Search results for 'liberal feminism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Simon Cabulea May (2012). Liberal Feminism and the Ethics of Polygamy. In Daniela Cutas & Sarah Chan (eds.), Families - Beyond the Nuclear Ideal. Bloomsbury Academic.score: 150.0
    I distinguish two ways that a cultural practice may be inherently objectionable. I reject the claim that polygamy is inherently "vicious" because asymmetric marriages are inevitably inegalitarian. I argue that there is good reason to think polygamy is inherently "bankrupt" insofar as a cultural ideal of asymmetric marriage presupposes stereotypical gender roles.
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  2. Black Feminism (1995). A Black Feminist Statement. In Beverly Guy-Sheftal (ed.), Words of Fire: An Anthology of African American Feminist Thought. The New Press.score: 150.0
  3. Mariana Szapuova (2006). Mill's Liberal Feminism: Its Legacy and Current Criticism. Prolegomena 5 (2):179-191.score: 132.0
    This paper highlights John Stuart Mill’s views on the problem of gender equality as expressed in The Subjection of Women, which is commonly regarded as one of the core texts of Enlightenment liberal feminism of the 19th century. In this paper, the author outlines the historical context of both Mill’s views and his personal biography, which influenced his argumentation for the emancipation of women, and considers Mill’s utilitarianism and liberalism, as the main philosophical background for his criticism of (...)
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  4. L. Ryan Musgrave (2003). Liberal Feminism, From Law to Art: The Impact of Feminist Jurisprudence on Feminist Aesthetics. Hypatia 18 (4):214-235.score: 120.0
    : This essay explores how early approaches in feminist aesthetics drew on concepts honed in the field of feminist legal theory, especially conceptions of oppression and equality. I argue that by importing these feminist legal concepts, many early feminist accounts of how art is political depended largely on a distinctly liberal version of politics. I offer a critique of liberal feminist aesthetics, indicating ways recent work in the field also turns toward critical feminist aesthetics as an alternative.
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  5. Susan Wendell (1987). A (Qualified) Defense of Liberal Feminism. Hypatia 2 (2):65 - 93.score: 120.0
    Liberal feminism is not committed to a number of philosophical positions for which it is frequently criticized, including abstract individualism, certain individualistic approaches to morality and society, valuing the mental/rational over the physical/emotional, and the traditional liberal way of drawing the line between the public and the private. Moreover, liberal feminism's clearest political commitments, including equality of opportunity, are important to women's liberation and not necessarily incompatible with the goals of socialist and radical feminism.
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  6. Loretta Kensinger (1997). (In)Quest of Liberal Feminism. Hypatia 12 (4):178 - 197.score: 120.0
    I am interested in exploring the usefulness and limits of traditional categories of feminist theory, such as those laid out by Alison Jaggar (1977; 1983). I begin the analysis by critically comparing various treatments of liberal feminism. I focus throughout this investigation on uncovering ways that current frameworks privilege white authors and concerns, recreate the split between theory and activism, and obscure long histories of theoretical and practical coalition and alliance work.
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  7. Mihaela Frunza (2010). Feminismul ca/si ideologie/ Feminism as/and Ideology. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 2 (6):4-28.score: 108.0
    This paper analyses the relations between feminism and its various ideological cores. Three tendancies are discussed here: acceptance of the ideological core, criticism and rejection of this core and, more intricately, acceptance of one core and rejection of the other. The emphasis is placed on Anglo- American second-wave liberal feminism, whose ideological nature is almost unanomously accepted, in all the meanings of the term – positive, negative, and neutral. The author adopts Christine di Stefano’s idea, that a (...)
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  8. Amy Baehr (2013). Liberal Feminism: Comprehensive and Political. In Feminist Interpretations of John Rawls. 150-166.score: 108.0
  9. Elizabeth Brake (2004). Rawls and Feminism: What Should Feminists Make of Liberal Neutrality? Journal of Moral Philosophy 1 (3):293-309.score: 96.0
    the issue of liberal neutrality, a topic suggested by the work of Catharine MacKinnon. I discuss two kinds of neutrality: neutrality at the level of justifying liberalism itself, and state neutrality in political decision-making. Both kinds are contentious within liberal theory. Rawls’s argument for justice as fairness has been criticized for non-neutrality at the justificatory level, a problem noted by Rawls himself in Political Liberalism . I will defend a qualified account of neutrality at the justificatory level, taking (...)
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  10. Lisa Schwartzman (1999). Liberal Rights Theory and Social Inequality: A Feminist Critique. Hypatia 14 (2):26-47.score: 96.0
    : Liberal rights theory can be used either to challenge or to support social hierarchies of power. Focusing on Ronald Dworkin's theory of rights and Catharine MacKinnon's feminist critique of liberalism, I identify a number of problems with the way that liberal theorists conceptualize rights. I argue that rights can be used to chal-lenge oppressive practices and structures only if they are defined and employed with an awareness and critique of social relations of power.
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  11. Hagar Kotef (2009). On Abstractness: First Wave Liberal Feminism and the Construction of the Abstract Woman. Feminist Studies 35 (3):495-522.score: 96.0
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  12. Wendy Donner (1993). John Stuart Mill's Liberal Feminism. Philosophical Studies 69 (2-3):155 - 166.score: 90.0
  13. Kristina Rolin (2004). Three Decades of Feminism in Science: From "Liberal Feminism" and "Difference Feminism" to Gender Analysis of Science. [REVIEW] Hypatia 19 (1):292 - 296.score: 90.0
  14. Ruth E. Groenhout (2002). Essentialist Challenges to Liberal Feminism. Social Theory and Practice 28 (1):51-75.score: 90.0
  15. Maria Christine Bernadetta Voet (1995). Feminism and Citizenship: Feminist Critiques of the Concept of Social-Liberal Citizenship. M.C.B. Voet.score: 90.0
    Until recently, feminist theory and citizenship theory have seemed two distinct areas, with writers in both camps seldom discussing the other's work.
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  16. Susan Hekman (1992). John Stuart Mill'sthe Subjection of Women: The Foundations of Liberal Feminism. History of European Ideas 15 (4-6):681-686.score: 90.0
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  17. Gail Tulloch (1989). Mill's Epistemology in Practice in His Liberal Feminism. Educational Philosophy and Theory 21 (2):32–39.score: 90.0
  18. Joyce Senders Pedersen (1987). Education, Gender and Social Change in Victorian Liberal Feminist Theory. History of European Ideas 8 (4-5):503-519.score: 90.0
  19. Amy R. Baehr (2013). Liberal Feminism. In Edward Zalta (ed.), Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 90.0
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  20. Julinna C. Oxley (2011). Liberal Feminism. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell. 258--262.score: 90.0
  21. Robert Almeder (1994). Liberal Feminism and Academic Feminism. Public Affairs Quarterly 8 (4):299-315.score: 90.0
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  22. Susan Leigh Anderson (1987). Criticisms of Liberal/Feminist Views on Abortion. Public Affairs Quarterly 1 (2):83-96.score: 90.0
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  23. Chairperson Mary Nash & Tjitske Akkerman (1996). Liberal Feminism and the Language of Slavery: A Legacy of the Colonial Past? The European Legacy 1 (3):975-980.score: 90.0
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  24. Karen Offen (1987). Pariahs Stand Up! The Founding of the Liberal Feminist Movement in France, 1858–1889. History of European Ideas 8 (6):726-729.score: 90.0
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  25. Joyce S. Pedersen (1999). Love, Politics, and the Victorians: Liberal Feminism and the Politics of Social Integration. The European Legacy 4 (6):42-57.score: 90.0
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  26. Chairperson June Purvis & Joyce Senders Pedersen (1996). The Historiography of the Women's Movement in Victorian and Edwardian England: Varieties of Contemporary Liberal Feminist Interpretation. The European Legacy 1 (3):1052-1057.score: 90.0
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  27. Elizabeth Frazer (1993). The Politics of Community: A Feminist Critique of the Liberal-Communitarian Debate. University of Toronto Press.score: 84.0
  28. Mihaela Frunza (2010). Mihaela Miroiu, The Road Towards Autonomy. Feminist Political Theories. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (8):120-121.score: 84.0
    Mihaela Miroiu, The road towards autonomy. Feminist Political Theories Polirom, Iasi, 2004.
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  29. Kate Nash (1998). Universal Difference: Feminism and the Liberal Undecidability of "Women". St. Martin's Press.score: 84.0
  30. Gordon Graham (1994). Liberal Vs Radical Feminism Revisited. Journal of Applied Philosophy 11 (2):155-170.score: 72.0
  31. Sandra Berns (2005). Liberalism and the Privatised Family: The Legacy of Rousseau. Res Publica 11 (2):125-155.score: 72.0
    This article argues that the intellectual legacy of Rousseau is at the root of the failure of 20th century egalitarian theorists such as Rawls and Dworkin to engage intellectually with feminist theorists working within the liberal tradition. Through an extended critique of Rousseau’s delineation of the relationship between liberal citizenship and the private family, it argues that the failure of such liberal theorists to take gender hierarchy seriously is a consequence of their attempt to place the private (...)
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  32. Samantha Brennan, The Liberal Rights of Feminist Liberalism.score: 72.0
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  33. John Exdell (1994). Feminism, Fundamentalism, and Liberal Legitimacy. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 24 (3):441 - 463.score: 72.0
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  34. Amy R. Baehr (2003). A Feminist Liberal Approach to Hate Crime Legislation. Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (1):134–152.score: 72.0
  35. Kevin M. Graham (2002). The Ideal of Objectivity in Political Dialogue: Liberal and Feminist Approaches. Social Epistemology 16 (3):295 – 309.score: 72.0
  36. Marion Tapper (1986). Can a Feminist Be a Liberal? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 64 (sup1):37-47.score: 72.0
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  37. Michaeleen J. Kelly (1994). Rights and Power: A Feminist Re-Thinking of Liberal Rights. Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (2):73-88.score: 72.0
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  38. Valerie R. Renegar & Stacey K. Sowards (2003). Liberal Irony, Rhetoric, and Feminist Thought: A Unifying Third Wave Feminist Theory. Philosophy and Rhetoric 36 (4):330-352.score: 72.0
  39. Michael Burke (2012). A Feminist Reconstruction of Liberal Rights and Sport. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 37 (1):11-28.score: 72.0
  40. Frazer Elizabeth & Lacey Nicola (1997). [Book Review] the Politics of Community, a Feminist Critique of the Liberal-Communitarian Debate. [REVIEW] Social Theory and Practice 23 (3).score: 72.0
     
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  41. Ratna Kapur (2010). Emancipatory Feminist Theory in Postcolonial India: Unmasking the Ruse of Liberal Internationalism. In Aakash Singh & Silika Mohapatra (eds.), Indian Political Thought: A Reader. Routledge.score: 72.0
  42. Johanna Oksala (2011). The Neo-Liberal Subject of Feminism: From Discipline to Self-Advancement. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 42 (1):104.score: 72.0
     
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  43. Joyce Pedersen (1994). Liberal Ideals and Feminist Organisation in Victorian England: One Cause or Many? History of European Ideas 19 (4-6):733-739.score: 72.0
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  44. Elizabeth Brake (2010). Minimal Marriage: What Political Liberalism Implies for Marriage Law. Ethics 120 (2):302-337.score: 66.0
    Recent defenses of same-sex marriage and polygamy have invoked the liberal doctrines of neutrality and public reason. Such reasoning is generally sound but does not go far enough. This paper traces the full implications of political liberalism for marriage. I argue that the constraints of public reason, applied to marriage law, entail ‘minimal marriage’, the most extensive set of state-determined restrictions on marriage compatible with political liberalism. Minimal marriage sets no principled restrictions on the sex or number of spouses (...)
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  45. Ladelle McWhorter (2013). Post-Liberation Feminism and Practices of Freedom. Foucault Studies 16:54-73.score: 66.0
    Most feminist theorists over the last forty years have held that a basic tenet of feminism is that women as a group are oppressed. The concept of oppression has never had a very broad meaning in liberal discourse, however, and with the rise of neo-liberalism since 1980 it has even less currency in public debate. This article argues that, while we may still believe women are oppressed, for pragmatic purposes Michel Foucault’s concept of practices of freedom is a (...)
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  46. Imelda Whelehan (1995). Modern Feminist Thought: From the Second Wave to "Post-Feminism". New York University Press.score: 60.0
    From the historical roots of second-wave feminism to current debates about feminist theory and politics. This introduction to Anglo-American feminist thought provides a critical and panoramic survey of dominant trends in feminism since 1968. Feminism is too often considered a monolithic movement, consisting of an enormous range of women and ideologies, with both similar and different perspectives and approaches. The book is divided into two parts, the first of which takes a close look at the most influential (...)
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  47. Stacey Young (1997). Changing the Wor(L)D: Discourse, Politics, and the Feminist Movement. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Changing the Wor(l)d draws on feminist publishing, postmodern theory and feminist autobiography to powerfully critique both liberal feminism and scholarship on the women's movement, arguing that both ignore feminism's unique contributions to social analysis and politics. These contributions recognize the power of discourse, the diversity of women's experiences, and the importance of changing the world through changing consciousness. Young critiques social movement theory and five key studies of the women's movement, arguing that gender oppression can be understood (...)
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  48. Ratna Kapur (2012). Pink Chaddis and SlutWalk Couture: The Postcolonial Politics of Feminism Lite. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 20 (1):1-20.score: 60.0
    The SlutWalk campaigns around the world have triggered a furious debate on whether they advance or limit feminist legal politics. This article examines the location of campaigns such as the SlutWalk marches in the context of feminist legal advocacy in postcolonial India, and discusses whether their emergence signifies the demise of feminism or its incarnation in a different guise. The author argues that the SlutWalks, much like the Pink Chaddi (panty) campaign in India, provide an important normative and discursive (...)
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  49. Chris Beasley (1999). What is Feminism?: An Introduction to Feminist Theory. Sage.score: 54.0
    So what is feminism anyway? Why are all the experts so reluctant to give us a clear definition? Is it possible to make sense of the complex and often contradictory debates? In this concise and accessible introduction to feminist theory, Chris Beasley provides clear explanations of the many types of feminism. She outlines the development of liberal, radical and Marxist//socialist feminism, and reviews the more contemporary influences of psychoanalysis, postmodernism, theories of the body, queer theory, and (...)
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  50. Sandra G. Harding & Merrill B. Hintikka (eds.) (2003). Discovering Reality: Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 54.0
    This collection of essays, first published two decades ago, presents central feminist critiques and analyses of natural and social sciences and their philosophies. Unfortunately, in spite of the brilliant body of research and scholarship in these fields in subsequent decades, the insights of these essays remain as timely now as they were then: philosophy and the sciences still presume kinds of social innocence to which they are not entitled. The essays focus on Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hobbes, Rousseau, and Marx; on (...)
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