Search results for 'migration' (try it on Scholar)

755 found
Order:
  1.  3
    Jed Horner (forthcoming). From Exceptional to Liminal Subjects: Reconciling Tensions in the Politics of Tuberculosis and Migration. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-9.
    Controlling the movement of potentially infectious bodies has been central to Australian immigration law. Nowhere is this more evident than in relation to tuberculosis, which is named as a ground for refusal of a visa in the Australian context. In this paper, I critically examine the “will to knowledge” that this gives rise to. Drawing on a critical analysis of texts, including interviews with migrants diagnosed with TB and healthcare professionals engaged in their care, I argue that this focus on (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2.  51
    Joseph H. Carens (1992). Migration and Morality: A Liberal Egalitarian Perspective. In Brian Barry & Robert E. Goodin (eds.), Free Movement: Ethical Issues in the Transnational Migration of People and of Money. University of Pennsylvania Press 25-47.
  3.  14
    Iseult Honohan (2014). Domination and Migration: An Alternative Approach to the Legitimacy of Migration Controls. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 17 (1):31-48.
    Freedom as non-domination provides a distinctive criterion for assessing the justifiability of migration controls, different from both freedom of movement and autonomy. Migration controls are dominating insofar as they threaten to coerce potential migrants. Both the general right of states to control migration, and the wide range of discretionary procedures prevalent in migration controls, render outsiders vulnerable to arbitrary power. While the extent and intensity of domination varies, it is sufficient under contemporary conditions of globalization to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  4. Christine Straehle (2013). Conditions of Care: Migration, Vulnerability, and Individual Autonomy. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (2):122-140.
    International migration has a female face in the beginning of the twenty-first century; since at least 1990, a total of 49 percent of international migrants have been women (UN 2008).1 Many women relocate in pursuit of goals that they can’t realize in their countries of origin, and many women move on their own to developed countries as caregivers to the very old or the very young, as nurses to attend to the sick in hospitals, and as domestic workers.2 How (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  18
    Matthew J. Lister (2014). Justice and Temporary Labor Migration. Georgetown Immigration Law Review 29:95.
    Temporary labor migration programs have been among the most controversial topics in discussions of immigration reform. They have been opposed by many, perhaps most, academics writing on immigration, by immigration reform activists, and by organized labor. This opposition has not been without some good reasons, as many historical temporary labor migration programs have led to significant injustice and abuse. However, in this paper I argue that a well-crafted temporary labor migration program is both compatible with liberal principles (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  33
    P. T. Lenard & C. Straehle (2012). Temporary Labour Migration, Global Redistribution, and Democratic Justice. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 (2):206-230.
    Calls to expand temporary work programmes come from two directions. First, as global justice advocates observe, every year thousands of poor migrants cross borders in search of better opportunities, often in the form of improved employment opportunities. As a result, international organizations now lobby in favour of expanding ‘guest-work’ opportunities, that is, opportunities for citizens of poorer countries to migrate temporarily to wealthier countries to fill labour shortages. Second, temporary work programmes permit domestic governments to respond to two internal, contradictory (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  7. Lukas Kaelin (2011). A Question of Justice: Assessing Nurse Migration From a Philosophical Perspective. Developing World Bioethics 11 (1):30-39.
    The intensified nurse migration leads to severe problems for the health care systems in many developing countries. Using the Philippines as an example, this paper will address the question of global nurse migration from a philosophical perspective. John Rawls' liberal and Michael Walzer's communitarian theory of justice will be examined in view of the ethical problem of nurse migration. In line with Rawls' A Theory of Justice, nurse migration undermines the ability of the people in developing (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  44
    Speranta Dumitru (2014). From 'Brain Drain' to 'Care Drain': Women's Labor Migration and Methodological Sexism. Women's Studies International Forum 47:203-212.
    The metaphor of “care drain” has been created as a womanly parallel to the “brain drain” idea. Just as “brain drain” suggests that the skilled migrants are an economic loss for the sending country, “care drain” describes the migrant women hired as care workers as a loss of care for their children left behind. This paper criticizes the construction of migrant women as “care drain” for three reasons: 1) it is built on sexist stereotypes, 2) it misrepresents and devalues care (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  16
    Speranta Dumitru (2013). Des visas, pas de l'aide! de la migration comme substitut de l'aide au développement. Éthique Publique. Revue Internationale D’Éthique Sociétale Et Gouvernementale 15 (2):77-98.
    If migration is more effective than aid for fighting poverty, should it replace aid? Not always. This article proposes a criterion that may be used to distinguish between cases where migration should serve as a substitute for development assistance and cases where it should supplement such aid. According to this criterion, development agendas are poverty-efficient when they lift the largest possible number of people out of poverty. Therefore, to be poverty-efficient, development agendas should always aim to complement aid (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  31
    Christine Straehle (2012). Territoire, migration et l'état légitime. Philosophiques 39 (2):393.
    Qui peut revendiquer un territoire, sur quelles bases et avec quelles conséquences sont des questions qui font l’objet de débats en philosophie politique contemporaine. En réponse, j’adopte « la théorie de l’État légitime » proposée par Stilz. Selon Wellman, une conséquence des revendications territoriales serait le droit de l’État de refuser la migration sur son territoire. Je juxtapose son propos de l’État légitime avec celui de Stilz et soutiens que, si l’on accepte la fondation de l’État légitime sur la (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  34
    Speranta Dumitru (2012). Migration and Equality: Should Citizenship Levy Be a Tax or a Fine? Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 7 (2):34-49.
    It is often argued that development aid can and should compensate the restrictions on migration. Such compensation, Shachar has recently argued, should be levied as a tax on citizenship to further the global equality of opportunity. Since citizenship is essentially a ‘birthright lottery’, that is, a way of legalizing privileges obtained by birth, it would be fair to compensate the resulting gap in opportunities available to children born in rich versus poor countries by a ‘birthright privilege levy’. This article (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  3
    Alex Sager (2012). Mobility (Migration). In Ruth Chadwick (ed.), Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics. 128-36.
    This article sets out the principal ethical considerations for a just immigration policy. Advocates of a more liberal immigration regime have called for open borders or at least a more relaxed immigration policy. They argue that it is incompatible with basic rights such as freedom of movement, association, and opportunity. Furthermore, the use of coercion to prevent needy people from seeking opportunities abroad sits uneasily in a world of massive inequalities divided along geographical and state lines, as well as the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  11
    Iseult Honohan & Marit Hovdal-Moan (2014). Introduction: Domination, Migration and Non-Citizens. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 17 (1):1-9.
    In Europe and other regions of the world public debate concerning how many immigrants should be admitted, which rights those admitted should have, and which conditions can be required for access to citizenship is intense and enduring, and these have increasingly become central electoral issues. On the one hand, the harsh treatment of migrants is often a matter of public criticism; on the other hand, states are concerned about problems of welfare, security and social unrest that they have come to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  8
    Tisha M. Rajendra (2015). The Rational Agent or the Relational Agent: Moving From Freedom to Justice in Migration Systems Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (2):355-369.
    Most accounts of immigration ethics implicitly rely upon neoclassical migration theory, which understands migration as the result of poverty and unemployment in sending countries. This paper argues that neoclassical migration theory assumes an account of the human person as solely an autonomous rational agent which then leads to ethics of migration which overemphasize freedom and self-determination. This tendency to assume that migration works as neoclassical migration theory describes is shared by political philosophers, such as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  10
    Marko Ahteensuu & Susanna Lehvävirta (2014). Assisted Migration, Risks and Scientific Uncertainty, and Ethics: A Comment on Albrecht Et Al.'S Review Paper. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (3):471-477.
    In response to Albrecht et al.’s (J Agric Environ Ethics 26(4):827–845, 2013) discussion on the ethics of assisted migration, we emphasize the issues of risk and scientific uncertainty as an inextricable part of a comprehensive ethical evaluation. Insisting on a separation of risk and ethical considerations, although arguably common in many policy contexts, is at best misguided and at worst damaging.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  1
    Clare Palmer & Brendon M. H. Larson (2014). Should We Move the Whitebark Pine? Assisted Migration, Ethics and Global Environmental Change. Environmental Values 23 (6):641-662.
    Some species face extinction if they are unable to keep pace with climate change. Yet proposals to assist threatened species’ poleward or uphill migration (‘assisted migration’) have caused significant controversy among conservationists, not least because assisted migration seems to threaten some values, even as it protects others. To date, however, analysis of ethical and value questions about assisted migration has largely remained abstract, removed from the ultimately pragmatic decision about whether or not to move a particular (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  10
    Zinovijus Ciupijus (2010). Ethical Pitfalls of Temporary Labour Migration: A Critical Review of Issues. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 97 (S1):9-18.
    The article discusses a particularly contentious aspect of labour mobility—state sanctioned and controlled temporary labour migration. In contrast to forced migration, which always has had a recognizable ethical dimension in terms of the universal right to asylum, temporary labour migration has tended to be viewed as an exclusively economic and thus ethically neutral phenomenon. This article presents a diametrically opposite approach to temporary labour migration: it is argued that this form of labour mobility creates a plethora (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  2
    Sylvie Bredeloup (2008). L'aventurier, une figure de la migration africaine. Cahiers Internationaux de Sociologie 125 (2):281.
    Loin de constituer une figure nouvelle dans l’histoire de la migration africaine, l’aventurier se pose en figure récurrente et connaît un regain de visibilité, dès lors que les politiques migratoires se durcissent un peu partout sur la planète et que la libre circulation des hommes est rendue de plus en plus problématique. À l’heure où les principes du salariat et de la fonction publique sont sérieusement contestés sur le continent africain, des itinéraires d’accumulation inédits prospèrent, tout comme de nouveaux (...)
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  9
    Catherine Dauvergne (1999). Confronting Chaos: Migration Law Responds to Images of Disorder. Res Publica 5 (1):21-43.
    This paper argues that in liberal nations migration law orders chaotic images and is an important site for the construction of national identities. Empirical illustrations are drawn primarily from Australia, but the thesis is applicable to all immigrant nations and also provides insights for the “Old World”. The argument proceeds by first examining the role of migration laws in liberal democratic societies. Building on this framework, it then looks at how Australian migration law responds to images of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  63
    Speranta Dumitru (2012). Migration qualifiée, développement et égalité des chances. Une critique de la taxe Bhagwati. Revue de Philosophie Économique 13 (2):63.
    Au regard du vieux débat sur la « fuite des cerveaux », le devoir de promouvoir le développement des pays pauvres semblait incompatible avec le droit humain à l’émigration. A l’encontre de cette idée, Jagdish Bhagwati a proposé dans les années 70 une mesure qui permettait au personnel qualifié de quitter les pays pauvres, tout en taxant leur revenu au bénéfice de leurs pays d’origine. Cet article discute (et rejette) trois justifications possibles de la taxe Bhagwati. Il conclut qu’une telle (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  35
    Speranta Dumitru (2012). Skilled Migration: Who Should Pay for What? Diversities 14 (1):8-23.
    Brain drain critiques and human rights advocates have conflicting views on emigration. From a brain drain perspective, the emigration harms a country when emigrants are skilled and the source country is poor. From the human rights perspective, the right "to leave any country, including one's own" is a fundamental right, protected for all, whatever their skills. Is the concern with poverty and social justice at odds with the right to emigrate? At the beginning of the l970s, the economist Jagdish Bhagwati (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Sarah Fine (forthcoming). Distributive Justice and Migration. In Serena Olsaretti (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Distributive Justice. Oxford University Press
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  3
    Joseph H. Carens (2009). Fear Vs. Fairness: Migration, Citizenship and the Transformation of Political Community. In Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen, Nils Holtug & Sune Laegaard (eds.), Nationalism and Multiculturalism in a World of Immigration. Palgrave Macmillan 151-173.
  24.  3
    Maria Luisa Cattaneo & Sabina Dal Verme (2009). Conflits familiaux autour de la maternité dans la migration. Dialogue 3:79-89.
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  5
    Asher Colombo & Tiziana Caponio (2011). Migration, Marital Separation and Gender Roles: The Case of Female Domestic Workers in Italy. Polis 25 (3):419-450.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  3
    Elena Rainero & Jim C. Norman (2013). Late Endosomal and Lysosomal Trafficking During Integrin‐Mediated Cell Migration and Invasion. Bioessays 35 (6):523-532.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  1
    Nicholas De Genova (2010). The Queer Politics of Migration: Reflections on “Illegality” and Incorrigibility. Studies in Social Justice 4 (2):101-126.
    The most resounding expression of the truly unprecedented mobilizations of migrants throughout the United States in 2006 was a mass proclamation of collective defiance: ¡Aquí Estamos, y No Nos Vamos! [Here we are, and we're not leaving!]. This same slogan was commonly accompanied by a still more forcefully incorrigible rejoinder: ¡Y Si Nos Sacan, Nos Regresamos! [... and if they throw us out, we'll come right back!]. It is quite striking and, as this essay contends, not merely provocative but genuinely (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  1
    Myria Fabregat (2009). Défauts de transmission symbolique dans la migration. Dialogue 3:29-42.
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  1
    Isam Idris (2009). Cultures, migration et sociétés : destin des loyautés familiales et culturelles chez les enfants de migrants. Dialogue 2:131-140.
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Patti T. Lenard & Christine Straehle (2010). Temporary Labour Migration: Exploitation, Tool of Development, or Both? Journal of International Political Theory 29 (4):283-294.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  53
    Alex Sager (forthcoming). Methodological Nationalism, Migration and Political Theory. Political Studies:xx-yy.
    The political theory of migration has largely occurred within a paradigm of methodological nationalism and this has led to the neglect of morally salient agents and causes. This article draws on research from the social sciences on the transnationalism, globalization and migration systems theory to show how methodological nationalist assumptions have affected the views of political theorists on membership, culture and distributive justice. In particular, it is contended that methodological nationalism has prevented political theorists of migration from (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  44
    Sarah Fine (2014). Non-Domination and the Ethics of Migration. In Iseult Honohan & Marit Hovdal-Moan (eds.), Domination, Migration and Non-Citizens. Routledge 10-30.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  33.  54
    José Jorge Mendoza (2015). Does Cosmopolitan Justice Ever Require Restrictions on Migration? Public Affairs Quarterly 29 (2):175-186.
    In this essay, I argue that even when they appear to help, restrictions on migration are usually only an impediment, not an aid, to cosmopolitan justice. Even though some egalitarian cosmopolitans are well intentioned in their support of migration restrictions, I argue that migration restrictions are (i) not truly cosmopolitan and (ii) will not have the kinds of consequences they expect. My argument in defense of this claim begins, in section 1, by outlining a defense of (...) restrictions based on egalitarian cosmopolitan grounds. Then in sections two and three, I reply to the harms this position associates with open borders and provide some reasons as to why restrictions on migration are incompatible with cosmopolitan justice. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  9
    Doogab Yi (2008). Cancer, Viruses, and Mass Migration: Paul Berg's Venture Into Eukaryotic Biology and the Advent of Recombinant DNA Research and Technology, 1967-1980. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 41 (4):589 - 636.
    The existing literature on the development of recombinant DNA technology and genetic engineering tends to focus on Stanley Cohen and Herbert Boyer's recombinant DNA cloning technology and its commercialization starting in the mid-1970s. Historians of science, however, have pointedly noted that experimental procedures for making recombinant DNA molecules were initially developed by Stanford biochemist Paul Berg and his colleagues, Peter Lobban and A. Dale Kaiser in the early 1970s. This paper, recognizing the uneasy disjuncture between scientific authorship and legal (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  35.  26
    Dean Yang (2008). Risk, Migration, and Rural Financial Markets: Evidence From Earthquakes in El Salvador. Social Research: An International Quarterly 75 (3):955-992.
    This study examines the circumstances under which rural households can use outmigration to cope with negative shocks. In theory, when financial markets are imperfect and when migration involves a fixed cost, the impact of economic shocks on migration can depend on the extent to which shocks are common across households. When shocks are idiosyncratic, shocks are likely to raise migration. But aggregate shocks may make it more difficult to pay fixed migration costs, and so can actually (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  10
    Alex Sager (2012). Implications of Migration Theory for Distributive Justice. Global Justice: Theory, Practice, Rhetoric 5.
    This paper explores the implications of empirical theories of migration for normative accounts of migration and distributive justice. It examines neo-classical economics, world-systems theory, dual labor market theory, and feminist approaches to migration and contends that neo-classical economic theory in isolation provides an inadequate understanding of migration. Other theories provide a fuller account of how national and global economic, political, and social institutions cause and shape migration flows by actively affecting people's opportunity sets in source (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  37.  22
    R. Boyd & P. J. Richerson, Voting with Your Feet: Payoff Biased Migration and the Evolution of Group Beneficial Behavior.
    Human migration is nonrandom. In small scale societies of the past, and in the modern world, people tend to move to wealthier, safer, and more just societies from poorer, more violent, less just societies. If immigrants are assimilated, such nonrandom migration can increase the occurrence of culturally transmitted beliefs, values, and institutions that cause societies to be attractive to immigrants. Here we describe and analyze a simple model of this process. This model suggests that long run outcomes depend (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  38.  15
    Jeremy Snyder (2009). Is Health Worker Migration a Case of Poaching? American Journal of Bioethics 9 (3):3-7.
    Many nations in the developing world invest scarce funding into training health workers. When these workers migrate to richer countries, particularly when this migration occurs before the source community can recoup the costs of training, the destination community realizes a net gain in resources by obtaining the workers' skills without having to pay for their training. This effect of health worker migration has frequently been condemned as 'poaching' or a case of theft. I assess the charge that the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  39.  13
    Lisa A. Eckenwiler (2009). Care Worker Migration and Transnational Justice. Public Health Ethics 2 (2):171-183.
    Department of Philosophy and Center for Health Policy, Research and Ethics, George Mason University, 4400 University Avenue, MS 2D7, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA. Tel.: +1 703 993 1724; Fax: +1 5703 993 1555; Email: leckenwi{at}gmu.edu ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> . Abstract Here I consider the migration of health workers and propose a conception of transnational justice that can best address the concerns it raises, including the perpetuation of global health inequities. My focus will (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  40.  13
    Jeremy Snyder (2009). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Is Health Worker Migration a Case of Poaching?”. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (3):W1 – W2.
    I would like to thank all of the respondents to my article both for their expansions on the theme of health worker migration and for their criticisms of my argument against the use of the term ’poaching’ in the context of international health worker migration. In this response, I will clarify my argument in light of the worries raised primarily by Tache and Schillinger and Ari Zivotofsky and Naomi Zivotofsky.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  41.  13
    Lisa Eckenwiler, Christine Straehle & Ryoa Chung (2012). Global Solidarity, Migration and Global Health Inequity. Bioethics 26 (7):382-390.
    The grounds for global solidarity have been theorized and conceptualized in recent years, and many have argued that we need a global concept of solidarity. But the question remains: what can motivate efforts of the international community and nation-states? Our focus is the grounding of solidarity with respect to global inequities in health. We explore what considerations could motivate acts of global solidarity in the specific context of health migration, and sketch briefly what form this kind of solidarity could (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  42.  4
    Patti Tamara Lenard (2012). Why Temporary Labour Migration is Not a Satisfactory Alternative to Permanent Migration. Journal of International Political Theory 8 (1-2):172-183.
    Temporary labour migration programs are often proposed as a way to provide the benefits of migration in general, while mitigating the allegedly problematic effects of permanent migration. Here I propose that the arguments deployed in favour of temporary labour migration over permanent migration are flawed, normatively, and that empirically temporary labour migration programs produce effects in receiving states that are even worse than those produced by permanent migration. As a result, I shall argue (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  43.  2
    Adrian Little & Terry Macdonald (2015). Introduction to Special Issue: Real-World Justice and International Migration. European Journal of Political Theory 14 (4):381-390.
    In this article, we introduce the project developed in this special issue: a search for principles of ‘real-world’ justice in international migration that can offer practical guidance on real political problems of migration governance. We begin by highlighting two sources of divergence between the principal topics of theoretical controversy within literatures on migration justice and the animating sources of political controversy within real national and international publics. These arise first in the framing of the problems on which (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Henrik Thorén & Johannes Persson, Philosophy of Interdisciplinarity: Problem‐Feeding, Conceptual Drift, and Methodological Migration.
    One way to bring order into the often muddled picture we have of interdisciplinarity is to sort interdisciplinary projects or aims by the kinds of element that interact in encounters between researchers of the two or more disciplines involved. This is not the usual approach. Since the early seventies and the publication of Erich Jantsch , at least, the level of integration of the disciplines has been the primary focus. For instance, the level of integration is often treated as the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  45.  5
    Filomeno Aguilar (2009). Labour Migration and Ties of Relatedness: Diasporic Houses and Investments in Memory in a Rural Philippine Village. Thesis Eleven 98 (1):88-114.
    Putting migrant remittances into house construction and rebuilding is generally seen as either conspicuous consumption or productive investment, but in both cases the perspective is economistic. This article argues that only when the cultural dimension of economic action is understood will it be possible to comprehend migrant spending on houses. Specifically, this article seeks to understand why, in the case of the rural Tagalog village in this study, located in upland Batangas Province in the Philippines, overseas labour migrants build houses (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  46.  1
    José Sánchez Méndez & Barreras López (2015). Strategy for the migration to free software in the public health sector in Camagüey province. Humanidades Médicas 15 (3):531-549.
    En el escenario actual de Cuba y el mundo la migración al software libre constituye una necesidad para el desarrollo para garantizar la independencia tecnológica. Los procedimientos para realizar dicho proceso son fundamentales en la estrategia definida por el país que incluye la "Guía cubana de migración al software libre", sin embargo, su aplicación práctica enfrenta dificultades que han motivado a los autores a la elaboración de una estrategia específica para la migración al software libre en el sector de la (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  50
    Z. Bauman (2011). Migration and Identities in the Globalized World. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (4):425-435.
    The assumption that human socializing instincts are restricted to the community of birth and upbringing was long accepted without question. But today’s modern states have passed from the nation-building stage into that of multicultural belonging, and fluidity of membership allied to perpetual population shifts is the norm. This article traces changing patterns of global migration: first, territoriality plus rooted identity plus ‘gardening’; second, emigration to supposedly ‘empty’ lands; third, interlocked diasporas. How may we now live with and in the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  12
    Robert Boyd & Peter J. Richerson, Payoff Biased Migration and the Evolution of Group Beneficial Behavior.
    Human migration is nonrandom. In small scale societies of the past, and in the modern world, people tend to move to wealthier, safer, and more just societies from poorer, more violent, less just societies. If immigrants are assimilated, such nonrandom migration can increase the occurrence of culturally transmitted beliefs, values, and institutions that cause societies to be attractive to immigrants. Here we describe and analyze a simple model of this process. This model suggests that long run outcomes depend (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  3
    Joseph H. Carens (2007). Wer gehört dazu? Migration und die Rekonzeptualisierung der Staatsbürgerschaft. In Simone Zurbuchen (ed.), Bürgerschaft und Migration: Einwanderung und Einburgerung aus ethisch-politischer Perspektive. LIT 25-51.
  50.  18
    Oliver Bakewell, Hein De Haas & Agnieszka Kubal (2012). Migration Systems, Pioneer Migrants and the Role of Agency. Journal of Critical Realism 11 (4):413-437.
    The notion of a migration system is often invoked but it is rarely clearly defined or conceptualized. De Haas recently provided a powerful critique of the current literature highlighting some important flaws that recur through it. In particular, migration systems tend to be identified as fully formed entities, and there is no theorization as to how they come into being and how they break down. The internal dynamics which drive such changes are not examined. Such critiques of (...) systems relate to wider critiques of the concept of systems in the broader social science literature, where they are often presented as black boxes in which human agency is largely excluded. The challenge is how to theorize system dynamics in which the actions of people at one time contribute to the emergence of systemic linkages at a later time. This article focuses on the genesis of migration systems and the notion of pioneer migration. It draws attention both to the role of particular individuals, the pioneers, and also the more general activity of pioneering which is undertaken by many migrants. By disentangling different aspects of agency, it is possible to develop hypotheses about how the emergence of migrations systems is related to the nature of the agency exercised by different pioneers or pioneering activities in different contexts. Content Type Journal Article Category Article Pages 413-437 DOI 10.1558/jcr.v11i4.413 Authors Oliver Bakewell, International Migration Institute, University of Oxford Hein De Haas, International Migration Institute, University of Oxford Agnieszka Kubal, International Migration Institute, University of Oxford Journal Journal of Critical Realism Online ISSN 1572-5138 Print ISSN 1476-7430 Journal Volume Volume 11 Journal Issue Volume 11, Number 4 / 2012. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 755