Search results for 'mental illness' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  93
    Ken Levy & Alex Cohen (2016). Commentary on Szmukler: Mental Illness, Dangerousness, and Involuntary Civil Commitment. In Daniel D. Moseley Gary J. Gala (ed.), Philosophy and Psychiatry: Problems, Intersections, and New Perspectives. Routledge 147-160.
    Prof. Cohen and I answer six questions: (1) Why do we lock people up? (2) How can involuntary civil commitment be reconciled with people's constitutional right to liberty? (3) Why don't we treat homicide as a public health threat? (4) What is the difference between legal and medical approaches to mental illness? (5) Why is mental illness required for involuntary commitment? (6) Where are we in our efforts to understand the causes of mental illness?
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  2. Matthew Broome, Lisa Bortolotti & Matteo Mameli (2010). Moral Responsibility and Mental Illness: A Case Study. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (19):179-187.
    It is far too early to say what global impact the neurocognitive and neuropsychiatric sciences will have on our intuitions about moral responsibility. And it is far too early to say whether the notion of moral responsibility will survive this impact (and if so, in what form). But it is certainly worth starting to think about the local impact that these sciences can or should have on some of our distinctions and criteria. It might be possible to use some of (...)
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  3.  8
    Jacqueline Anne Sullivan (forthcoming). Medical Models of Mental Illness. In Harold Kincaid, Jeremy Simon & Miriam Solomon (eds.), The Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Medicine,.
    This chapter has two aims. The first aim is to compare and contrast three different conceptual-explanatory models for thinking about mental illness with an eye towards identifying the assumptions upon which each model is based, and exploring the model’s advantages and limitations in clinical contexts. Major Depressive Disorder is used as an example to illustrate these points. The second aim is to address the question of what conceptual-theoretical framework for thinking about mental illness is most likely (...)
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  4.  33
    Erick Ramirez, Mental Illness, Philosophy Of. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Philosophy of Mental Illness The Philosophy of Mental Illness is an interdisciplinary field of study that combines views and methods from the philosophy of mind, psychology, neuroscience, and moral philosophy in order to analyze the nature of mental illness. Philosophers of mental illness are concerned with examining the ontological, epistemological, and normative issues arising from […].
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  5.  69
    Dominic Murphy (2005). The Concept of Mental Illness--Where the Debate has Reached and Where It Needs to Go. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 25 (1):116-132.
    The paper develops a framework for discussing concepts of health and disease along two dimensions. The first is the role of values in our disease concepts, and the second is the relationship between science and folk psychology. This framework is then applied to the concept of mental disorder. I argue that existing treatments of the concept yield too much authority to common sense, which produces a tension within the program of finding a scientific basis for our ascriptions of (...) disorder. The science should be given more authority, even if this leads to counterintuitive results. I conclude by identifying several smaller scale conceptual problems within the application of science to mental illness, and argue that the debate needs to shift towards dealing with such problems in an empirically informed way, rather than remaining at the level of conceptual analysis. 2012 APA, all rights reserved). (shrink)
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  6.  10
    Thomas R. V. Nys & Maurits G. Nys (2006). Psychiatry Under Pressure: Reflections on Psychiatry's Drift Towards a Reductionist Biomedical Conception of Mental Illness. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 9 (1):107-115.
    We argue that contemporary psychiatry adopts a defensive strategy vis-à-vis various external sources of pressure. We will identify two of these sources – the plea for individual autonomy and the idea of Managed Care – and explain how they have promoted a strict biomedical conception of disease. The demand for objectivity, however, does not take into account the complexity of mental illness. It ignores that the psychiatrist’s profession is essentially characterized by fragility: fluctuating between scientific reduction and the (...)
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  7.  4
    Sandra J. Tanenbaum (2006). The Role of “Evidence” in Recovery From Mental Illness. Health Care Analysis 14 (4):195-201.
    Evidence-based practice (EBP), a derivative of evidence-based medicine (EBM), is ascendant in the United States’ mental health system; the findings of randomized controlled trials and other experimental research are widely considered authoritative in mental health practice and policy. The concept of recovery from mental illness is similarly pervasive in mental health programming and advocacy, and it emphasizes consumer expertise and self-determination. What is the relationship between these two powerful and potentially incompatible forces for mental (...)
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  8. Martin Roth (1986). The Reality of Mental Illness. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is psychiatry's reply to the diverse group of antipsychiatrists, including Laing, Foucault, Goffman, Szasz and Bassaglia, that has made fashionable the view that mental illness is merely socially deviant behaviour and that psychiatrists are agents of the capitalist society seeking to repress such behaviour. It establishes, by the use of evidence from historical and transcultural studies, that mental illness has been recognised in all cultures since the beginning of history and goes on to explore (...)
     
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  9.  98
    Neil Pickering (2006). The Metaphor of Mental Illness. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction : the existence of mental illness -- The likeness argument -- The categorical argument -- Metaphor -- Two metaphors from physical medicine -- The metaphor of mental illness -- Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, social construction, and metaphor -- Metaphors and models.
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  10. George Graham (2010). The Disordered Mind: An Introduction to Philosophy of Mind and Mental Illness. Routledge.
    Conceiving mental disorder -- Disorder of mental disorder -- On being skeptical about mental disorder -- Seeking norms for mental disorder -- An original position -- Addiction and responsibility for self -- Reality lost and found -- Minding the missing me.
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  11.  18
    Thomas Stephen Szasz (1974). The Myth of Mental Illness: Foundations of a Theory of Personal Conduct. New York,Harper & Row.
  12.  13
    Jukka Varelius (1st ed. 2015). Mental Illness, Lack of Autonomy, and Physician-Assisted Death. In Jukka Varelius & Michael Cholbi (eds.), New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Springer International Publishing 59-77.
    In this chapter, I consider the idea that physician-assisted death might come into question in the cases of psychiatric patients who are incapable of making autonomous choices about ending their lives. I maintain that the main arguments for physician-assisted death found in recent medical ethical literature support physician-assisted death in some of those cases. After assessing several possible criticisms of what I have argued, I conclude that the idea that physicianassisted death can be acceptable in some cases of psychiatric patients (...)
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  13. Carl Elliott (2004). Mental Illness and its Limits. In Jennifer Radden (ed.), The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion. Oxford: Oxford University Press 426.
     
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  14.  44
    Robert L. Woolfolk (1999). Malfunction and Mental Illness. The Monist 82 (4):658-670.
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  15.  63
    Soren Holm (1998). Mind, Body, and Mental Illness. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (4):337-341.
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  16.  60
    Pamela Bjorklund (2004). 'There but for the Grace of God': Moral Responsibility and Mental Illness. Nursing Philosophy 5 (3):188-200.
  17.  21
    Dirk Richter (1999). Chronic Mental Illness and the Limits of the Biopsychosocial Model. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (1):21-30.
    Twenty years ago, the biopsychosocial model was proposed by George Engel to be the new paradigm for medicine and psychiatry. The model assumed a hierarchical structure of the biological, psychological and social system and simple interactions between the participating systems. This article holds the thesis that the original biopsychosocial model cannot depict psychiatry's reality and problems. The clinical validity of the biopsychosocial model has to be questioned. It is argued that psychiatric interventions can only stimulate but not determine their target (...)
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  18.  2
    Richard Byng & Roger Jones (2004). Mental Health Link: The Development and Formative Evaluation of a Complex Intervention to Improve Shared Care for Patients with Long‐Term Mental Illness. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (1):27-36.
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  19. James Rohrer, Barbara Rohland, Anne Denison, J. Rush Pierce & Norman H. Rasmussen (2007). Family History of Mental Illness and Frequent Mental Distress in Community Clinic Patients. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (3):435-439.
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  20.  91
    David Papineau (1994). Mental Disorder, Illness and Biological Disfunction. Philosophy 37:73-82.
    I shall begin with the "anti-psychiatry" view that the lack of a physical basis excludes many familiar mental disorders from the category of "illness". My response to this argument will be that anti-psychiatrists are probably right to hold that most mental disorders do not involve any physical disorder, but that they are wrong to conclude from this that these mental disorders are not illnesses.
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  21.  33
    Christopher Ryan (2011). One Flu Over The Cuckoo's Nest: Comparing Legislated Coercive Treatment for Mental Illness with That for Other Illness. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (1):87-93.
    Many of the world’s mental health acts, including all Australian legislation, allow for the coercive detention and treatment of people with mental illnesses if they are deemed likely to harm themselves or others. Numerous authors have argued that legislated powers to impose coercive treatment in psychiatric illness should pivot on the presence or absence of capacity not likely harm, but no Australian act uses this criterion. In this paper, I add a novel element to these arguments by (...)
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  22. Matt King & Joshua May (forthcoming). Moral Responsibility and Mental Illness. In M. Griffiths, N. Levy & K. Timpe (eds.), Routledge Companion to Free Will. Routledge
    In this chapter, we explore how mental illness affects the aptness for attributing responsibility to individuals as well as the justification for holding them responsible for their acts. We begin in Section 2 by tackling some preliminaries, both to refine our guiding question and the parameters relevant to that inquiry. In Section 3, we consider when mental illness surely excuses. In Section 4, we consider conditions that don’t excuse agents from responsibility. Section 5 looks at how (...)
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  23. Michel Foucault & Hubert Dreyfus (2008). Mental Illness and Psychology. University of California Press.
    This seminal early work of Foucault is indispensable to understanding his development as a thinker. Written in 1954 and revised in 1962, _Mental Illness and Psychology _delineates the shift that occurred in Foucault's thought during this period. The first iteration reflects the philosopher's early interest in and respect for Freud and the psychoanalytic tradition. The second part, rewritten in 1962, marks a dramatic change in Foucault's thinking. Examining the history of madness as a social and cultural construct, he moves (...)
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  24.  9
    Luca Malatesti & Marko Jurjako, Vrijednosti u psihijatriji i pojam mentalne bolesti (eng. Values in psychiatry and the concept of mental illness). Moralni, Politički I Društveni Odgovori Na Društvene Devijacije (Eng. Moral, Political, and Social Responses to Antisocial Deviation).
    The crucial problem in the philosophy of psychiatry is to determine under which conditions certain behaviors, mental states, and personality traits should be regarded as symptoms of mental illnesses. Participants in the debate can be placed on a continuum of positions. On the one side of the continuum, there are naturalists who maintain that the concept of mental illness can be explained by relying on the conceptual apparatus of the natural sciences, such as biology and neuroscience. (...)
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  25.  54
    Allan V. Horwitz (2002). Creating Mental Illness. University of Chicago Press.
    In this surprising book, Allan V. Horwitz argues that our current conceptions of mental illness as a disease fit only a small number of serious psychological conditions and that most conditions currently regarded as mental illness are cultural constructions, normal reactions to stressful social circumstances, or simply forms of deviant behavior.
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  26. Thomas Szasz (2001). Mental Illness: Psychiatry's Phlogiston. Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (5):297-301.
    In physics, we use the same laws to explain why airplanes fly, and why they crash. In psychiatry, we use one set of laws to explain sane behaviour, which we attribute to reasons (choices), and another set of laws to explain insane behaviour, which we attribute to causes (diseases). God, man's idea of moral perfection, judges human deeds without distinguishing between sane persons responsible for their behaviour and insane persons deserving to be excused for their evil deeds. It is hubris (...)
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  27.  17
    Jukka Varelius (2015). Mental Illness, Natural Death, and Non-Voluntary Passive Euthanasia. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-14.
    When it is considered to be in their best interests, withholding and withdrawing life-supporting treatment from non-competent physically ill or injured patients – non-voluntary passive euthanasia, as it has been called – is generally accepted. A central reason in support of the procedures relates to the perceived manner of death they involve: in non-voluntary passive euthanasia death is seen to come about naturally. When a non-competent psychiatric patient attempts to kill herself, the mental health care providers treating her are (...)
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  28.  14
    Amresh Shrivastava, Megan Johnston & Yves Bureau (2012). Stigma of Mental Illness-1: Clinical Reflections. Mens Sana Monographs 10 (1):70.
    Although the quality and effectiveness of mental health treatments and services have improved greatly over the past 50 years, therapeutic revolutions in psychiatry have not yet been able to reduce stigma. Stigma is a risk factor leading to negative mental health outcomes. It is responsible for treatment seeking delays and reduces the likelihood that a mentally ill patient will receive adequate care. It is evident that delay due to stigma can have devastating consequences. This review will discuss the (...)
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  29.  49
    S. Nassir Ghaemi (2007). The Concepts of Psychiatry: A Pluralistic Approach to the Mind and Mental Illness. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    The status quo: dogmatism, the biopsychosocial model, and alternatives -- What there is: of mind and brain -- How we know: understanding the mind -- What is scientific method? -- Reading Karl Jaspers's General Psychopathology -- What is scientific method in psychiatry? -- Darwin's dangerous method: the essentialist fallacy -- What we value: the ethics of psychiatry -- Desire and self: Hellenistic and Islamic approaches -- On the nature of mental illness: disease or myth? -- Order out of (...)
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  30.  27
    Christopher Megone (2000). Mental Illness, Human Function, and Values. Philosophy, Psychiatry and Psychology 7 (1):45-65.
    The present paper constitutes a development of the position that illness, whether bodily or mental, should be analyzed as an incapacitating failure of bodily or mental capacities, respectively, to realize their functions. The paper undertakes this development by responding to two critics. It addresses first Szasz’s continued claims that (1) physical illness is the paradigm concept of illness and (2) a philosophical analysis of mental illness does not shed any light on the social (...)
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  31.  57
    Dominic Murphy (2001). Hacking's Reconciliation: Putting the Biological and Sociological Together in the Explanation of Mental Illness. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 31 (2):139-162.
    In a series of recent works, Ian Hacking has produced a model of social causation in mental illness and begun to sketch in outline how this might be integrated with the medical model of psychiatry. This article elaborates and revises Hacking 's model of social forces, criticizes him for attempting a merely semantic resolution of the tension between the social and the biological, and sketches an alternative approach that builds upon his substantial insights.
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  32.  17
    T. Szasz (2003). Psychiatry and the Control of Dangerousness: On the Apotropaic Function of the Term “Mental Illness”. Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (4):227-230.
    The term “mental illness” implies that persons with such illnesses are more likely to be dangerous to themselves and/or others than are persons without such illnesses. This is the source of the psychiatrist’s traditional social obligation to control “harm to self and/or others,” that is, suicide and crime. The ethical dilemmas of psychiatry cannot be resolved as long as the contradictory functions of healing persons and protecting society are united in a single discipline.Life is full of dangers. Our (...)
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  33. Hanna Pickard (2009). Mental Illness is Indeed a Myth. In Matthew Broome & Lisa Bortolotti (eds.), Psychiatry as Cognitive Neuroscience. OUP Oxford
    This chapter offers a novel defence of Szasz’s claim that mental illness is a myth by bringing to bear a standard type of thought experiment used in philosophical discussions of the meaning of natural kind concepts. This makes it possible to accept Szasz’s conclusion that mental illness involves problems of living, some of which may be moral in nature, while bypassing the debate about the meaning of the concept of illness. The chapter then considers the (...)
     
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  34.  90
    K. W. M. Fulford (1993). Mental Illness and the Mind-Brain Problem: Delusion, Belief and Searle's Theory of Intentionality. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (2).
    Until recently there has been little contact between the mind-brain debate in philosophy and the debate in psychiatry about the nature of mental illness. In this paper some of the analogies and disanalogies between the two debates are explored. It is noted in particular that the emphasis in modern philosophy of mind on the importance of the concept of action has been matched by a recent shift in the debate about mental illness from analyses of disease (...)
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  35. Peter Raabe (2010). Healing Words: Philosophy in the Treatment of Mental Illness. Philosophy and Culture 37 (1):21-34.
    This paper, the brain is defined as biological constructs, the soul is defined as propositions or narrative constructs. Advocates non-biological mental illness - such as depression and schizophrenia - not causal entity , just the thought of the group symptoms given name. The disease is suspected the source of beliefs, values ​​and assumptions. This conclusion is, whether mild or severe, or so-called "clinical" mental illness, as long as the body on the non-biological, can be treated through (...)
     
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  36.  17
    Erick Ramirez, Mental Illness, Philosophy Of.
    Philosophy of Mental Illness The Philosophy of Mental Illness is an interdisciplinary field of study that combines views and methods from the philosophy of mind, psychology, neuroscience, and moral philosophy in order to analyze the nature of mental illness. Philosophers of mental illness are concerned with examining the ontological, epistemological, and normative issues arising from […].
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  37.  23
    Tim Thornton (2000). Mental Illness and Reductionism: Can Functions Be Naturalized? Philosophy Psychiatry and Psychology 9 (1):229-253.
    There has been considerable recent philo- sophical work on the nature of mental illness. Two..
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  38.  3
    Emanuel Nicolas Cortes Simonet (2014). Victoria's 'Mental Health Act 2014': The Human Rights of Persons with Mental Illness. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 20 (1):3.
    Simonet, Emanuel Nicolas Cortes Victoria's new Mental Health Act 2014 came into operation on 1st July 2014. Corresponding with international standards, the new Act aims to strengthen the human rights of persons with mental illness. This is supported by the inclusion of a recovery framework which promotes a collaborative treatment approach, procedures that reduce the duration of compulsory treatment, as well as better mental health service oversight and safeguards. This article analyses and highlights these reforms from (...)
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  39.  26
    David Michael Levin (1976). II. The Concept of Mental Illness: Working Through the Myths. Inquiry 19 (1-4):360-365.
    In ?Some Myths about ?Mental Illness'? (Inquiry, Vol. 18 [1975], No. 3), Michael Moore attempts to clarify and refute what he takes to be the radical (existential) position concerning the nature and diagnosis of mental illness. Moore's dissatisfaction with certain formulations and conceptualizations of the radical position is endorsed; as also the need to introduce greater rigor and precision into the discussion of mental illness. But Moore's clarifications are really misunderstandings and, in consequence, his (...)
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  40.  9
    J. G. Wong (2001). Genetic Discrimination and Mental Illness: A Case Report. Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (6):393-397.
    With advances in genetic technology, there are increasing concerns about the way in which genetic information may be abused, particularly in people at increased genetic risk of developing certain disorders. In a recent case in Hong Kong, the court ruled that it was unlawful for the civil service to discriminate in employment, for the sake of public safety, against people with a family history of mental illness. The plaintiffs showed no signs of any mental health problems and (...)
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  41.  43
    Mark Cresswell (2008). Szasz and His Interlocutors: Reconsidering Thomas Szasz's "Myth of Mental Illness" Thesis. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 38 (1):23–44.
    It is a matter of some irony that psychiatry's most trenchant critic for over four decades is himself a psychiatrist. I refer to Thomas S. Szasz. Szasz's core thesis may be succinctly rendered: mental illness is a “myth”, a “metaphor” which serves only to obscure the social and ethical “problems in living” we face as human beings. This paper reconsiders the conceptual bases of Szasz's assault on psychiatry and assesses recent counter-arguments of his critical interlocutors. It presents a (...)
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  42.  30
    Michael S. Moore (1975). Some Myths About 'Mental Illness'. Inquiry 18 (3):233 – 265.
    Radical psychiatrists and others assert that mental illness is a myth. The opening and closing portions of the paper deal with the impact such argument has had in law and psychiatry. The body of the paper discusses the five versions of the myth argument prevalent in radical psychiatry: (A) that there is no such thing as mental illness; (B) that those called ?mentally ill? are really as rational as everyone else, only with different aims; that the (...)
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  43.  9
    Geoff Hamilton (2008). Mythos and Mental Illness: Psychopathy, Fantasy, and Contemporary Moral Life. Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (4):231-242.
    Medical accounts of the absence of conscience are intriguing for the way they seem disposed to drift away from the ideal of scientific objectivity and towards fictional representations of the subject. I examine here several contemporary accounts of psychopathy by Robert Hare and Paul Babiak. I first note how they locate the truth about their subject in fiction, then go on to contend that their accounts ought to be thought of as a “mythos,” for they betray a telling uncertainty about (...)
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  44.  20
    Chris Megone (2007). Mental Illness, Metaphysics, Facts and Values. Philosophical Papers 36 (3):399-426.
    A number of prominent writers on the concept of mental illness/disease are committed to accounts which involve rejecting certain plausible widely held beliefs, namely: that it is part of the meaning of illness that it is bad for its possessor, so the concept of illness is essentially evaluative; that if a person has a mental illness, that is a fact about him; and that the same concept of illness is applicable in the case (...)
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  45.  17
    Kathryn E. Artnak (2008). Ethics Consultation in Dual Diagnosis of Mental Illness and Mental Retardation: Medical Decisionmaking for Community-Dwelling Persons. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (2):239-246.
    An evaluation of mental capacity is critical to a clinician's judgment about whether or not persons can make medical treatment decisions on their own behalf, and uncertainty about their ability to meaningfully participate in that process is one of the more common reasons an ethics consult is requested. The care of decisionally incapable patients—particularly those who lack advance care documents and no living relative who can speak for them—presents a quandary to healthcare personnel attempting to plan care in their (...)
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  46.  6
    Anthony Wrigley (2007). Realism and Anti-Realism About Mental Illness. Philosophical Papers 36 (3):371-397.
    In this paper I provide an account of the metaphysical foundations of mental illness in terms of a realism debate. I motivate the importance of such metaphysical analysis as a means of avoiding some intractable problems that beset discussion of the concept of mental illness. I apply aspects of the framework developed by Crispin Wright for realism debates in order to examine the ontological commitments to mental illness as a property that humans may exhibit (...)
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  47.  15
    A. Rothenberg (2006). Creativity, Self Creation, and the Treatment of Mental Illness. Medical Humanities 32 (1):14-19.
    This paper examines how an understanding of systematic findings about creative processes involved in art, literature, and science can be applied to the effective treatment of mental illness. These findings and applications are illustrated by particular reference to the work of the poet Sylvia Plath and the treatment of a patient who aspired to become a writer.
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  48.  14
    Vanessa Lux (2008). The Concept of the Gene in Psychiatric Genetics and its Consequences for the Concept of Mental Illness. Poiesis and Praxis 6 (1-2):65-77.
    At this point in time, it is hard to say which consequences for the concept of mental illness result from modern genetics. Current research projects are trying to find significant statistical correlations between the diagnosis of a disease and a gene locus or an endophenotype. Up until now, there has not been any identification of alleles or mutations causing mental illness. In the meantime, the relations between the genetic basis and the disease are given the term (...)
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  49.  11
    Timothy Murphy (1982). Differential Diagnosis and Mental Illness. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 7 (4):327-336.
    In considering the argument that Thomas Szasz advances on behalf of his claim that there is no mental illness, it becomes evident that despite his stated assumptions, moral valuations are necessarily tied up with assessment of disease. By following his remarks about differential diagnosis, it becomes evident that behavior is the occasion for differential diagnosis, that behavior determines which anatomical deviations are counted as diseases, and that Szasz's insistence on autonomy introduces his own moral assumptions into the concept (...)
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  50.  4
    Shlomo Kravetz & Ilanit Hasson-Ohayon (2012). Some Social Science Antinomies and Their Implications for the Recovery-Oriented Approach to Mental Illness and Psychiatric Rehabilitation. In Abraham Rudnick (ed.), Recovery of People with Mental Illness: Philosophical and Related Perspectives. OUP Oxford 185.
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