Search results for 'jury' (try it on Scholar)

297 found
Order:
See also:
Profile: Ben Jury (Oklahoma State University)
Profile: David Jury
Profile: Ricky Jury (Massey University)
  1. Sigmund Freud, P. Jury & E. Fraenkel (1955). Inhibition, symptôme et angoisse. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 145:59-59.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Mark Jury (1981). Coastal Winds and Upwelling. Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 44 (3):299-302.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Mark R. Jury (1994). Implications of Marine Weather Conditions for the Shipping of Environmentally Sensitive Cargo Along the Coast of South Africa. Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 49 (2):225-236.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  10
    Gordon Sinclair Jury (1937). Value and Ethical Objectivity: A Study in Ethical Objectivity and the Objectivity of Value. London, G. Allen & Unwin, Ltd..
    November 1936 PREFACE THIS book is, in slightly revised form, a dis sertation presented for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Yale University.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  88
    Annabelle Lever (2009). Racial Profiling and Jury Trials. The Jury Expert 21 (1):20-35.
    How, if at all, should race figure in criminal trials with a jury? How far should attorneys be allowed or encouraged to probe the racial sensitivities of jurors and what does this mean for the appropriate way to present cases which involve racial profiling and, therefore, are likely to pit the words and actions of a white policeman against those of a young black man?
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6. Christian List & Robert E. Goodin (2001). Epistemic Democracy: Generalizing the Condorcet Jury Theorem. Journal of Political Philosophy 9 (3):277–306.
    This paper generalises the classical Condorcet jury theorem from majority voting over two options to plurality voting over multiple options. The paper further discusses the debate between epistemic and procedural democracy and situates its formal results in that debate. The paper finally compares a number of different social choice procedures for many-option choices in terms of their epistemic merits. An appendix explores the implications of some of the present mathematical results for the question of how probable majority cycles (as (...)
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   23 citations  
  7.  28
    Serguei Kaniovski (2010). Aggregation of Correlated Votes and Condorcet's Jury Theorem. Theory and Decision 69 (3):453-468.
    This paper proves two theorems for homogeneous juries that arise from different solutions to the problem of aggregation of dichotomous choice. In the first theorem, negative correlation increases the competence of the jury, while positive correlation has the opposite effect. An enlargement of the jury with positive correlation can be detrimental up to a certain size, beyond which it becomes beneficial. The second theorem finds a family of distributions for which correlation has no effect on a jury’s (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  8.  28
    Serguei Kaniovski & Alexander Zaigraev (2011). Optimal Jury Design for Homogeneous Juries with Correlated Votes. Theory and Decision 71 (4):439-459.
    In a homogeneous jury, in which each vote is correct with the same probability, and each pair of votes correlates with the same correlation coefficient, there exists a correlation-robust voting quota, such that the probability of a correct verdict is independent of the correlation coefficient. For positive correlation, an increase in the correlation coefficient decreases the probability of a correct verdict for any voting rule below the correlation-robust quota, and increases that probability for any above the correlation-robust quota. The (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  9.  66
    Jason Brennan (forthcoming). Condorcet's Jury Theorem and the Optimum Number of Voters. POLITICS.
    Many political theorists and philosophers use Condorcet's Jury Theorem to defend democracy. This paper illustrates an uncomfortable implication of Condorcet's Jury Theorem. Realistically, when the conditions of Condorcet’s Jury Theorem hold, even in very high stakes elections, having more than 100,000 citizens vote does no significant good in securing good political outcomes. On the Condorcet model, unless voters enjoy voting, or unless they produce some other value by voting, then the cost to most voters of voting exceeds (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  77
    Thom Brooks (2004). A Defence of Jury Nullification. Res Publica 10 (4):401-423.
    In both Great Britain and the United States there has been a growing debate about the modern acceptability of jury nullification. Properly understood, juries do not have any constitutional right to ignore the law, but they do have the power to do so nevertheless. Juries that nullify may be motivated by a variety of concerns: too harsh sentences, improper government action, racism, etc. In this article, I shall attempt to defend jury nullification on a number of grounds. First, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  38
    Thom Brooks (2004). The Right to Trial by Jury. Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (2):197–212.
    This article offers a justification for the continued use of jury trials. I shall critically examine the ability of juries to render just verdicts, judicial impartiality, and judicial transparency. My contention is that the judicial system that best satisfies these values is most preferable. Of course, these three values are not the only factors relevant for consideration. Empirical evidence demonstrates that juries foster both democratic participation and public legitimation of legal decisions regarding the most serious cases. Nevertheless, juries are (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  12.  24
    Ruth Ben-Yashar (2014). The Generalized Homogeneity Assumption and the Condorcet Jury Theorem. Theory and Decision 77 (2):237-241.
    The Condorcet jury theorem (CJT) is based on the assumption of homogeneous voters who imperfectly know the correct policy. We reassess the validity of the CJT when voters are homogeneous and each knows the correct decision with an average probability of more than a half.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  4
    Jon Elster (2010). Secret et publicité dans les procédures avec jury. Archives de Philosophie du Droit 53:212-239.
    Nombreux sont les programmes de recherche ambitieux mais irréaliste s visant à déterminer le régime du jury. Cet article, qui se limite aux arguments touchant à la vérité et à la rectitude, s’intéresse aux rapports entre les variables institutionnelles, subjectives et de résultat qui sont en jeu. Il étudie en particulier l’influence des facteurs institutionnels sur les variables intermédiaires sur plusieurs points, étant bien entendu que ces facteurs tournent, très diversement, autour du choix entre débat public ou secret, ces (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  3
    Thomas A. Green (2015). The Jury and Criminal Responsibility in Anglo-American History. Criminal Law and Philosophy 9 (3):423-442.
    Anglo-American theories of criminal responsibility require scholars to grapple with, inter alia, the relationship between the formal rule of law and the powers of the lay jury as well as two inherent ideas of freedom: freedom of the will and political liberty. Here, by way of canvassing my past work and prefiguring future work, I sketch some elements of the history of the Anglo-American jury and offer some glimpses of commentary on the interplay between the jury—particularly its (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. David M. Estlund (1994). Opinion Leaders, Independence, and Condorcet's Jury Theorem. Theory and Decision 36 (2):131-162.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   24 citations  
  16. Franz Dietrich & Kai Spiekermann (2013). Independent Opinions? On the Causal Foundations of Belief Formation and Jury Theorems. Mind 122 (487):fzt074.
    It is often claimed that opinions are more likely to be correct if they are held independently by many individuals. But what does it mean to hold independent opinions? To clarify this condition, we distinguish four notions of probabilistic opinion independence. Which notion applies depends on environmental factors such as commonly perceived evidence. More formally, it depends on the causal network that determines how people interact and form their opinions. In a general theorem, we identify conditions on this network that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  17. Jan-Willem Romeijn & David Atkinson (2011). Learning Juror Competence: A Generalized Condorcet Jury Theorem. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 10 (3):237-262.
    This article presents a generalization of the Condorcet Jury Theorem. All results to date assume a fixed value for the competence of jurors, or alternatively, a fixed probability distribution over the possible competences of jurors. In this article, we develop the idea that we can learn the competence of the jurors by the jury vote. We assume a uniform prior probability assignment over the competence parameter, and we adapt this assignment in the light of the jury vote. (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18.  3
    Albert W. Dzur (2012). Punishment, Participatory Democracy, and the Jury. OUP Usa.
    Focusing democratic theory on the pressing issue of punishment, Punishment, Participatory Democracy, and the Jury argues for participatory institutional designs as antidotes to the American penal state. Citizen action in institutions like the jury and restorative justice programs can foster the attunement, reflectiveness, and full-bodied communication needed as foundations for widespread civic responsibility for criminal justice.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  19.  49
    Franz Dietrich & Christian List (2004). A Model of Jury Decisions Where All Jurors Have the Same Evidence. Synthese 142 (2):175 - 202.
    Under the independence and competence assumptions of Condorcet’s classical jury model, the probability of a correct majority decision converges to certainty as the jury size increases, a seemingly unrealistic result. Using Bayesian networks, we argue that the model’s independence assumption requires that the state of the world (guilty or not guilty) is the latest common cause of all jurors’ votes. But often – arguably in all courtroom cases and in many expert panels – the latest such common cause (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  20.  16
    Alexander Zaigraev & Serguei Kaniovski (2012). Bounds on the Competence of a Homogeneous Jury. Theory and Decision 72 (1):89-112.
    In a homogeneous jury, the votes are exchangeable correlated Bernoulli random variables. We derive the bounds on a homogeneous jury’s competence as the minimum and maximum probability of the jury being correct, which arise due to unknown correlations among the votes. The lower bound delineates the downside risk associated with entrusting decisions to the jury. In large and not-too-competent juries the lower bound may fall below the success probability of a fair coin flip—one half, while the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  21.  90
    Franz Dietrich (2008). The Premises of Condorcet's Jury Theorem Are Not Simultaneously Justified. Episteme 5 (1):56-73.
    Condorcet's famous jury theorem reaches an optimistic conclusion on the correctness of majority decisions, based on two controversial premises about voters: they are competent and vote independently, in a technical sense. I carefully analyse these premises and show that: (i) whether a premise is justified depends on the notion of probability considered and (ii) none of the notions renders both premises simultaneously justified. Under the perhaps most interesting notions, the independence assumption should be weakened.
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  22.  61
    Christian List (2001). Some Remarks on the Probability of Cycles - Appendix 3 to 'Epistemic Democracy: Generalizing the Condorcet Jury Theorem'. Journal of Political Philosophy 9 (3).
    This item was published as 'Appendix 3: An Implication of the k-option Condorcet jury mechanism for the probability of cycles' in List and Goodin (2001) http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/705/. Standard results suggest that the probability of cycles should increase as the number of options increases and also as the number of individuals increases. These results are, however, premised on a so-called "impartial culture" assumption: any logically possible preference ordering is assumed to be as likely to be held by an individual as any (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  23.  24
    Brenner M. Fissell (2013). Jury Nullification and the Rule of Law. Legal Theory 19 (3):217-241.
    Despite an intractable judiciary, there is widespread consensus within the legal academy that jury nullification is compatible with the rule of law. This proposition is most strongly tested by where a jury nullifies simply because it disagrees with the law itself. While some substantive nullifications can comport with the rule of law, most commentatorsjustice,vely undifferentiated view of a morality (even though jurisdictional and vicinage morality can diverge). In doing so, a healthy vision of antityrannical nullifications is presented, but (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  16
    Paul Robertshaw (2000). The Jury Between the Civil and the Criminal Law. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 13 (3):251-278.
    This article comprises two case studies of a ``problem'' within the Anglo-Welsh legal process of jury trial. In that tradition, the judge not only instructs on the law to be applied by the jury, s/he also ``summarises'' the evidence after counsel have already done so. This summarising is largely unconstrained by appellate control. The ``problem'' that the two cases present is that they were trials of ``civil'' issues in which the subject matter is also categorised as ``criminal''. Where (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  39
    Sally Ramage (2005). In Support of Fraud Trials Without a Jury. The Criminal Lawyer 156:2-52.
    The United Kingdom's Parliamentary Bill 'Fraud Trials (Without a Jury) 2007', failed. Nevertheless, fraud trials without a jury do take place and there is much evidence to support this.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  13
    Jason Wyckoff (2011). Rousseau's General Will and the Condorcet Jury Theorem. History of Political Thought 32 (1):49-62.
    In The Social Contract, Rousseau asserts his infallibility thesis: that the general will can never err, and that one's position in the minority indicates that what one took the general will to be was not actually so. Several theorists have argued that the Condorcet Jury Theorem, which states that in a sufficiently large group the majority opinion on a yes/no question is highly likely to be correct, provides a way to interpret and justify Rousseau's bold claim. I argue that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  11
    Marco Goldoni (2012). At the Origins of Constitutional Review: Sieyès' Constitutional Jury and the Taming of Constituent Power. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 32 (2):211-234.
    Even though he is mainly known for his concept of constituent power, Sieyès was one of the first constitutional theorists to ask for a guardian of the constitution which closely resembles contemporary constitutional courts. This article reconstructs the main tenets of his proposal, puts them in the larger context of his constitutional theory and then assesses the constitutional nature and functions of this institution. The judgment is mixed: as an organ, Sieyès’ constitutional jury is a hybrid institution, neither a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  17
    Douglas W. Maynard & John F. Manzo (1993). On the Sociology of Justice: Theoretical Notes From an Actual Jury Deliberation. Sociological Theory 11 (2):171-193.
    Despite the venerable place that "justice" occupies in social scientific theory and research, little effort has been made to see how members of society themselves define and use the concept when confronted with determining "what has happened" in some social arena, theorizing about why it happened, and deciding what should ensue. We take an ethnomethodological approach to justice, attempting to recover it as a feature of practical activity or a "phenomenon of order." Our analysis involves an actual videotaped jury (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29. John Jackson & Sean Doran (1995). Judge Without Jury: Diplock Trials in the Adversary System. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Cases connected with the troubles in Northern Ireland have been tried by a judge sitting without a jury in `Diplock Courts'. Given the symbolic importance of the jury within the common law tradition, this study offers the first systematic comparison of the process of trial by judge alone with that of trial by jury. The authors determine the impact of the replacement of jury trial with trial by a professional judge on the adversarial character of the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  30.  3
    J. Forsemalm (2014). Consolidated Youth Jury: Alcohol Prevention for Young People From Matters of Fact to Matters of Concern. A Swedish Case Report. Public Health Ethics 7 (1):17-20.
    In the course of a project on European policy on media and alcohol, a series of structured deliberative discussion sessions with young people (aged 13–25 years) in Sweden were arranged, where young people could communicate and exchange ideas about risks and policy issues connected to alcohol consumption and drinking, as presented in fictional media. The objective was to understand how risks and knowledge about alcohol consumption is acquired by young people and ‘uploaded’ to peers. The discussion sessions applied adapted variants (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  8
    Lucinda Vandervort (2005). The Defence of Belief in Consent: Guidelines and Jury Instructions for Application of Criminal Code Section 265(4). Criminal Law Quarterly 50 (4):441-452.
    The availability of the defence of belief in consent under section 265(4) is a question of law, subject to review on appeal. The statutory provision is based on the common law rule that applies to all defences. Consideration of the defence when it is unavailable in law and failure to consider it when it is available are both incorrect. A judge is most likely to avoid error when ruling on availability of the defence if the ruling: (1) is grounded on (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  4
    Robert A. Sedler, The Michigan Supreme Court Diminishes the Right to Trial by Jury in Civil Cases.
    In this paper, I have analyzed the right to trial by jury in civil cases as reflected in decisions of the Michigan Supreme Court over approximately a 20 year period dealing with three areas affecting the right to trial by jury in civil cases: (1) entitlement to a jury trial; (2) summary disposition; and (3) directed verdicts. The study was constructed to cover cases over a substantial period of time, so that it would be possible to analyze (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. George Fletcher (1995). Democracy In Jury Selection. Jahrbuch für Recht Und Ethik 3.
    Americans believe in the criminal jury as a vehicle of democratic participation as well as a bulwark against state oppression. Racial and gender discrimination poses a threat to the ideal of democratic participation. The vehicle for discrimination is the use of peremptory challenges against candidates for the jury. Since 1986 the Supreme Court has tried to work out rules restricting the use of peremptory challenges. One problem has been the extending application of the principle of non-discrimination to tactical (...)
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. John A. Murley & Sean D. Sutton (2014). The Supreme Court Against the Criminal Jury: Social Science and the Palladium of Liberty. Lexington Books.
    The Supreme Court against the Criminal Jury critiques the Supreme Court’s decisions to allow reduced jury sizes and less than unanimous jury verdicts to determine guilt. John A. Murley and Sean D. Sutton challenges the Court’s decisions by examining its incomplete understanding of the purpose of trial by jury and evaluating its use of inaccurate and unreliable studies as support for its decisions.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. James Ostrowski (2001). The Rise and Fall of Jury Nullification. Journal of Libertarian Studies 15 (2; SEAS SPR):89-115.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  21
    Staffan Angere, Erik J. Olsson & Emmanuel Genot, Inquiry and Deliberation in Judicial Systems : The Problem of Jury Size.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  8
    Roberto Gargarella (2015). Punishment, Deliberative Democracy & The Jury. Criminal Law and Philosophy 9 (4):709-717.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38.  7
    Ingo Althöfer & Raphael Thiele (forthcoming). A Condorcet Jury Theorem for Couples. Theory and Decision.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  9
    Marianne Aasen & Arild Vatn (2013). Deliberation on GMOs: A Study of How a Citizens' Jury Affects the Citizens' Attitudes. Environmental Values 22 (4):461-481.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  40.  40
    Jan-Willem Romeijn & David Atkinson (2011). A Condorcet Jury Theorem for Unknown Juror Competence. Politics, Philosophy, and Economics 10 (3):237-262.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  7
    George Masterton, Erik J. Olsson & Staffan Angere, Linking as Voting : How the Condorcet Jury Theorem in Political Science is Relevant to Webometrics.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  64
    M. F. Burnyeat & Jonathan Barnes (1980). Socrates and the Jury: Paradoxes in Plato's Distinction Between Knowledge and True Belief. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 54 (1):173 - 206.
  43.  24
    Albert W. Dzur (2011). “Why American Democracy Needs the Jury Trial”. Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (1):87-92.
  44.  12
    James S. Stramel (2008). A New Verdict on the 'Jury Passage'. Ancient Philosophy 9 (1):1-14.
  45.  21
    Eve Kitsik (2012). Eli Hirsch: Quantifier Variance and Realism: Essays in Metaontology. Trees and Tables Crackpot Ontology: Jury Still Out. Studia Philosophica Estonica 5 (1):vii.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  16
    E. K. Achah (2007). Did a Biased Jury Convict Plato's Socrates? Journal of Philosophy and Culture 2 (2):1-16.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  16
    Denis J. Brion (1998). The Louise Woodward Jury and the Genesis of Truth. Semiotics:225-239.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  43
    Jeffrey Abramson (1993). The Jury and Democratic Theory. Journal of Political Philosophy 1 (1):45-68.
  49.  14
    Andrew Oxman Wolpert (2003). Addresses to the Jury in the Attic Orators. American Journal of Philology 124 (4):537-555.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  8
    Lynette Reid, Natalie Ram & R. Blake Brown (2006). Compensation for Gamete Donation: The Analogy with Jury Duty. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (1):35-43.
    In Canada, laws and policies consistently reject the commodification of human organs and tissues, and Canadian practice is consistent with international standards in this regard. Until the Assisted Human Reproduction Act of 2004, gamete donation in Canada was an exception: Canadians could pay and be paid open market rates for gametes for use in in vitro fertilization. As sections of the AHR Act forbidding payment for gametes and permitting only reimbursement of receipted expenses gradually came into effect in 2005, Canada (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 297