Search results for 'melanoma' (try it on Scholar)

11 found
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  1.  57
    Brendan Clarke (2011). Causation and Melanoma Classification. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (1):19-32.
    In this article, I begin by giving a brief history of melanoma causation. I then discuss the current manner in which malignant melanoma is classified. In general, these systems of classification do not take account of the manner of tumour causation. Instead, they are based on phenomenological features of the tumour, such as size, spread, and morphology. I go on to suggest that misclassification of melanoma is a major problem in clinical practice. I therefore outline an alternative (...)
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  2. John M. Harris, Stuart J. Salasche & Robin B. Harris (1999). Using the Internet to Teach Melanoma Management Guidelines to Primary Care Physicians. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 5 (2):199-211.
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  3.  1
    Adel Shahnam, David M. Roder, Elizabeth A. Tracey, Susan J. Neuhaus, Michael P. Brown & Michael J. Sorich (2014). Can Cancer Registries Show Whether Treatment is Contributing to Survival Increases for Melanoma of the Skin at a Population Level? Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (1):74-80.
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  4.  25
    Ray Moseley (1985). Excuse Me, but You Have a Melanoma on Your Neck! Unsolicited Medical Opinions. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 10 (2):163-170.
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  5. Barbara Malitschek, Dorothee Förnzler & Manfred Schartl (1995). Melanoma Formation in Xiphophorus: A Model System for the Role of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Tumorigenesis. Bioessays 17 (12):1017-1023.
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  6.  3
    Samantha L. Leaf, Lisa G. Aspinwall & Sancy A. Leachman (2010). God and Agency in the Era of Molecular Medicine: Religious Beliefs Predict Sun-Protection Behaviors Following Melanoma Genetic Test Reporting. Archive for the Psychology of Religion / Archiv für Religionspychologie 32 (1):87-112.
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  7.  3
    Tobias Schatton, Natasha Y. Frank & Markus H. Frank (2009). Identification and Targeting of Cancer Stem Cells. Bioessays 31 (10):1038-1049.
  8.  5
    Ann M. Morgan, Jennifer Lo & David E. Fisher (2013). How Does Pheomelanin Synthesis Contribute to Melanomagenesis? Bioessays 35 (8):672-676.
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  9.  4
    Sonja Hombach & Markus Kretz (2013). The Non‐Coding Skin: Exploring the Roles of Long Non‐Coding RNAs in Epidermal Homeostasis and Disease. Bioessays 35 (12):1093-1100.
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  10.  2
    J. Thombs (2005). Recruiting Donors for Autopsy Based Cancer Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (6):360-361.
    The use of human tissue for scientific research is a highly sensitive issue. A lack of confidence in patient recruitment is one reason for the failure of many studies to be funded and it is important therefore that recruitment procedures are as effective and sympathetic as possible. The authors recruited patients with uveal melanoma into a postmortem study investigating tumour latency in this cancer. Two approaches were used—firstly a direct approach when patients attended clinic and secondly an initial approach (...)
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  11. John D. Bridson & Bertil Damato (2010). Consent to Rapid Treatment of Eye Tumours: Is the Waiting Time Too Short at Liverpool Ocular Oncology Centre? Clinical Ethics 5 (2):86-94.
    At the Liverpool Ocular Oncology Centre (LOOC), patients with an eye tumour are offered rapid treatment. Procedures such as enucleation (surgical removal of the eye) are usually performed within 24 hours of initial assessment. Such expedited treatment can be challenged on the basis that it is incompatible with valid consent. We present the results of a questionnaire audit exploring the views of patients on how long they waited to undergo invasive procedures for intraocular melanoma. The findings inform a discussion (...)
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