Search results for 'international justice' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Saladin Meckled-Garcia (2004). International Justice, Human Rights and Neutrality. Res Publica 10 (2):153-174.score: 90.0
    A number of theorists have tried to resolve the tension between a western-oriented liberal scheme of human rights and an account that accommodates different political systems and constitutional ideals than the liberal one. One important way the tension has been addressed is through a “neutral” or tolerant, notion of human rights, as present in the work of Rawls, Scanlon and Buchanan. In this paper I argue that neutrality cannot by itself explain the difference between rights considered appropriate for liberal states (...)
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  2. Rosemary Foot, John Lewis Gaddis & Andrew Hurrell (eds.) (2003). Order and Justice in International Relations. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    The relationship between international order and justice has long been central to the study and practice of international relations. For most of the twentieth century, states and international society gave priority to a view of order that focused on the minimum conditions for coexistence in a pluralist, conflictual world. Justice was seen either as secondary or sometimes even as a challenge to order. Recent developments have forced a reassessment of this position. This book sets current (...)
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  3. Andrew Altman (2009). A Liberal Theory of International Justice. Oxford University Press.score: 84.0
    This book advances a novel theory of international justice that combines the orthodox liberal notion that the lives of individuals are what ultimately matter morally with the putatively antiliberal idea of an irreducibly collective right of self-governance. The individual and her rights are placed at center stage insofar as political states are judged legitimate if they adequately protect the human rights of their constituents and respect the rights of all others. Yet, the book argues that legitimate states have (...)
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  4. Robin Attfield & Barry Wilkins (eds.) (1992). International Justice and the Third World: Studies in the Philosophy of Development. Routledge.score: 84.0
    International Justice and the Third World examines the conceptual and ethical issues surrounding the idea of development. The contributors forcefully contest the view that there is no such thing as justice beween societies of unequal power, and no obligation to assist poor people in distant countries. While attentive to and explicatory of the presuppositions adhering to development models, Liberal and Marxist approaches to universal responsibilities are forwarded and these approaches' ability to manage global issues of equity are (...)
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  5. Dejan Guzina & Branka Marijan (2013). Local Uses of International Criminal Justice in Bosnia-Herzegovina: Transcending Divisions or Building Parallel Worlds? Studies in Social Justice 7 (2):245-263.score: 75.0
    Transitionaljustice mechanisms and the International Criminal Tribunal for the FormerYugoslavia (ICTY) have had only a limited success in overcoming ethnic divisionsin Bosnia-Herzegovina. Rather than elaborating upon the role of local politicalelites in perpetuating ethnic divisions, we examine ordinary peoples’ popularperceptions of war and its aftermath. In our view, the idea that elites havecomplete control over the broader narratives about the past is misplaced. Weargue that transitional justice and peace mechanisms supported by externalactors are always interpreted on the ground (...)
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  6. Jacqueline Mowbray (2011). Linguistic Justice in International Law: An Evaluation of the Discursive Framework. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (1):79-95.score: 75.0
    Claims by minority groups to use their own languages in different social contexts are often presented as claims for “linguistic justice”, that is, justice as between speakers of different languages. This article considers how the language of international law can be used to advance such claims, by exploring how international law, as a discourse, approaches questions of language policy. This analysis reveals that international legal texts structure their engagement with “linguistic justice” around two key (...)
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  7. Rytis Satkauskas (2011). Reservations in Declarations accepting Compulsory Jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice (article in Lithuanian). Jurisprudence 18 (2):517-546.score: 75.0
    Notwithstanding constant “crises of confidence,” a high number of international disputes lay at the docket of the International Court of Justice in The Hague. In the word of Judge Rosalyn Higgins, states are turning to the ICJ for the peaceful settlement of their disputes. The option provided by the Charter of the United Nations in limiting the compulsory jurisdiction of the Court to certain categories of disputes, clearly contributes to convening a greater number of states to accept (...)
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  8. Daniel Butt (2009). ‘Victors’ Justice’? Historic Injustice and the Legitimacy of International Law. In Lukas H. Meyer (ed.), Legitimacy, Justice and Public International Law. Cambridge Univeristy Press. 163.score: 72.0
  9. Larry S. Temkin (2004). Thinking About the Needy, Justice, and International Organizations. Journal of Ethics 8 (4):349 - 395.score: 72.0
    This article has three main parts, Section 2 considers the nature and extent to which individuals who are well-off have a moral obligation to aid the worlds needy. Drawing on a pluralistic approach to morality, which includes consequentialist, virtue-based, and deontological elements, it is contended that most who are well-off should do much more than they do to aid the needy, and that they are open to serious moral criticism if they simply ignore the needy. Part one also focuses on (...)
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  10. Bridget Pratt & Bebe Loff (2013). A Framework to Link International Clinical Research to the Promotion of Justice in Global Health. Bioethics 27 (3):n/a-n/a.score: 72.0
    How international research might contribute to justice in global health has not been substantively addressed by bioethics. Theories of justice from political philosophy establish obligations for parties from high-income countries owed to parties from low and middle-income countries. We have developed a new framework that is based on Jennifer Ruger's health capability paradigm to strengthen the link between international clinical research and justice in global health. The ‘research for health justice’ framework provides direction on (...)
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  11. Sirine Shebaya, Andrea Sutherland, Orin Levine & Ruth Faden (2010). Alternatives to National Average Income Data as Eligibility Criteria for International Subsidies: A Social Justice Perspective. Developing World Bioethics 10 (3):141-149.score: 69.0
    Current strategies to address global inequities in access to life-saving vaccines use averaged national income data to determine eligibility. While largely successful in the lowest income countries, we argue that this approach could lead to significant inefficiencies from the standpoint of justice if applied to middle-income countries, where income inequalities are large and lead to national averages that obscure truly needy populations. Instead, we suggest alternative indicators more sensitive to social justice concerns that merit consideration by policy-makers developing (...)
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  12. Robert Sparrow (2009). Xenotransplantation, Consent and International Justice. Developing World Bioethics 9 (3):119-127.score: 66.0
    The risk posed to the community by possible xenozoonosis after xenotransplantation suggests that some form of 'community consent' is required before whole organ animal-to-human xenotransplantation should take place. I argue that this requirement places greater obstacles in the path of ethical xenotransplantation than has previously been recognised. The relevant community is global and there are no existing institutions with democratic credentials sufficient to establish this consent. The distribution of the risks and benefits from xenotransplantation also means that consent is unlikely (...)
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  13. Leslie Vinjamuri (2010). Deterrence, Democracy, and the Pursuit of International Justice. Ethics and International Affairs 24 (2):191-211.score: 63.0
    In recent years the efforts to hold the perpetrators of mass atrocities accountable have become increasingly normalized, and building capacity in this area has become central to the strategies of numerous advocacy groups, international organizations, and governments engaged in rebuilding and reconstructing states. The indictment of sitting heads of state and rebel leaders engaged in ongoing conflicts, however, has been more exceptional than normal, but is nonetheless radically altering how we think about, debate, and practice justice. While a (...)
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  14. James Dwyer (2007). What's Wrong with the Global Migration of Health Care Professionals? Individual Rights and International Justice. Hastings Center Report 37 (5):36-43.score: 60.0
    : When health care workers migrate from poor countries to rich countries, they are exercising an important human right and helping rich countries fulfill obligations of social justice. They are also, however, creating problems of social justice in the countries they leave. Solving these problems requires balancing social needs against individual rights and studying the relationship of social justice to international justice.
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  15. Michal Engelman & Summer Johnson (2007). Population Aging and International Development: Addressing Competing Claims of Distributive Justice. Developing World Bioethics 7 (1):8–18.score: 60.0
  16. Maurice Hamington (2007). Care Ethics and International Justice. Social Philosophy Today 23:149-160.score: 60.0
    This article attends to an unnamed and often missing element of the cosmopolitanism discourse: care ethics. Developed out of feminist theory in the 1980s, care ethics privileges the relational, contextual, and affective aspects of morality. It is my suggestion that contemporary discussions of cosmopolitanism would benefit from integrating the moral commitments of care ethics. First, a definition of care ethics is offered followed by a delineation of themes of care in the cosmopolitan theorizing of an historical figure, Jane Addams, and (...)
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  17. Chi Carmody, Frank J. Garcia & John Linarelli (eds.) (2011). Global Justice and International Economic Law: Opportunities and Prospects. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    This volume reflects the results of a symposium held at Tillar House, the ASIL headquarters in Washington, DC, in November 2008 which brought together philosophers, legal scholars, and economists to discuss the problems of understanding ...
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  18. Lisa Fuller (forthcoming). International NGO Health Programs in a Non-Ideal World: Imperialism, Respect & Procedural Justice. In E. Emanuel J. Millum (ed.), Global Justice and Bioethics. Oxford University Press.score: 57.0
    Many people in the developing world access essential health services either partially or primarily through programs run by international non-governmental organizations (INGOs). Given that such programs are typically designed and run by Westerners, and funded by Western countries and their citizens, it is not surprising that such programs are regarded by many as vehicles for Western cultural imperialism. In this chapter, I consider this phenomenon as it emerges in the context of development and humanitarian aid programs, particularly those delivering (...)
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  19. Frederick Ochieng'-odhiambo (2005). International Justice and Individual Self-Preservation. Journal of Global Ethics 1 (2):99 – 112.score: 57.0
    The article explores the fundamental difference between two aspects of justice: international and global. It is then argued that for the sake of global justice, the difference can be overcome by taking a closer look at the basic human right of self-preservation in relation to moral agency, human well-being and social/distributive justice at both global and national levels. In an endeavour to attain global justice, the article defends an absolute moral right to a human minimum.
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  20. Lars O. Ericsson (1980). Two Principles of International Justice. In Lars O. Ericsson, Harald Ofstad & Giuliano Pontara (eds.), Justice, Social, and Global: Papers Presented at the Stockholm International Symposium on Justice, Held in September 1978. Akademilitteratur.score: 57.0
     
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  21. Delfín Grueso (2012). International Justice or World Peace? About the Nature of John Rawl's The Law of Peoples [Spanish]. Eidos 17:168-191.score: 57.0
    This article tries to explain why it was impossible for Rawls to develop a normative theory of justice for international relations; something that has been demanded by some rawlsian thinkers (Beitz, Pogge, etc.). There were two obstacles for such an enterprise. On one hand, the link established by the philosophical tradition between justice, as a political virtue, and the political unity (polis, national-state, etc.). On the other hand, Rawls’ meta-philosophical decisions, which make his a ‘post-metaphysical’ and ‘strictly (...)
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  22. Allen E. Buchanan (2004). Justice, Legitimacy, and Self-Determination: Moral Foundations for International Law. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    This book articulates a systematic vision of an international legal system grounded in the commitment to justice for all persons. It provides a probing exploration of the moral issues involved in disputes about secession, ethno-national conflict, "the right of self-determination of peoples," human rights, and the legitimacy of the international legal system itself. Buchanan advances vigorous criticisms of the central dogmas of international relations and international law, arguing that the international legal system should make (...)
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  23. Bridget Pratt & Bebe Loff (2011). Justice in International Clinical Research. Developing World Bioethics 11 (2):75-81.score: 54.0
    Debates about justice in international clinical research problematically conflate two quite different forms of obligation. International research ethics guidelines were intended to describe how to conduct biomedical research in a just manner at the micro or clinical level (within the researcher-participant interaction) but have come to include requirements that are clearly intended to promote justice at the global level. Ethicists have also made a variety of claims regarding what international research should contribute to global (...). This paper argues that the conflation of debates about justice at the micro and macro-levels has not only resulted in the placement of obligations upon the wrong actors but has also served to exclude relevant actors from the ethical picture. Suggestions for who should properly bear macro-level obligations of justice in international clinical research are offered. The paper further contends that, unlike researchers who violate informed consent requirements, no similar type of accountability exists for obligations of global justice, even for those obligation-bearers (incorrectly) identified by current ethics guidelines. (shrink)
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  24. Phil Cole & Doris Schroeder (2004). Justice Beyond Borders. Res Publica 10 (2):107-113.score: 54.0
    Liberal theories of social justicefocus predominantly on the national, ratherthan international, level, and where they doaddress international concerns they insist thatprinciples of justice at the national levelhave priority over principles at theinternational level. We question the coherenceof this arrangement, given liberal theory'scommitment to moral equality of persons as suchrather than to that of particular sets of persons. What isat issue is whether liberal theory can providea coherent basis for international justice atall. If it is to (...)
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  25. Tracy Isaacs (forthcoming). International Criminal Courts and Political Reconciliation. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-10.score: 54.0
    In A Moral Theory of Political Reconciliation, Colleen Murphy devotes a full chapter to arguing that international criminal trials make significant contributions to political reconciliation within post-conflict and transitional societies. While she is right to claim that these trials serve an important function, I take issue with her with respect to what that important function is. Whereas Murphy focuses on the contributions international criminal prosecutions might make to political reconciliation within the borders of transitional societies, I claim instead (...)
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  26. Roland Pierik & Wouter Werner (2005). Cosmopolitism, Global Justice and International Law. The Leiden Journal of International Law 18 (4):679-684.score: 51.0
    Along with the exploding attention to globalization, issues of global justice have become central elements in political philosophy. After decades in which debates were dominated by a state-centric paradigm, current debates in political philosophy also address issues of global inequality, global poverty, and the moral foundations of international law. As recent events have demonstrated, these issues also play an important role in the practice of international law. In fields such as peace and security, economic integration, environmental law, (...)
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  27. John Gastil, Colin J. Lingle & Eugene P. Deess (2010). Deliberation and Global Criminal Justice: Juries in the International Criminal Court. Ethics and International Affairs 24 (1):69-90.score: 51.0
    The jury system is one of the oldest deliberative democratic bodies, and it has a robust historical record spanning hundreds of years in numerous countries. As scholars and civic reformers envision a democratic global public sphere and international institutions, we advocate for the inclusion of juries of lay citizens as a means of administering justice and promoting deliberative norms. Focusing specifically on the case of the International Criminal Court, we show how juries could bolster that institution's legitimacy (...)
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  28. Vojin Rakic (2010). The Future of Morality and International Justice. Filozofija I Drustvo 21 (1):19-30.score: 51.0
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  29. Gopal Sreenivasan (2002). International Justice and Health: A Proposal. Ethics and International Affairs 16 (2):81–90.score: 48.0
  30. Gabriel Wollner (2013). Justice in Finance: The Normative Case for an International Financial Transaction Tax. Journal of Political Philosophy 22 (1).score: 48.0
    There has recently been much debate about the idea of levying a tax on particular transactions on international financial markets. Economists have argued about how much revenue such an international financial transaction tax would raise and they disagree about what effects it would have on trade volumes, financial stability, and overall growth. Politicians have argued about the feasibility of introducing such a tax internationally and they disagree on its adequacy as a policy response to the current financial and (...)
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  31. Jean Bethke Elshtain (2003). International Justice as Equal Regard and the Use of Force. Ethics and International Affairs 17 (2):63–75.score: 48.0
  32. Alex John London (2005). Justice and the Human Development Approach to International Research. Hastings Center Report 35 (1):24-37.score: 48.0
    : The debate over when medical research may be performed in developing countries has steered clear of the broad issues of social justice in favor of what seem more tractable, practical issues. A better approach will reframe the question of justice in international research in a way that makes explicit the links between medical research, the social determinants of health, and global justice.
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  33. Nicki Hedge & Penny Enslin (2010). International Students, Export Earnings and the Demands of Global Justice. Ethics and Education 3 (2):107-119.score: 48.0
    Is it just to charge international students fees that are generally much higher than those paid by home and European Union students at UK universities? Exploring the ethical tension between universities' avowed commitment to social justice on the one hand and selling education to foreign students at a premium on the other, we argue that increased global association and the reduced salience of the sovereign state make the education of international students an issue of global justice. (...)
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  34. Phil Clark (2008). International Justice in Rwanda and the BALKans: Virtual Trials and the Struggle for State Cooperation- by Victor Peskin. Ethics and International Affairs 22 (4):433-434.score: 48.0
  35. Penny Enslin & Nicki Hedge (2010). International Students, Export Earnings and the Demands of Global Justice. Ethics and Education 3 (2):107-119.score: 48.0
    Is it just to charge international students fees that are generally much higher than those paid by home and European Union students at UK universities? Exploring the ethical tension between universities? avowed commitment to social justice on the one hand and selling education to foreign students at a premium on the other, we argue that increased global association and the reduced salience of the sovereign state make the education of international students an issue of global justice. (...)
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  36. Janna Thompson (1992). Justice and World Order: A Philosophical Inquiry. Routledge.score: 48.0
    Thompson considers the concept of international justice as it has developed in political theory from Hobbes to the present day, and develops a theory designed to take account of both individual freedom and differences among communities. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
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  37. L. W. Lee (2011). International Justice in Elder Care: The Long Run. Public Health Ethics 4 (3):292-296.score: 48.0
    The migration of elder-care workers appears to be a zero-sum game. This naturally offends our sense of justice, especially when the host populations are richer. In this article, I argue that we ought to look beyond the short run. Once we look at the long run, we will see possibilities of non-zero-sum games that are mutually beneficial.
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  38. B. Pratt, D. Zion, K. M. Lwin, P. Y. Cheah, F. Nosten & B. Loff (2012). Closing the Translation Gap for Justice Requirements in International Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (9):552-558.score: 48.0
    Bioethicists have long debated the content of sponsors and researchers' obligations of justice in international clinical research. However, there has been little empirical investigation as to whether and how obligations of responsiveness, ancillary care, post-trial benefits and research capacity strengthening are upheld in low- and middle-income country settings. In this paper, the authors argue that research ethics guidelines need to be more informed by international research practice. Practical guidance on how to fulfil these obligations is needed if (...)
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  39. Paul B. Stephan (2006). Process Values, International Law, and Justice. Social Philosophy and Policy 23 (1):131-152.score: 48.0
    A focus on the lawmaking process, I submit, permits us to explore a particular dimension of justice, namely the relationship between law and liberty. Laws that reflect the arbitrary whims of the lawmaker are presumptively unjust, because they constrain liberty for no good reason. A strategy for making arbitrary laws less likely involves recognizing checks on the lawmaker's powers and grounding those checks in processes that allow the governed to express their disapproval. The system of checks and balances employed (...)
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  40. A. Hammarskjöld (1924). The Place of the Permanent Court of International Justice Within the System of the League of Nations. International Journal of Ethics 34 (2):146-156.score: 48.0
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  41. Bridget Pratt, Deborah Zion & Bebe Loff (2012). Evaluating the Capacity of Theories of Justice to Serve as a Justice Framework for International Clinical Research. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (11):30-41.score: 48.0
    This article investigates whether or not theories of justice from political philosophy, first, support the position that health research should contribute to justice in global health, and second, provide guidance about what is owed by international clinical research (ICR) actors to parties in low- and middle-income countries. Four theories?John Rawls's theory of justice, the rights-based cosmopolitan theories of Thomas Pogge and Henry Shue, and Jennifer Ruger's health capability paradigm?are evaluated. The article shows that three of the (...)
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  42. Phil Clark (2008). International Justice in Rwanda and the Balkans: Virtual Trials and the Struggle for State Cooperation, Victor Peskin (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), 294 Pp., $85 Cloth. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 22 (4):433-434.score: 48.0
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  43. Phil Clark (2008). Review of Victor Peskin,'International Justice in Rwanda and the Balkans: Virtual Trials and State Cooperation'. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 22 (4).score: 48.0
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  44. Amy E. Eckert (2008). Obligations Beyond National Borders: International Institutions and Distributive Justice. Journal of Global Ethics 4 (1):67 – 78.score: 48.0
    Recent scholarship has tied duties of distributive justice to the existence of coercive institutions. This body of work argues that, because the international system lacks institutions that can coerce individuals in the same manner as domestic institutions, there are no international obligations to address relative poverty and inequality. Proponents of this view use it to support the existence of a compatriot preference that requires us to meet the needs of compatriots before meeting those of the global poor. (...)
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  45. Stephen Holmes (2002). Why International Justice Limps. Social Research: An International Quarterly 69 (4):1061-1081.score: 48.0
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  46. Dorothy V. Jones (2000). Judging War Criminals: The Politics of International Justice, Yves Beigbeder (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1999), 230 Pp., $65 Cloth. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 14:165-166.score: 48.0
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  47. Bob Kerrey (2002). International Justice, War Crimes, and Terrorism. Social Research: An International Quarterly 69 (4):1019-1030.score: 48.0
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  48. Peter Koller (2009). International Law and Global Justice. In Lukas H. Meyer (ed.), Legitimacy, Justice and Public International Law. Cambridge Univeristy Press. 186.score: 48.0
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  49. Giuliano Pontara (1980). International Charity or Global Justice? In Lars O. Ericsson, Harald Ofstad & Giuliano Pontara (eds.), Justice, Social, and Global: Papers Presented at the Stockholm International Symposium on Justice, Held in September 1978. Akademilitteratur.score: 48.0
     
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  50. Derek R. Bell (2004). Environmental Refugees: What Rights? Which Duties? Res Publica 10 (2):135-152.score: 45.0
    It is estimated that there could be 200 million‘environmental refugees’ by the middle of this century. One major environmental cause of population displacement is likely to be global climate change. As the situation is likely to become more pressing, it is vital to consider now the rights of environmental refugees and the duties of the rest of the world. However, this is not an issue that has been addressed in mainstream theories of global justice. This paper considers the potential (...)
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