Search results for 'internal relation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jakub Mácha (2009). Metaphor: Perceiving an Internal Relation. In Contributions of the Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society.score: 240.0
    The problem of metaphor has come to a noteworthy revival in the analytical philosophy of today. Despite all progress that has been made, the majority of important studies consider the function of metaphor as an analogue to visual perception. Such comparison may be conceived as metaphor as well. In his late philosophy, Wittgenstein spent a lot of effort to explain the use of the expression "seeing as". I argue that his explanations can be transposed to the explanation of the function (...)
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  2. David Yates (forthcoming). Is Powerful Causation an Internal Relation? In Anna Marmodoro & David Yates (eds.), The Metaphysics of Relations. OUP.score: 210.0
    In this paper I consider whether a powers ontology facilitates a reduction of causal relations to intrinsic powers of the causal relata. I first argue that there is a tension in the view that powerful causation is an internal relation in this sense. Powers are ontologically dependent on other powers for their individuation, but in that case—given an Aristotelian conception of properties as immanent universals—powers will not be intrinsic on several extant analyses of ‘intrinsic’, since to possess a (...)
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  3. Ingvar Johansson (2004). Truthmaking: A Cognition-Independent Internal Relation with Heterogeneous Relata. In Johann Christian Marek & Maria Elisabeth Reicher (eds.), Experience and Analysis: Papers of the 27th International Wittgenstein Symposium. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society. 154--56.score: 182.0
    For many assertions, the correspondence theory of truth seems intuitively to give the best account of the difference between truth and falsity, but one of its problems is how to explicate the notions of “correspondence” and “truthmaking”. In conformity with the view of David Armstrong, it is claimed that truthmaking is an internal relation between a truthmaker and a truth(-value-)bearer. The truthbearer (a token proposition) can exist without the truthmaker (an object or a state of affairs), and vice (...)
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  4. Alberto Voltolini (2006). Reference Intentionality is an Internal Relation. In S. Miguens, J. A. Pinto & C. E. Mauro (eds.), Analyses. Facultade de Letras da Universidade do Porto. 66-78.score: 180.0
    In this paper, I will focus on the basic form of intentionality, reference intentionality (from now on, RI), the property an intentional state has of being ‘directed upon’ a certain object, its intentional object. I will try to prove that (as Husserl, Wittgenstein and others originally envisaged) RI is not only a state - intentional object relation, but it also is an internal, i.e., a necessary, relation between that state and that object, at least in the sense (...)
     
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  5. Jürgen Habermas (1995). On the Internal Relation Between the Rule of Law and Democracy. European Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):12-20.score: 150.0
  6. Judith Jarvis (1961). Definition by Internal Relation. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 39 (2):125 – 142.score: 150.0
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  7. C. J. F. Williams (1963). Definition by Internal Relation. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 41 (1):76 – 79.score: 150.0
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  8. Kathryn Russell (1984). The Internal Relation Between Production and Reproduction: Reflections on the Manipulation of Family Life in South Africa. Journal of Social Philosophy 15 (2):14-25.score: 150.0
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  9. A. M. Thorson (1925). The Relation of Tongue Movements to Internal Speech. Journal of Experimental Psychology 8 (1):1.score: 132.0
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  10. Helge Malmgren (1975). Internal Relations in the Analysis of Consciousness. Theoria 41 (2):61-83.score: 130.0
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  11. Jocelyn Benoist (2005). Seeking and Finding: Intentionality as an Internal and an External Relation. Synthesis Philosophica 20 (2):327-338.score: 120.0
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  12. A. K. M. Alauddin Chowdhury (1986). Infant Mortality in Relation to Internal Migration in Rural Bangladesh. Journal of Biosocial Science 18 (4):449-456.score: 120.0
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  13. Gerard Kuyper (1987). Is Knowledge An Internal Or An External Relation Between A Person And A Proposition? Dialectica 41 (3):209-220.score: 120.0
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  14. Colin McGinn (1982). According to Fodor, Beliefs (and I Shall Take These as Exemplary) Involve Relations to Internal Representations: To Believe That P is to Be in a Certain Relation to Some Internal State s Which Represents. In Andrew Woodfield (ed.), Thought and Object: Essays on Intentionality. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 207.score: 120.0
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  15. Marie McGinn (2010). Wittgenstein and Internal Relations. European Journal of Philosophy 18 (4):495-509.score: 100.0
    Abstract: Interpretations of the Tractatus divide into what might be called a metaphysical and an anti-metaphysical approach to the work. The central issue between the two interpretative approaches has generally been characterised in terms of the question whether the Tractatus is committed to the idea of ‘things’ that cannot be said in language, and thus to the idea of a distinctive kind of nonsense: nonsense that is an attempt to say what can only be shown. In this paper, I look (...)
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  16. Andreas Blank (2007). Wittgenstein on Expectation, Action, and Internal Relations, 1930-1932. Inquiry 50 (3):270 – 287.score: 100.0
    According to Wittgenstein, internal relations are such that, once their terms are given, it is unthinkable that they do not hold. In his early philosophy, the concept of internal relation plays a central role in his views on meaning. The present paper addresses the question of how Wittgenstein's views about internal relations develop during his years of transition (1930-32). In particular, it investigates the connections between the concepts of internal relation, logical multiplicity, and aspect (...)
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  17. Max Kistler (2005). Necessary Laws. In Jan Faye, Paul Needham, Uwe Scheffler & Max Urchs (eds.), Nature’s Principles. Springer. 201-227.score: 90.0
    In the first part of this paper, I argue against the view that laws of nature are contingent, by attacking a necessary condition for its truth within the framework of a conception of laws as relations between universals. I try to show that there is no independent reason to think that universals have an essence independent of their nomological properties. However, such a non-qualitative essence is required to make sense of the idea that different laws link the same universals in (...)
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  18. Jakub Mácha (2011). Metaphor in the Twilight Area Between Philosophy and Linguistics. In P. Stalmaszczyk & K. Kosecki (eds.), Turning Points in the Philosophy of Language and Linguistics. Peter Lang. 159--169.score: 90.0
    This paper investigates the issue whether metaphors have a metaphorical or secondary meaning and how this question is related to the borderline between philosophy and linguistics. On examples by V. Woolf and H. W. Auden, it will be shown that metaphor accomplishes something more than its literal meaning expresses and this “more” cannot be captured by any secondary meaning. What is essential in the metaphor is not a secondary meaning but an internal relation between a metaphorical proposition and (...)
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  19. Ian Underwood (2010). Cross-Count Identity, Distinctness, and the Theory of Internal and External Relations. Philosophical Studies 151 (2):265 - 283.score: 90.0
    Baxter (Australas J Philos 79: 449-464, 2001) proposes an ingenious solution to the problem of instantiation based on his theory of cross-count identity. His idea is that where a particular instantiates a universal it shares an aspect with that universal. Both the particular and the universal are numerically identical with the shared aspect in different counts. Although Baxter does not say exactly what a count is, it appears that he takes ways of counting as mysterious primitives against which different numerical (...)
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  20. Rosemary Foot, John Lewis Gaddis & Andrew Hurrell (eds.) (2003). Order and Justice in International Relations. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    The relationship between international order and justice has long been central to the study and practice of international relations. For most of the twentieth century, states and international society gave priority to a view of order that focused on the minimum conditions for coexistence in a pluralist, conflictual world. Justice was seen either as secondary or sometimes even as a challenge to order. Recent developments have forced a reassessment of this position. This book sets current concerns within a broad historical (...)
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  21. Arley R. Moreno (2009). Pragmática da relação/propriedade interna. Doispontos 6 (1).score: 90.0
    In this article we seek to show that the evolution of the concept of internal relation or internal property expresses a requirement, at the same time ethical and theoretical, which will lead Wittgenstein to the acceptance of pragmatic elements in the once formal field of the transcendental.
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  22. Hilan Bensusan & Manuel de Pinedo, Priority Monism, Physical Intentionality and the Internal Relatedness of All Things.score: 88.0
    Schaffer (2010) argues that the internal relatedness of all things, no matter how it is conceived, entails priority monism. He claims that a sufficiently pervasive internal relation among objects implies the priority of the whole, understood as a concrete object. This paper shows that at least in the case of an internal relatedness of all things conceived in terms of physical intentionality - one way to understand dispositions - priority monism not only doesn't follow but also (...)
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  23. Mark H. Bickhard (2003). Some Notes on Internal and External Relations and Representation. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):101-110.score: 86.0
    Internal relations are those relations that are intrinsic to the nature of one or more of the relata. They are a kind of essential relation, rather than an essential property. For example, an arc of a circle is internally related to the center of that circle in the sense that.
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  24. Arkadiusz Chrudzimski (2005). Internal, External and Intra-Individual Relations. Axiomathes 15 (4):487-512.score: 84.0
    In this paper I argue that there are in fact external relations in Russell’s sense. The level at which we are forced to acknowledge them is, however, not the level of relations between concrete individual objects. All relations of this kind, which I will call “inter-individual” relations, can be construed as supervenient on the monadic properties of their terms. But if we pursue our ontological analysis a little bit deeper and consider the internal structure of a concrete individual, then (...)
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  25. Robert H. Jackson (2007). Introduction to International Relations: Theories and Approaches. Oxford University Press.score: 80.0
    This highly successful textbook provides a systematic introduction to the principal theories of international relations. Combining incisive and original analyses with a clear and accessible writing style, it is ideal for introductory courses in international relations or international relations theory. Introduction to International Relations, Third Edition, focuses on the main theoretical traditions--realism, liberalism, international society, and theories of international political economy. The authors carefully explain how particular theories organize and sharpen our view of the world. They integrate excellent pedagogical features (...)
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  26. Andrew Linklater (ed.) (2000). International Relations: Critical Concepts in Political Science. Routledge.score: 80.0
    Reprinting more than 80 essential papers published in the 20th century, this set is the most comprehensive collection to appear to date. The papers include "classics" in the field as well as ones placing International Relations in a wider context, from the late 1940s to the present day. An invaluable resource for all students of this field.
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  27. Patrick Thaddeus Jackson (2010). The Conduct of Inquiry in International Relations: Philosophy of Science and its Implications for the Study of World Politics. Routledge.score: 80.0
    The immense value of this book is its accessibility and the intimate connections it builds between theories of international relations and their philosophical ...
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  28. Emanuel Adler (2005). Communitarian International Relations: The Epistemic Foundations of International Relations. Routledge.score: 80.0
    In Emanuel Adler's distinctive constructivist approach to international relations theory, international practices evolve in tandem with collective knowledge of the material and social worlds. This book - comprising a selection of his journal publications, a new introduction and three previously unpublished articles - points IR constructivism in a novel direction, characterized as 'communitarian'. Adler's synthesis does not herald the end of the nation-state; nor does it suggest that agency is unimportant in international life. Rather, it argues that what mediates between (...)
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  29. Beate Jahn (ed.) (2006). Classical Theory in International Relations. Cambridge University Press.score: 80.0
    Classical political theorists such as Thucydides, Kant, Rousseau, Smith, Hegel, Grotius, Mill, Locke and Clausewitz are often employed to explain and justify contemporary international politics and are seen to constitute the different schools of thought in the discipline. However, traditional interpretations frequently ignore the intellectual and historical context in which these thinkers were writing as well as the lineages through which they came to be appropriated in International Relations. This collection of essays provides alternative interpretations sensitive to these political and (...)
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  30. Maja Zehfuss (2002). Constructivism in International Relations: The Politics of Reality. Cambridge University Press.score: 80.0
    Maya Zehfuss critiques constructivist theories of international relations (currently considered to be at the cutting edge of the discipline) and finds them wanting and even politically dangerous. Zehfuss uses Germany's first shift toward using its military abroad after the end of the Cold War to illustrate why constructivism does not work and how it leads to particular analytical outcomes and forecloses others. She argues that scholars are limiting their abilities to act responsibly in international relations by looking towards constructivism as (...)
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  31. Christine Sylvester (1994). Feminist Theory and International Relations in a Postmodern Era. Cambridge University Press.score: 80.0
    This book evaluates the major debates around which the discipline of international relations has developed in the light of contemporary feminist theories. The three debates (realist versus idealist, scientific versus traditional, modernist versus postmodernist) have been subject to feminist theorising since the earliest days of known feminist activities, with the current emphasis on feminist, empiricist standpoint and postmodernist ways of knowing. Christine Sylvester shows how feminist theorising could have affected our understanding of international relations had it been included in the (...)
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  32. Jenny Edkins & Nick Vaughan-Williams (eds.) (2009). Critical Theorists and International Relations. Routledge.score: 80.0
    Covering a broad range of approaches within critical theory including Marxism and post-Marxism, the Frankfurt School, hermeneutics, phenomenology, postcolonialism, feminism, queer theory, poststructuralism, pragmatism, scientific realism, deconstruction and psychoanalysis, this book provides students with a comprehensive and accessible introduction to 32 key critical theorists whose work has been influential in the field of international relations.
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  33. Tvrtko Jolić (2011). Political realism and anarchy in international relations. Prolegomena 10 (1):113-130.score: 80.0
    In this paper I critically examine an influential argument in favor of political realism. The argument claims that international relations, by analogy with Hobbes’s state of nature at the individual level, are governed by anarchy which makes it irrational for states to observe the principles of morality and justice since there are no guarantees that they will be observed by other states. However, this analogy is unsustainable due to the differences that exist between agents on the international and individual levels. (...)
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  34. Colin Wight (2006). Agents, Structures and International Relations: Politics as Ontology. Cambridge University Press.score: 80.0
    The agent-structure problem is a much discussed issue in the field of international relations. In his comprehensive analysis of this problem, Colin Wight deconstructs the accounts of structure and agency embedded within differing IR theories and, on the basis of this analysis, explores the implications of ontology - the metaphysical study of existence and reality. Wight argues that there are many gaps in IR theory that can only be understood by focusing on the ontological differences that construct the theoretical landscape. (...)
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  35. Abigail E. Ruane (2012). The International Relations of Middle-Earth: Learning From the Lord of the Rings. University of Michigan Press.score: 80.0
    Introduction: Middle-Earth, The lord of the rings, and international relations -- Order, justice, and Middle-Earth -- Thinking about international relations and Middle-Earth -- Middle-Earth and three great debates in international relations -- Middle-Earth, levels of analysis, and war -- Middle-Earth and feminist theory -- Middle-Earth and feminist analysis of conflict -- Middle-Earth as a source of inspiration and enrichment -- Conclusion: international relations and our many worlds.
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  36. Alexander Astrov (2005). On World Politics: R.G. Collingwood, Michael Oakeshott, and Neotraditionalism in International Relations. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 80.0
    This book outlines an idea of world politics as thinking and speaking about the conditions of world order. World order is understood not as an arrangement of entities but a complex of variously situated activities conducted by individuals as members of diverse associations of their own. Within contemporary international relations it entails a theoretical position, neotraditionalism, as a reformulation of the initial "traditionalist" approach in the wake of rationalism and subsequent reflectivist critique.
     
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  37. Scott Burchill (ed.) (2005). Theories of International Relations. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 80.0
    The fully updated and revised third edition of this widely used text provides a comprehensive survey of leading perspectives in the field including an entirely new chapter on Realism by Jack Donnelly. The introduction explains the nature of theory and the reasons for studying international relations in a theoretically informed way. The nine chapters which follow--written by leading scholars in the US, the UK, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand--provide thorough examinations of each of the major approaches currently prevailing in the (...)
     
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  38. Molly Cochran (1999). Normative Theory in International Relations: A Pragmatic Approach. Cambridge University Press.score: 80.0
    Molly Cochran offers an account of the development of normative theory in international relations over the past two decades. In particular, she analyzes the tensions between cosmopolitan and communitarian approaches to international ethics, paying attention to differences in their treatments of a concept of the person, the moral standing of states and the scope of moral arguments. The book draws connections between this debate and the tension between foundationalist and antifoundationalist thinking and offers an argument for a pragmatic approach to (...)
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  39. Robert H. Jackson (1999). Introduction to International Relations. Oxford University Press.score: 80.0
    Offering a unique, theory-based approach to international relations, An Introduction to International Relations provides readers with an ideal entry into the discipline. Succinct and clearly written, it covers the principal theories in the field, including the post-positivist theories that have gained prominence in recent years.
     
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  40. Daniel J. Levine (2012). Recovering International Relations: The Promise of Sustainable Critique. Oxford University Press.score: 80.0
    Introduction: sustainable critique and the lost vocation of international relations -- "For we born after:" the challenge of sustainable critique -- Sustainable critique and critical IR theory: against emancipation -- The realist dilemma: politics and the limits of theory -- Communitarian IR theory -- Individualist IR theory: disharmonious cooperation -- Conclusion: toward sustainably critical international theory.
     
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  41. A. Nuri Yurdusev (2003). International Relations and the Philosophy of History: A Civilizational Approach. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 80.0
    International Relations and the Philosophy of History examines the concept of civilization in relation to international systems through an extensive use of the literature in the philosophy of history. A. Nuri Yurdusev demonstrates the relevance of a civilizational approach to the study of contemporary international relations by looking at the multi-civilizational nature of the modern international system, the competing claims of national and civilizational identities and the rise of civilizational consciousness after the Cold War.
     
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  42. Arkadiusz Chrudzimski (2010). Composed Objects, Internal Relations, and Purely Intentional Negativity. Ingarden's Theory of States of Affairs. Polish Journal of Philosophy 4 (2):63-80.score: 76.0
    Ingarden’s official ontology of states of affairs is by no means reductionist. According to him there are states of affairs, but they are ontologically dependent onother entities. There are certain classical arguments for the introduction of states of affairs as extra entities over and above the nominal objects, that can be labelled “the problem of composition,” “the problem of relation” and “the problem of negation.” To the first two Ingarden proposes rather traditional solutions, while his treatment of negation proves (...)
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  43. Ian Proops (2002). The Tractatus on Inference and Entailment. In Erich Reck (ed.), From Frege to Wittgenstein: Essays on Early Analytic Philosophy, 283–307. Oxford University Press.score: 72.0
    In the Tractatus Wittgenstein criticizes Frege and Russell's view that laws of inference (Schlussgesetze) "justify" logical inferences. What lies behind this criticism, I argue, is an attack on Frege and Russell's conceptions of logical entailment. In passing, I examine Russell's dispute with Bradley on the question whether all relations are "internal".
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  44. Stephanie G. Neuman (ed.) (1998). International Relations Theory and the Third World. St. Martin's Press.score: 72.0
    In this collected volume, the authors analyze the deficiencies of existing theory and present alternate explanations of Third World foreign policy behavior. The essays show how examining Third World experience can broaden our understanding of how and why states and non-state actors interact in the international system.
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  45. Necati Polat (2012). International Relations, Meaning and Mimesis. Routledge.score: 72.0
    Introduction -- International -- Peace -- Difference -- Law -- Integration.
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  46. Badredine Arfi (2012). Re-Thinking International Relations Theory Via Deconstruction. Routledge.score: 72.0
    Re-thinking via deconstruction qua affirmation -- "Testimonial faith" in/about IR philosophy of science: the possibility condition of a pluralist science of world politics -- Khôra as the condition of possibility of the ontological without ontology -- Rethinking the "agent-structure" problematique: from ontology to parergonality -- Identity/difference and othering: negotiating the impossible politics of aporia -- Autoimmunity of trust without trust -- Rethinking international constitutional order: the autoimmune politics of binding without binding -- The quest for "illogical" logics of action in (...)
     
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  47. Renée Jeffery (2008). Evil and International Relations: Human Suffering in an Age of Terror. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 72.0
    Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the concept of 'evil' has enjoyed renewed popularity in both international political rhetoric and scholarly writing. World leaders, politicians, and intellectuals have increasingly turned to 'evil' to describe the very worst humanitarian atrocities that continue to mark international affairs. However, precisely what 'evil' actually entails is not well understood. Little consensus exists as to what 'evil' is, how it is manifested in the international sphere, and what we ought to do about it. (...)
     
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  48. David Long & Brian C. Schmidt (eds.) (2005). Imperialism and Internationalism in the Discipline of International Relations. State University of New York Press.score: 70.0
    This book reconstructs in detail some of the formative episodes of the field's early development and arrives at the conclusion that, in actuality, the early ...
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  49. M. A. Muqtedar Khan (2004). Jihad for Jerusalem: Identity and Strategy in International Relations. Praeger.score: 70.0
    Introduction : a divided discipline -- A genealogy of agency -- Reforming a paradigm : constructivism to rational constructivism -- A rational constructivist theory of identity and strategy -- Jerusalem : the unsubstitutable core value -- Jihad for Jerusalem : Israel the tiger 1967-1997 -- Jihad for Jerusalem : Iran the cub 1967-1997 -- Jihad for Jerusalem : Saudi Arabia the paper tiger 1967-1997 -- Jihad for Jerusalem : Jordan the mouse 1967-1997 -- Conclusion : the future of Jerusalem.
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