Search results for 'licensing parents' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  91
    Michael McFall (2009). Licensing Parents: Family, State, and Child Maltreatment. Rowman and Littlefield.
    In Licensing Parents, Michael McFall argues that political structures, economics, education, racism, and sexism are secondary in importance to the inequality caused by families, and that the family plays the primary role in a child's acquisition of a sense of justice. He demonstrates that examination of the family is necessary in political philosophy and that informal structures (families) and considerations (character formation) must be taken seriously. McFall advocates a threshold that should be accepted by all political philosophers: (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  2. Hugh LaFollette (1980). Licensing Parents. Philosophy and Public Affairs 9 (2):182-197.
    In this essay I shall argue that the state should require all parents to be licensed. My main goal is to demonstrate that the licensing of parents is theoretically desirable, though I shall also argue that a workable and just licensing program actually could be established.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  3.  3
    Andrew Botterell & Carolyn McLeod (2015). Licensing Parents in International Contract Pregnancies. Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (1):n/a-n/a.
    The Hague Conference on Private International Law currently has a Parentage/Surrogacy Project, which evaluates the legal status of children in cross-border situations, including situations involving international contract pregnancy. Should a convention focusing on international contract pregnancy emerge from this project, it will need to be consistent with the Hague convention on Intercountry Adoption. The latter convention prohibits adoptions unless, among other things, ‘the competent authorities of the receiving State have determined that the prospective adoptive parents are eligible and suited (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Hugh Lafollette (2010). Licensing Parents Revisited. Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (4):327-343.
    Although systems for licensing professionals are far from perfect, and their problems and costs should not be ignored, they are justified as a necessary means of protecting innocent people's vital interests. Licensing defends patients from inept doctors, pharmacists, and physical therapists; it protects clients from unqualified lawyers. We should protect people who are highly vulnerable to those who are supposed to serve them, those with whom they have a special relationship. Requiring professionals to be licensed is the most (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  5.  42
    Jurgen De Wispelaere & Daniel Weinstock (2012). Licensing Parents to Protect Our Children? Ethics and Social Welfare 6 (2):195-205.
    In this paper we re-examine Hugh LaFollette's proposal that the state carefully determine the eligibility and suitability of prospective parents before granting them a ?license to parent?. Assuming a prima facie case for licensing parents grounded in our duty to promote the welfare of the child, we offer several considerations that complicate LaFollette's radical proposal. We suggest that LaFollette can only escape these problems by revising his proposal in a way that renders the license effectively obsolete, a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6. Michael McFall & Laurence Thomas (2009). Licensing Parents: Family, State, and Child Maltreatment. Lexington Books.
    This book examines the negative power that child maltreatment has on individuals and society ethically and politically, while analyzing the positive power that parental love and healthy families have. To address how best to confront the problem of child maltreatment, it examines several policy options, ultimately defending a policy of licensing parents, while carefully examining the tension between child and adult rights and duties.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Andrew Botterell & Carolyn McLeod, Can a Right to Reproduce Justify the Status Quo on Parental Licensing?
    The status quo on parental licensing in most Western jurisdictions is that licensing is required in the case of adoption but not in the case of assisted or unassisted biological reproduction. To have a child via adoption, one must fulfill licensing requirements, which, beyond the usual home study, can include mandatory participation in parenting classes. One is exempt from these requirements, however, if one has a child via biological reproduction, including assisted reproduction involving donor gametes or a (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Carolyn McLeod & Andrew Botterell (2014). Not For the Faint of Heart: Assessing the Status Quo on Adoption and Parental Licensing. In Francoise Baylis & Carolyn McLeod (eds.), Family Making: Contemporary Ethical Challenges. Oxford University Press 151-167.
    The process of adopting a child is “not for the faint of heart.” This is what we were told the first time we, as a couple, began this process. Part of the challenge lies in fulfilling the licensing requirements for adoption, which, beyond the usual home study, can include mandatory participation in parenting classes. The question naturally arises for many people who are subjected to these requirements whether they are morally justified. We tackle this question in this paper. In (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  18
    Christine Overall (2015). Reproductive ‘Surrogacy’ and Parental Licensing. Bioethics 29 (5):353-361.
    A serious moral weakness of reproductive ‘surrogacy’ is that it can be harmful to the children who are created. This article presents a proposal for mitigating this weakness. Currently, the practice of commercial ‘surrogacy’ operates only in the interests of the adults involved , not in the interests of the child who is created. Whether ‘surrogacy’ is seen as the purchase of a baby, the purchase of parental rights, or the purchase of reproductive labor, all three views share the same (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  10
    Tomislav Bracanović (2012). Parental Licensing Meets Evolutionary Psychology. Ethical Perspectives 19 (2):207-233.
    Hugh LaFollette has proposed that in order to prevent statistically expected harm that many parents inflict on their children prospective parents should be licensed. This article evaluates his proposal by looking at various facts, statistical data and probability estimates related to sex differences in human mating and parenting behaviour provided by evolutionary psychology. It is suggested that these evolutionary considerations create a serious stalemate between certain basic moral principles to which LaFollette subscribes, thus rendering the entire proposal morally (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.) (2010). The Ethical Life: Fundamental Readings in Ethics and Moral Problems. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction -- Value theory : the nature of the good life -- Epicurus letter to Menoeceus -- John Stuart Mill, Hedonism -- Aldous Huxley, Brave new world -- Robert Nozick, The experience machine -- Richard Taylor, The meaning of life -- Jean Kazez, Necessities -- Normative ethics : theories of right conduct -- J.J.C. Smart, Eextreme and restricted utilitarianism -- Immanuel Kant the good will & the categorical imperative -- Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan -- Philippa Foot, Natural goodness -- Aristotle, Nicomachean (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Vuko Andrić (2013). Objective Consequentialism and the Licensing Dilemma. Philosophical Studies 162 (3):547-566.
    Frank Jackson has put forward a famous thought experiment of a physician who has to decide on the correct treatment for her patient. Subjective consequentialism tells the physician to do what intuitively seems to be the right action, whereas objective consequentialism fails to guide the physician’s action. I suppose that objective consequentialists want to supplement their theory so that it guides the physician’s action towards what intuitively seems to be the right treatment. Since this treatment is wrong according to objective (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13.  42
    Jérémy Vanhelst, Ludovic Hardy, Dina Bert, Stéphane Duhem, Stéphanie Coopman, Christian Libersa, Dominique Deplanque, Frédéric Gottrand & Laurent Béghin (2013). Effect of Child Health Status on Parents' Allowing Children to Participate in Pediatric Research. BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):7.
    To identify motivational factors linked to child health status that affected the likelihood of parents’ allowing their child to participate in pediatric research.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14.  30
    Simon Hudson, David Hudson & John Peloza (2008). Meet the Parents: A Parents' Perspective on Product Placement in Children's Films. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):289 - 304.
    The ethics of advertising to children has been identified as one of the most important topics worthy of academic research in the marketing field. A fast growing advertising technique is product placement, and its use in children's films is becoming more and more common. The limited evidence existing suggests that product placements are especially potent in their effects upon children. Yet regulations regarding placements targeted at children are virtually non-existent, with advertising guidelines suggesting that it remains the prime responsibility of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  15.  16
    Jim Leitzel (2013). Toward Drug Control: Exclusion and Buyer Licensing. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (1):99-119.
    The uncertainties associated with the precise nature of legalization regimes and with their expected outcomes sometimes are used to justify the maintenance of drug prohibition. This paper details the role that buyer licensing and exclusion might play in implementing a low-risk, post-prohibition drug regulatory regime. Buyer licensing and exclusion provide assistance to those who exhibit or are worried about self-control problems with drugs, while not being significantly constraining upon those who are informed and satisfied drug consumers. Relative to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16.  6
    Maria C. Stuifbergen & Johannes J. M. Van Delden (2011). Filial Obligations to Elderly Parents: A Duty to Care? [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (1):63-71.
    A continuing need for care for elderly, combined with looser family structures prompt the question what filial obligations are. Do adult children of elderly have a duty to care? Several theories of filial obligation are reviewed. The reciprocity argument is not sensitive to the parent–child relationship after childhood. A theory of friendship does not offer a correct parallel for the relationship between adult child and elderly parent. Arguments based on need or vulnerability run the risk of being unjust to those (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  3
    Martine C. de Vries, Mirjam Houtlosser, Jan M. Wit, Dirk P. Engberts, Dorine Bresters, Gertjan Jl Kaspers & Evert van Leeuwen (2011). Ethical Issues at the Interface of Clinical Care and Research Practice in Pediatric Oncology: A Narrative Review of Parents' and Physicians' Experiences. BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):18.
    BackgroundPediatric oncology has a strong research culture. Most pediatric oncologists are investigators, involved in clinical care as well as research. As a result, a remarkable proportion of children with cancer enrolls in a trial during treatment. This paper discusses the ethical consequences of the unprecedented integration of research and care in pediatric oncology from the perspective of parents and physicians.MethodologyAn empirical ethical approach, combining a narrative review of qualitative studies on parents' and physicians' experiences of the pediatric oncology (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18.  6
    Rosalind McDougall, Lauren Notini & Jessica Phillips (2015). Conflicts Between Parents and Health Professionals About a Child’s Medical Treatment: Using Clinical Ethics Records to Find Gaps in the Bioethics Literature. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12 (3):429-436.
    Clinical ethics records offer bioethics researchers a rich source of cases that clinicians have identified as ethically complex. In this paper, we suggest that clinical ethics records can be used to point to types of cases that lack attention in the current bioethics literature, identifying new areas in need of more detailed bioethical work. We conducted an analysis of the clinical ethics records of one paediatric hospital in Australia, focusing specifically on conflicts between parents and health professionals about a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  5
    AnnR Eisenberg (1987). Learning to Argue with Parents and Peers. Argumentation 1 (2):113-125.
    The infant's first natural response when faced with opposition or when he opposes others' actions is to cry. As this kind of behavior becomes ineffective, the responses of the individuals with which he interacts force him to adopt more conventional — especially verbal — patterns of arguing, leading him to rational argumentation. The purpose of the present paper is to observe progressions in children's earliest verbal arguments and to see how and when they learn to adjust their strategies for different (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  20.  20
    Roger Marples (2014). Parents' Rights and Educational Provision. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (1):23-39.
    Legitimate parental interests need to be distinguished from any putative rights parents qua parents may be said to possess. Parents have no right to insulate their children from conceptions of the good at variance with those of their own. Claims to the right to faith schools, private schools, home-schooling or to withdraw a child from any aspect of the curriculum designed to enhance a child’s capacity for autonomous decision-making, are refuted.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  26
    Z. E. E. der & Inez de Beaufort (2011). Preconception Care: A Parenting Protocol. A Moral Inquiry Into the Responsibilities of Future Parents Towards Their Future Children. Bioethics 25 (8):451-457.
    In the Netherlands fertility doctors increasingly formulate protocols, which oblige patients to quit their unhealthy lifestyle before they are admitted to IVF procedures. We argue that moral arguments could justify parenting protocols that concern all future parents. In the first part we argue that want-to-be parents have moral responsibilities towards their future children to prevent them from harm by diminishing or eliminating risk factors before as well as during the pregnancy. This is because of the future children's potential (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  8
    Natalie Ball & Gregor Wolbring (2014). Cognitive Enhancement: Perceptions Among Parents of Children with Disabilities. Neuroethics 7 (3):345-364.
    Cognitive enhancement is an increasingly discussed topic and policy suggestions have been put forward. We present here empirical data of views of parents of children with and without cognitive disabilities. Analysis of the interviews revealed six primary overarching themes: meanings of health and treatment; the role of medicine; harm; the ‘good’ parent; normality and self-perception; and ability. Interestingly none of the parents used the term ethics and only one parent used the term moral twice.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  29
    Jack Hoeksema (2008). There is No Number Effect in the Licensing of Negative Polarity Items: A Reply to Guerzoni and Sharvit. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 31 (4):397-407.
    Guerzoni and Sharvit (Linguistics and Philosophy 30:361–391, 2007) provide an argument that plural, but not singular, wh-phrases may contain a negative polarity item in their restriction, and connect this with the semantic property of exhaustivity. I will show that this claim is factually incorrect, and that the theory of negative polarity licensing does not need to be complicated by taking number distinctions into account. In addition, I will argue that number distinctions do not appear to be relevant for polarity (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  26
    Raffaella Bernardi & Anna Szabolcsi (2008). Optionality, Scope, and Licensing: An Application of Partially Ordered Categories. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 17 (3):237-283.
    This paper uses a partially ordered set of syntactic categories to accommodate optionality and licensing in natural language syntax. A complex but well-studied data set pertaining to the syntax of quantifier scope and negative polarity licensing in Hungarian is used to illustrate the proposal. The presentation is geared towards both linguists and logicians. The paper highlights that the main ideas can be implemented in different grammar formalisms, and discusses in detail an implementation where the partial ordering on (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  1
    Reidun Førde & Trude Linja (2015). “It Scares Me to Know That We Might Not Have Been There!”: A Qualitative Study Into the Experiences of Parents of Seriously Ill Children Participating in Ethical Case Discussions. BMC Medical Ethics 16 (1):1-8.
    BackgroundAll hospital trusts in Norway have clinical ethics committees. Some of them invite next of kin/patients to be present during the discussion of their case. This study looks closer at how parents of seriously ill children have experienced being involved in CEC discussions.MethodsTen next of kin of six seriously ill children were interviewed. Their cases were discussed in two CECs between April of 2011 and March of 2014. The main ethical dilemma was limitation of life-prolonging treatment. Health care personnel (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  10
    Asher Friedberg, Robert Schwartz & Shuki Amrani (2004). Oversight Ethics: The Case of Business Licensing. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 53 (4):371-381.
    The ethics research community has all but ignored issues of oversight ethics – the vices and virtues of overseers. This study develops a conceptual framework for exploring the ethics of oversight and provides insights into the design of codes of ethics for oversight institutions and for overseers. Analysis of business licensing in Israel reveals prospective and retrospective oversight ethics problems at the levels of national and local policy and implementation: Overseers failed to act on knowledge of breaches of business (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  5
    Michael Wagner (2006). Association by Movement: Evidence From NPI-Licensing. [REVIEW] Natural Language Semantics 14 (4):297-324.
    ‘Only’ associates with focus and licenses NPIs. This paper looks at the distributional pattern of NPIs under ‘only’ and presents evidence for the movement theory of focus association and against an in situ approach. NPIs are licensed in the ‘scope’ (or the second argument) of ‘only’, but not in the complement (or its first argument), which I will call the ‘syntactic restrictor’. While earlier approaches argued that ‘only’ licenses NPIs in the unfocused part of the sentence it occurs in except (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  28.  7
    Felicity Kaganas & Shelley Day Sclater (2004). Contact Disputes: Narrative Constructions of `Good' Parents. Feminist Legal Studies 12 (1):1-27.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  29.  2
    Richard Hooper (2013). Copyright Licensing. Logos 24 (2):33-40.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  4
    Boukje Van der Zee & Inez De Beaufort (2011). Preconception Care: A Parenting Protocol. A Moral Inquiry Into the Responsibilities of Future Parents Towards Their Future Children. Bioethics 25 (8):451-457.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  2
    Eva Turner (2010). Technology Use in Reporting to Parents of Primary School Children. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 40 (3):25-37.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  57
    Kai von Fintel (1999). NPI Licensing, Strawson Entailment, and Context Dependency. Journal of Semantics 16 (2):97-148.
    The Fauconnier-Ladusaw analysis of negative polarity licensing (that NPIs are licensed in the scope of downward entailing operators) continues to be the benchmark theory of negative polarity. In this paper, I consider some of the moves that are needed to maintain its basic intuition in some recalcitrant arenas: negative polarity licensing by only, adversatives, superlatives, and conditionals. We will see that one has to (i) use a notion of entailment that I call Strawson Entailment, which deals with presuppositions (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   38 citations  
  33.  30
    Ilina Singh (2005). Will the "Real Boy" Please Behave: Dosing Dilemmas for Parents of Boys with ADHD. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (3):34 – 47.
    The use of Ritalin and other stimulant drug treatments for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) raises distinctive moral dilemmas for parents; these moral dilemmas have not been adequately addressed in the bioethics literature. This paper draws upon data from a qualitative empirical study to investigate parents' use of the moral ideal of authenticity as part of their narrative justifications for dosing decisions and actions. I show that therapeutic decisions and actions are embedded in valued cultural ideals about masculinity, self-actualization (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   19 citations  
  34.  13
    A. S. Iltis (2013). Parents, Adolescents, and Consent for Research Participation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (3):332-346.
    Decisions concerning children in the health care setting have engendered significant controversy and sparked ethics policies and statements, legal action, and guidelines regarding who ought to make decisions involving children and how such decisions ought to be made. Traditionally, parents have been the default decision-makers for children not only with regard to health care but with regard to other matters, such as religious practice and education. In recent decades, there has been a steady trend away from the view that (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  35.  58
    Sigrid Sterckx (2011). Patenting and Licensing of University Research: Promoting Innovation or Undermining Academic Values? Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (1):45-64.
    Since the 1980s in the US and the 1990s in Europe, patenting and licensing activities by universities have massively increased. This is strongly encouraged by governments throughout the Western world. Many regard academic patenting as essential to achieve ‘knowledge transfer’ from academia to industry. This trend has far-reaching consequences for access to the fruits of academic research and so the question arises whether the current policies are indeed promoting innovation or whether they are instead a symptom of a pro-intellectual (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  36.  4
    Valerie Shilling & Bridget Young (2009). How Do Parents Experience Being Asked to Enter a Child in a Randomised Controlled Trial? BMC Medical Ethics 10 (1):1-.
    BackgroundAs the number of randomised controlled trials of medicines for children increases, it becomes progressively more important to understand the experiences of parents who are asked to enrol their child in a trial. This paper presents a narrative review of research evidence on parents' experiences of trial recruitment focussing on qualitative research, which allows them to articulate their views in their own words.DiscussionParents want to do their best for their children, and socially and legally their role is to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  37.  71
    Nicky Jacobs & David Harvey (2005). Do Parents Make a Difference to Children's Academic Achievement? Differences Between Parents of Higher and Lower Achieving Students. Educational Studies 31 (4):431-448.
    Differences in family factors in determining academic achievement were investigated by testing 432 parents in nine independent, coeducational Melbourne schools. Schools were ranked and categorized into three groups , based on student achievement scores in their final year of secondary school and school improvement indexes. Parents completed a questionnaire investigating their attitudes towards the school environment, their aspirations, expectations, encouragement and interest in their child’s education . They also responded to six open‐ended questions on their attitudes to achievement (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38.  29
    Sara Goering (2009). Postnatal Reproductive Autonomy: Promoting Relational Autonomy and Self-Trust in New Parents. Bioethics 23 (1):9-19.
    New parents suddenly come face to face with myriad issues that demand careful attention but appear in a context unlikely to provide opportunities for extended or clear-headed critical reflection, whether at home with a new baby or in the neonatal intensive care unit. As such, their capacity for autonomy may be compromised. Attending to new parental autonomy as an extension of reproductive autonomy, and as a complicated phenomenon in its own right rather than simply as a matter to be (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  39.  48
    Anastasia Giannakidou & Suwon Yoon, No NPI Licensing in Comparatives.
    Abstract In this paper, we caution that the comparative is, in fact, not, a licensing environment for NPIs. We show that the appearance of NPIs is much more restricted than previously assumed: strong NPIs do not appear in comparatives, and often NPI- any is confused with free choice any . Strong NPIs are licensed only if an antiveridical function is introduced, such as the negative metalinguistic comparative charari (Giannakidou and Yoon 2009)—but the comparative itself does not contain an antiveridical (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  40.  24
    Rosalind Mcdougall & Lauren Notini (2014). Overriding Parents’ Medical Decisions for Their Children: A Systematic Review of Normative Literature. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (7):448-452.
    This paper reviews the ethical literature on conflicts between health professionals and parents about medical decision-making for children. We present the results of a systematic review which addressed the question ‘when health professionals and parents disagree about the appropriate course of medical treatment for a child, under what circumstances is the health professional ethically justified in overriding the parents’ wishes?’ We identified nine different ethical frameworks that were put forward by their authors as applicable across various ages (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  41.  66
    Judith G. Smetana (1999). The Role of Parents in Moral Development: A Social Domain Analysis. Journal of Moral Education 28 (3):311-321.
    This article provides a social domain theory analysis of the role of parents in moral development. Social knowledge domains, including morality as distinct from other social concepts, are described. Then, it is proposed that, although morality is constructed from reciprocal social interactions, both affective and cognitive components of parents' interactions with their children may facilitate children's moral development. The affective context of the relationship may influence children's motivation to listen to and respond to parents; in addition, affect (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  42.  22
    Rita Manning (2011). Punishing the Innocent: Children of Incarcerated and Detained Parents. Criminal Justice Ethics 30 (3):267-287.
    About 2 million minor children in the U.S. have at least one parent incarcerated for criminal offenses. There are about 33,000 undocumented persons detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement in jails and federal detention centers around the country, and 79% of the minor children of these detainees are U.S. citizens. There are few government programs that measure and respond to the harm caused to these children by the incarceration and detention of their parents, and the negative effects on these (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  43.  28
    J. Burr & P. Reynolds (2008). Thinking Ethically About Genetic Inheritance: Liberal Rights, Communitarianism and the Right to Privacy for Parents of Donor Insemination Children. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (4):281-284.
    The issue of genetic inheritance, and particularly the contradictory rights of donors, recipients and donor offspring as to the disclosure of donor identities, is ethically complicated. Donors, donor offspring and parents of donor offspring may appeal to individual rights for confidentiality or disclosure within legal systems based on liberal rights discourse. This paper explores the ethical issues of non-disclosure of genetic inheritance by contrasting two principle models used to articulate the problem—liberal and communitarian ethical models. It argues that whilst (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  44.  54
    Cemal Hüseyin Güvercin & Berna Arda (2013). Parents Refusing Treatment of the Child: A Discussion About Child's Health Right and Parental Paternalism. Clinical Ethics 8 (2-3):52-60.
    In recent years, decision-making processes related to medical practices have undergone a change from physician paternalism towards patient autonomy. However, it has been put forward that this situation has changed into or strengthened the parent paternalism for children. Parental paternalism might bring along decisions of refusing the child’s treatment, in such a way to occasionally violate the health right of the child. Paternalistic attitude of parents may also cause physicians to direct towards defensive medicine practices and to display a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  15
    Daniela Cutas (2011). On Triparenting. Is Having Three Committed Parents Better Than Having Only Two? Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (12):735-738.
    Although research indicates that single parenting is not by itself worse for children than their being brought up by both their parents, there are reasons why it is better for children to have more than one committed parent. If having two committed parents is better, everything else being equal, than having just one, I argue that it might be even better for children to have three committed parents. There might, in addition, be further reasons why allowing triparenting (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  46.  29
    Marvin Berkowitz & John Grych (1998). Fostering Goodness: Teaching Parents to Facilitate Children's Moral Development. Journal of Moral Education 27 (3):371-391.
    Although moral development of children has long been ascribed predominantly to the effects of parenting, there has been little systematic examination of the specific nature of this relation. In this paper, we identify four foundational components of children's moral development (social orientation, self?control, compliance, self?esteem) and four central aspects of moral functioning (empathy, conscience, moral reasoning, altruism). The parenting roots of each of these eight psychological characteristics are examined, and five core parenting processes (induction, nurturance, demandingness, modelling, democratic family process) (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  47.  8
    Abraham R. Oduro, Raymond A. Aborigo, Dickson Amugsi, Francis Anto, Thomas Anyorigiya, Frank Atuguba, Abraham Hodgson & Kwadwo A. Koram (2008). Understanding and Retention of the Informed Consent Process Among Parents in Rural Northern Ghana. BMC Medical Ethics 9 (1):12-.
    The individual informed consent model remains critical to the ethical conduct and regulation of research involving human beings. Parental informed consent process in a rural setting of northern Ghana was studied to describe comprehension and retention among parents as part of the evaluation of the existing informed consent process.
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  48.  5
    Katrina Ferrara, Malena Silva, Colin Wilson & Barbara Landau (2015). Spatial Language and the Embedded Listener Model in Parents’ Input to Children. Cognitive Science 40 (3).
    Language is a collaborative act: To communicate successfully, speakers must generate utterances that are not only semantically valid but also sensitive to the knowledge state of the listener. Such sensitivity could reflect the use of an “embedded listener model,” where speakers choose utterances on the basis of an internal model of the listener's conceptual and linguistic knowledge. In this study, we ask whether parents’ spatial descriptions incorporate an embedded listener model that reflects their children's understanding of spatial relations and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  3
    Conrad V. Fernandez, Darcy Santor, Charles Weijer, Caron Strahlendorf, Albert Moghrabi, Rebecca Pentz, Jun Gao & Eric Kodish, The Return of Research Results to Participants: Pilot Questionnaire of Adolescents and Parents of Children with Cancer.
    PURPOSE: The offer to return research results to participants is increasingly recognized as an ethical obligation, although few researchers routinely return results. We examined the needs and attitudes of parents of children with cancer and of adolescents with cancer to the return of research results. METHODS: Seven experts in research ethics scored content validity on parent and adolescent questionnaires previously developed through focus group and phone interviews. The questionnaires were revised and provided to 30 parents and 10 adolescents (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  50.  15
    Kristina M. Lybecker & Elisabeth Fowler (2009). Compulsory Licensing in Canada and Thailand: Comparing Regimes to Ensure Legitimate Use of the WTO Rules. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 37 (2):222-239.
    This paper examines two recent examples of compulsory licensing legislation: one globally embraced regime and one internationally controversial regime operating under the same WTO rules. In particular, we consider Canadian legislation and the use of compulsory licensing for HIV/AIDS drugs destined for a developing country. This is then contrasted with the conditions under which Thai authorities are pursuing compulsory licenses, the outcomes of their compulsory licenses, as well as the likely impact of the Thai policy. Finally, we construct (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000