifies the study (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. E. H. Alves & J. A. D. Guerzoni (1990). Extending Montague's System: A Three Valued Intensional Logic. Studia Logica 49 (1):127 - 132.score: 120.0
    In this note we present a three-valued intensional logic, which is an extension of both Montague's intensional logic and ukasiewicz three-valued logic. Our system is obtained by adapting Gallin's version of intensional logic (see Gallin, D., Intensional and Higher-order Modal Logic). Here we give only the necessary modifications to the latter. An acquaintance with Gallin's work is pressuposed.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Melvin Fitting, Intensional Logic. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 120.0
    There is an obvious difference between what a term designates and what it means. At least it is obvious that there is a difference. In some way, meaning determines designation, but is not synonymous with it. After all, “the morning star” and “the evening star” both designate the planet Venus, but don't have the same meaning. Intensional logic attempts to study both designation and meaning and investigate the relationships between them.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Imre Ruzsa (1981). An Approach to Intensional Logic. Studia Logica 40 (3):269 - 287.score: 120.0
    A system of tensed intensional logic excluding iterations of intensions is introduced. Instead of using the type symbols (for ‘sense’), extensional and intensional functor types are distinguished. A peculiarity of the semantics is the general acceptance of value-gaps (including truth-value-gaps): the possible semantic values (extensions) of extensional functors are partial functions. Some advantages of the system (relatively to R. Montague's intensional logic) are briefly indicated. Also, applications for modelling natural languages are illustrated by examples.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Melvin Fitting, Intensional Logic — Beyond First Order.score: 120.0
    Classical first-order logic can be extended in two different ways to serve as a foundation for mathematics: introduce higher orders, type theory, or introduce sets. As it happens, both approaches have natural analogs for quantified modal logics, both approaches date from the 1960’s, one is not very well-known, and the other is well-known as something else. I will present the basic semantic ideas of both higher order intensional logic, and intensional set theory. Before doing so, I’ll (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Joyce Friedman & David S. Warren (1980). Λ-Normal Forms in an Intensional Logic for English. Studia Logica 39 (2-3):311 - 324.score: 120.0
    Montague [7] translates English into a tensed intensional logic, an extension of the typed -calculus. We prove that each translation reduces to a formula without -applications, unique to within change of bound variable. The proof has two main steps. We first prove that translations of English phrases have the special property that arguments to functions are modally closed. We then show that formulas in which arguments are modally closed have a unique fully reduced -normal form. As a corollary, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Lynn Pasquerella (1987). Intensional Logic and Brentano's Non-Propositional Theory of Judgement. Grazer Philosophische Studien 29:117-119.score: 120.0
    The reism adopted by Brentano in the later stages of his philosophy led him to advocate a non-propositional theory of judgment. George Bealer, in his book Quality and Concept, charges that Brentano's theory, and indeed all non-propositional theories of judgment are not adequate to certain "intuitively valid" arguments in the realm of intensional logic. I show that Bealer is mistaken when he claims that Brentano's theory cannot offer an adequate rendering of the first two arguments, and I challenge (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. D. W. Mertz (1999). The Logic of Instance Ontology. Journal of Philosophical Logic 28 (1):81-111.score: 114.0
    An ontology's theory of ontic predication has implications for the concomitant predicate logic. Remarkable in its analytic power for both ontology and logic is the here developed Particularized Predicate Logic (PPL), the logic inherent in the realist version of the doctrine of unit or individuated predicates. PPL, as axiomatized and proven consistent below, is a three-sorted impredicative intensional logic with identity, having variables ranging over individuals x, intensions R, and instances of intensions $R_{i}$ . (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Daniel Gallin (1975). Intensional and Higher-Order Modal Logic: With Applications to Montague Semantics. American Elsevier Pub. Co..score: 114.0
    CHAPTER 1. INTENSIONAL LOGIC §1. Natural Language and Intensional Logic When we speak of a theory of meaning for a natural language such as English, ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Daniel Gallin (1972). Intensional and Higher-Order Modal Logic. [Berkeley.score: 114.0
    INTENSIONAL LOGIC §1. Natural Language and Intensional Logic When we speak of a theory of meaning for a natural language such as English, we have in mind an ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Nuel Belnap & Thomas Müller (2013). BH-CIFOL: Case-Intensional First Order Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic (2-3):1-32.score: 114.0
    This paper follows Part I of our essay on case-intensional first-order logic (CIFOL; Belnap and Müller (2013)). We introduce a framework of branching histories to take account of indeterminism. Our system BH-CIFOL adds structure to the cases, which in Part I formed just a set: a case in BH-CIFOL is a moment/history pair, specifying both an element of a partial ordering of moments and one of the total courses of events (extending all the way into the future) that (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Bjørn Jespersen & Massimiliano Carrara (2013). A New Logic of Technical Malfunction. Studia Logica 101 (3):547-581.score: 108.0
    Aim of the paper is to present a new logic of technical malfunction. The need for this logic is motivated by a simple-sounding philosophical question: Is a malfunctioning corkscrew, which fails to uncork bottles, nonetheless a corkscrew? Or in general terms, is a malfunctioning F, which fails to do what Fs do, nonetheless an F? We argue that ‘malfunctioning’ denotes the modifier Malfunctioning rather than a property, and that the answer depends on whether Malfunctioning is subsective or privative. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Newton C. A. Da Costa & Décio Krause (1997). An Intensional Schrödinger Logic. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 38 (2):179-194.score: 102.0
    We investigate the higher-order modal logic , which is a variant of the system presented in our previous work. A semantics for that system, founded on the theory of quasi sets, is outlined. We show how such a semantics, motivated by the very intuitive base of Schrödinger logics, provides an alternative way to formalize some intensional concepts and features which have been used in recent discussions on the logical foundations of quantum mechanics; for example, that some terms like (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Pavel Materna (2013). Is Transparent Intensional Logic a Non-Classical Logic? Logic and Logical Philosophy 23 (1):47-55.score: 102.0
    It is shown that: (a) classicality is connected with various criteria some of which are fulfilled by TIL while some other are not; (b) some more general characteristic of classicality connects it with philosophical realism whereas (radical) anti-realism is connected with non-classical logics; (c) TIL is highly expressive due to its hyperintensionality, which makes it possible to handle procedures as objects sui generis. Thus TIL is classical in obeying principles of realism and non-classical in transcending some principles taught by textbooks (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. C. Anthony Anderson (1998). Alonzo Church's Contributions to Philosophy and Intensional Logic. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 4 (2):129-171.score: 96.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Marie Duží (2010). The Paradox of Inference and the Non-Triviality of Analytic Information. Journal of Philosophical Logic 39 (5):473 - 510.score: 96.0
    The classical theory of semantic information (ESI), as formulated by Bar-Hillel and Carnap in 1952, does not give a satisfactory account of the problem of what information, if any, analytically and/or logically true sentences have to offer. According to ESI, analytically true sentences lack informational content, and any two analytically equivalent sentences convey the same piece of information. This problem is connected with Cohen and Nagel's paradox of inference: Since the conclusion of a valid argument is contained in the premises, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Yue J. Jiang (1993). An Intensional Epistemic Logic. Studia Logica 52 (2):259 - 280.score: 96.0
    One of the fundamental properties inclassical equational reasoning isLeibniz's principle of substitution. Unfortunately, this propertydoes not hold instandard epistemic logic. Furthermore,Herbrand's lifting theorem which isessential to thecompleteness ofresolution andParamodulation in theclassical first order logic (FOL), turns out to be invalid in standard epistemic logic. In particular, unlike classical logic, there is no skolemization normal form for standard epistemic logic. To solve these problems, we introduce anintensional epistemic logic, based on avariation of Kripke's possible-worlds semantics (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Peter Gärdenfors (1975). Qualitative Probability as an Intensional Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 4 (2):171 - 185.score: 96.0
  23. V. Halbach & P. Welch (2009). Necessities and Necessary Truths: A Prolegomenon to the Use of Modal Logic in the Analysis of Intensional Notions. Mind 118 (469):71-100.score: 96.0
    In philosophical logic necessity is usually conceived as a sentential operator rather than as a predicate. An intensional sentential operator does not allow one to express quantified statements such as 'There are necessary a posteriori propositions' or 'All laws of physics are necessary' in first-order logic in a straightforward way, while they are readily formalized if necessity is formalized by a predicate. Replacing the operator conception of necessity by the predicate conception, however, causes various problems and forces (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Melvin Fitting (2004). First-Order Intensional Logic. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 127 (1-3):171-193.score: 96.0
  25. Charles Parsons (1982). Intensional Logic in Extensional Language. Journal of Symbolic Logic 47 (2):289-328.score: 96.0
  26. Steffen Lewitzka (2009). $\in_I$ : An Intuitionistic Logic Without Fregean Axiom and with Predicates for Truth and Falsity. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 50 (3):275-301.score: 96.0
    We present $\in_I$-Logic (Epsilon-I-Logic), a non-Fregean intuitionistic logic with a truth predicate and a falsity predicate as intuitionistic negation. $\in_I$ is an extension and intuitionistic generalization of the classical logic $\in_T$ (without quantifiers) designed by Sträter as a theory of truth with propositional self-reference. The intensional semantics of $\in_T$ offers a new solution to semantic paradoxes. In the present paper we introduce an intuitionistic semantics and study some semantic notions in this broader context. Also we (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Charles B. Daniels & James B. Freeman (1977). Classical Second-Order Intensional Logic with Maximal Propositions. Journal of Philosophical Logic 6 (1):1 - 31.score: 96.0
    By the standards presented in the Introduction, CMFC2 is deficient on at least one ontological ground: ‘∀’ is a syncategorematic expression and so CMFC2 is not an ideal language. To some there may be an additional difficulty: any two wffs provably equivalent in the classical sense are provably identical. We hope in sequel to present systems free of these difficulties, free either of one or the other, or perhaps both.This work was done with the aid of Canada Council Grant S74-0551-S1.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Serge Lapierre (1992). A Functional Partial Semantics for Intensional Logic. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 33 (4):517-541.score: 96.0
  29. Paul Weingartner (1973). A Predicate Calculus for Intensional Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 2 (2):220 - 303.score: 96.0
  30. James W. Garson (1980). The Unaxiomatizability of a Quantified Intensional Logic. Journal of Philosophical Logic 9 (1):59 - 72.score: 96.0
  31. Thomas Ede Zimmermann (1989). Intensional Logic and Two-Sorted Type Theory. Journal of Symbolic Logic 54 (1):65-77.score: 96.0
  32. James W. Garson (1973). The Completeness of an Intensional Logic: Definite Topological Logic. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 14 (2):175-184.score: 96.0
  33. Godehard Link (1996). Review: L. T. F. Gamut, Logic, Language, and Meaning. Volume I. Introduction to Logic; Grammar., L. T. F. Gamut, Logic, Language, and Meaning. Volume II. Intensional Logic and Logical. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 61 (1):343-346.score: 96.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Nuel Belnap & Thomas Müller, CIFOL: Case-Intensional First Order Logic. (I) Toward a Theory of Sorts.score: 96.0
    This is Part I of a two-part essay introducing case-intensional first-order logic (CIFOL), an easy-to-use, uniform, powerful, and useful combination of first order logic with modal logic resulting from philosophical and technical modifications of Bressan’s General interpreted modal calculus (Yale University Press 1972). CIFOL starts with a set of cases; each expression has an extension in each case and an intension, which is the function from the cases to the respective case-relative extensions. Predication is intensional; (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. James Andrew Fulton (1979). An Intensional Logic of Predicates and Predicate Modifiers Without Modal Operators. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 20 (4):807-834.score: 96.0
  36. Christopher Menzel (1992). Review: Edward N. Zalta, Intensional Logic and the Metaphysics of Intentionality. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 57 (3):1146-1150.score: 96.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Charles Parsons (1990). Anderson C. Anthony. General Intensional Logic. Handbook of Philosophical Logic, Volume II, Extensions of Classical Logic, Edited by Gabbay D. And Guenthner F., Synthese Library, Vol. 165, D. Reidel Publishing Company, Dordrecht, Boston, and Lancaster, 1984, Pp. 355–385. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 55 (2):892-894.score: 96.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. M. J. Cresswell (1972). Second‐Order Intensional Logic. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 18 (19‐20):297-320.score: 96.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Marie Duží & Pavel Materna (2010). Can Concepts Be Defined in Terms of Sets? Logic and Logical Philosophy 19 (3):195-242.score: 96.0
    The goal of this paper is a philosophical explication and logical rectification of the notion of concept. We take into account only those contexts that are relevant from the logical point of view. It means that we are not interested in contexts characteristic of cognitive sciences, particularly of psychology, where concepts are conceived of as some kind of mental objects or representations. After a brief recapitulation of various theories of concept, in particular Frege’s and Church’s ones, we propose our own (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Charles Parsons (1990). Review: C. Anthony Anderson, D. Gabbay, F. Guenthner, General Intensional Logic. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 55 (2):892-894.score: 96.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Bede Rundle (1972). Review: J. Myhill, Problems Arising in the Formalization of Intensional Logic. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 37 (1):180-180.score: 96.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Walter H. O'Briant (1967). Leibnitz's Preference for an Intensional Logic (A Reply to Mr. Parkinson). Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 8 (3):254-256.score: 96.0
  43. R. A. Bull (1989). Review: Johan van Benthem, A Manual of Intensional Logic. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 54 (4):1489-1489.score: 96.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Matt Fairtlough & Michael Mendler (2003). Intensional Completeness in an Extension of Gödel/Dummett Logic. Studia Logica 73 (1):51 - 80.score: 96.0
    We enrich intuitionistic logic with a lax modal operator and define a corresponding intensional enrichment of Kripke models M = (W, , V) by a function T giving an effort measure T(w, u) {} for each -related pair (w, u). We show that embodies the abstraction involved in passing from true up to bounded effort to true outright. We then introduce a refined notion of intensional validity M |= p : and present a corresponding intensional calculus (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. K. J. J. Hintikka (1960). Review: Raili Kauppi, Some Problems of Intensional Logic. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 25 (4):340-340.score: 96.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. S. Kuroda (1955). Review: Shozo Omori, Formalization of an Intensional Logic. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 20 (2):173-173.score: 96.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Godehard Link (1996). Gamut LTF (Pseudonym). Logic, Language, and Meaning. Volume I. Introduction to Logic. English Translation of Logica, Taal En Betekenis, Volume I, Inleiding in de Logica. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London 1991, Xiv+ 282 Pp. Gamut LTF (Pseudonym). Logic, Language, and Meaning. Volume II. Intensional Logic and Logical Grammar. English Translation of Logica, Taal En Betekenis, Volume II, Intensionele Logica En Logische Grammatica. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London 1991 ... [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 61 (1):343-345.score: 96.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Bernd J. Stephan (1975). Compactness and Recursive Enumerability in Intensional Logic. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 21 (1):343-346.score: 96.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Richard Montague (1970). Pragmatics and Intensional Logic. Synthese 22 (1-2):68--94.score: 90.0
1 — 50 / 1000