Search results for 'metaontology' (try it on Scholar)

59 found
Sort by:
See also:
Bibliography: Metaontology in Metaphysics
Bibliography: Metaontology, Misc in Metaphysics
  1. T. Parent (2013). Ontic Terms and Metaontology, Or: On What There Actually Is. Philosophical Studies (2):1-16.score: 18.0
    Terms such as ‘exist’, ‘actual’, etc., (hereafter, “ontic terms”) are recognized as having uses that are not ontologically committing, in addition to the usual commissive uses. (Consider, e.g., the Platonic and the neutral readings of ‘There is an even prime’.) In this paper, I identify five different noncommissive uses for ontic terms, and (by a kind of via negativa) attempt to define the commissive use, focusing on ‘actual’ as my example. The problem, however, is that the resulting definiens for the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jiri Benovsky (2011). Endurance, Perdurance, and Metaontology. SATS (2):159-177.score: 18.0
    The recent debate in metaontology gave rise to several types of (more or less classical) answers to questions about "equivalences" between metaphysical theories and to the question whether metaphysical disputes are substantive or merely verbal (i.e. various versions of realism, strong anti-realism, moderate anti-realism, or epistemicism). In this paper, I want to do two things. First, I shall have a close look at one metaphysical debate that has been the target and center of interest of many meta-metaphysicians, namely the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Julian Dodd (2013). Adventures in the Metaontology of Art: Local Descriptivism, Artefacts and Dreamcatchers. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 165 (3):1047-1068.score: 15.0
    Descriptivism in the ontology of art is the thesis that the correct ontological proposal for a kind of artwork cannot show the nascent ontological conception of such things embedded in our critical and appreciative practices to be substantially mistaken. Descriptivists believe that the kinds of revisionary art ontological proposals propounded by Nelson Goodman, Gregory Currie, Mark Sagoff, and me are methodologically misconceived. In this paper I examine the case that has been made for a local form of descriptivism in the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jonathan Schaffer (2009). The Deflationary Metaontology of Thomasson's Ordinary Objects. Philosophical Books 50 (3):142-157.score: 12.0
    In Ordinary Objects, Thomasson pursues an integrated conception of ontology and metaontology. In ontology, she defends the existence of shoes, ships, and other ordinary objects. In metaontology, she defends a deflationary view of ontological inquiry, designed to suck the air out of arguments against ordinary objects. The result is an elegant and insightful defense of a common sense worldview. I am sympathetic—in spirit if not always in letter—with Thomasson’s ontology. But I am skeptical of her deflationary metaontology.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Ross P. Cameron (2008). Truthmakers and Ontological Commitment: Or How to Deal with Complex Objects and Mathematical Ontology Without Getting Into Trouble. Philosophical Studies 140 (1):1 - 18.score: 9.0
    What are the ontological commitments of a sentence? In this paper I offer an answer from the perspective of the truthmaker theorist that contrasts with the familiar Quinean criterion. I detail some of the benefits of thinking of things this way: they include making the composition debate tractable without appealing to a neo-Carnapian metaontology, making sense of neo-Fregeanism, and dispensing with some otherwise recalcitrant necessary connections.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Matti Eklund (2013). Carnap's Metaontology. Noûs 47 (2):229-249.score: 9.0
  7. Matti Eklund, Carnapian Theses in Metaontology and Metaethics.score: 9.0
    In contemporary debates about ontology, one prominent skeptical view emphasizes the existence of different possible languages for doing ontology. Eli Hirsch, in recent years the most prominent proponent of a view like this, has defended the claim that “many familiar questions about the ontology of physical objects are merely verbal. Nothing is substantively at stake in these questions beyond the correct use of language” and the claim that “quantifier expressions can have different meaning in different languages”.1 Ted Sider, while critical (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Matti Eklund (2006). Metaontology. Philosophy Compass 1 (3):317-334.score: 9.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Øystein Linnebo (2012). Metaontological Minimalism. Philosophy Compass 7 (2):139-151.score: 9.0
    Can there be objects that are ‘thin’ in the sense that very little is required for their existence? A number of philosophers have thought so. For instance, many Fregeans believe it suffices for the existence of directions that there be lines standing in the relation of parallelism; other philosophers believe it suffices for a mathematical theory to have a model that the theory be coherent. This article explains the appeal of thin objects, discusses the three most important strategies for articulating (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Karen Bennett (2009). Composition, Colocation, and Metaontology. In David John Chalmers, David Manley & Ryan Wasserman (eds.), Metametaphysics: New Essays on the Foundations of Ontology. Oxford University Press.score: 9.0
    The paper is an extended discussion of what I call the ‘dismissive attitude’ towards metaphysical questions. It has three parts. In the first part, I distinguish three quite different versions of dismissivism. I also argue that there is little reason to think that any of these positions is correct about the discipline of metaphysics as a whole; it is entirely possible that some metaphysical disputes should be dismissed and others should not be. Doing metametaphysics properly requires doing metaphysics first. I (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Matthew McGrath (2008). Conciliatory Metaontology and the Vindication of Common Sense. Noûs 42 (3):482-508.score: 9.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Eli Hirsch (2010). Quantifier Variance and Realism: Essays in Metaontology. Oxford University Press.score: 9.0
    A sense of unity -- Basic objects : a reply to Xu -- Objectivity without objects -- The vagueness of identity -- Quantifier variance and realism -- Against revisionary ontology -- Comments on Theodore Sider's four dimensionalism -- Sosa's existential relativism -- Physical-object ontology, verbal disputes, and common sense -- Ontological arguments : interpretive charity and quantifier variance -- Language, ontology, and structure -- Ontology and alternative languages.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Tora Koyama (2010). A Metaontology-Based Objection to Modal Realism. Kagaku Tetsugaku 43 (1):79-90.score: 9.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Jiri Benovsky (2013). Primitiveness, Metaontology, and Explanatory Power. Dialogue 52 (2):341-358.score: 9.0
    Metaphysical theories heavily rely on the use of primitives to which they typically appeal. I will start by examining and evaluating some traditional well-known theories and I will discuss the role of primitives in metaphysical theories in general. I will then turn to a discussion of claims of between theories that, I think, depend on equivalences of primitives, and I will explore the nature of primitives. I will then claim that almost all explanatory power of metaphysical theories comes from their (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Matti Eklund (2011). Book Review. Quantifier Variance and Realism: Essays in Metaontology. Eli Hirsch. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Review.score: 9.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. D. Liebesman (2013). Quantifier Variance and Realism: Essays in Metaontology. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 122 (2):310-314.score: 9.0
  17. Thorben Petersen (2012). Explicating Eternalism A Study in Metaontology. Philosophia Naturalis 49 (1):137-161.score: 9.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Pawel Garbacz & Robert Trypuz (2013). A Metaontology for Applied Ontology. Applied Ontology 8 (1):1-30.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. J. T. M. Miller (2013). Eli Hirsch , Quantifier Variance and Realism: Essays in Metaontology . Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 33 (6):464-467.score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Eve Kitsik (2012). Eli Hirsch: Quantifier Variance and Realism: Essays in Metaontology. Trees and Tables Crackpot Ontology: Jury Still Out. Studia Philosophica Estonica 5 (1).score: 9.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (2009). The Metaontology of Abstraction. In David John Chalmers, David Manley & Ryan Wasserman (eds.), Metametaphysics: New Essays on the Foundations of Ontology. Oxford University Press.score: 9.0
  22. Marcus Rossberg, On the Logic of Quantifier Variance.score: 7.0
    Eli Hirsch recently suggested the metaontological doctrine of so-called "quantifier variance", according to which ontological disputes—e.g. concerning the question whether arbitrary, possibly scattered, mereological fusions exist, in the sense that these are recognised as objects proper in our ontology—can be defused as insubstantial. His proposal is that the meaning of the quanti er `there exists' varies in such debates: according to one opponent in this dispute, some existential statement claiming the existence of, e.g., a scattered object is true, according to (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Chris Daly & David Liggins, Hirsch's Charity Argument Against Revisionary Ontology.score: 7.0
    Eli Hirsch argues that metaphysical debates about material composition are merely verbal and the ontologists who take part in them are talking past each other. According to Hirsch, 'there is no uniquely best ontological language with which to describe the world', a doctrine he calls 'quantifier variance'. Hirsch argues that if we combine quantifier variance with an appeal to interpretative charity, we reach the conclusion that contemporary debates about composition are merely verbal. Much contemporary metaontological discussion has concerned Hirsch’s doctrine (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Nurbay Irmak (2013). The Privilege of the Physical and the Status of Ontological Debates. Philosophical Studies 166 (1 Supplement):1-18.score: 7.0
    Theodore Sider in his latest book provides a defense of the substantivity of the first-order ontological debates against recent deflationary attacks. He articulates and defends several realist theses: (a) nature has an objective structure, (b) there is an objectively privileged language to describe the structure, and (c) ontological debates are substantive. Sider’s defense of metaontological realism, (c), crucially depends on his realism about fundamental languages, (b). I argue that (b) is wrong. As a result, Sider’s metaontological realism fails to establish (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. David Ludwig (2013). Disagreement in Scientific Ontologies. Journal for General Philosophy of Science (1):1-13.score: 7.0
    The aim of this article is to discuss the nature of disagreement in scientific ontologies in the light of case studies from biology and cognitive science. I argue that disagreements in scientific ontologies are usually not about purely factual issues but involve both verbal and normative aspects. Furthermore, I try to show that this partly non-factual character of disagreement in scientific ontologies does not lead to a radical deflationism but is compatible with a “normative ontological realism.” Finally, I argue that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Tuomas E. Tahko (2008). The Necessity of Metaphysics. Dissertation, Durham Universityscore: 6.0
    The purpose of this thesis is to demonstrate that metaphysics is a necessary discipline -- necessary in the sense that all areas of philosophy, all areas of science, and in fact any type of rational activity at all would be impossible without a metaphysical background or metaphysical presuppositions. Because of the extremely strong nature of this claim, it is not possible to put forward a very simple argument, although I will attempt to construct one. A crucial issue here is what (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Tuomas E. Tahko (2012). In Defence of Aristotelian Metaphysics. In , Contemporary Aristotelian Metaphysics. Cambridge University Press. 26-43.score: 6.0
    When I say that my conception of metaphysics is Aristotelian, or neo-Aristotelian, this may have more to do with Aristotle’s philosophical methodology than his metaphysics, but, as I see it, the core of this Aristotelian conception of metaphysics is the idea that metaphysics is the first philosophy . In what follows I will attempt to clarify what this conception of metaphysics amounts to in the context of some recent discussion on the methodology of metaphysics (e.g. Chalmers et al . (2009), (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Matthew Davidson & Tony Roy (forthcoming). New Directions in Metaphysics. In Continuum Companion to Metaphysics. Continuum.score: 6.0
    In this paper we set out a Quinean approach to metaphysics. We evaluate Eli Hirsch's and Amie Thomasson's deflationary metaphysics and set out our metametaphysical framework.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Amie L. Thomasson (2009). The Easy Approach to Ontology. Axiomathes 19 (1):1-15.score: 6.0
    This paper defends the view that ontological questions (properly understood) are easy—too easy, in fact, to be subjects of substantive and distinctively philosophical debates. They are easy, roughly, in the sense that they may be resolved straightforwardly—generally by a combination of conceptual and empirical enquiries. After briefly outlining the view and some of its virtues, I turn to examine two central lines of objection. The first is that this ‘easy’ approach is itself committed to substantive ontological views, including an implausibly (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Justin Clarke-Doane, Platonic Semantics.score: 6.0
    If anything is taken for granted in contemporary metaphysics, it is that platonism with respect to a discourse of metaphysical interest, such as fictional or mathematical discourse, affords a better account of the semantic appearances than nominalism, other things being equal. This belief is often motivated by the intuitively stronger one that the platonist can take the semantic appearances “at face-value” while the nominalist must resort to apparently ad hoc and technically problematic machinery in order to explain those appearances away. (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Alan Sidelle (2002). Is There a True Metaphysics of Material Objects? Philosophical Issues 12 (1):118-145.score: 6.0
    I argue (1) that metaphysical views of material objects should be understood as 'packages', rather than individual claims, where the other parts of the package include how the theory addresses 'recalcitant data' (such as - the denier of artifacts has to account, somehow, for the seeming truth of 'there are three pencils on my table'), and (2) that when the packages meet certain general desiderata - which all of the currently competing views *can* meet - there is nothing in the (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Alan Sidelle (2007). The Method of Verbal Dispute. Philosophical Topics 35 (1/2):83-113.score: 6.0
    The idea that disputes which are heated, and apparently important, may nonetheless be 'merely verbal' or 'just semantic' is surely no stranger to any philosopher. I urge that many disputes, both in and out of philosophy, are indeed plausibly considered verbal, and that it would repay us to more frequently consider whether they are so or not. Asking this question is what I call ‘The Method of Verbal Dispute’. Neither the notion nor the method of verbal dispute is new. What (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jessica M. Wilson (forthcoming). Three Dogmas of Metaphysical Methodology. In Matthew Haug (ed.), New Essays on Philosophical Methodology. Routledge.score: 6.0
    In what does philosophical progress consist? 'Vertical' progress corresponds to development within a specific paradigm/framework for theorizing (of the sort associated, revolutions aside, with science); 'horizontal' progress corresponds to the identification and cultivation of diverse paradigms (of the sort associated, conservativism aside, with art and pure mathematics). Philosophical progress seems to involve both horizontal and vertical dimensions, in a way that is somewhat puzzling: philosophers work in a number of competing frameworks (like artists or mathematicians), while typically maintaining that only (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. T. Parent, An Objection to the Laplacean Chalmers.score: 6.0
    I discuss David Chalmers’ “scrutability thesis,” roughly that a Laplacean intellect could know every truth about the universe from a “compact class” of basic truths. It is argued that despite Chalmers’ remarks to the contrary, the thesis is problematic owing to quantum indeterminacy. Chalmers attempts to “frontload” various principles into the compact class to help out. But though frontloading may succeed in principle, Chalmers does not frontload enough to avoid the problem.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. David Manley (2009). Introduction : A Guided Tour of Metametaphysics. In David John Chalmers, David Manley & Ryan Wasserman (eds.), Metametaphysics: New Essays on the Foundations of Ontology. Oxford University Press.score: 6.0
    Metaphysics is concerned with the foundations of reality. It asks questions about the nature of the world, such as: Aside from concrete objects, are there also abstract objects like numbers and properties? Does every event have a cause? What is the nature of possibility and necessity? When do several things make up a single bigger thing? Do the past and future exist? And so on. -/- Metametaphysics is concerned with the foundations of metaphysics. It asks: Do the questions of metaphysics (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Thomas Donaldson (forthcoming). Reading the Book of the World. Philosophical Studies:1-27.score: 6.0
    In Writing the Book of the World, Ted Sider argues that David Lewis’s distinction between those predicates which are ‘perfectly natural’ and those which are not can be extended so that it applies to words of all semantic types. Just as there are perfectly natural predicates, there may be perfectly natural connectives, operators, singular terms and so on. According to Sider, one of our goals as metaphysicians should be to identify the perfectly natural words. Sider claims that there is a (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Jiri Benovsky (2014). Tropes or Universals: How (Not) to Make One's Choice. Metaphilosophy 45 (1):69-86.score: 6.0
    This article discusses a familiar version of trope theory as opposed to a familiar version of the theory of universals, examining how these two rivals address the problem of “attribute agreement”—a problem that has been at the root of the very reason for developing these theories in the first place. The article shows that there is not much of a difference between the ways these two theories handle the problem, and in a more general way it argues that there is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. David Ludwig (2013). Hysteria, Race, Phlogiston. A Model of Ontological Elimination in the Human Sciences. Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences:68-77.score: 6.0
  39. Nurbay Irmak (2014). Purpose-Relativity and Ontology. Dissertation, University of Miamiscore: 6.0
  40. David J. Chalmers (2009). Ontological Anti-Realism. In David John Chalmers, David Manley & Ryan Wasserman (eds.), Metametaphysics: New Essays on the Foundations of Ontology. Oxford University Press.score: 3.0
    The basic question of ontology is “What exists?”. The basic question of metaontology is: are there objective answers to the basic question of ontology? Here ontological realists say yes, and ontological anti-realists say no. (Compare: The basic question of ethics is “What is right?”. The basic question of metaethics is: are there objective answers to the basic question of ethics? Here moral realists say yes, and moral anti-realists say no.) For example, the ontologist may ask: Do numbers exist? The (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Daniel Z. Korman (2010). Strange Kinds, Familiar Kinds, and the Charge of Arbitrariness. Oxford Studies in Metaphysics:119-144.score: 3.0
    Particularists in material-object metaphysics hold that our intuitive judgments about which kinds of things there are and are not are largely correct. One common argument against particularism is the argument from arbitrariness, which turns on the claim that there is no ontologically significant difference between certain of the familiar kinds that we intuitively judge to exist (snowballs, islands, statues, solar systems) and certain of the strange kinds that we intuitively judge not to exist (snowdiscalls, incars, gollyswoggles, the fusion of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. David Liebesman & Matti Eklund (2007). Sider on Existence. Noûs 41 (3):519–528.score: 3.0
    In (2001), (2003), and elsewhere, Ted Sider presents two arguments concerning the existential quantifier which are justly central to the recent discussion of metaontology. What we will call Sider's indeterminacy argument is an attempted reductio of the suggestion that the existential quantifier might be semantically indeterminate. What we will call Sider's naturalness argument is an argument for the claim that the semantic value of the existential quantifier is the most eligible existence-like meaning there is, à la David Lewis' eligibility (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Stephan Blatti & Sandra Lapointe (eds.) (forthcoming). Ontology After Carnap. Oxford University Press.score: 3.0
    Analytic philosophy is once again in a methodological frame of mind. Nowhere is this more evident than in metaphysics, whose practitioners and historians are actively reflecting on the nature of ontological questions, the status of their answers, and the relevance of contributions both from other areas within philosophy (e.g., philosophical logic, semantics) and beyond (notably, the natural sciences). Such reflections are hardly new: the debate between Willard van Orman Quine and Rudolf Carnap about how to understand and resolve ontological questions (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Juan José Lara Peñaranda (2013). Ontology: Minimalism and Truth-Conditions. Philosophical Studies 162 (3):683-696.score: 3.0
    In this paper, I develop a criticism to a method for metaontology, namely, the idea that a discourse’s or theory’s ontological commitments can be read off its sentences’ truth-conditions. Firstly, I will put forward this idea’s basis and, secondly, I will present the way Quine subscribed to it (not actually for hermeneutical or historic interest, but as a way of exposing the idea). However, I distinguish between two readings of Quine’s famous ontological criterion, and I center the focus on (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. David Manley (2009). When Best Theories Go Bad. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 78 (2):392-405.score: 3.0
    It is common for contemporary metaphysical realists to adopt Quine’s criterion of ontological commitment while at the same time repudiating his ontological pragmatism. Drawing heavily from the work of others--especially Joseph Melia and Stephen Yablo--I will argue that the resulting approach to metaontology is unstable. In particular, if we are metaphysical realists, we need not accept ontological commitment to whatever is quantified over by our best first-order theories.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Bob Hale (2013). Review of G. Duke: Dummett on Abstract Objects. [REVIEW] Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 2 (2).score: 3.0
    Review of G. Duke: Dummett onObjects References G. Frege. Über Sinn und Bedeutung. Zeitschrift für Philosophie und philosophische Kritik, 100, 25–50, 1892. Translated in G.Frege, Collected Papers on Mathematics, Logic and Philosophy, edited by B. McGuinness. Oxford, Basil Blackwell, 157–77. G. Frege. Die Grundlagen der Arithmetik. Breslau, Verlag von W. Koebner, 1884. Translated by J.L. Austin as The Foundations of Arithmetic, Oxford, Basil Blackwell, second revised edition 1953. M. Dummett. Frege: Philosophy of Language. London, Duckworth, 1973. M. Dummett. Frege: Philosophy (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Andrej Jandrić (2014). “The King of France is Bald” Reconsidered: A Case Against Yablo. Philosophical Studies 169 (2):173-181.score: 3.0
    Stephen Yablo has argued for metaontological antirealism: he believes that the sentences claiming or denying the existence of numbers (or other abstract entities or mereological sums) are inapt for truth valuation, because the reference failure of a numerical singular term (or a singular term for an abstract entity or a mereological sum) would not produce a truth value gap in any sentence containing that term. At the same time, Yablo believes that nothing similar applies to singular terms that aim to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Ross P. Cameron (2010). How to Have a Radically Minimal Ontology. Philosophical Studies 151 (2):249 - 264.score: 1.0
    In this paper I further elucidate and defend a metaontological position that allows you to have a minimal ontology without embracing an error-theory of ordinary talk. On this view 'there are Fs' can be strictly and literally true without bringing an ontological commitment to Fs. Instead of a sentence S committing you to the things that must be amongst the values of the variables if it is true, I argue that S commits you to the things that must exist as (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Gerald Marsh (2010). Is the Hirsch-Sider Dispute Merely Verbal? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (3):459-469.score: 1.0
    There is currently debate between deflationists and anti-deflationists about the ontology of persisting objects. Some deflationists think that disputes between, for example, four-dimensionalists (e.g. Ted Sider and David Lewis) and quasi-nihilists (e.g. Peter Van Inwagen and Trenton Merricks) are merely verbal disputes. Anti-deflationists deny this. Eli Hirsch is a deflationist who maintains that many ontological disputes are merely verbal. Theodore Sider maintains that the disputes are not merely verbal. Hirsch and Sider are thus engaged in a metaontological dispute. In this (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 59