Search results for 'mechanical arts' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Rexmond C. Cochrane (1956). Francis Bacon and the Rise of the Mechanical Arts in Eighteenth-Century England. Annals of Science 12 (2):137-156.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Barry Kātz (1993). Paradise Restored: The Mechanical Arts From Antiquity Through the Thirteenth Century (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (1):131-133.score: 150.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Cesare Pastorino (2009). The Mine and the Furnace: Francis Bacon, Thomas Russell, and Early Stuart Mining Culture. Early Science and Medicine 14 (6):630-660.score: 90.0
    "Notwithstanding Francis Bacon’s praise for the philosophical role of the mechanical arts, historians have often downplayed Bacon’s connections with actual artisans and entrepreneurs. Addressing the specific context of mining culture, this study proposes a rather different picture. The analysis of a famous mining metaphor in _The Advancement of Learning_ shows us how Bacon’s project of reform of knowledge could find an apt correspondence in civic and entrepreneurial values of his time. Also, Bacon had interesting and so far unexplored (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Grażyna Gajewska (2008). Man as an Electro-Mechanical Art Project. Art Inquiry. Recherches Sur les Arts 10:85-96.score: 76.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Thierry Gontier (2006). Mathématiques et science universelle chez Bacon et chez Descartes. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 2:285-312.score: 60.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Charles Vincent (1992). Southern University's Agriculture and Mechanical Departments: Descriptive Analysis of the New Orleans Years, 1880–1913. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 9 (1):3-10.score: 60.0
    This is an analysis of the shift in educational emphasis at the first state supported Black institution of higher education in Louisiana during its first three decades. The national emphasis on Agricultural and Mechanical training with the expanded Morrill Act of 1890 was embraced by the University. Thus it qualified and received the Land Grant funding and developed a progressive, well-attended program in Agriculture and Mechanical Arts. This article closely reviews and describes its inner workings, facilities, curriculum, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ian Knizek (1993). Walter Benjamin and the Mechanical Reproducibility of Art Works Revisited. British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (4):357-366.score: 50.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Nick Peim (2007). Walter Benjamin in the Age of Digital Reproduction: Aura in Education: A Rereading of 'the Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction'. Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (3):363–380.score: 50.0
  9. Steven Marrone (2009). Magic and the Physical World in Thirteenth-Century Scholasticism. Early Science and Medicine 14 (1):158-185.score: 48.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. [deleted]David A. Silbersweig David R. Vago (2012). Self-Awareness, Self-Regulation, and Self-Transcendence (S-ART): A Framework for Understanding the Neurobiological Mechanisms of Mindfulness. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 48.0
    Mindfulness - as a state, trait, process, type of meditation, and intervention has proven to be beneficial across a diverse group of psychological disorders as well as for general stress reduction. Yet, there remains a lack of clarity in the operationalization of this construct, and underlying mechanisms. Here, we provide an integrative theoretical framework and systems-based neurobiological model that explains the mechanisms by which mindfulness reduces biases related to self-processing and creates a sustainable healthy mind. Mindfulness is described through systematic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. F. A. Lepper (1989). Anne-Marie Leander Touati: The Great Trajanic Frieze: The Study of a Monument and of the Mechanisms of Message Transmission in Roman Art. (Acta Instituti Romani Regni Sueciae, Quarto Series, 45.) Pp. 130; 56 Plates. Stockholm: Distributed by Paul Åströms Förlag, 1987. Paper, Sw.Kr. 350. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 39 (02):418-419.score: 40.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Jonathan Davis (2008). Questioning 'the Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction': A Stroll Around the Louvre After Reading Benjamin. Contemporary Aesthetics 6.score: 40.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Gavin Parkinson (2004). Surrealism and Quantum Mechanics: Dispersal and Fragmentation in Art, Life, and Physics. Science in Context 17 (4):557-577.score: 40.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Gabriella Bartoli (2011). Several Cognitive Mechanisms in Psychology, Art and Psychoanalysis. Rivista di Estetica 51 (3):13-35.score: 40.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Js Bell (1992). 6 Possible Worlds of Quantum-Mechanics (Reprinted From Possible Worlds in Humanities Arts and Sciences, Pg 359-373, 1989. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 22 (10):1201-1215.score: 40.0
  16. Antonio Marchionni (2004). As Artes Mechanicae Em Hugo E S. Bernardo. Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 60 (3):661-685.score: 40.0
    In modern times, the philosophical and theological meaning of work acquires an urgency anticipated by the Marxistic materialism and the Christian spirituality, as witnessed by the Economic-philosophical Manuscripts of Karl Marx and the encyclical letter Laborems Exercens of John Paul II. But this preoccupation was already present in earlier times. In Greco-Roman history there were aulical preconceptions about the work of man 's hands, but there were also religious associations of workers where work was celebrated. The fact that God incarnated (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. P. Mattick (1993). Mechanical Reproduction in the Age of Art. Theory, Culture and Society 10 (2):127-147.score: 40.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Robert S. Nelson (2000). The Slide Lecture, or the Work of Art "History" in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction. Critical Inquiry 26 (3):414.score: 40.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Tamara Trodd (2015). The Art of Mechanical Reproduction: Technology and Aesthetics From Duchamp to the Digital. University of Chicago Press.score: 40.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. [deleted]David R. Vago & David A. Silbersweig (2012). Self-Awareness, Self-Regulation, and Self-Transcendence (S-ART): A Framework for Understanding the Neurobiological Mechanisms of Mindfulness. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 40.0
  21. Salim Kemal & Ivan Gaskell (eds.) (2000). Politics and Aesthetics in the Arts. Cambridge University Press.score: 38.0
    This volume brings together new essays from distinguished scholars in a variety of disciplines - philosophy, history, literary studies, art history - to explore various ways in which aesthetics, politics and the arts interact with one another. Politics is an elastic concept, covering an oceanic breadth of mechanisms for conducting relations between empowered groups, and these essays offer a range of perspectives, including nations, classes, and gendered subjects, which examine the imbrication of politics with arts. Together they demonstrate (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Milan Jaros (2005). Materia Poetica: Models of Corporeality and Onto-Poetic Pata-Physics of the Post-Mechanical Age. Technoetic Arts: A Journal of Speculative Research 3 (1):3-12.score: 36.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Matthew Wilson Smith (2007). The Total Work of Art: From Bayreuth to Cyberspace. Routledge.score: 34.0
    Total work of art in an age of mechanical reproduction -- Total stage: Wagner's festspielhaus -- Total machine: the Bauhaus theatre -- Total montage: Brecht's reply to Wagner -- Total state: Riefenstahl's triumph of the will -- Total world: Disney's theme parks -- Total vacuum: Warhol's performances -- Total immersion: cyberspace.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. H. Moss, C. Donnellan & D. O'Neill (2012). A Review of Qualitative Methodologies Used to Explore Patient Perceptions of Arts and Healthcare. [REVIEW] Medical Humanities 38 (2):106-109.score: 30.0
    Although the importance of the arts in healthcare is increasingly recognised, further research is needed to investigate the mechanisms by which arts and health programmes achieve their impact. An overview of the qualitative methods used to explore patients' perceptions of these interventions is lacking. We reviewed the literature to gain insights into the qualitative methods used to explore patients' perceptions of the role of arts in healthcare with a view to identifying the most common methodologies used and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Lee A. Craig (1992). “Raising Among Themselves”: Black Educational Advancement and the Morrill Act of 1890. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 9 (1):31-37.score: 30.0
    Debate over the curricula of Black colleges and universities dates back to before the turn of the century and involved such noted Black leaders as Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois. The 1890 Land-Grant Colleges eventually established in 17 southern and border states were created to provide institutions for the teaching of the agricultural and mechanical arts to African-Americans. However, due to their being chronically underfunded and understaffed during the early decades of their existence, they focused mainly on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Annette de Vries (2010). The Hand of the Artist: Reflections on the Notion of Technê in Some Antwerp Gallery Paintings by Frans II Francken and His Circle. Intellectual History Review 20 (1):79-101.score: 30.0
    This paper explores and highlights the value given to craftsmanship or technê in the community of liefhebbers and artists associated with the pictures of collections genre. Taking as its case study a group of gallery interiors by the probable inventor and leading light of the genre, Frans II Francken, it places pictures of collections within the reform of attitudes towards manual dexterity and the mechanical arts that took place in the Early Modern period. Antwerp gallery interiors exemplify the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Edward Tenner (2003). Our Own Devices: The Past and Future of Body Technology. Alfred A. Knopf.score: 30.0
    Machine generated contents note: Preface ix -- Chapter One: Technology, Technique, and the Body 3 --Chapter Two: The First Technology: Bottle-Feeding 30 --Chapter Three: Slow Motion: Zori 51 --Chapter Four: Double Time: Athletic Shoes 75 --Chapter Five: Sitting Up Straight: Posture Chairs 104 --Chapter Six: Laid Back: Reclining Chairs 134 --Chapter Seven: Mechanical Arts: Musical Keyboards 161 --Chapter Eight: Letter Perfect?: Text Keyboards 187 --Chapter Nine: Second Sight: Eyeglasses 213 --Chapter Ten: Hardheaded Logic: Helmets 238 --Epilogue: Thumbs Up (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Amit Hagar (2009). Active Fault‐Tolerant Quantum Error Correction: The Curse of the Open System. Philosophy of Science 76 (4):506-535.score: 24.0
    Relying on the universality of quantum mechanics and on recent results known as the “threshold theorems,” quantum information scientists deem the question of the feasibility of large‐scale, fault‐tolerant, and computationally superior quantum computers as purely technological. Reconstructing this question in statistical mechanical terms, this article suggests otherwise by questioning the physical significance of the threshold theorems. The skepticism it advances is neither too strong (hence is consistent with the universality of quantum mechanics) nor too weak (hence is independent of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Matthew Kieran & Dominic Lopes (eds.) (2003). Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Imagination is a central concept in aesthetics with close ties to issues in the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language, yet it has not received the kind of sustained, critical attention it deserves. Imagination, Philosophy and the Arts represents the work of fifteen young yet distinguished philosophers of art, who critically examine just how and in what form the notion of imagination illuminates fundamental problems in the philosophy of art. All new papers, a strong collection on the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Marcus P. Adams (2014). The Wax and the Mechanical Mind: Reexamining Hobbes's Objections to Descartes's Meditations. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (3):403-424.score: 24.0
    Many critics, Descartes himself included, have seen Hobbes as uncharitable or even incoherent in his Objections to the Meditations on First Philosophy. I argue that when understood within the wider context of his views of the late 1630s and early 1640s, Hobbes's Objections are coherent and reflect his goal of providing an epistemology consistent with a mechanical philosophy. I demonstrate the importance of this epistemology for understanding his Fourth Objection concerning the nature of the wax and contend that Hobbes's (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Ronald Bogue (2003). Deleuze on Music, Painting, and the Arts. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Bogue provides a systematic overview and introduction to Deleuze's writings on music and painting, and an assessment of their position within his aesthetics as a whole. Deleuze on Music, Painting and the Arts breaks new ground in the scholarship on Deleuze's aesthetics, while providing a clear and accessible guide to his often overlooked writings in the fields of music and painting.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Michael R. DePaul (1993). Balance and Refinement: Beyond Coherence Methods of Moral Inquiry. Routledge.score: 24.0
    We all have moral beliefs. What if we are unsure about what to believe about a serious moral issue, or if one belief conflicts with another that we hold with equal conviction? When such conflicts and doubts occur, we try to make our beliefs cohere, and are forced to engage in a moral inquiry. Michael R. DePaul argues that we have to make our beliefs cohere, but that the current coherence methods are seriously flawed. Methods such as that which (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. David Davies (2011). Philosophy of the Performing Arts. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 24.0
    This book provides an accessible yet sophisticated introduction to the significant philosophical issues concerning the performing arts.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Thomas E. Peterson (2010). Badiou, Pedagogy and the Arts. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (2):159-176.score: 24.0
    The essay distils from Badiou's writing a pedagogy based on his theories of knowledge and truth, as brought to bear on poetry and the arts. By following Badiou's implicit ontology of learning, which presupposes a dynamic and passionate engagement with a concrete situation, the essay argues that Badiou's view of modernity, in particular, contributes greatly to the educational topic, and offers an alternative teaching paradigm to the outmoded schools of criticism of the 20 th century. It also argues that (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Caroline van Eck, James McAllister & Renée van de Vall (eds.) (1995). The Question of Style in Philosophy and the Arts. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    The eighteenth and nineteenth centuries witnessed a change in the perception of the arts and of philosophy. In the arts this transition occurred around 1800, with, for instance, the breakdown of Vitruvianism in architecture, while in philosophy the foundationalism of which Descartes and Spinoza were paradigmatic representatives, which presumed that philosophy and the sciences possessed a method of ensuring the demonstration of truths, was undermined by the idea, asserted by Nietzsche and Wittgenstein, that there exist alternative styles of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Benjamin Rutter (2010). Hegel on the Modern Arts. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Debates over the 'end of art' have tended to obscure Hegel's work on the arts themselves. Benjamin Rutter opens this study with a defence of art's indispensability to Hegel's conception of modernity; he then seeks to reorient discussion toward the distinctive values of painting, poetry, and the novel. Working carefully through Hegel's four lecture series on aesthetics, he identifies the expressive possibilities particular to each medium. Thus, Dutch genre scenes animate the everyday with an appearance of vitality; metaphor frees (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. S. Brent Plate (2005). Walter Benjamin, Religion, and Aesthetics: Rethinking Religion Through the Arts. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Walter Benjamin, Religion, and Aesthetics is an innovative attempt to reconceive the key concepts of religious studies through a reading with, and against, Walter Benjamin. Brent Plate deftly sifts through Benjamin's voluminous writings showing how his concepts of art, allegory, and experience undo traditional religious concepts such as myth, symbol, memory, narrative, creation, and redemption. Recasting religion as religious practice, as process and movement, Plate locates a Benjaminian materialist aesthetics, what the author calls an "allegorical aesthetics," in order to uncover (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Darryl Reed (2004). Universities and the Promotion of Corporate Responsibility: Reinterpreting the Liberal Arts Tradition. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 2 (1):3-41.score: 24.0
    The issue of corporate responsibility has long been discussed in relationship to universities, but generally only in an ad hoc fashion. While the role of universities in teaching business ethics is one theme that has received significant and rather constant attention, other issues tend to be raised only sporadically. Moreover, when issues of corporate responsibility are raised, it is often done on the presumption of some understanding of a liberal arts mandate of the university, a position that has come (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Anton Killin (2013). The Arts and Human Nature: Evolutionary Aesthetics and the Evolutionary Status of Art Behaviours. Biology and Philosophy 28 (4):703-718.score: 24.0
    This essay reviews one of the most recent books in a trend of new publications proffering evolutionary theorising about aesthetics and the arts—themes within an increasing literature on aspects of human life and human nature in terms of evolutionary theory. Stephen Davies’ The Artful Species links some of our aesthetic sensibilities with our evolved human nature and critically surveys the interdisciplinary debate regarding the evolutionary status of the arts. Davies’ engaging and accessible writing succeeds in demonstrating the maturity (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Barry Allen (2014). Daoism and Chinese Martial Arts. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (2):251-266.score: 24.0
    The now-global phenomenon of Asian martial arts traces back to something that began in China. The idea the Chinese communicated was the dual cultivation of the spiritual and the martial, each perfected in the other, with the proof of perfection being an effortless mastery of violence. I look at one phase of the interaction between Asian martial arts and Chinese thought, with a reading of the Zhuangzi 莊子 and the Daodejing 道德經 from a martial arts perspective. I (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Peter Kivy (1997). Philosophies of Arts: An Essay in Differences. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Since the beginning of the eighteenth century the philosophy of art has been engaged on the project of trying to find out what the fine arts have in common and, thus, how they might be defined. Peter Kivy's purpose in this accessible and lucid book is to trace the history of that enterprise and argue that the definitional project has been unsuccessful. He offers a fruitful change of strategy: instead of engaging in an obsessive quest for sameness, let us (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Salim Kemal & Ivan Gaskell (eds.) (1993). Explanation and Value in the Arts. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Explanation and Value in the Arts offers penetrating studies by art historians, literary theorists, and philosophers, of issues central to explaining works of literature and painting. The first chapters look at the sources of interest in the fine arts and point to the intimate relation between aesthetic and other values. The next contributions develop the interaction between value and explanation in the study of the arts, including considerations of the nature of creativity and the principles for the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Patrick Maynard (2012). Arts, Agents, Artifacts: Photography's Automatisms. Critical Inquiry 38 (4):727-745.score: 24.0
    Recent advances in paleoarchaeology show why nothing in the Tate Modern, where a conference on "Agency & Automatism" took place, challenges the roots of 'the idea of the fine arts' (Kristeller) as high levels of craft, aesthetics, mimesis and mental expression, as exemplifying cultures: it is by them that we define our species. This paper identifies and deals with resistances, early and late, to photographic fine art as based on concerns about automatism reducing human agency--that is, mental expression--then offers (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Lance Moir & Richard Taffler (2004). Does Corporate Philanthropy Exist?: Business Giving to the Arts in the U.K. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 54 (2):149 - 161.score: 24.0
    This paper addresses the question of the existence of corporate philanthropy. It proposes a framework for analysing corporate philanthropy along the dimensions of business/society interest and primary/secondary stakeholder focus. The framework is then applied in order to understand business involvement with the arts in the U.K. A unique dataset of 60 texts which describe different firms' involvement with the Arts is analysed using formal content analysis to uncover the motivations for business involvement. Cluster analysis is then used in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Nina Zaragoza (2002). Rethinking Language Arts: Passion and Practice. Routledgefalmer.score: 24.0
    In Rethinking Language Arts: Passion and Practice, Second Edition , author Nina Zaragoza uses the form of letters to her students to engage pre-service teachers in reevaluating teaching practices. Zaragoza discusses and explains the need for teachers to be decision-makers, reflective thinkers, political beings, and agents of social change in order to create a positive and inclusive classroom setting. This book is both a critical text that deconstructs the way language arts are traditionally taught in our schools as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Chozan Niwa (2006). The Demon's Sermon on the Martial Arts and Other Tales. Kodansha International.score: 24.0
    The Demon said to the swordsman, "Fundamentally, man's mind is not without good. It is simply that from the moment he has life, he is always being brought up with perversity. Thus, having no idea that he has gotten used to being soaked in it, he harms his self-nature and falls into evil. Human desire is the root of this perversity." Woven deeply into the martial traditions and folklore of Japan, the fearsome Tengu dwell in the country's mountain forest. Mythical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Michael J. Pratt (2005). Some Aspects of Product Shape in Mechanical Engineering. Axiomathes 15 (3):373-397.score: 24.0
    The paper examines some of the many factors that influence the shape of designed products in the mechanical engineering industries. It is shown that, once the detailed shape of a product has been determined, the analysis of that shape from the viewpoints of various engineering activities downstream of design leads to a range of inherently different perceptions of it.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Terry Quinn (2012). Invitation to Functional Collaboration: Dynamics of Progress in the Sciences, Technologies, and Arts. Journal of Macrodynamic Analysis 7.score: 24.0
    In all disciplines there is the question of how to promote progress and offset decline. But, what are progress and decline ? For this short article, the main discussion centers on biology. A solution called functional specialization begins to emerge as relevant to all of the sciences, technologies and arts. This introductory article ends with some heuristics on various follow-up issues.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Malcolm Oster (1992). The Scholar and the Craftsman Revisited: Robert Boyle as Aristocrat and Artisan. Annals of Science 49 (3):255-276.score: 24.0
    Summary The early background of Robert Boyle, a leading advocate of the mechanical philosophy at the Restoration, helps to illuminate his later understanding of both the relationship between gentleman naturalists and artisans, as well as that of theoretical abstraction and practical application in experimental philosophy and the manual arts. Boyle's agenda for ethical reconstruction emphasized practical moral knowledge and a transformation in intellectual values which, reinforced by the general outlook of the Hartlib circle, postulated the desirability of knowledge (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Lillian Schwartz (1994). Leonardo and “Pixellence”™. World Futures 40 (1):147-165.score: 24.0
    In the search for the roots of computer art, the notes of Leonardo provide guiding principles which continue to surface in much of 20th century art. The essay is written in Leonardo's voice to combine excerpts from his early writings with the author's extrapolations from his teachings. This text purports that the heritage of computer art is linked to Renaissance precepts, and descended from the Mechanical age, Visual arts, and Animation. This exploration positions a new movement, herein called (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000