Search results for 'mapping and comparing different causal scenarios' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Peter Fazekas & George Kampis, Turning Negative Causation Back to Positive.score: 391.0
    In contemporary literature, the fact that there is negative causation is the primary motivation for rejecting the physical connection view, and arguing for alternative accounts of causation. In this paper we insist that such a conclusion is too fast. We present two frameworks, which help the proponent of the physical connection view to resist the anti-connectionist conclusion. According to the first framework, there are positive causal claims, which co-refer with at least some negative causal claims. According to the (...)
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  2. Petri Ylikoski (2013). Causal and Constitutive Explanation Compared. Erkenntnis 78 (2):277-297.score: 144.0
    This article compares causal and constitutive explanation. While scientific inquiry usually addresses both causal and constitutive questions, making the distinction is crucial for a detailed understanding of scientific questions and their interrelations. These explanations have different kinds of explananda and they track different sorts of dependencies. Constitutive explanations do not address events or behaviors, but causal capacities. While there are some interesting relations between building and causal manipulation, causation and constitution are not to be (...)
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  3. Tammy Swenson-Lepper (2005). Ethical Sensitivity for Organizational Communication Issues: Examining Individual and Organizational Differences. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 59 (3):205 - 231.score: 94.0
    . This descriptive study discusses cognitive mapping as a technique for analyzing ethical sensitivity, examines whether the method allows comparisons between people, compares the ethical sensitivity levels of participants from three organizations, examines which indicators of ethical sensitivity are most salient to members of specific organizations, and examines whether education level or organizational membership is the best predictor of an individual’s ethical sensitivity level. Subjects from three organizations read background information, listened to two audiotaped scenarios containing multiple ethical (...)
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  4. Rom Harré (2010). Causal Concepts in Chemical Vernaculars. Foundations of Chemistry 12 (2):101-115.score: 92.0
    Though causality seems to have a natural place in chemical thought, the analysis of the underlying causal concepts requires attention to two different research styles. In Part One I attempt a classification and critical analysis of several philosophical accounts of causal concepts which appear to be very diverse. I summarize this diversity which ranges from causality as displayed in regular concomitances of types of events to causality as the activity of agents. Part Two is concerned with the (...)
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  5. Kevin MacDonald (1999). What About Sex Differences? An Adaptationist Perspective on “the Lines of Causal Influence” of Personality Systems. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):530-531.score: 87.0
    The evolutionary theory of sex implies a theoretically principled account of the causal mechanisms underlying personality systems in which males pursue a relatively high-risk strategy compared to females and are thus higher on traits linked to sensation seeking and social dominance. Females are expected to be lower on these traits but higher on traits related to nurturance and attraction to long-term relationships. The data confirm this pattern of sex differences. It is thus likely that these traits (...)
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  6. H. Atmanspacher, Stabilization of Causally and Non-Causally Coupled Map Lattices.score: 87.0
    Two-dimensional coupled map lattices have global stability properties that depend on the coupling between individual maps and their neighborhood. The action of the neighborhood on individual maps can be implemented in terms of ‘‘causal’’ coupling (to spatially distant past states) or ‘‘non-causal’’ coupling (to spatially distant simultaneous states). In this contribution we show that globally stable behavior of coupled map lattices is facilitated by causal coupling, thus indicating a surprising relationship between stability and causality. The influence of (...)
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  7. Elisabeth Camp (2007). Thinking with Maps. Philosophical Perspectives 21 (1):145–182.score: 84.0
    Most of us create and use a panoply of non-sentential representations throughout our ordinary lives: we regularly use maps to navigate, charts to keep track of complex patterns of data, and diagrams to visualize logical and causal relations among states of affairs. But philosophers typically pay little attention to such representations, focusing almost exclusively on language instead. In particular, when theorizing about the mind, many philosophers assume that there is a very tight mapping between language and thought. Some (...)
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  8. Luke Glynn (2013). Causal Foundationalism, Physical Causation, and Difference-Making. Synthese 190 (6):1017-1037.score: 64.0
    An influential tradition in the philosophy of causation has it that all token causal facts are, or are reducible to, facts about difference-making. Challenges to this tradition have typically focused on pre-emption cases, in which a cause apparently fails to make a difference to its effect. However, a novel challenge to the difference-making approach has recently been issued by Alyssa Ney. Ney defends causal foundationalism, which she characterizes as the thesis that facts about difference-making depend upon facts about (...)
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  9. Ahmet Ekici & Sule Onsel (2013). How Ethical Behavior of Firms is Influenced by the Legal and Political Environments: A Bayesian Causal Map Analysis Based on Stages of Development. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):271-290.score: 64.0
    Even though potential impacts of political and legal environments of business on ethical behavior of firms (EBOF) have been conceptually recognized, not much evidence (i.e., empirical work) has been produced to clarify their role. In this paper, using Bayesian causal maps (BCMs) methodology, relationships between legal and political environments of business and EBOF are investigated. The unique design of our study allows us to analyze these relationships based on the stages of development in 92 countries around the world. The (...)
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  10. John R. Fairweather & Lesley M. Hunt (2011). Can Farmers Map Their Farm System? Causal Mapping and the Sustainability of Sheep/Beef Farms in New Zealand. Agriculture and Human Values 28 (1):55-66.score: 64.0
    It is generally accepted that farmers manage a complex farm system. In this article we seek answers to the following questions. How do farmers perceive and understand their farm system? Are they sufficiently aware of their farm system that they are able to represent it in the form of a map? The research reported describes how causal mapping was applied to sheep/beef farmers in New Zealand and shows that farmers can create maps of their farm systems in ways (...)
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  11. Ulf Lotzmann, Michael Möhring & Klaus G. Troitzsch (2013). Simulating the Emergence of Norms in Different Scenarios. Artificial Intelligence and Law 21 (1):109 - 138.score: 60.0
    This paper deals with EMIL-S, a software tool box which was designed during the EMIL project for the simulation of processes during which norms emerged in an agent society. This tool box implements the cognitive architecture of normative agents which was designed during the EMIL project which is also discussed in other papers in this issue. This implementation is described in necessary detail, and two examples of its application to several different scenarios are given, namely a scenario in (...)
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  12. Russell Abratt, Deon Nel & Nicola Susan Higgs (1992). An Examination of the Ethical Beliefs of Managers Using Selected Scenarios in a Cross-Cultural Environment. Journal of Business Ethics 11 (1):29 - 35.score: 54.0
    Academic literature addressing the topic of business ethics has paid little attention to cross-cultural studies of business ethics. Uncertainty exists concerning the effect of culture on ethical beliefs. The purpose of this research is to compare the ethical beliefs of managers operating in South Africa and Australia. Responses of 52 managers to a series of ethical scenarios were sought. Results indicate that despite differences in socio-cultural and political factors there are no statistically significant differences between the two groups regarding (...)
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  13. Federica Russo & Jon Williamson (2012). EnviroGenomarkers: The Interplay Between Mechanisms and Difference Making in Establishing Causal Claims. Medicine Studies 3 (4):249-262.score: 52.0
    According to Russo and Williamson (Int Stud Philos Sci 21(2):157–170, 2007, Hist Philos Life Sci 33:389–396, 2011a, Philos Sci 1(1):47–69, 2011b), in order to establish a causal claim of the form, ‘C is a cause of E’, one typically needs evidence that there is an underlying mechanism between C and E as well as evidence that C makes a difference to E. This thesis has been used to argue that hierarchies of evidence, as championed by evidence-based movements, tend to (...)
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  14. K. Smets, T. Gebuis & B. Reynvoet (2012). Comparing the Neural Distance Effect Derived From the Non-Symbolic Comparison and the Same-Different Task. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:28-28.score: 52.0
    As a result of the representation of numerosities, more accurate and faster discrimination between two numerosities is observed when the distance between them increases. In previous studies, the comparison and same-different task were most frequently used to investigate this distance effect. Recently, it was questioned whether the non-symbolic distance effects derived from these tasks originate at the same level. In the current study, we examined the behavioral and neural distance effects of the comparison and same-different task to assess (...)
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  15. Jukka Jernvall (2013). The Causality Horizon and the Developmental Bases of Morphological Evolution. Biological Theory 8 (3):286-292.score: 51.0
    With the advent of evolutionary developmental research, or EvoDevo, there is hope of discovering the roles that the genetic bases of development play in morphological evolution. Studies in EvoDevo span several levels of organismal organization. Low-level studies identify the ultimate genetic changes responsible for morphological variation and diversity. High-level studies of development focus on how genetic differences affect the dynamics of gene networks and epigenetic interactions to modify morphology. Whereas an increasing number of studies link independent acquisition of homoplastic or (...)
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  16. Natalie Gold, Andrew Colman & Briony Pulford (2014). Cultural Differences in Responses to Real-Life and Hypothetical Trolley Problems. Judgment and Decision Making 9 (1):65-76.score: 50.0
    Trolley problems have been used in the development of moral theory and the psychological study of moral judgments and behavior. Most of this research has focused on people from the West, with implicit assumptions that moral intuitions should generalize and that moral psychology is universal. However, cultural differences may be associated with differences in moral judgments and behavior. We operationalized a trolley problem in the laboratory, with economic incentives and real-life consequences, and compared British and Chinese samples on moral behavior (...)
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  17. Andrea Kiesel Carola Haering (2012). Mine is Earlier Than Yours: Causal Beliefs Influence the Perceived Time of Action Effects. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 49.2
    When a key press causes a stimulus, the key press is perceived later and the stimulus earlier than key presses and stimuli presented independently. This bias in time perception has been linked to the intention to produce the effect and thus been called intentional binding. In recent studies it has been shown that the intentional binding effect is stronger when participants believed that they caused the effect stimulus compared to when they believed that another person caused the effect (Desantis, Roussel, (...)
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  18. James Garvey (2011). Climate Change and Causal Inefficacy: Why Go Green When It Makes No Difference? Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 69:157-174.score: 48.0
    Reflection on personal choices and climate change can lead to the thought that nothing an individual does can possibly make a difference to the planet’s future. So why bother going green? This is a version of the problem of causal inefficacy, and it is a particular problem for those with consequentialist leanings. Voters and vegetarians are consulted for help, and a suggestive thought about consistency is pursued. Consequentialist arguments for governmental action are shored up with reflection on consistency, and, (...)
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  19. Alison Gopnik, Clark Glymour, David M. Sobel, Laura Schulz, Tamar Kushnir & David Danks, A Theory of Causal Learning in Children: Causal Maps and Bayes Nets.score: 48.0
    We propose that children employ specialized cognitive systems that allow them to recover an accurate “causal map” of the world: an abstract, coherent, learned representation of the causal relations among events. This kind of knowledge can be perspicuously understood in terms of the formalism of directed graphical causal models, or “Bayes nets”. Children’s causal learning and inference may involve computations similar to those for learning causal Bayes nets and for predicting with them. Experimental results suggest (...)
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  20. Alison Gopnik, Clark Glymour, David M. Sobel & Laura E. Schultz, Causal Learning in Children: Causal Maps and Bayes Nets.score: 48.0
    We outline a cognitive and computational account of causal learning in children. We propose that children employ specialized cognitive systems that allow them to recover an accurate “causal map” of the world: an abstract, coherent representation of the causal relations among events. This kind of knowledge can be perspicuously represented by the formalism of directed graphical causal models, or “Bayes nets”. Human causal learning and inference may involve computations similar to those for learnig causal (...)
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  21. Bradley Douglas Park (2004). Differing Ways, Dao and Weg: Comparative, Metaphysical, and Methodological Considerations in Heidegger's “Aus Einem Gespräch Von der Sprache”. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 37 (3):309-339.score: 48.0
    This paper critically examines Heidegger’s 1959 dialogue, A Conversation from [von] Language – Between a Japanese and an Inquirer, across three distinct levels: as (1) a cross-cultural comparative exchange, (2) a meta-philosophical/ontological analysis of the fundamental relation between language and thought, and (3) a methodological inquiry into the phenomenology and hermeneutics of conversation. Despite the problematic nature of Heidegger’s explicit comparative engagement, I contend that his questioning of the possibility of “a conversation from house to house” provides a substantial clarification (...)
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  22. Carlos E. Alchourrón & David Makinson (1986). Maps Between Some Different Kinds of Contraction Function: The Finite Case. Studia Logica 45 (2):187 - 198.score: 48.0
    In some recent papers, the authors and Peter Gärdenfors have defined and studied two different kinds of formal operation, conceived as possible representations of the intuitive process of contracting a theory to eliminate a proposition. These are partial meet contraction (including as limiting cases full meet contraction and maxichoice contraction) and safe contraction. It is known, via the representation theorem for the former, that every safe contraction operation over a theory is a partial meet contraction over that theory. The (...)
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  23. Werner Backhaus (1999). How to Compare Color Sensations in Different Brains. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (6):944-945.score: 48.0
    The qualitative and quantitative properties of color sensations and neuronal color coding are discussed in relation to physiological color exchanges and their evolutionary constraints. Based on the identity mind/matter thesis, additional physical measurements on color sensations are described that will allow us, at least in principle, to compare the qualitative properties of color sensations in different brains.
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  24. Jan Lemeire & Dominik Janzing (2013). Replacing Causal Faithfulness with Algorithmic Independence of Conditionals. Minds and Machines 23 (2):227-249.score: 48.0
    Independence of Conditionals (IC) has recently been proposed as a basic rule for causal structure learning. If a Bayesian network represents the causal structure, its Conditional Probability Distributions (CPDs) should be algorithmically independent. In this paper we compare IC with causal faithfulness (FF), stating that only those conditional independences that are implied by the causal Markov condition hold true. The latter is a basic postulate in common approaches to causal structure learning. The common spirit of (...)
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  25. Mark Purdon (2013). Land Acquisitions in Tanzania: Strong Sustainability, Weak Sustainability and the Importance of Comparative Methods. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (6):1127-1156.score: 48.0
    This paper distinguished different analytical approaches to the evaluation of the sustainability of large-scale land acquisitions—at both the conceptual and methodological levels. First, at the conceptual level, evaluation of the sustainability of land acquisitions depends on what definition of sustainability is adopted—strong or weak sustainability. Second, a lack of comparative empirical methods in many studies has limited the identification of causal factors affecting sustainability. An empirical investigation into the sustainability of land acquisitions in Tanzania that employs these existing (...)
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  26. Áron Perényi (forthcoming). Are Theories Applicable Across Different Contexts? A Cross-National Comparative Analysis Through the Lens of Firm Life-Cycle Theory in the ICT Sector. AI and Society:1-21.score: 48.0
    It is currently common practice in social and business research, to lift concepts and theories from one country context—and extending the validity of the results—using them in another. This paper discusses the question relating to such generalisability in the context of global, innovative industries. Statistical methods are applied to compare results of a quantitative investigation of firm life-cycle theory between two developed countries. Such comparison implemented with statistical rigour on a quantitative basis is not common, and difficult to execute. Results (...)
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  27. Bettina Huber (1981). Differing National Orientations Toward the Future: A Comparative Examination of Societal Characteristics and Public Opinion. World Futures 17 (3):157-194.score: 48.0
    (1981). Differing national orientations toward the future: A comparative examination of societal characteristics and public opinion∗. World Futures: Vol. 17, No. 3-4, pp. 157-194.
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  28. An Luo & Paul Sajda (2009). Comparing Neural Correlates of Visual Target Detection in Serial Visual Presentations Having Different Temporal Correlations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3:5.score: 48.0
    Most visual stimuli we experience on a day-to-day basis are continuous sequences, with spatial structure highly correlated in time. During rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP), this correlation is absent. Here we study how subjects' target detection responses, both behavioral and electrophysiological, differ between continuous serial visual sequences (CSVP), flashed serial visual presentation (FSVP) and RSVP. Behavioral results show longer reaction times for CSVP compared to the FSVP and RSVP conditions, as well as a difference in miss-rate between RSVP and the (...)
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  29. Benjamin E. Hilbig Andreas Glöckner, Susann Fiedler, Guy Hochman, Shahar Ayal (2012). Processing Differences Between Descriptions and Experience: A Comparative Analysis Using Eye-Tracking and Physiological Measures. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 48.0
    Do decisions from description and from experience trigger different cognitive processes? We investigated this general question using cognitive modeling, eye-tracking, and physiological arousal measures. Three novel findings indeed suggest qualitatively different processes between the two types of decisions. First, comparative modeling indicates that evidence accumulation models assuming averaging of all fixation-sampled outcomes predict choices best in decisions from experience, whereas Cumulative Prospect Theory predicts choices best in decisions from descriptions. Second, arousal decreased with increasing difference in expected value (...)
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  30. Cynthia F. Moss (2013). Has a Fully Three-Dimensional Space Map Never Evolved in Any Species? A Comparative Imperative for Studies of Spatial Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (5):557-557.score: 48.0
    I propose that it is premature to assert that a fully three-dimensional map has never evolved in any species, as data are lacking to show that space coding in all animals is the same. Instead, I hypothesize that three-dimensional representation is tied to an animal's mode of locomotion through space. Testing this hypothesis requires a large body of comparative data.
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  31. Gina Rippon Fiona McNab, Arjan Hillebrand, Stephen J. Swithenby (2012). Combining Temporal and Spectral Information with Spatial Mapping to Identify Differences Between Phonological and Semantic Networks: A Magnetoencephalographic Approach. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 48.0
    Early, lesion-based models of language processing suggested that semantic and phonological processes are associated with distinct temporal and parietal regions respectively, with frontal areas more indirectly involved. Contemporary spatial brain mapping techniques have not supported such clear-cut segregation, with strong evidence of activation in left temporal areas by both processes and disputed evidence of involvement of frontal areas in both processes. We suggest that combining spatial information with temporal and spectral data may allow a closer scrutiny of the differential (...)
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  32. Adrian Garcia, Shu-Guang Kuai & Zoe Kourtzi (2013). Differences in the Time Course of Learning for Hard Compared to Easy Training. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 48.0
    Learning is known to facilitate performance in a range of perceptual tasks. Behavioral improvement after training is typically shown after practice with highly similar stimuli that are difficult to discriminate (i.e. hard training), or after exposure to dissimilar stimuli that are highly discriminable (i.e. easy training). However, little is known about the processes that mediate learning after training with difficult compared to easy stimuli. Here we investigate the time course of learning when observers were asked to discriminate similar global form (...)
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  33. Stuart Gray (2010). A Historical-Comparative Approach to Indian Political Thougt: Locating and Examining Domesticated Differences. History of Political Thought 31 (3):383-406.score: 48.0
    Scholars have highlighted various issues and approaches on which to focus attention within the emerging field of cross-cultural political thought. Developing a responsible methodological approach to non-Western traditions is of particular significance, given the growing importance of such traditions, the danger of cultural reductionism and the undue imposition of Western terms and categories during the comparative process. Consequently, this article argues for a historical approach to Brahmanical-Hindu political thought that examines distinctions between genres, concepts, terms and categories, including how these (...)
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  34. David R. Mandel (2007). Differential Focus in Causal and Counterfactual Thinking: Different Possibilities or Different Functions? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5-6):460-461.score: 48.0
    In The Rational Imagination, Byrne proposes a mental models account of why causal and counterfactual thinking often focus on different antecedents. This review critically examines the two central propositions of her account, finding both only weakly defensible. Byrne's account is contrasted with judgment dissociation theory, which offers a functional explanation for differences in the focus of causal and counterfactual thinking.
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  35. Glen C. Filson (1993). Comparative Differences in Ontario Farmers' Environmental Attitudes. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 6 (2):165-184.score: 46.0
    This paper provides an analysis of a 1991 survey of the views of a stratified random sample of 1,105 Ontario farmers. Factor analysis, Kruskal—Wallis one-way ANOVA, chi-square and correlations were used to identify differences in farmers' attitudes toward rural environmental issues as a function of their demographic and farm characteristics. Younger, well-educated farmers, especially if female, were most concerned about the seriousness of rural environmental degradation. The largest operators expressed the greatest support for the use of agricultural chemicals, were most (...)
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  36. Benjamin M. Rottman, Dedre Gentner & Micah B. Goldwater (2012). Causal Systems Categories: Differences in Novice and Expert Categorization of Causal Phenomena. Cognitive Science 36 (5):919-932.score: 46.0
    We investigated the understanding of causal systems categories—categories defined by common causal structure rather than by common domain content—among college students. We asked students who were either novices or experts in the physical sciences to sort descriptions of real-world phenomena that varied in their causal structure (e.g., negative feedback vs. causal chain) and in their content domain (e.g., economics vs. biology). Our hypothesis was that there would be a shift from domain-based sorting to causal sorting (...)
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  37. Winston Chang Herrmann (2007). What We Imagine Versus How We Imagine, and a Problem for Explaining Counterfactual Thoughts with Causal Ones. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5-6):455-456.score: 45.2
    Causal and counterfactual thoughts are bound together in Byrne's theory of human imagination. We think there are two issues in her theory that deserve clarification. First, Byrne describes which counterfactual possibilities we think of, but she leaves unexplained the mechanisms by which we generate these possibilities. Second, her exploration of and enablers gives two different predictions of which counterfactuals we think of in causal scenarios. On one account, we think of the counterfactuals which we have control (...)
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  38. Adam Feltz, A. Perez & M. Harris (2012). Free Will, Causes, and Decisions: Individual Differences in Written Reports. Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (9-10):166-189.score: 44.0
    We present evidence indicating new individual differences with people's intuitions about the relation of determinism to freedom and moral responsibility. We analysed participants' written explanations of why a person acted. Participants offered one of either 'decision' or 'causal' based explanations of behaviours in some paradigmatic cases. Those who gave causal explanations tended to have more incompatibilist intuitions than those who gave decision explanations. Importantly, the affective content of a scenario influenced the type of explanation given. Scenarios containing (...)
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  39. Iris Vermeir & Patrick Van Kenhove (2008). Gender Differences in Double Standards. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):281 - 295.score: 44.0
    The purpose of the present study is to investigate gender differences in the use of double standards in ethical judgements of questionable conduct instigated by business or consumers. We investigate if consumers are more critical towards unethical corporate versus consumer actions and if these double standards depend on the gender of the respondent. In the first study, we compared evaluations of four specific unethical actions [cfr. DePaulo, 1987, in: J. Saegert (ed.) Proceedings of the Division of Consumer Psychology (American Psychological (...)
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  40. Yi-hui Hung, Daisy L. Hung, Ovid J.-L. Tzeng & Denise H. Wu (2008). Flexible Spatial Mapping of Different Notations of Numbers in Chinese Readers. Cognition 106 (3):1441-1450.score: 44.0
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  41. Tervaniemi Mari (2009). Mapping the Differences in Sound Feature Processing Between Musicians and Nonmusicians Using a Melodic Paradigm. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 44.0
  42. G. A. Orban, D. Essen & W. Vanduffel (2004). Comparative Mapping of Higher Visual Areas in Monkeys and Humans. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (7):315-324.score: 44.0
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  43. Yi-hui Hung, Daisy L. Hung, Ovid J.-L. Tzeng & Denise H. Wu (2010). Corrigendum to “Flexible Spatial Mapping of Different Notations of Numbers in Chinese Readers” [Cognition 106 (3) (2008) 1441–1450]. [REVIEW] Cognition 116 (2):302-302.score: 44.0
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  44. Remigiusz Szczepanowski, Jakub Traczyk, Michał Wierzchoń & Axel Cleeremans (2013). The Perception of Visual Emotion: Comparing Different Measures of Awareness. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (1):212-220.score: 44.0
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  45. Iris Vermeir & Patrick Van Kenhove (2008). Gender Differences in Double Standards. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):281 - 295.score: 44.0
    The purpose of the present study is to investigate gender differences in the use of double standards in ethical judgements of questionable conduct instigated by business or consumers. We investigate if consumers are more critical towards unethical corporate versus consumer actions and if these double standards depend on the gender of the respondent. In the first study, we compared evaluations of four specific unethical actions [cfr. DePaulo, 1987, in: J. Saegert (ed.) Proceedings of the Division of Consumer Psychology (American Psychological (...)
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  46. Irwin P. Levin (1976). Comparing Different Models and Response Transformations in an Information Integration Task. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 7 (1):78-80.score: 44.0
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  47. John O'keefe (1994). Cognitive Maps, Time and Causality. Proceedings of the British Academy 83:35-45.score: 44.0
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  48. Julia Tanney (2009). Reasons as Non-Causal, Context-Placing Explanations. In Constantine Sandis (ed.), New Essays on the Explanation of Action. Palgrave Macmillan. 94--111.score: 42.0
    forthcoming in New Essays on the Explanation of Action Abstract Philosophers influenced by Wittgenstein rejected the idea that the explanatory power of our ordinary interpretive practices is to be found in law-governed, causal relations between items to which our everyday mental terms allegedly refer. Wittgenstein and those he inspired pointed to differences between the explanations provided by the ordinary employment of mental expressions and the style of causal explanation characteristic of the hard sciences. I believe, however, that the (...)
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  49. Jiri Benovsky (2012). The Causal Efficiency of the Passage of Time. Philosophia 40 (4):763-769.score: 42.0
    Does mere passage of time have causal powers ? Are properties like "being n days past" causally efficient ? A pervasive intuition among metaphysicians seems to be that they don't. Events and/or objects change, and they cause or are caused by other events and/or objects; but one does not see how just the mere passage of time could cause any difference in the world. In this paper, I shall discuss a case where it seems that mere passage of time (...)
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  50. Gábor Hofer-Szabó (2011). Bell(Δ) Inequalities Derived From Separate Common Causal Explanation of Almost Perfect EPR Anticorrelations. Foundations of Physics 41 (8):1398-1413.score: 42.0
    It is a well known fact that a common common causal explanation of the EPR scenario which consists in providing a local, non-conspiratorial common common cause system for a set of EPR correlations is excluded by various Bell inequalities. But what if we replace the assumption of a common common cause system by the requirement that each correlation of the set has a local, non-conspiratorial separate common cause system? In the paper we show that this move does not yield (...)
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