Search results for 'interaction process' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Johanna Seibt (2009). Forms of Emergent Interaction in General Process Theory. Synthese 166 (3):479 - 512.score: 72.0
    General Process Theory (GPT) is a new (non-Whiteheadian) process ontology. According to GPT the domains of scientific inquiry and everyday practice consist of configurations of ‘goings-on’ or ‘dynamics’ that can be technically defined as concrete, dynamic, non-particular individuals called general processes. The paper offers a brief introduction to GPT in order to provide ontological foundations for research programs such as interactivism that centrally rely on the notions of ‘process,’ ‘interaction,’ and ‘emergence.’ I begin with an analysis (...)
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  2. Josep Vidal (2012). Decision theory: Interaction process or organizations as decision systems. Cinta de Moebio 44 (44):136-152.score: 51.0
    We present a theoretical discussion of the sociological contribution concerning decisions in organizations. Two theories stand. The first, based on the decision process from a critical theory of the traditional linear multi rational by Lucien Sfez, argues that the decision is a process of interactions and treats it as an institutional process based on the freedom of the subject. The second theory based on self-referential systems by Niklas Luhmann, interprets organizations as systems-making, and understands the concept of (...)
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  3. Hanne De Jaegher (2009). Social Understanding Through Direct Perception? Yes, by Interacting. Consciousness & Cognition 18 (2):535-542.score: 48.0
    This paper comments on Gallagher’s recently published direct perception proposal about social cognition [Gallagher, S. (2008a). Direct perception in the intersubjective context. Consciousness and Cognition, 17(2), 535–543]. I show that direct perception is in danger of being appropriated by the very cognitivist accounts criticised by Gallagher (theory theory and simulation theory). Then I argue that the experiential directness of perception in social situations can be understood only in the context of the role of the interaction process in social (...)
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  4. Raisa B. Kvesko, Svetlana B. Kvesko & Irina L. Vanina (2008). Sociolinguistic Communication as a Basis of Interaction of Subjects of Educational Process. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 35:21-27.score: 48.0
    In the article is founded that sociolinguistic communication is an interaction of subjects in which basis are language and textual activity. Person`s existence and work are directly and absolutely connected with a main function of language – communicative. Sociolinguistic reality is directly connected with a process ofcommunication. Communication is today an essential part of our life and is very important. In the article sociolinguistic communication rates as a social phenomenon, as a basis of interaction of subjects of (...)
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  5. Bolanle Olaniran (2001). Computer-Mediated Communication and Conflict Management Process: A Closer Look at Anticipation of Future Interaction. World Futures 57 (4):285-313.score: 48.0
    This paper explores the concept of anticipation of future interaction (AFI) in Computer?Mediated Communication (CMC) with conflict management. Specifically, the tenet of the current paper is to determine whether CMC is suitable for conflict management. This central question was address drawing on anticipation of future interaction. Along this line, the issue of task, identity, self?presentations are discussed relative to the role of anticipation of future interaction in CMC encounters. Specific propositions are presented. The discussion addresses implications for (...)
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  6. Hanne De Jaegher & Ezequiel Di Paolo (2007). Participatory Sense-Making. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (4):485-507.score: 45.0
    As yet, there is no enactive account of social cognition. This paper extends the enactive concept of sense-making into the social domain. It takes as its departure point the process of interaction between individuals in a social encounter. It is a well-established finding that individuals can and generally do coordinate their movements and utterances in such situations. We argue that the interaction process can take on a form of autonomy. This allows us to reframe the problem (...)
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  7. Ron Sun (2005). The Interaction of the Explicit and the Implicit in Skill Learning: A Dual-Process Approach. Psychological Review 112:159-192.score: 42.0
    This article explicates the interaction between implicit and explicit processes in skill learning, in contrast to the tendency of researchers to study each type in isolation. It highlights various effects of the interaction on learning (including synergy effects). The authors argue for an integrated model of skill learning that takes into account both implicit and explicit processes. Moreover, they argue for a bottom-up approach (first learning implicit knowledge and then explicit knowledge) in the integrated model. A variety of (...)
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  8. R. Buttny & J. Lannamann (2011). Investigating Process as Language and Social Interaction. Constructivist Foundations 7 (1):14-17.score: 39.0
    Open peer commentary on the target article “From Objects to Processes: A Proposal to Rewrite Radical Constructivism” by Siegfried J. Schmidt. Upshot: We largely agree with Siegfried J. Schmidt’s focus on process and his call to look at how the “heavy words” of philosophy – “reality,” “knowledge,” “truth,” and like – are used in our everyday life-world. As communication researchers, we examine two transcripts of conversation to sketch empirically how “the real” is reported in giving directions or used in (...)
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  9. Mark H. Bickhard (2000). Motivation and Emotion: An Interactive Process Model. In Ralph D. Ellis & Natika Newton (eds.), The Caldron of Consciousness: Motivation, Affect and Self-Organization. John Benjamins. 161.score: 36.0
    In this chapter, I outline dynamic models of motivation and emotion. These turn out not to be autonomous subsystems, but, instead, are deeply integrated in the basic interactive dynamic character of living systems. Motivation is a crucial aspect of particular kinds of interactive systems -- systems for which representation is a sister aspect. Emotion is a special kind of partially reflective interaction process, and yields its own emergent motivational aspects. In addition, the overall model accounts for some of (...)
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  10. Richard Campbell (2009). A Process-Based Model for an Interactive Ontology. Synthese 166 (3):453 - 477.score: 36.0
    The paper proposes a process-based model for an ontology that encompasses the emergence of process systems generated by increasingly complex levels of organization. Starting with a division of processes into those that are persistent and those that are fleeting, the model builds through a series of exclusive and exhaustive disjunctions. The crucial distinction is between those persistent and cohesive systems that are energy wells, and those that are far-from-equilibrium. The latter are necessarily open; they can persist only by (...)
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  11. Anne-Lise Lövlie (1981). Part Process Analysis: Toward a New Method for Studying Interaction. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 12 (2):261-273.score: 36.0
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  12. Ian S. Hargreaves, Gemma A. Leonard, Penny M. Pexman, Daniel J. Pittman, Paul D. Siakaluk & Bradley G. Goodyear (2012). The Neural Correlates of the Body-Object Interaction Effect in Semantic Processing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:22-22.score: 36.0
    The semantic richness dimension referred to as body-object interaction (BOI) measures perceptions of the ease with which people can physically interact with words’ referents. Previous studies have shown facilitated lexical and semantic processing for words rated high in BOI (e.g., belt) than for words rated low in BOI (e.g., sun) (e.g., Siakaluk, Pexman, Sears, Wilson, Locheed, & Owen, 2008b). These BOI effects have been taken as evidence that embodied information is relevant to word recognition. However, to date there is (...)
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  13. Oana Apostol & Salme Näsi (2008). Business Talk on Corporate – Employee Interaction as an Evolutionary Process. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:184-195.score: 36.0
    This paper focuses on corporate social responsibilities to employees, one key stakeholder for each firm. In particular, the views and attitudes of managers and entrepreneurs with respect to various social aspects related to their employees are investigated. The context of this research, Romania, a postcommunist country in Eastern Europe, allows us to look for dissimilarities between the talk of local firms and MNCs or foreign-based companies. The analysis is based on qualitative research and adopts an interpretative approach.The articles of the (...)
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  14. Ciano Aydin (2007). Towards a Process-Pragmatic Grounding of the Concept of Identity: Peirce on Potentiality, Interaction, and Regularity. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 69 (1):35-78.score: 36.0
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  15. Adam Kendon (1985). Behavioral Foundations for the Process of Frame Attunement in Face-to-Face Interaction. In G. P. Ginsburg, Marylin Brenner & Mario von Cranach (eds.), Discovery Strategies in the Psychology of Action. Academic Press. 229--253.score: 36.0
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  16. Naomi Miyake (1986). Constructive Interaction and the Iterative Process of Understanding. Cognitive Science 10 (2):151-177.score: 36.0
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  17. Daniel Robichaud (2001). Interaction as Text: A Semiotic Look at an Organizing Process. American Journal of Semiotics 17 (1):141-161.score: 36.0
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  18. Alain Trognon (1993). How Does the Process of Interaction Work When Two Interlocutors Try to Resolve a Logical Problem? Ethics and Behavior 11 (3):325-345.score: 36.0
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  19. Donald R. Yelen (1985). Opponent-Process Theory: The Interaction of Trials, Intertrial Interval, and the Presence of Evoking Stimuli. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 23 (1):25-27.score: 36.0
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  20. Hanne De Jaegher (2009). What Made Me Want the Cheese? A Reply to Shaun Gallagher and Dan Hutto. Consciousness & Cognition 18 (2):549-550.score: 30.0
  21. Takashi Ikegami Tom Froese, Charles Lenay (2012). Imitation by Social Interaction? Analysis of a Minimal Agent-Based Model of the Correspondence Problem. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 30.0
    One of the major challenges faced by explanations of imitation is the ‘correspondence problem’: How is an agent able to match its bodily expression to the observed bodily expression of another agent, especially when there is no possibility of external self-observation? Current theories only consider the possibility of an innate or acquired matching mechanism belonging to an isolated individual. In this paper we evaluate an alternative that situates the explanation of imitation in the inter-individual dynamics of the interaction (...) itself. We implemented a minimal model of two interacting agents based on a recent psychological study of imitative behavior during minimalist perceptual crossing. The agents cannot sense the configuration of their own body, and do not have access to other’s body configuration, either. And yet surprisingly they are still capable of converging on matching bodily configurations. Analysis revealed that the agents solved this version of the correspondence problem in terms of collective properties of the interaction process. Contrary to the assumption that such properties merely serve as external input or scaffolding for individual mechanisms, it was found that the behavioral dynamics were distributed across the model as a whole. (shrink)
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  22. Cody Tousignant & Penny M. Pexman (2012). Flexible Recruitment of Semantic Richness: Context Modulates Body-Object Interaction Effects in Lexical-Semantic Processing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:53-53.score: 30.0
    Body-object interaction (BOI) is a semantic richness variable that measures the perceived ease with which the human body can physically interact with a word’s referent. Lexical and semantic processing is facilitated when words are associated with relatively more bodily experience (high BOI words, e.g., belt). To date, BOI effects have been examined in only one semantic decision context (is it imageable?). It has been argued that semantic processing is dynamic and can be modulated by context. We examined these influences (...)
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  23. Niamh M. Brennan, Doris M. Merkl-Davies & Annika Beelitz (2013). Dialogism in Corporate Social Responsibility Communications: Conceptualising Verbal Interaction Between Organisations and Their Audiences. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (4):665-679.score: 28.0
    We conceptualise CSR communication as a process of reciprocal influence between organisations and their audiences. We use an illustrative case study in the form of a conflict between firms and a powerful stakeholder which is played out in a series of 20 press releases over a 2-month period to develop a framework of analysis based on insights from linguistics. It focuses on three aspects of dialogism, namely (i) turn-taking (co-operating in a conversation by responding to the other party), (ii) (...)
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  24. Jeremy I. M. Carpendale & Charlie Lewis (2004). Constructing an Understanding of Mind: The Development of Children's Social Understanding Within Social Interaction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):79-96.score: 27.0
    Theories of children's developing understanding of mind tend to emphasize either individualistic processes of theory formation, maturation, or introspection, or the process of enculturation. However, such theories must be able to account for the accumulating evidence of the role of social interaction in the development of social understanding. We propose an alternative account, according to which the development of children's social understanding occurs within triadic interaction involving the child's experience of the world as well as communicative (...) with others about their experience and beliefs (Chapman 1991; 1999). It is through such triadic interaction that children gradually construct knowledge of the world as well as knowledge of other people. We contend that the extent and nature of the social interaction children experience will influence the development of children's social understanding. Increased opportunity to engage in cooperative social interaction and exposure to talk about mental states should facilitate the development of social understanding. We review evidence suggesting that children's understanding of mind develops gradually in the context of social interaction. Therefore, we need a theory of development in this area that accords a fundamental role to social interaction, yet does not assume that children simply adopt socially available knowledge but rather that children construct an understanding of mind within social interaction. Key Words: language; Piaget; social interaction; theories of mind; Vygotsky; Wittgenstein. (shrink)
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  25. Philip Brey (2005). The Epistemology and Ontology of Human-Computer Interaction. Minds and Machines 15 (3-4):383-398.score: 27.0
    This paper analyzes epistemological and ontological dimensions of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) through an analysis of the functions of computer systems in relation to their users. It is argued that the primary relation between humans and computer systems has historically been epistemic: computers are used as information-processing and problem-solving tools that extend human cognition, thereby creating hybrid cognitive systems consisting of a human processor and an artificial processor that process information in tandem. In this role, computer systems extend human (...)
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  26. Tom Froese & Shaun Gallagher (2012). Getting Interaction Theory (IT) Together: Integrating Developmental, Phenomenological, Enactive, and Dynamical Approaches to Social Interaction. Interaction Studies 13 (3):436-468.score: 27.0
    We argue that progress in our scientific understanding of the `social mind' is hampered by a number of unfounded assumptions. We single out the widely shared assumption that social behavior depends solely on the capacities of an individual agent. In contrast, both developmental and phenomenological studies suggest that the personal-level capacity for detached `social cognition' (conceived as a process of theorizing about and/or simulating another mind) is a secondary achievement that is dependent on more immediate processes of embodied social (...)
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  27. Joshua D. Reichard (2013). Of Miracles and Metaphysics: A Pentecostal‐Charismatic and Process‐Relational Dialogue. Zygon 48 (2):274-293.score: 27.0
    This article is comprised of a dialogue between Pentecostal-Charismatic and Process-Relational theologies on the perennial issue of miracles. The language of supernaturalism, widely employed by Pentecostal-Charismatic theologians, is contrasted with the metaphysical naturalism of Process-Relational theology; it is proposed that a philosophically and scientifically sensitive theology of miracles is possible through a synthesis of both traditions. Themes such as nonmaterialism over materialism, spiritual experience, and prayer for healing miracles are explored. A theology of miracles, mutually informed by both (...)
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  28. Hiroko Shoji & Koichi Hori (2004). S-Conart: An Interaction Method That Facilitates Concept Articulation in Shopping Online. [REVIEW] AI and Society 19 (1):65-83.score: 27.0
    This study addresses building an interactive system that effectively prompts customers to make their decision while shopping online. It is especially targeted at purchasing as concept articulation where customers initially have a vague concept of what they want and then gradually clarify it in the course of interaction, which has not been covered by traditional online shopping systems. This paper proposes information presentation methods to effectively facilitate customers in their concept articulation process, and the framework for interaction (...)
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  29. Andreas Roepstorff Kristian Tylén, Micah Allen, Bjørk K. Hunter (2012). Interaction Vs. Observation: Distinctive Modes of Social Cognition in Human Brain and Behavior? A Combined fMRI and Eye-Tracking Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 27.0
    Human cognition has usually been approached on the level of individual minds and brains, but social interaction is a challenging case. Is it best thought of as a self-contained individual cognitive process aiming at an ‘understanding of the other’, or should it rather be approached as an collective, inter-personal process where individual cognitive components interact on a moment-to-moment basis to form coupled dynamics? In a combined fMRI and eye tracking study we directly contrasted these models of social (...)
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  30. Sonja A. Kotz Laura Verga (2013). How Relevant is Social Interaction in Second Language Learning? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 27.0
    Verbal language is the most widespread mode of human communication, and an intrinsically social activity. This claim is strengthen by evidence emerging from different fields, which clearly indicate that social interaction influences human communication, and more specifically, language learning. Indeed, research conducted with infants and children shows that interaction with a caregiver is necessary to acquire language. Further evidence on the influence of sociality on language comes from social and linguistic pathologies, in which deficits in social and linguistic (...)
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  31. Laura Verga & Sonja A. Kotz (2013). How Relevant is Social Interaction in Second Language Learning? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 27.0
    Verbal language is the most widespread mode of human communication, and an intrinsically social activity. This claim is strengthen by evidence emerging from different fields, which clearly indicate that social interaction influences human communication, and more specifically, language learning. Indeed, research conducted with infants and children shows that interaction with a caregiver is necessary to acquire language. Further evidence on the influence of sociality on language comes from social and linguistic pathologies, in which deficits in social and linguistic (...)
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  32. Sharon C. Bolton, Rebecca Chung-hee Kim & Kevin D. O'Gorman (2011). Corporate Social Responsibility as a Dynamic Internal Organizational Process: A Case Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 101 (1):61 - 74.score: 27.0
    This article tracks Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as an emergent organizational process that places the employee at its center. Predominantly, research on CSR tends to focus on external pressures and outcomes leading to a neglect of CSR as a dynamic and developing process that relies on the involvement of the employee as a major stakeholder in its co-creation and implementation. Utilizing case study data drawn from a study of a large multinational energy company, we explore how management relies (...)
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  33. B. James Deaton & John P. Hoehn (2005). The Social Construction of Production Externalities in Contemporary Agriculture: Process Versus Product Standards as the Basis for Defining “Organic”. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 22 (1):31-38.score: 27.0
    The analysis distinguishes two types of standards for defining organic produce; process standards and product standards. Process standards define organic products by the method and means of production. Product standards define organic by the physical quality of the end product. The National Organic Program (NOP) uses process standards as the basis for defining organic. However, the situation is complicated by agricultural production practices, which sometimes result in the migration of NOP prohibited substances from conventional to organic fields. (...)
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  34. Tania Singer Marisa Przyrembel, Jonathan Smallwood, Michael Pauen (2012). Illuminating the Dark Matter of Social Neuroscience: Considering the Problem of Social Interaction From Philosophical, Psychological, and Neuroscientific Perspectives. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 27.0
    Successful human social interaction depends on our capacity to understand other people’s mental states and to anticipate how they will react to our actions. Despites its importance to the human condition, there are still quite a few debates about how we actually solve the problem of understanding other peoples’ actions, feelings and thoughts. Here we consider this problem from philosophical, psychological, and neuroscientific perspectives. In a critical review we show that attempts to draw parallels across these complementary levels of (...)
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  35. K. Imanaka & Brad Abernethy (2000). Distance-Location Interference in Movement Reproduction: An Interaction Between Conscious and Unconscious Processing? In Yves Rossetti & Antti Revonsuo (eds.), Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. John Benjamins.score: 26.0
  36. Laure Pisella & Yves Rosetti (2000). Interaction Between Conscious Identification and Non-Conscious Sensory-Motor Processing: Temporal Constraints. In Yves Rossetti & Antti Revonsuo (eds.), Beyond Dissociation: Interaction Between Dissociated Implicit and Explicit Processing. John Benjamins.score: 26.0
     
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  37. Aaron V. Cicourel (2006). Cognitive/Affective Processes, Social Interaction, and Social Structure as Representational Re-Descriptions: Their Contrastive Bandwidths and Spatio-Temporal Foci. Mind and Society 5 (1):39-70.score: 24.0
    Research on brain or cognitive/affective processes, culture, social interaction, and structural analysis are overlapping but often independent ways humans have attempted to understand the origins of their evolution, historical, and contemporary development. Each level seeks to employ its own theoretical concepts and methods for depicting human nature and categorizing objects and events in the world, and often relies on different sources of evidence to support theoretical claims. Each level makes reference to different temporal bandwidths (milliseconds, seconds, minutes, hours, days, (...)
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  38. Douglas Ehring (1986). Causal Processes and Causal Interactions. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:24 - 32.score: 24.0
    Wesley Salmon has developed a theory of causation which makes use of the concepts of a "causal process" and a "causal interaction." Roughly, a causal process is a process which transmits its own structure, and a causal interaction is an intersection of processes which transforms the character of these processes. The cause-effect relation is analyzed as a causal interaction followed by a causal process which terminates in a further causal interaction. In this (...)
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  39. Hanne De Jaegher & Ezequiel Di Paolo (2012). Enactivism is Not Interactionism. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
  40. Jin Joo Lee, Brad Knox, Jolie Baumann, Cynthia Breazeal & David DeSteno (2013). Computationally Modeling Interpersonal Trust. Frontiers in Psychology 4:893.score: 24.0
    We present a computational model capable of predicting—above human accuracy—the degree of trust a person has toward their novel partner by observing the trust-related nonverbal cues expressed in their social interaction. We summarize our prior work, in which we identify nonverbal cues that signal untrustworthy behavior and also demonstrate the human mind’s readiness to interpret those cues to assess the trustworthiness of a social robot. We demonstrate that domain knowledge gained from our prior work using human-subjects experiments, when incorporated (...)
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  41. Ezequiel Di Paolo Hanne De Jaegher (2012). Enactivism is Not Interactionism. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
  42. Sergej Lebedev (2009). Religious Processes as Intercultural Interaction: Contours of a Sociological Discourse. Filozofija I Drustvo 20 (1):37-48.score: 24.0
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  43. Jean-François Marcel (2012). La Situation Professionnelle: De la Notion Vers les Prémices d'Un Concept. Phronesis 1 (1):40-58.score: 24.0
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  44. Jean-François Marcel, Frédéric Tupin & Philippe Maubant (2012). La Situation Professionnelle : Contributions des Sciences de l'Éducation à l'Élaboration d'Un Objet Scientifique. Phronesis 1 (1):1-4.score: 24.0
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  45. Sung Jin Song (2007). Process Theology and Chinul's Buddhist Thought. Process Studies 36 (2):215-228.score: 24.0
    There is a great similarity between process theology and Chinul’s Buddhist thought. They share the conception of a mutual immanence and interaction between the world and the ultimate reality. They also share the view that the true or sanctified self is an incarnation and expression of the ultimate reality in and for the world. However, Chinul’s Buddhist thought is weak in dealing with the aspect of redemption.
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  46. Hanne De Jaegher & Tom Froese (2009). On the Role of Social Interaction in Individual Agency. Adaptive Behavior 17 (5):444-460.score: 22.0
    Is an individual agent constitutive of or constituted by its social interactions? This question is typically not asked in the cognitive sciences, so strong is the consensus that only individual agents have constitutive efficacy. In this article we challenge this methodological solipsism and argue that interindividual relations and social context do not simply arise from the behavior of individual agents, but themselves enable and shape the individual agents on which they depend. For this, we define the notion of autonomy as (...)
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  47. Dina Goldin & Peter Wegner (2008). The Interactive Nature of Computing: Refuting the Strong Church–Turing Thesis. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 18 (1):17-38.score: 22.0
    The classical view of computing positions computation as a closed-box transformation of inputs (rational numbers or finite strings) to outputs. According to the interactive view of computing, computation is an ongoing interactive process rather than a function-based transformation of an input to an output. Specifically, communication with the outside world happens during the computation, not before or after it. This approach radically changes our understanding of what is computation and how it is modeled. The acceptance of interaction as (...)
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  48. Markus F. Peschl & Chris Stary (1998). The Role of Cognitive Modeling for User Interface Design Representations: An Epistemological Analysis of Knowledge Engineering in the Context of Human-Computer Interaction. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 8 (2):203-236.score: 22.0
    In this paper we review some problems with traditional approaches for acquiring and representing knowledge in the context of developing user interfaces. Methodological implications for knowledge engineering and for human-computer interaction are studied. It turns out that in order to achieve the goal of developing human-oriented (in contrast to technology-oriented) human-computer interfaces developers have to develop sound knowledge of the structure and the representational dynamics of the cognitive system which is interacting with the computer.We show that in a first (...)
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  49. Nivia Álvarez Aguilar, Carmen Marín Rodríguez & Arturo Torres Bugdud (2012). Tutor-student interaction in Higher Education; an approach to its diagnosis. Humanidades Médicas 12 (3):409-426.score: 22.0
    Los acelerados cambios científicos tecnológicos y sociales exigen de los centros de Educación Superior la búsqueda de nuevas vías y el perfeccionamiento de las ya existentes para lograr egresados más competentes. La tutoría se identifica como un proceso educativo que debe favorecer el pleno desarrollo personal e integral del estudiante, en el que éste se conciba como sujeto activo y responsable de su propio proceso de formación. En este sentido cobra una especial importancia el proceso de interacción en el desarrollo (...)
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  50. Hanne de Jaegher, Ezequiel di Paolo & Shaun Gallagher (2010). Can Social Interaction Constitute Social Cognition? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (10):441-447.score: 22.0
    An important shift is taking place in social cognition research, away from a focus on the individual mind and toward embodied and participatory aspects of social understanding. Empirical results already imply that social cognition is not reducible to the workings of individual cognitive mechanisms. To galvanize this interactive turn, we provide an operational definition of social interaction and distinguish the different explanatory roles – contextual, enabling and constitutive – it can play in social cognition. We show that interactive processes (...)
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