Search results for 'late-medieval disputation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  23
    Paloma Pérez-Ilzarbe (2011). Disputation and Logic in the Medieval Treatises De Modo Opponendi Et Respondendi. Vivarium 49 (1-3):127-149.
    In 1980 L. M. de Rijk edited some texts connected with medieval disputation ( Die mittelaterlichen Traktate De modo opponendi et respondendi ), towards which he showed a strikingly contemptuous attitude. The reason for his contempt was that the treatises did not fit the obligationes and sophismata tradition. In this article I focus on the original version, the Thesaurus Philosophorum , to highlight the distinction of this family of treatises with respect to the “modern“ tradition. First, I study the (...)
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  2.  1
    Pekka Kärkkäinen (2008). Objects of Sense Perception in Late Medieval Erfurtian Nominalism. In Kärkkäinen Knuuttila (ed.), Theories of Perception in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. 187--202.
    The Buridanian view of the concrete cognition as the general characteristics of sense perception was adopted by Jodocus Trutfetter and Bartholomaeus Arnoldi of Usingen. This theory was not accepted merely on the basis of authority, but it was argued against the competing view, which appeared as legitimate inside the late medieval school of via moderna.
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  3.  56
    Giorgio Pini (2005). Scotus's Realist Conception of the Categories: His Legacy to Late Medieval Debates. Vivarium 43 (1):63-110.
    Scotus claims that the extramental world is divided into ten distinct kinds of essences, no one of which can be reduced to another one. Although by the end of the thirteenth century this claim was not new, Scotus's way of articulating it into a comprehensive metaphysical doctrine resulted into a ground-breaking contribution to what became known as 'late medieval realism'. This paper shows how Scotus's view of the categories as ten kinds of irreducible essences should be seen as a development (...)
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  4.  24
    Paul Kiparsky, Clitics and Clause Structure: The Late Medieval Greek System.
    We rebut Pappas’ critique (this issue) of our treatment of Late Medieval Greek clausal syntax and clitic placement (Condoravdi & Kiparsky 2001), point out some weaknesses of his counterproposal, and suggest directions for further research.
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  5.  18
    David Albertson (2012). A Late Medieval Reaction to Thierry of Chartress (D. 1157) Philosophy: The Anti-Platonist Argument of the Anonymous Fundamentum Naturae. Vivarium 50 (1):53-84.
    Abstract An anonymous manuscript from the fourteenth or early fifteenth century, recently discovered, apparently transmitted Thierry of Chartres's philosophical theology to Nicholas of Cusa around 1440. Yet the author of the treatise is not endorsing Thierry's views, as both Cusanus and modern readers have assumed, but in fact is writing in order to refute them. Curiously the author never mentions Thierry's best known triad of unitas, aequalitas and conexio . But a careful comparison of the structure of the author's argument (...)
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  6.  3
    Andrew Galloway (1995). The Rhetoric of Riddling in Late-Medieval England: The “Oxford” Riddles, the Secretum Philosophorum, and the Riddles in Piers Plowman. Speculum 70 (1):68-105.
    Scholars have long recognized that riddles were part of literary and intellectual culture in late-medieval England, and considerable effort has been expended to ponder a prominent handful of late-fourteenth-century writings in Latin and English that use them, including John Ergome's commentary on the Vaticinium of “John of Bridlington,” the seditious vernacular letters circulated during the Rising of 1381, and most famously Piers Plowman, all notorious for the use of peculiar and difficult riddles that flaunt their interpretative challenges and the (...)
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  7.  21
    Elly R. Truitt (2009). The Virtues of Balm in Late Medieval Literature. Early Science and Medicine 14 (6):711-736.
    This article argues that balm, or balsam, was, by the late medieval period, believed to be a panacea, capable of healing wounds and illnesses, and also preventing putrefaction. Natural history and pharmacological texts on balm from the ancient and late antique periods emphasized specific qualities of balm, especially its heat; these were condensed and repeated in medieval encyclopedias. The rarity and cost of balsam, from antiquity through the medieval period, and the high rate of counterfeiting also demonstrate its high demand (...)
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  8.  13
    Donald R. Davis (1999). Recovering the Indigenous Legal Traditions of India: Classical Hindu Law in Practice in Late Medieval Kerala. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 27 (3):159-213.
    The collection of Malayalam records entitled Vanjeri Grandhavari, taken from the archives of an important Namputiri Brahmin family and the temple under its leadership, provides some long-awaited information regarding a wide range of legal activities in late medieval Kerala. The organization of law and the jurisprudence represented by these records bear an unmistakable similarity to legal ideas found in dharmastra texts. A thorough comparison of the records and relevant dharma texts shows that landholding Namputiri Brahmins, who possessed enormous political and (...)
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  9.  2
    Linda Ehrsam Voigts (1996). What's the Word? Bilingualism in Late-Medieval England. Speculum 71 (4):813-826.
    The movement of vernacular languages into domains of written language that were formerly the exclusive preserve of Latin is one that characterizes all of late-medieval Europe. I shall address the implications of one aspect of that process, in one country—the vernacularization of science and medicine in England from 1375 to 1475.
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  10.  2
    Thomas H. Bestul (1989). Chaucer's Parson's Tale and the Late-Medieval Tradition of Religious Meditation. Speculum 64 (3):600-619.
    In the prologue to the Parson's Tale, the discourse that is to follow is twice referred to as a “meditacioun.” The Parson states that he will put “this meditacioun” under the correction of clerks , and at the end of the prologue Harry Bailly instructs the Parson: “Telleth … youre meditacioun” . Despite the oddly persistent uncertainty about what the Parson's tale is , few critics have attended to the fact that both Harry Bailly and the Parson call it a (...)
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  11.  13
    Pekka Kärkkäinen (2012). Synderesis in Late Medieval Philosophy and the Wittenberg Reformers. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (5):881-901.
    The present article discusses the concept of synderesis in the late medieval universities of Erfurt and Leipzig and the later developments in Wittenberg. The comparison between Bartholomaeus Arnoldi of Usingen in Erfurt and Johannes Peyligk in Leipzig shows that school traditions played an important role in the exposition of synderesis by the late medieval scholastic natural philosophers. However, Jodocus Trutfetter's example warns against overemphasizing the importance of the school traditions and reminds us of the manifold history of medieval discussions on (...)
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  12.  14
    Jack Zupko (1997). What Is the Science of the Soul? A Case Study in the Evolution of Late Medieval Natural Philosophy. Synthese 110 (2):297 - 334.
    This paper aims at a partial rehabilitation of E. A. Moody's characterization of the 14th century as an age of rising empiricism, specifically by contrasting the conception of the natural science of psychology found in the writings of a prominent 13th-century philosopher (Thomas Aquinas) with those of two 14th-century philosophers (John Buridan and Nicole Oresme). What emerges is that if the meaning of empiricism can be disengaged from modern and contemporary paradigms, and understood more broadly in terms of a cluster (...)
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  13.  5
    A. J. Musson (1999). Turning King's Evidence: The Prosecution of Crime in Late Medieval England. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 19 (3):467-480.
    This paper provides a re-assessment of the significance of turning king's evidence in late medieval England through a re-examination of the use of approvers' appeals as a method of prosecution. It puts forward the hypothesis that the process was not only popular with felons, but also actively encouraged by the Crown. Exploring attitudes towards confessions and their admissibility, it compares and contrasts contemporary Continental prosecution practices and considers the extent to which the English legal system was developing a form of (...)
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  14.  15
    Jack Zupcko (1997). What is the Science of the Soul? A Case Study in the Evolution of Late Medieval Natural Philosophy. Synthese 110 (2):297-334.
    This paper aims at a partial rehabilitation of E. A. Moody''s characterization of the 14th century as an age of rising empiricism, specifically by contrasting the conception of the natural science of psychology found in the writings of a prominent 13th-century philosopher (Thomas Aquinas) with those of two 14th-century philosophers (John Buridan and Nicole Oresme). What emerges is that if the meaning of empiricism can be disengaged from modern and contemporary paradigms, and understood more broadly in terms of a cluster (...)
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  15.  2
    Eliana Corbari (2013). Lost and Found in Translation: The Heart of Vernacular Theology in Late Medieval Italy. Franciscan Studies 71 (1):263-279.
    Medieval theology is, at times, still conventionally identified with systematic thought as exemplified by the works of scholastic thinkers such as the Franciscan friar, Bonaventure of Bagnoregio, and the Dominican, Thomas Aquinas. However, this was not the only form of medieval theology. Influential studies have established that monastic theology can be treated as an older partner of scholasticism.1 An increasing number of scholars are adopting the concept of vernacular theology as a third theological tradition from medieval Christianity.2This essay considers vernacular (...)
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  16.  3
    Katherine H. Tachau (2006). Logic's God and the Natural Order in Late Medieval Oxford: The Teaching of Robert Holcot. Annals of Science 53 (3):235-267.
    Recent students of late medieval intellectual history have treated Oxford theologians' Sentences lectures from the 1320s to 1330s as revealing the interface of the theological, logical, and scientific thinking characteristic of a historically momentous ‘New English Theology’. Its conceptual achievement, historians generally concur, was the casting off of the speculative metaphysics of such thirteenth-century authors as Robert Grosseteste and Roger Bacon; its methodological novelty made it akin to twentieth-century analytic philosophy and seminal for the early Scientific Revolution. Yet the metaphysically (...)
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  17.  3
    J. M. M. H. Thijssen (2000). Late-Medieval Natural Philosophy. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 67 (1):158-190.
    In this survey, I should like to present an overview of the scholarly literature that appeared during the last decade or so in the field of fourteenth-century natural philosophy. This survey is partial in both senses of the term: it is fragmentary, and occasionally, it records my disagreements with some of the scholarly literature. Before narrowing down its scope it might be well to raise two methodological problems which one encounters when attempting to deal with the history of late-medieval (...)
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  18. Alessandro Conti (ed.) (2013). A Companion to Walter Burley: Late Medieval Logician and Metaphysician. Brill.
    Walter Burley was one of the most prominent logicians and metaphysicians of the Middle Ages. This volume, which contain thirteen substantial articles on his philosophy, is aimed to reconstruct the internal evolution of his doctrines and the role they played in the development of Late Medieval philosophy.
     
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  19. Andrea Denny-Brown (2012). Fashioning Change: The Trope of Clothing in High- and Late-Medieval England. Ohio State University Press.
    Medieval European culture was obsessed with clothing. In _Fashioning Change: The Trope of Clothing in High-and Late-Medieval England,_ Andrea Denny-Brown explores the central impact of clothing in medieval ideas about impermanence and the ethical stakes of human transience. Studies of dress frequently contend with a prevailing cultural belief that bodily adornment speaks to interests that are frivolous, superficial, and cursory. Taking up the vexed topic of clothing’s inherent changeability, Denny-Brown uncovers an important new genealogy of clothing as a representational (...)
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  20. Mark Gerald Henninger (1984). Some Late Medieval Theories of the Category of Relation. University Microfilms International.
    As with the problem of universals, late medieval thinkers were very concerned with the ontological status of relations, for they were central to numerous theological and philosophical problems. These relations were of various types: relations of identity, qualitative similarity, quantitative equality, causal relations, and intentional relations, such as those between knower and the object known. Each of these relations was taken to be an Aristotelian accident. Does it differ from the substance which is related? Broadly speaking, I have discovered four (...)
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  21. Petra Melichar (2009). God, Slave and a Nun: A Case From Late Medieval Cyprus. Byzantion 79:280-291.
    A draft of a will takes us back to the fifteenth century Cyprus introducing a strange case : a nun as an owner of a slave woman of foreign origin. While attempting to reconstruct the identities and circumstances of the two women, the primary sources offer a glimpse of the late medieval eastern Mediterranean with its quickly changing boundaries, multicultural context and complex interpersonal relationships.
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  22. Virpi Mäkinen (2010). Self-Preservation and Natural Rights in Late Medieval and Early Modern Political Thought. In The Nature of Rights: Moral and Political Aspects of Rights in Late Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. The Philosophical Society of Finland
  23.  51
    M. S. Kempshall (1999). The Common Good in Late Medieval Political Thought. Oxford University Press.
    This book offers a major reinterpretation of the `secularization' of medieval ideas by examining scholastic discussions on the nature of the common good. It challenges the view that the rediscovery of Aristotle was the primary catalyst for the emergence of a secular theory of the state. A detailed exposition of the content and the context of late scholastic political and ethical thought reveals that the roots of medieval 'secularization' were profoundly theological.
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  24.  43
    Terence Parsons (1994). Anaphoric Pronouns in Very Late Medieval Supposition Theory. Linguistics and Philosophy 17 (5):429 - 445.
    This paper arose from an attempt to determine how the very late medieval1 supposition theorists treated anaphoric pronouns, pronouns whose significance is derivative from their antecedents. Modern researches into pronouns were stimulated in part by the problem of "donkey sentences" discussed by Geach 1962 in a section explaining what is wrong with medieval supposition theory. So there is some interest in seeing exactly what the medieval account comes to, especially if it turns out, as I suspect, to work as well (...)
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  25.  22
    William Crossgrove (2000). The Vernacularization of Science, Medicine, and Technology in Late Medieval Europe: Broadening Our Perspectives. Early Science and Medicine 5 (1):47-63.
    The following article is the concluding piece of a series on the vernacularization of science, medicine, and technology in the Late Middle Ages inaugurated in 1998 with a special issue of ESM and continued with two articles in ESM in 1999, featuring papers selected by William Crossgrove and Linda Ehrsam Voigts. All of these articles grew out of a series of papers presented at the Thirty-Second International Congress on Medieval Studies at Western Michigan University in May 1997, a series which (...)
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  26.  6
    Bruce Eastwood (1986). Alhazen, Leonardo, and Late-Medieval Speculation on the Inversion of Images in the Eye. Annals of Science 43 (5):413-446.
    No one before Platter and Kepler proposed retinal reception of an inverted visual image. The dominant tradition in visual theory, especially that of Alhazen and his Western followers, subordinated the intra-ocular geometry of visual rays to the requirement for an upright image and to preconceptions about the precise nature of the visual spirit and its part in vision. Henry of Langenstein and an anonymous glossator in the late Middle Ages proposed alternatives to Alhazen, including the suggestion of double inversion of (...)
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  27. Anneliese Maier (1982). On the Threshold of Exact Science: Selected Writings of Anneliese Maier on Late Medieval Natural Philosophy. University of Pennsylvania Press.
    The nature of motion -- Causes, forces, and resistance -- The concept of the function in fourteenth-century physics -- The significance of the theory of impetus for Scholastic natural philosophy -- Galileo and the Scholastic theory of impetus -- The theory of the elements and the problem of their participation in compounds -- The achievements of late Scholastic natural philosophy.
     
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  28.  10
    Jessica Rosenfeld (2010). Ethics and Enjoyment in Late Medieval Poetry: Love After Aristotle. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction: love after Aristotle; 1. Enjoyment: a medieval history; 2. Narcissus after Aristotle: love and ethics in Le Roman de la Rose; 3. Metamorphoses of pleasure in the fourteenth century Dit Amoureux; 4. Love's knowledge: fabliau, allegory, and fourteenth-century anti-intellectualism; 5. On human happiness: Dante, Chaucer, and the felicity of friendship; Coda: Chaucer's philosophical women.
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  29.  8
    Daniel J. Lasker (2008). From Judah Hadassi to Elijah Bashyatchi: Studies in Late Medieval Karaite Philosophy. Brill.
    Background -- Major thinkers -- Contacts with Rabbanite thinkers -- Topics -- Into the modern period.
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  30. Michael H. Shank (1988). "Unless You Believe, You Shall Not Understand" Logic, University, and Society in Late Medieval Vienna. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  31. Alexander Broadie (1989). Notion and Object: Aspects of Late Medieval Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    The early 16th century was a time of intense intellectual activity during which ideas central to the disputes between traditionalists and reformers were being refined. This is the first full-length study of the quest for the answer to the question then being asked: "What is knowlege?" Broadie focuses on the distinction between sensory and intellectual cognition, and on the concept of "notion" which was central to the epistemological debates of the period, paying special attention to the doctrines of John Mair, (...)
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  32.  12
    Christophe Grellard & Aurélien Robert (eds.) (2009). Atomism in Late Medieval Philosophy and Theology. Brill.
    DMet 10: Prime matter is the origin of all quantities. Hence it is the origin of every dimension of continuous quantity whatever. ...
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  33. Virpi Mäkinen (ed.) (2010). The Nature of Rights: Moral and Political Aspects of Rights in Late Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. The Philosophical Society of Finland.
     
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  34. J. C. Roberts (1990). The Influence of Aristotle on Late Medieval Ethics a Study of the Treatise de Via Paradisi by Remigio de Girolami O. P.
     
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  35. Robert Swanson (ed.) (2006). Promissory Notes on the Treasury of Merits: Indulgences in Late Medieval Europe. Brill.
    _Promissary Notes on the Treasury of Merits_ offers an important selection of work on a neglected topic of medieval European religious history. The contributions clearly demonstrate the vibrant, multi-faceted, and at times contested, role which indulgences played in many aspects of medieval catholic life.
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  36.  58
    Paul Vincent Spade, Thoughts, Words and Things: An Introduction to Late Mediaeval Logic and Semantic Theory.
    The “dragon” that graces the cover of this volume has a story that goes with it. In the summer of 1980, I was on the teaching staff of the Summer Institute on Medieval Philosophy held at Cornell University under the direction of Norman Kretzmann and the auspices of the Council for Philosophical Studies and the National Endowment for the Humanities. While I was giving a series of lectures there (lectures that contribute to this volume, as it turns out), I went (...)
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  37.  11
    Siegfried Wenzel (1973). The Pilgrimage of Life as a Late Medieval Genre. Mediaeval Studies 35 (1):370-388.
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  38.  9
    John Hennig (1954). The Place of Irish Saints in Late Mediaeval English Hagiography. Mediaeval Studies 16 (1):165-171.
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  39.  14
    Alan J. Fletcher (2004). Variations on a Theme Attributed to Robert Holcot: Lessons for Late-Medieval English Preaching From the Castle of Prudence. Mediaeval Studies 66 (1):27-98.
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  40.  12
    Richard Hazelton (1957). The Christianization of" Cato": The Disticha Catonis in the Light of Late Medieval Commentaries. Mediaeval Studies 19 (1):157-173.
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  41.  32
    Simo Knuuttila (2010). Generality and Identity in Late Medieval Discussions of the Prior Analytics. Vivarium 48 (1-2):215-227.
    In this article, I shall consider medieval discussions of the principles of Aristotelian syllogistic which were called the dictum de omni et nullo and the expository syllogism. I am particularly interested in how theological questions contributed to the introduction of some influential new medieval ideas, such as the extensional sameness of the subject as the basis of predication, the interpretation of the expository syllogism from this point of view, and the explication of the logical subject of universal and particular syllogistic (...)
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  42.  6
    Alistair John Minnis (1981). The Influence of Academic Prologues on the Prologues and Literary Attitudes of Late-Medieval English Writers. Mediaeval Studies 43 (1):342-383.
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  43.  10
    Dominik Perler (2010). Does God Deceive Us? Skeptical Hypotheses in Late Medieval Epistemology. In Henrik Lagerlund (ed.), Rethinking the History of Skepticism: The Missing Medieval Background. Brill 103--171.
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  44.  8
    Robert H. Lucas (1977). Ennoblement in Late Medieval France. Mediaeval Studies 39 (1):239-260.
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  45.  4
    Marci Sortor (1998). The Ieperleet Affair: The Struggle for Market Position in Late-Medieval Flanders. Speculum 73 (4):1068-1100.
    Between 1423 and 1435 the Flemish cities of Ypres and Ghent engaged in a protracted struggle over a waterway called the Ieperleet, which connected Ypres to the sea. The struggle was played out in the courtroom, in brawls along canal banks, and even in a quasi-military expedition. This series of legal battles and fistfights—what I will call the Ieperleet Affair—is a graphic example of the changing economic and political fortunes of the cities of Flanders during the unsettled conditions of the (...)
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  46.  5
    Christine Lutgens (1976). The Case of Waghen Vs. Sutton: Conflict Over Burial Rights in Late Medieval England. Mediaeval Studies 38 (1):145-184.
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  47.  12
    Pekka Kärkkäinen (2009). Psychology and the Soul in Late Medieval Erfurt. Vivarium 47 (4):421-443.
    In the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries the University of Erfurt was one of the strongholds of the via moderna in Germany. The present article examines how this school's identity was manifested in discussions on the soul and its powers, engaged in by three Erfurtian philosophers: Johannes Carnificis de Lutrea, Jodocus Trutfetter and Bartholomaeus Arnoldi de Usingen. In the various forms of their expositions these authors reveal a rather uniform stance concerning doctrinal issues. Their positions are largely based on (...)
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  48.  9
    Gyula Klima, Philosophy Among the Artistae: A Late-Medieval Picture of the Limits of Rational Inquiry.
    It is a commonplace in the historiography of medieval philosophy that theology represents philosophy's culmination in the later Middle Ages, and specifically, that it is in the work of theologians and theologically-trained Arts Masters that we find philosophy in its purest and most advanced form. By comparison, the philosophy produced by thinkers who worked exclusively or primarily in the Faculty of Arts is seen as inferior -- by which is usually meant that it is shallow, unsophisticated, immature, and driven by (...)
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  49. Julius Kirshner (2008). Made Exiles for the Love of Knowledge: Students in Late Medieval Italy. Mediaeval Studies 70:163-202.
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  50. G. A. Lobineau (1977). 1707: Histoire de Bretagne, Paris 1707. 178 Werner Paravicini Lot, F. et R. Fawtier 1958: Histoire des institutions françaises au moyen âge, 2. Institutions royales, Paris 1958. Lucas, RH 1977: Ennoblement in Late Medieval France. [REVIEW] Mediaeval Studies 39:239-60.
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