Search results for 'interaction process' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  72
    Johanna Seibt (2009). Forms of Emergent Interaction in General Process Theory. Synthese 166 (3):479 - 512.
    General Process Theory (GPT) is a new (non-Whiteheadian) process ontology. According to GPT the domains of scientific inquiry and everyday practice consist of configurations of ‘goings-on’ or ‘dynamics’ that can be technically defined as concrete, dynamic, non-particular individuals called general processes. The paper offers a brief introduction to GPT in order to provide ontological foundations for research programs such as interactivism that centrally rely on the notions of ‘process,’ ‘interaction,’ and ‘emergence.’ I begin with an analysis (...)
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  2.  24
    Josep Vidal (2012). Decision theory: Interaction process or organizations as decision systems. Cinta de Moebio 44 (44):136-152.
    We present a theoretical discussion of the sociological contribution concerning decisions in organizations. Two theories stand. The first, based on the decision process from a critical theory of the traditional linear multi rational by Lucien Sfez, argues that the decision is a process of interactions and treats it as an institutional process based on the freedom of the subject. The second theory based on self-referential systems by Niklas Luhmann, interprets organizations as systems-making, and understands the (...)
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  3.  27
    Raisa B. Kvesko, Svetlana B. Kvesko & Irina L. Vanina (2008). Sociolinguistic Communication as a Basis of Interaction of Subjects of Educational Process. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 35:21-27.
    In the article is founded that sociolinguistic communication is an interaction of subjects in which basis are language and textual activity. Person`s existence and work are directly and absolutely connected with a main function of language – communicative. Sociolinguistic reality is directly connected with a process ofcommunication. Communication is today an essential part of our life and is very important. In the article sociolinguistic communication rates as a social phenomenon, as a basis of interaction of subjects of (...)
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  4.  9
    Bolanle Olaniran (2001). Computer-Mediated Communication and Conflict Management Process: A Closer Look at Anticipation of Future Interaction. World Futures 57 (4):285-313.
    This paper explores the concept of anticipation of future interaction (AFI) in Computer?Mediated Communication (CMC) with conflict management. Specifically, the tenet of the current paper is to determine whether CMC is suitable for conflict management. This central question was address drawing on anticipation of future interaction. Along this line, the issue of task, identity, self?presentations are discussed relative to the role of anticipation of future interaction in CMC encounters. Specific propositions are presented. The discussion addresses implications for (...)
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  5.  30
    Ron Sun (2005). The Interaction of the Explicit and the Implicit in Skill Learning: A Dual-Process Approach. Psychological Review 112:159-192.
    This article explicates the interaction between implicit and explicit processes in skill learning, in contrast to the tendency of researchers to study each type in isolation. It highlights various effects of the interaction on learning (including synergy effects). The authors argue for an integrated model of skill learning that takes into account both implicit and explicit processes. Moreover, they argue for a bottom-up approach (first learning implicit knowledge and then explicit knowledge) in the integrated model. A variety of (...)
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  6.  3
    R. Buttny & J. Lannamann (2011). Investigating Process as Language and Social Interaction. Constructivist Foundations 7 (1):14-17.
    Open peer commentary on the target article “From Objects to Processes: A Proposal to Rewrite Radical Constructivism” by Siegfried J. Schmidt. Upshot: We largely agree with Siegfried J. Schmidt’s focus on process and his call to look at how the “heavy words” of philosophy – “reality,” “knowledge,” “truth,” and like – are used in our everyday life-world. As communication researchers, we examine two transcripts of conversation to sketch empirically how “the real” is reported in giving directions or used in (...)
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  7.  89
    Argyris Arnellos, Thomas Spyrou & Ioannis Darzentas (2010). Naturalising the Design Process: Autonomy and Interaction as Core Features. In Marcin Miłkowski Konrad Talmont-Kaminski (ed.), Beyond Description: Naturalism and Normativity. College Publications
  8.  12
    Naomi Miyake (1986). Constructive Interaction and the Iterative Process of Understanding. Cognitive Science 10 (2):151-177.
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  9. Adam Kendon (1985). Behavioral Foundations for the Process of Frame Attunement in Face-to-Face Interaction. In G. P. Ginsburg, Marylin Brenner & Mario von Cranach (eds.), Discovery Strategies in the Psychology of Action. Academic Press 229--253.
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  10.  1
    Alain Trognon (1993). How Does the Process of Interaction Work When Two Interlocutors Try to Resolve a Logical Problem? Ethics and Behavior 11 (3):325-345.
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  11.  10
    Oana Apostol & Salme Näsi (2008). Business Talk on Corporate – Employee Interaction as an Evolutionary Process. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:184-195.
    This paper focuses on corporate social responsibilities to employees, one key stakeholder for each firm. In particular, the views and attitudes of managers and entrepreneurs with respect to various social aspects related to their employees are investigated. The context of this research, Romania, a postcommunist country in Eastern Europe, allows us to look for dissimilarities between the talk of local firms and MNCs or foreign-based companies. The analysis is based on qualitative research and adopts an interpretative approach.The articles of the (...)
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  12.  3
    Daniel Robichaud (2001). Interaction as Text: A Semiotic Look at an Organizing Process. American Journal of Semiotics 17 (1):141-161.
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  13.  1
    Johanna Seibt (2009). Forms of Emergent Interaction in General Process Theory. Synthese 166 (3):479-512.
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  14.  2
    Donald R. Yelen (1985). Opponent-Process Theory: The Interaction of Trials, Intertrial Interval, and the Presence of Evoking Stimuli. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 23 (1):25-27.
  15.  2
    Anne-Lise Lövlie (1981). Part Process Analysis: Toward a New Method for Studying Interaction. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 12 (2):261-273.
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  16. Ciano Aydin (2007). Towards a Process-Pragmatic Grounding of the Concept of Identity: Peirce on Potentiality, Interaction, and Regularity. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 69 (1):35-78.
     
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  17.  66
    Hanne De Jaegher & Ezequiel Di Paolo (2007). Participatory Sense-Making. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (4):485-507.
    As yet, there is no enactive account of social cognition. This paper extends the enactive concept of sense-making into the social domain. It takes as its departure point the process of interaction between individuals in a social encounter. It is a well-established finding that individuals can and generally do coordinate their movements and utterances in such situations. We argue that the interaction process can take on a form of autonomy. This allows us to reframe the problem (...)
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  18. Hanne De Jaegher (2009). Social Understanding Through Direct Perception? Yes, by Interacting. Consciousness & Cognition 18 (2):535-542.
    This paper comments on Gallagher’s recently published direct perception proposal about social cognition [Gallagher, S. (2008a). Direct perception in the intersubjective context. Consciousness and Cognition, 17(2), 535–543]. I show that direct perception is in danger of being appropriated by the very cognitivist accounts criticised by Gallagher (theory theory and simulation theory). Then I argue that the experiential directness of perception in social situations can be understood only in the context of the role of the interaction (...)
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  19.  4
    Vivian Bohl & Wouter van den Bos (2012). Toward an Integrative Account of Social Cognition: Marrying Theory of Mind and Interactionism to Study the Interplay of Type 1 and Type 2 Processes. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience:1-15.
    Traditional theory of mind (ToM) accounts for social cognition have been at the basis of most studies in the social cognitive neurosciences. However, in recent years, the need to go beyond traditional ToM accounts for understanding real life social interactions has become all the more pressing. At the same time it remains unclear whether alternative accounts, such as interactionism, can yield a sufficient description and explanation of social interactions. We argue that instead of considering ToM and interactionism as mutually exclusive (...)
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  20.  80
    Jeremy I. M. Carpendale & Charlie Lewis (2004). Constructing an Understanding of Mind: The Development of Children's Social Understanding Within Social Interaction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):79-96.
    Theories of children's developing understanding of mind tend to emphasize either individualistic processes of theory formation, maturation, or introspection, or the process of enculturation. However, such theories must be able to account for the accumulating evidence of the role of social interaction in the development of social understanding. We propose an alternative account, according to which the development of children's social understanding occurs within triadic interaction involving the child's experience of the world as well as communicative (...) with others about their experience and beliefs (Chapman 1991; 1999). It is through such triadic interaction that children gradually construct knowledge of the world as well as knowledge of other people. We contend that the extent and nature of the social interaction children experience will influence the development of children's social understanding. Increased opportunity to engage in cooperative social interaction and exposure to talk about mental states should facilitate the development of social understanding. We review evidence suggesting that children's understanding of mind develops gradually in the context of social interaction. Therefore, we need a theory of development in this area that accords a fundamental role to social interaction, yet does not assume that children simply adopt socially available knowledge but rather that children construct an understanding of mind within social interaction. Key Words: language; Piaget; social interaction; theories of mind; Vygotsky; Wittgenstein. (shrink)
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  21.  1
    Niamh M. Brennan, Doris M. Merkl-Davies & Annika Beelitz (2013). Dialogism in Corporate Social Responsibility Communications: Conceptualising Verbal Interaction Between Organisations and Their Audiences. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (4):665-679.
    We conceptualise CSR communication as a process of reciprocal influence between organisations and their audiences. We use an illustrative case study in the form of a conflict between firms and a powerful stakeholder which is played out in a series of 20 press releases over a 2-month period to develop a framework of analysis based on insights from linguistics. It focuses on three aspects of dialogism, namely (i) turn-taking (co-operating in a conversation by responding to the other party), (ii) (...)
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  22.  42
    Richard Campbell (2009). A Process-Based Model for an Interactive Ontology. Synthese 166 (3):453 - 477.
    The paper proposes a process-based model for an ontology that encompasses the emergence of process systems generated by increasingly complex levels of organization. Starting with a division of processes into those that are persistent and those that are fleeting, the model builds through a series of exclusive and exhaustive disjunctions. The crucial distinction is between those persistent and cohesive systems that are energy wells, and those that are far-from-equilibrium. The latter are necessarily open; they can persist only by (...)
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  23.  44
    Sharon C. Bolton, Rebecca Chung-hee Kim & Kevin D. O'Gorman (2011). Corporate Social Responsibility as a Dynamic Internal Organizational Process: A Case Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 101 (1):61 - 74.
    This article tracks Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as an emergent organizational process that places the employee at its center. Predominantly, research on CSR tends to focus on external pressures and outcomes leading to a neglect of CSR as a dynamic and developing process that relies on the involvement of the employee as a major stakeholder in its co-creation and implementation. Utilizing case study data drawn from a study of a large multinational energy company, we explore how management relies (...)
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  24.  32
    Tom Froese & Shaun Gallagher (2012). Getting Interaction Theory (IT) Together: Integrating Developmental, Phenomenological, Enactive, and Dynamical Approaches to Social Interaction. Interaction Studies 13 (3):436-468.
    We argue that progress in our scientific understanding of the `social mind' is hampered by a number of unfounded assumptions. We single out the widely shared assumption that social behavior depends solely on the capacities of an individual agent. In contrast, both developmental and phenomenological studies suggest that the personal-level capacity for detached `social cognition' (conceived as a process of theorizing about and/or simulating another mind) is a secondary achievement that is dependent on more immediate processes of embodied social (...)
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  25.  98
    Joshua D. Reichard (2013). Of Miracles and Metaphysics: A Pentecostal‐Charismatic and Process‐Relational Dialogue. Zygon 48 (2):274-293.
    This article is comprised of a dialogue between Pentecostal-Charismatic and Process-Relational theologies on the perennial issue of miracles. The language of supernaturalism, widely employed by Pentecostal-Charismatic theologians, is contrasted with the metaphysical naturalism of Process-Relational theology; it is proposed that a philosophically and scientifically sensitive theology of miracles is possible through a synthesis of both traditions. Themes such as nonmaterialism over materialism, spiritual experience, and prayer for healing miracles are explored. A theology of miracles, mutually informed by both (...)
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  26.  62
    Philip Brey (2005). The Epistemology and Ontology of Human-Computer Interaction. Minds and Machines 15 (3-4):383-398.
    This paper analyzes epistemological and ontological dimensions of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) through an analysis of the functions of computer systems in relation to their users. It is argued that the primary relation between humans and computer systems has historically been epistemic: computers are used as information-processing and problem-solving tools that extend human cognition, thereby creating hybrid cognitive systems consisting of a human processor and an artificial processor that process information in tandem. In this role, computer systems extend human (...)
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  27.  4
    Leonhard Schilbach, Bert Timmermans, Vasudevi Reddy, Alan Costall, Gary Bente, Tobias Schlicht & Kai Vogeley (2013). A Second-Person Neuroscience in Interaction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):441-462.
    In this response we address additions to as well as criticisms and possible misinterpretations of our proposal for a second-person neuroscience. We map out the most crucial aspects of our approach by (1) acknowledging that second-person engaged interaction is not the only way to understand others, although we claim that it is ontogenetically prior; (2) claiming that spectatorial paradigms need to be complemented in order to enable a full understanding of social interactions; and (3) restating that our theoretical proposal (...)
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  28.  5
    B. James Deaton & John P. Hoehn (2005). The Social Construction of Production Externalities in Contemporary Agriculture: Process Versus Product Standards as the Basis for Defining “Organic”. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 22 (1):31-38.
    The analysis distinguishes two types of standards for defining organic produce; process standards and product standards. Process standards define organic products by the method and means of production. Product standards define organic by the physical quality of the end product. The National Organic Program (NOP) uses process standards as the basis for defining organic. However, the situation is complicated by agricultural production practices, which sometimes result in the migration of NOP prohibited substances from conventional to organic fields. (...)
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  29.  10
    Hiroko Shoji & Koichi Hori (2004). S-Conart: An Interaction Method That Facilitates Concept Articulation in Shopping Online. [REVIEW] AI and Society 19 (1):65-83.
    This study addresses building an interactive system that effectively prompts customers to make their decision while shopping online. It is especially targeted at purchasing as concept articulation where customers initially have a vague concept of what they want and then gradually clarify it in the course of interaction, which has not been covered by traditional online shopping systems. This paper proposes information presentation methods to effectively facilitate customers in their concept articulation process, and the framework for interaction (...)
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  30.  2
    Sergej Lebedev (2009). Religious Processes as Intercultural Interaction: Contours of a Sociological Discourse. Filozofija I Društvo 20 (1):37-48.
    During 'cyclic' historical periods it would be correct to interpret religious processes in terms of interaction of two essentially different, but substantially, structurally and functionally comparative types of integrating cultural complexes that, in historical perspective, compete with each other on the effect on individuals and society in general. Such complexes represent secular and religious culture. Contemporary socio-cultural situation can be defined as an asymmetric representativeness of both secular and religious cultures. In a modern secular society, dominance of a secular (...)
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  31. Hanne De Jaegher (2009). What Made Me Want the Cheese? A Reply to Shaun Gallagher and Dan Hutto. Consciousness & Cognition 18 (2):549-550.
  32. Mark H. Bickhard (2000). Motivation and Emotion: An Interactive Process Model. In Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (eds.), The Caldron of Consciousness: Motivation, Affect and Self-Organization. John Benjamins 161.
    In this chapter, I outline dynamic models of motivation and emotion. These turn out not to be autonomous subsystems, but, instead, are deeply integrated in the basic interactive dynamic character of living systems. Motivation is a crucial aspect of particular kinds of interactive systems -- systems for which representation is a sister aspect. Emotion is a special kind of partially reflective interaction process, and yields its own emergent motivational aspects. In addition, the overall model accounts for (...)
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  33.  21
    Timothy Barker (2012). Toward a Process Philosophy for Digital Aesthetics. Process Studies 41 (1):188-189.
    Digital media seem to be marked by process. The digital image itself is produced by software processes and the constant flux of code. Further this, interaction with digital systems involves a constant process by which a so-called 'user' comes into contact with various machinic occasions. It seems that in light of these processes it is impossible to maintain an aesthetic or media theory that pictures a self-contained and psychologised subject interacting with a static and inert object. How (...)
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  34.  10
    Sung Jin Song (2007). Process Theology and Chinul's Buddhist Thought. Process Studies 36 (2):215-228.
    There is a great similarity between process theology and Chinul’s Buddhist thought. They share the conception of a mutual immanence and interaction between the world and the ultimate reality. They also share the view that the true or sanctified self is an incarnation and expression of the ultimate reality in and for the world. However, Chinul’s Buddhist thought is weak in dealing with the aspect of redemption.
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  35.  26
    Pia Lotila (2010). Corporate Responsiveness to Social Pressure: An Interaction-Based Model. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (3):395 - 409.
    The study introduces an interaction-based model that illustrates the iterative process of corporate responsiveness to social pressure. The model is then applied to a recent case of international relevance. The study implies that corporate management can apply three types of management approaches when managing relations with society, depending on their perception of social pressure: tactic, strategic or no action. This is then reflected in their practice of public relations (PR). Ethical leadership is considered to be manifested by the (...)
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  36.  6
    James Hollings (2013). Let the Story Go: The Role of Emotion in the Decision-Making Process of the Reluctant, Vulnerable Witness or Whistle-Blower. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):501-512.
    This paper draws on cognitive psychological theory to explain the role of emotion in the decision-making process of four reluctant, vulnerable witnesses to wrongdoing, who were persuaded to blow the whistle on matters of substantial public interest. It proposes a theoretical explanation for the role of emotion on whistle-blower or witness decision-making, based on the Iterative Reprocessing Model and drawing on appraisal-based theories of cognitive psychology. It concludes that the decision to speak is preceded by an intense emotional episode, (...)
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  37.  29
    Edward J. N. Stupple & Linden J. Ball (2008). Belief-Logic Conflict Resolution in Syllogistic Reasoning: Inspection-Time Evidence for a Parallel-Process Model. Thinking and Reasoning 14 (2):168 – 181.
    An experiment is reported examining dual-process models of belief bias in syllogistic reasoning using a problem complexity manipulation and an inspection-time method to monitor processing latencies for premises and conclusions. Endorsement rates indicated increased belief bias on complex problems, a finding that runs counter to the “belief-first” selective scrutiny model, but which is consistent with other theories, including “reasoning-first” and “parallel-process” models. Inspection-time data revealed a number of effects that, again, arbitrated against the selective scrutiny model. The most (...)
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  38.  34
    Argyris Arnellos, Thomas Spyrou & Ioannis Darzentas (2007). Exploring Creativity in the Design Process: A Systems-Semiotic Perspective. Cybernetics and Human Knowing 14 (1):37-64.
    This paper attempts to establish a systems-semiotic framework explaining creativity in the design process, where the design process is considered to have as its basis the cognitive process. The design process is considered as the interaction between two or more cognitive systems resulting in a purposeful and ongoing transformation of their already complex representational structures and the production of newer ones, in order to fulfill an ill-defined goal. Creativity is considered as the result of an (...)
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  39.  46
    Linden J. Ball & Edward J. N. Stupple (2008). Belief-Logic Conflict Resolution in Syllogistic Reasoning: Inspection-Time Evidence for a Parallel-Process Model. Thinking and Reasoning 14 (2):168-181.
    An experiment is reported examining dual-process models of belief bias in syllogistic reasoning using a problem complexity manipulation and an inspection-time method to monitor processing latencies for premises and conclusions. Endorsement rates indicated increased belief bias on complex problems, a finding that runs counter to the “belief-first” selective scrutiny model, but which is consistent with other theories, including “reasoning-first” and “parallel-process” models. Inspection-time data revealed a number of effects that, again, arbitrated against the selective scrutiny model. The most (...)
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  40.  12
    Ioannis Xenakis & Argyris Arnellos (2013). The Relation Between Interaction Aesthetics and Affordances. Design Studies 34 (1).
    Even though aesthetics and affordances are two important factors based on which designers provide effective ways of interaction through their artifacts, there is no study or theoretical model that relates these two aspects of design. We suggest a theoretical explanation that relates the underlying functionality of aesthetics, in particular, of interaction aesthetics and of affordances in the design process. Our claim is that interaction aesthetics are one among other factors that allow users to enhance the detection (...)
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  41. Renate Fruchter, Subashri Swaminathan, Manjunath Boraiah & Chhavi Upadhyay (2007). Reflection in Interaction. AI and Society 22 (2):211-226.
    A decision delay can translate into significant financial and business losses. One way to accelerate the decision process is through improved communication among the stakeholders engaged in the project. Capturing, transferring, managing, and reusing data, information, and knowledge in the context it is generated can lead to higher productivity, effective communication, reduced number of requests for clarification, and a shorter time-to-market cycle. We formalized the concept of reflection in interaction during communicative events among multiple project stakeholders. This concept (...)
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  42.  2
    Sara Rubinelli & Peter J. Schulz (2006). “Let Me Tell You Why!”. When Argumentation in Doctor–Patient Interaction Makes a Difference. Argumentation 20 (3):353-375.
    This paper throws some light on the nature of argumentation, its use and advantages, within the setting of doctor–patient interaction. It claims that argumentation can be used by doctors to offer patients reasons that work as ontological conditions for enhancing the decision making process, as well as to preserve the institutional nature of their relationship with patients. In support of these claims, selected arguments from real-life interactions are presented in the second part of the paper, and analysed by (...)
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  43.  21
    Bruce Glymour (2008). Correlated Interaction and Group Selection. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (4):835-855.
    argues that correlated interactions are necessary for group selection. His argument turns on a particular procedure for measuring the strength of selection, and employs a restricted conception of correlated interaction. It is here shown that the procedure in question is unreliable, and that while related procedures are reliable in special contexts, they do not require correlated interactions for group selection to occur. It is also shown that none of these procedures, all of which employ partial regression methods, are reliable (...)
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  44.  4
    Gemma Corradi Fiumara (1995). The Metaphoric Process: Connections Between Language and Life. Routledge.
    Metaphor is much more than just a linguistic phenomena, argues Gemma Corradi Fiumara, it is in fact the key process by which we construct and develop our ability to understand the world and the people we share it with. Rationality as understood by philosophers has led to a disembodied view of ourselves in which interaction between life and language has been downplayed. By looking at the metaphoric process - in an interpersonal rather than a formal way - (...)
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  45.  5
    Wesley R. Dean & H. Morgan Scott (2005). Antagonistic Synergy: Process and Paradox in the Development of New Agricultural Antimicrobial Regulations. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 22 (4):479-489.
    There is currently great controversy over the contribution antimicrobial use in animal agriculture has made to antimicrobial resistance in pathogenic bacteria with negative consequences for human health. In light of this, the approval process for antimicrobials used in US animal agriculture, known as New Animal Drug Application or NADA, is currently being revised by the federal government. We explore the public deliberations over the development of these new policies focusing our attention on the interaction between pharmaceutical companies and (...)
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  46.  59
    Ron Sun, The Interaction of Explicit and Implicit Learning: An Integrated Model.
    This paper explicates the interaction between the implicit and explicit learning processes in skill acquisition, contrary to the common tendency in the literature of studying each type of learning in isolation. It highlights the interaction between the two types of processes and its various effects on learning, including the synergy effect. This work advocates an integrated model of skill learning that takes into account both implicit and explicit processes; moreover, it embodies a bottom-up approach (first learning implicit knowledge (...)
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  47.  27
    Dawn M. McBride & B. Dosher (2002). A Comparison of Conscious and Automatic Memory Processes for Picture and Word Stimuli: A Process Dissocation Analysis. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):423-460.
    Four experiments were conducted to evaluate explanations of picture superiority effects previously found for several tasks. In a process dissociation procedure with word stem completion, picture fragment completion, and category production tasks, conscious and automatic memory processes were compared for studied pictures and words with an independent retrieval model and a generate-source model. The predictions of a transfer appropriate processing account of picture superiority were tested and validated in “process pure” latent measures of conscious and unconscious, or automatic (...)
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  48. Paul Griffiths (2006). The Baldwin Effect and Genetic Assimilation: Contrasting Explanatory Foci and Gene Concepts in Two Approaches to an Evolutionary Process. In P. Carruthers, S. Laurence & S. Stich (eds.), The Innate Mind: Culture and Cognition. Oxford University Press 91-101.
    David Papineau (2003; 2005) has discussed the relationship between social learning and the family of postulated evolutionary processes that includes ‘organic selection’, ‘coincident selection’, ‘autonomisation’, ‘the Baldwin effect’ and ‘genetic assimilation’. In all these processes a trait which initially develops in the members of a population as a result of some interaction with the environment comes to develop without that interaction in their descendants. It is uncontroversial that the development of an identical phenotypic trait might depend on an (...)
     
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  49.  10
    Rodrick Wallace (2002). Adaptation, Punctuation and Information: A Rate-Distortion Approach to Non-Cognitive 'Learning Plateaus' in Evolutionary Process. Acta Biotheoretica 50 (2):101-116.
    We extend recent information-theoretic phase transition approaches to evolutionary and cognitive process via the Rate Distortion and Joint Asymptotic Equipartition Theorems, in the circumstance of interaction with a highly structured environment. This suggests that learning plateaus in cognitive systems and punctuated equilibria in evolutionary process are formally analogous, even though evolution is not cognitive. Extending arguments by Adami et al. (2000), we argue that 'adaptation' is the process by which a distorted genetic image of a coherently (...)
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    Aaron C. T. Smith & Bob Stewart (2011). Becoming Believers: Studying the Conversion Process From Within. Zygon 46 (4):806-834.
    Abstract Employing an extended case method ethnography (Burawoy 1998), the researcher joined five new members forming a spiritualist's group under the leadership of an experienced advocate. Over a period of eighteen months, the researcher attended all the group's activities and events. Data were collected to reflexively interrogate the process theory of conversion proposed by Lewis Rambo (1993). The data revealed conversion to be a multifaceted and dynamic process of cognitive change, mediated by structural, and contextual forces. The results (...)
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