Search results for 'learning' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Stephen Downes (2010). Learning Networks and Connective Knowledge. In Harrison Hao Yang & Steve Chi-Yin Yuen (eds.), Collective Intelligence and E-Learning 2.0: Implications of Web-Based Communities and Networking. IGI Global.score: 21.0
    The purpose of this chapter is to outline some of the thinking behind new e-learning technology, including e-portfolios and personal learning environments. Part of this thinking is centered around the theory of connectivism, which asserts that knowledge - and therefore the learning of knowledge - is distributive, that is, not located in any given place (and therefore not 'transferred' or 'transacted' per se) but rather consists of the network of connections formed from experience and interactions with a (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Arthur S. Reber (1993). Implicit Learning and Tacit Knowledge: An Essay on the Cognitive Unconscious. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    In this new volume in the Oxford Psychology Series, the author presents a highly readable account of the cognitive unconscious, focusing in particular on the problem of implicit learning. Implicit learning is defined as the acquisition of knowledge that takes place independently of the conscious attempts to learn and largely in the absence of explicit knowledge about what was acquired. One of the core assumptions of this argument is that implicit learning is a fundamental, "root" process, one (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Christopher Winch (1998). The Philosophy of Human Learning. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Christopher Winch launches a vigorous Wittgensteinian attack on both the "romantic" Rousseauian and the "scientific" cognitivist traditions in learning theory. These two schools, he argues, are more closely related than is commonly realized.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Gregory M. Nixon (2013). Scientism, Philosophy and Brain-Based Learning. Northwest Journal of Teacher Education 11 (2):113-144.score: 18.0
    Since educators are always looking for ways to improve their practice, and since empirical science is now accepted in our worldview as the final arbiter of truth, it is no surprise they have been lured toward cognitive neuroscience in hopes that discovering how the brain learns will provide a nutshell explanation for student learning in general. I argue that identifying the person with the brain is scientism (not science), that the brain is not the person, and that it is (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Knud Illeris (ed.) (2009). Contemporary Theories of Learning: Learning Theorists -- In Their Own Words. Routledge.score: 18.0
    In this definitive collection of today's most influential learning theorists, sixteen world-renowned experts present their understanding of what learning is and ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. David R. Shanks & M. F. St John (1994). Characteristics of Dissociable Human Learning Systems. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):367-447.score: 18.0
    A number of ways of taxonomizing human learning have been proposed. We examine the evidence for one such proposal, namely, that there exist independent explicit and implicit learning systems. This combines two further distinctions, (1) between learning that takes place with versus without concurrent awareness, and (2) between learning that involves the encoding of instances (or fragments) versus the induction of abstract rules or hypotheses. Implicit learning is assumed to involve unconscious rule learning. We (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Richard Edwards, Gert Biesta & Mary Thorpe (eds.) (2009). Rethinking Contexts for Learning and Teaching. Routledge.score: 18.0
    It specifically addressesWhat constitutes a context for learning?How do we engage the full resources of learners for learning?What are the relationships between ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Michael Cholbi (2007). Intentional Learning as a Model for Philosophical Pedagogy. Teaching Philosophy 30 (1):35-58.score: 18.0
    The achievement of intentional learning is a powerful paradigm for the objectives and methods of the teaching of philosophy. This paradigm sees the objectives and methods of such teaching as based not simply on the mastery of content, but as rooted in attempts to shape the various affective and cognitive factors that influence students’ learning efforts. The goal of such pedagogy is to foster an intentional learning orientation, one characterized by self-awareness, active monitoring of the learning (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Kevin Connolly, Dylan Bianchi, Craig French, Lana Kuhle & Andy MacGregor, Report on the Network for Sensory Research/University of York Perceptual Learning Workshop.score: 18.0
    This report highlights and explores five questions that arose from the Network for Sensory Research workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of York on March 19th and 20th, 2012: 1. What is perceptual learning? 2. Can perceptual experience be modified by reason? 3. How does perceptual learning alter perceptual phenomenology? 4. How does perceptual learning alter the contents of perception? 5. How is perceptual learning coordinated with action?
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Kevin Connolly, John Donaldson, David M. Gray, Emily McWilliams, Sofia Ortiz-Hinojosa & David Suarez, Cognitive Penetration? (Network for Sensory Research Toronto Workshop on Perceptual Learning: Question Four).score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt from a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from the workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of Toronto, Mississauga on May 10th and 11th, 2012. This excerpt explores the question: What counts as cognitive penetration?
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Kevin Connolly, Dylan Bianchi, Craig French, Lana Kuhle & Andy MacGregor, Perceptual Learning and Cognitive Penetration (Network for Sensory Research/University of York Perceptual Learning Workshop, Question Two).score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt of a report that highlights and explores five questions that arose from the Network for Sensory Research workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of York in March, 2012. This portion of the report explores the question: Can perceptual experience be modified by reason?
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Christopher D. Viger (2005). Learning to Think: A Response to the Language of Thought Argument for Innateness. Mind and Language 20 (3):313-25.score: 18.0
    Jerry Fodor's argument for an innate language of thought continues to be a hurdle for researchers arguing that natural languages provide us with richer conceptual systems than our innate cognitive resources. I argue that because the logical/formal terms of natural languages are given a usetheory of meaning, unlike predicates, logical/formal terms might be learned without a mediating internal representation. In that case, our innate representational system might have less logical structure than a natural language, making it possible that we augment (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Kevin Connolly, John Donaldson, David M. Gray, Emily McWilliams, Sofia Ortiz-Hinojosa & David Suarez, Report on the Network for Sensory Research Toronto Workshop on Perceptual Learning.score: 18.0
    This report highlights and explores five questions which arose from the workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of Toronto, Mississauga on May 10th and 11th, 2012: 1. How should we demarcate perceptual learning from perceptual development? 2. What are the origins of multimodal associations? 3. Does our representation of time provide an amodal framework for multi-sensory integration? 4. What counts as cognitive penetration? 5. How can philosophers and psychologists most fruitfully collaborate?
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Kevin Connolly, Dylan Bianchi, Craig French, Lana Kuhle & Andy MacGregor, Perceptual Learning (Network for Sensory Research/University of York Perceptual Learning Workshop, Question One).score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt of a report that highlights and explores five questions that arose from the Network for Sensory Research workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of York in March, 2012. This portion of the report explores the question: What is perceptual learning?
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. B. van Oers (ed.) (2008). The Transformation of Learning: Advances in Cultural-Historical Activity Theory. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Learning is a changing phenomenon, depending on the advances in theory and research. This book presents a relatively new approach to learning, based on meaningful human activities in cultural practices and in collaboration with others. It draws extensively from the ideas of Lev Vygotsky and his recent followers. The book presents ideas that elaborate this learning theory and also gives recent developments and applications of this approach in a variety of educational situations in and outside of school. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Kenneth Reisman (2007). Is Culture Inherited Through Social Learning? Biological Theory 2 (3):300-306.score: 18.0
    In this article I challenge the widely held assumption that human culture is inherited by means of social learning. First, I address the distinction between “social” learning and “individual” learning. I argue that most cultural ideas are not acquired by one form of learning or the other, but from a hybrid of both. Second, I discuss how individual learning can interact with niche construction. I argue that these processes collectively provide a non-social route for learned (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Nicholas Maxwell (2003). Two Great Problems of Learning. Teaching in Higher Education, 8 (January):129-134.score: 18.0
    Two great problems of learning confront humanity: learning about the universe, and learning how to live wisely. The first problem was solved with the creation of modern science, but the second problem has not been solved. This combination puts humanity into a situation of unprecedented danger. In order to solve the second problem we need to learn from our solution to the first problem. This requires that we bring about a revolution in the overall aims and methods (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Susan Leigh Anderson (2003). Teaching Today's Students How to Examine Ethical Issues and Be More Actively Involved in the Learning Process. Journal of Academic Ethics 1 (2):189-198.score: 18.0
    In response to the difficulty of teaching an increasingly large number of students who are ill prepared for the sort of abstract thinking and well-structured essay writing that are essential to the field of Philosophy, I have discovered a five-step method for teaching students in my Philosophy and Social Ethics course how to examine any ethical issue and write well-structured essays discussing the issue. Just as important, students are now required to take more responsibility for the learning process which, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Kevin Connolly (forthcoming). Sensory Substitution and Perceptual Learning. In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), Sensory Substitution and Augmentation. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    When a user integrates a sensory substitution device into her life, the process involves perceptual learning, that is, ‘relatively long-lasting changes to an organism’s perceptual system that improve its ability to respond to its environment’ (Goldstone 1998: 585). In this paper, I explore ways in which the extensive literature on perceptual learning can be applied to help improve sensory substitution devices. I then use these findings to answer a philosophical question. Much of the philosophical debate surrounding sensory substitution (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Daniel Steel (2009). Testability and Ockham's Razor: How Formal and Statistical Learning Theory Converge in the New Riddle of Induction. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophical Logic 38 (5):471 - 489.score: 18.0
    Nelson Goodman’s new riddle of induction forcefully illustrates a challenge that must be confronted by any adequate theory of inductive inference: provide some basis for choosing among alternative hypotheses that fit past data but make divergent predictions. One response to this challenge is to distinguish among alternatives by means of some epistemically significant characteristic beyond fit with the data. Statistical learning theory takes this approach by showing how a concept similar to Popper’s notion of degrees of testability is linked (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Dominic Scott (1995). Recollection and Experience: Plato's Theory of Learning and its Successors. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Questions about learning and discovery have fascinated philosophers from Plato onwards. Does the mind bring innate resources of its own to the process of learning or does it rely wholly upon experience? Plato was the first philosopher to give an innatist response to this question and in doing so was to provoke the other major philosophers of ancient Greece to give their own rival explanations of learning. This book is the first to examine these theories of (...) in relation to each other. It presents an entirely new interpretation of the theory of recollection which also changes the way we understand the development of ancient philosophy after Plato. The final section of the book compares ancient theories of learning with the seventeenth-century debate about innate ideas, and finds that the relation between the two periods is far more interesting and complete than is usually supposed. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Rachael L. Brown (2013). Learning, Evolvability and Exploratory Behaviour: Extending the Evolutionary Reach of Learning. Biology and Philosophy 28 (6):933-955.score: 18.0
    Traditional accounts of the role of learning in evolution have concentrated upon its capacity as a source of fitness to individuals. In this paper I use a case study from invasive species biology—the role of conditioned taste aversion in mitigating the impact of cane toads on the native species of Northern Australia—to highlight a role for learning beyond this—as a source of evolvability to populations. This has two benefits. First, it highlights an otherwise under-appreciated role for learning (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Kevin Connolly, Dylan Bianchi, Craig French, Lana Kuhle & Andy MacGregor, Perceptual Learning and Perceptual Phenomenology (Network for Sensory Research/University of York Perceptual Learning Workshop, Question Three).score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt of a report that highlights and explores five questions that arose from the Network for Sensory Research workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of York in March, 2012. This portion of the report explores the question: How does perceptual learning alter perceptual phenomenology?
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Kevin Connolly (forthcoming). Perceptual Learning and the Contents of Perception. Erkenntnis:1-12.score: 18.0
    Suppose you have recently gained a disposition for recognizing a high-level kind property, like the property of "being a wren." Wrens might look different to you now. According to the Phenomenal Contrast Argument, such cases of perceptual learning show that the contents of perception can include high-level kind properties such as the property of "being a wren." I detail an alternative explanation for the different look of the wren: a shift in one’s attentional pattern onto other low-level properties. Philosophers (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Kevin Connolly, John Donaldson, David M. Gray, Emily McWilliams, Sofia Ortiz-Hinojosa & David Suarez, Philosophy/Psychology Collaboration (Network for Sensory Research Toronto Workshop on Perceptual Learning: Question Five).score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt from a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from the workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of Toronto, Mississauga on May 10th and 11th, 2012. This excerpt explores the question: How can philosophers and psychologists most fruitfully collaborate?
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Gloria Dall'Alba (2009). Learning Professional Ways of Being: Ambiguities of Becoming. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (1):34-45.score: 18.0
    The purpose of professional education programs is to prepare aspiring professionals for the challenges of practice within a particular profession. These programs typically seek to ensure the acquisition of necessary knowledge and skills, as well as providing opportunities for their application. While not denying the importance of knowledge and skills, this paper reconfigures professional education as a process of becoming. Learning to become a professional involves not only what we know and can do, but also who we are (becoming). (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Peter Rule (2011). Bakhtin and Freire: Dialogue, Dialectic and Boundary Learning. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (9):924-942.score: 18.0
    Dialogue is a seminal concept within the work of the Brazilian adult education theorist, Paulo Freire, and the Russian literary critic and philosopher, Mikhail Bakhtin. While there are commonalities in their understanding of dialogue, they differ in their treatment of dialectic. This paper addresses commonalities and dissonances within a Bakhtin-Freire dialogue on the notions of dialogue and dialectic. It then teases out some of the implications for education theory and practice in relation to two South African contexts of learning (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Kevin Connolly, Dylan Bianchi, Craig French, Lana Kuhle & Andy MacGregor, Perceptual Learning and Action (Network for Sensory Research/University of York Perceptual Learning Workshop, Question Five).score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt of a report that highlights and explores five questions that arose from the Network for Sensory Research workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of York in March, 2012. This portion of the report explores the question: How is perceptual learning coordinated with action?
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Kevin Connolly, Dylan Bianchi, Craig French, Lana Kuhle & Andy MacGregor, Perceptual Learning and Perceptual Content (Network for Sensory Research/University of York Perceptual Learning Workshop, Question Four).score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt of a report that highlights and explores five questions that arose from the Network for Sensory Research workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of York in March, 2012. This portion of the report explores the question: How does perceptual learning alter the contents of perception?
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Kevin Connolly, John Donaldson, David M. Gray, Emily McWilliams, Sofia Ortiz-Hinojosa & David Suarez, Multi-Sensory Integration and Time (Network for Sensory Research Toronto Workshop on Perceptual Learning: Question Three).score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt from a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from the workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of Toronto, Mississauga on May 10th and 11th, 2012. This excerpt explores the question: Does our representation of time provide and amodal framework for multi-sensory integration?
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Kevin Connolly, John Donaldson, David M. Gray, Emily McWilliams, Sofia Ortiz-Hinojosa & David Suarez, Perceptual Learning and Development (Network for Sensory Research Toronto Workshop on Perceptual Learning: Question One).score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt from a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from the workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of Toronto, Mississauga on May 10th and 11th, 2012. This excerpt explores the question: How should we demarcate perceptual learning from perceptual development?
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Kevin Connolly, John Donaldson, David M. Gray, Emily McWilliams, Sofia Ortiz-Hinojosa & David Suarez, Multimodal Associations (Network for Sensory Research Toronto Workshop on Perceptual Learning: Question Two).score: 18.0
    This is an excerpt from a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from the workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of Toronto, Mississauga on May 10th and 11th, 2012. This excerpt explores the question: What are the origins of multimodal associations?
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Chris Thornton (1997). Brave Mobots Use Representation: Emergence of Representation in Fight-or-Flight Learning. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 7 (4):475-494.score: 18.0
    The paper uses ideas from Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence and Genetic Algorithms to provide a model of the development of a fight-or-flight response in a simulated agent. The modelled development process involves (simulated) processes of evolution, learning and representation development. The main value of the model is that it provides an illustration of how simple learning processes may lead to the formation of structures which can be given a representational interpretation. It also shows how these may form (...)
    Direct download (17 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Jean-Pascal Gond & Olivier Herrbach (2006). Social Reporting as an Organisational Learning Tool? A Theoretical Framework. Journal of Business Ethics 65 (4):359 - 371.score: 18.0
    Social reporting has become an increasingly important dimension of the corporate social responsibility process. The growing necessity to include the social dimension in reporting practices raises important questions about the nature of social responsibility and its impact on corporate and individual behaviour and performance. The literature has yet to provide a reliable theoretical definition of corporate social responsibility and performance, however. Based on the approach proposed by Simons, we argue that organisational reporting about social responsibility can be viewed as a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Ronald R. Sims & Edward L. Felton (2006). Designing and Delivering Business Ethics Teaching and Learning. Journal of Business Ethics 63 (3):297 - 312.score: 18.0
    The recent corporate scandals in the United States have caused a renewed interest and focus on teaching business ethics. Business schools and their faculties are reexamining the teaching of business ethics and are reassessing their responsibilities to produce honest and truthful managers who live lives of integrity and ethical accountability. The authors recognize that no agreement exists among business schools and their faculties regarding what should be the content and pedagogy of a course in business ethics. However, the authors hold (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Ariel S. Cecchi (2014). Cognitive Penetration, Perceptual Learning and Neural Plasticity. Dialectica 68 (1):63-95.score: 18.0
    Cognitive penetration of perception, broadly understood, is the influence that the cognitive system has on a perceptual system (e.g., visual, auditory, haptic). The paper shows a form of cognitive penetration in the visual system (defined as early vision) which I call ‘architectural’. Architectural cognitive penetration is the process whereby the behaviour or the structure of the perceptual system is influenced by the cognitive system, which consequently may have an impact on the content of the perceptual experience. I scrutinize a study (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Nina Gierasimczuk (2009). Bridging Learning Theory and Dynamic Epistemic Logic. Synthese 169 (2):371-384.score: 18.0
    This paper discusses the possibility of modelling inductive inference (Gold 1967) in dynamic epistemic logic (see e.g. van Ditmarsch et al. 2007). The general purpose is to propose a semantic basis for designing a modal logic for learning in the limit. First, we analyze a variety of epistemological notions involved in identification in the limit and match it with traditional epistemic and doxastic logic approaches. Then, we provide a comparison of learning by erasing (Lange et al. 1996) and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Alison Gopnik & Laura Schulz (eds.) (2007). Causal Learning: Psychology, Philosophy, and Computation. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Understanding causal structure is a central task of human cognition. Causal learning underpins the development of our concepts and categories, our intuitive theories, and our capacities for planning, imagination and inference. During the last few years, there has been an interdisciplinary revolution in our understanding of learning and reasoning: Researchers in philosophy, psychology, and computation have discovered new mechanisms for learning the causal structure of the world. This new work provides a rigorous, formal basis for theory theories (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. David Guez (2009). A Bio-Logical Theory of Animal Learning. Biological Theory 4 (2):148-158.score: 18.0
    This article provides the foundation for a new predictive theory of animal learning that is based upon a simple logical model. The knowledge of experimental subjects at a given time is described using logical equations. These logical equations are then used to predict a subject’s response when presented with a known or a previously unknown situation. This new theory suc- cessfully anticipates phenomena that existing theories predict, as well as phenomena that they cannot. It provides a theoretical account for (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Conor Mayo-Wilson, Kevin Zollman & David Danks (2013). Wisdom of the Crowds Vs. Groupthink: Learning in Groups and in Isolation. International Journal of Game Theory 42 (3):695-723.score: 18.0
    We evaluate the asymptotic performance of boundedly-rational strategies in multi-armed bandit problems, where performance is measured in terms of the tendency (in the limit) to play optimal actions in either (i) isolation or (ii) networks of other learners. We show that, for many strategies commonly employed in economics, psychology, and machine learning, performance in isolation and performance in networks are essentially unrelated. Our results suggest that the appropriateness of various, common boundedly-rational strategies depends crucially upon the social context (if (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Anthony E. Kelly (2011). Can Cognitive Neuroscience Ground a Science of Learning? Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):17-23.score: 18.0
    In this article, I review recent findings in cognitive neuroscience in learning, particularly in the learning of mathematics and of reading. I argue that while cognitive neuroscience is in its infancy as a field, theories of learning will need to incorporate and account for this growing body of empirical data.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Yam San Chee (2014). Interrogating the Learning Sciences as a Design Science: Leveraging Insights From Chinese Philosophy and Chinese Medicine. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (1):89-103.score: 18.0
    Design research has been positioned as an important methodological contribution of the learning sciences. Despite the publication of a handbook on the subject, the practice of design research in education remains an eclectic collection of specific approaches implemented by different researchers and research groups. In this paper, I examine the learning sciences as a design science to identify its fundamental goals, methods, affiliations, and assumptions. I argue that inherent tensions arise when attempting to practice design research as an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Robert M. French (2002). Implicit Learning and Consciousness: An Empirical, Philosophical, and Computational Consensus in the Making. Psychology Press.score: 18.0
    Implicit Learning and Consciousness challenges conventional wisdom and presents the most up-to-date studies to define, quantify and test the predictions of the main models of implicit learning. The chapters include a variety of research from computer modeling, experimental psychology and neural imaging to the clinical data resulting from work with amnesics. The result is a topical book that provides an overview of the debate on implicit learning, and the various philosophical, psychological and neurological frameworks in which it (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Robert F. Hadley & M. B. Hayward (1997). Strong Semantic Systematicity From Hebbian Connectionist Learning. Minds and Machines 7 (1):1-55.score: 18.0
    Fodor's and Pylyshyn's stand on systematicity in thought and language has been debated and criticized. Van Gelder and Niklasson, among others, have argued that Fodor and Pylyshyn offer no precise definition of systematicity. However, our concern here is with a learning based formulation of that concept. In particular, Hadley has proposed that a network exhibits strong semantic systematicity when, as a result of training, it can assign appropriate meaning representations to novel sentences (both simple and embedded) which contain words (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Huaiyu Wang (2007). On Ge Wu: Recovering the Way of the "Great Learning". Philosophy East and West 57 (2):204 - 226.score: 18.0
    By rethinking the meaning of a central idiom in the Great Learning, this essay intends to open up a new horizon for the hermeneutics of early Confucian thinking, which has little to do with metaphysics. Through a careful etymological study of ge wu and a dialogue between the Great Learning and Heidegger's phenomenology of human affection, I demonstrate the critical position of the human heart in early Chinese thinking. This new interpretation of early Confucian moral teachings also recovers (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Aarre Laakso & Paco Calvo (2011). How Many Mechanisms Are Needed to Analyze Speech? A Connectionist Simulation of Structural Rule Learning in Artificial Language Acquisition. Cognitive Science 35 (7):1243-1281.score: 18.0
    Some empirical evidence in the artificial language acquisition literature has been taken to suggest that statistical learning mechanisms are insufficient for extracting structural information from an artificial language. According to the more than one mechanism (MOM) hypothesis, at least two mechanisms are required in order to acquire language from speech: (a) a statistical mechanism for speech segmentation; and (b) an additional rule-following mechanism in order to induce grammatical regularities. In this article, we present a set of neural network studies (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Eamon P. Fulcher & Marianne Hammerl (2001). When All is Considered: Evaluative Learning Does Not Require Contingency Awareness. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (4):567-573.score: 18.0
    We argue that the effects of evaluative learning may occur (a) without conscious perception of the affective stimuli, (b) without awareness of the stimulus contingencies, and (c) without any awareness that learning has occurred at all. Whether the three experiments reported in our target article provide conclusive evidence for either or any of these assertions is discussed in the commentaries of De Houwer and Field. We respond with the argument that when considered alongside other studies carried out over (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Richard Stöckle-Schobel (2012). Perceptual Learning and Feature-Based Approaches to Concepts - a Critical Discussion. Frontiers in Psychology 3:1-10.score: 18.0
    A central challenge for any theory of concept learning comes from Fodor’s argument against the learning of concepts, which lies at the basis of contemporary computationalist accounts of the mind. Robert Goldstone and his colleagues propose a theory of perceptual learning that attempts to overcome Fodor’s challenge. Its main component is the addition of a cognitive device at the interface of perception and conception, which slowly builds “cognitivesymbols” out of perceptual stimuli. Two main mechanisms of concept creation (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Robyn Barnacle (2009). Gut Instinct: The Body and Learning. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (1):22-33.score: 18.0
    In the current socio-political climate pedagogies consistent with rationalism are in the ascendancy. One way to challenge the purchase of rationalism within educational discourse and practice is through the body, or by re-thinking the nature of mind-body relations. While the orientation of this paper is ultimately phenomenological, it takes as its point of departure recent feminist scholarship, which is demonstrating that attending to physiology can provide insight into the complexity of mind-body relations. Elizabeth Wilson's account of the role of the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Sunbin Song, Howard Jr, James H. & Darlene V. Howard (2007). Implicit Probabilistic Sequence Learning is Independent of Explicit Awareness. Learning and Memory 14 (1-6):167-176.score: 18.0
1 — 50 / 1000