Search results for 'migration' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Lukas Kaelin (2011). A Question of Justice: Assessing Nurse Migration From a Philosophical Perspective. Developing World Bioethics 11 (1):30-39.score: 24.0
    The intensified nurse migration leads to severe problems for the health care systems in many developing countries. Using the Philippines as an example, this paper will address the question of global nurse migration from a philosophical perspective. John Rawls' liberal and Michael Walzer's communitarian theory of justice will be examined in view of the ethical problem of nurse migration. In line with Rawls' A Theory of Justice, nurse migration undermines the ability of the people in developing (...)
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  2. Zinovijus Ciupijus (2010). Ethical Pitfalls of Temporary Labour Migration: A Critical Review of Issues. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 97 (S1):9-18.score: 24.0
    The article discusses a particularly contentious aspect of labour mobility—state sanctioned and controlled temporary labour migration. In contrast to forced migration, which always has had a recognizable ethical dimension in terms of the universal right to asylum, temporary labour migration has tended to be viewed as an exclusively economic and thus ethically neutral phenomenon. This article presents a diametrically opposite approach to temporary labour migration: it is argued that this form of labour mobility creates a plethora (...)
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  3. Catherine Dauvergne (1999). Confronting Chaos: Migration Law Responds to Images of Disorder. Res Publica 5 (1):21-43.score: 24.0
    This paper argues that in liberal nations migration law orders chaotic images and is an important site for the construction of national identities. Empirical illustrations are drawn primarily from Australia, but the thesis is applicable to all immigrant nations and also provides insights for the “Old World”. The argument proceeds by first examining the role of migration laws in liberal democratic societies. Building on this framework, it then looks at how Australian migration law responds to images of (...)
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  4. Speranta Dumitru (2012). Migration and Equality: Should Citizenship Levy Be a Tax or a Fine? Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 7 (2):34-49.score: 24.0
    It is often argued that development aid can and should compensate the restrictions on migration. Such compensation, Shachar has recently argued, should be levied as a tax on citizenship to further the global equality of opportunity. Since citizenship is essentially a ‘birthright lottery’, that is, a way of legalizing privileges obtained by birth, it would be fair to compensate the resulting gap in opportunities available to children born in rich versus poor countries by a ‘birthright privilege levy’. This article (...)
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  5. Iseult Honohan (2014). Domination and Migration: An Alternative Approach to the Legitimacy of Migration Controls. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 17 (1):31-48.score: 24.0
    Freedom as non-domination provides a distinctive criterion for assessing the justifiability of migration controls, different from both freedom of movement and autonomy. Migration controls are dominating insofar as they threaten to coerce potential migrants. Both the general right of states to control migration, and the wide range of discretionary procedures prevalent in migration controls, render outsiders vulnerable to arbitrary power. While the extent and intensity of domination varies, it is sufficient under contemporary conditions of globalization to (...)
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  6. Speranta Dumitru (2014). From 'Brain Drain' to 'Care Drain': Women's Labor Migration, Methodological Sexism and Care Devaluation. Women's Studies International Forum:x-x.score: 24.0
    The metaphor of “care drain” has been created as a womanly parallel to the “brain drain” idea. Just as “brain drain” suggests that the skilled migrants are an economic loss for the sending country, “care drain” describes the migrant women hired as care workers as a loss of care for their children left behind. This paper criticizes the construction of migrant women as “care drain” for three reasons: 1) it is built on sexist stereotypes, 2) it misrepresents and devalues care (...)
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  7. Marko Ahteensuu & Susanna Lehvävirta (2014). Assisted Migration, Risks and Scientific Uncertainty, and Ethics: A Comment on Albrecht Et Al.'S Review Paper. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (3):471-477.score: 24.0
    In response to Albrecht et al.’s (J Agric Environ Ethics 26(4):827–845, 2013) discussion on the ethics of assisted migration, we emphasize the issues of risk and scientific uncertainty as an inextricable part of a comprehensive ethical evaluation. Insisting on a separation of risk and ethical considerations, although arguably common in many policy contexts, is at best misguided and at worst damaging.
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  8. Iseult Honohan & Marit Hovdal-Moan (2014). Introduction: Domination, Migration and Non-Citizens. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 17 (1):1-9.score: 24.0
    In Europe and other regions of the world public debate concerning how many immigrants should be admitted, which rights those admitted should have, and which conditions can be required for access to citizenship is intense and enduring, and these have increasingly become central electoral issues. On the one hand, the harsh treatment of migrants is often a matter of public criticism; on the other hand, states are concerned about problems of welfare, security and social unrest that they have come to (...)
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  9. Tisha M. Rajendra (forthcoming). The Rational Agent or the Relational Agent: Moving From Freedom to Justice in Migration Systems Ethics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-15.score: 24.0
    Most accounts of immigration ethics implicitly rely upon neoclassical migration theory, which understands migration as the result of poverty and unemployment in sending countries. This paper argues that neoclassical migration theory assumes an account of the human person as solely an autonomous rational agent which then leads to ethics of migration which overemphasize freedom and self-determination. This tendency to assume that migration works as neoclassical migration theory describes is shared by political philosophers, such as (...)
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  10. Speranta Dumitru (2013). Des visas, pas de l'aide! de la migration comme substitut de l'aide au développement. Éthique Publique. Revue Internationale D’Éthique Sociétale Et Gouvernementale 15 (2):77-98.score: 24.0
    If migration is more effective than aid for fighting poverty, should it replace aid? Not always. This article proposes a criterion that may be used to distinguish between cases where migration should serve as a substitute for development assistance and cases where it should supplement such aid. According to this criterion, development agendas are poverty-efficient when they lift the largest possible number of people out of poverty. Therefore, to be poverty-efficient, development agendas should always aim to complement aid (...)
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  11. Speranta Dumitru (2012). Skilled Migration: Who Should Pay for What? Diversities 14 (1):8-23.score: 21.0
    Brain drain critiques and human rights advocates have conflicting views on emigration. From a brain drain perspective, the emigration harms a country when emigrants are skilled and the source country is poor. From the human rights perspective, the right "to leave any country, including one's own" is a fundamental right, protected for all, whatever their skills. Is the concern with poverty and social justice at odds with the right to emigrate? At the beginning of the l970s, the economist Jagdish Bhagwati (...)
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  12. Elena Rainero & Jim C. Norman (2013). Late Endosomal and Lysosomal Trafficking During Integrin‐Mediated Cell Migration and Invasion. Bioessays 35 (6):523-532.score: 21.0
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  13. Asher Colombo & Tiziana Caponio (2011). Migration, Marital Separation and Gender Roles: The Case of Female Domestic Workers in Italy. Polis 25 (3):419-450.score: 21.0
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  14. Sylvie Bredeloup (2008). L'aventurier, une figure de la migration africaine. Cahiers Internationaux de Sociologie 2 (2):281-306.score: 21.0
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  15. Maria Luisa Cattaneo & Sabina Dal Verme (2009). Conflits familiaux autour de la maternité dans la migration. Dialogue 3:79-89.score: 21.0
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  16. Nicholas De Genova (2010). The Queer Politics of Migration: Reflections on “Illegality” and Incorrigibility. Studies in Social Justice 4 (2):101-126.score: 21.0
    The most resounding expression of the truly unprecedented mobilizations of migrants throughout the United States in 2006 was a mass proclamation of collective defiance: ¡Aquí Estamos, y No Nos Vamos! [Here we are, and we're not leaving!]. This same slogan was commonly accompanied by a still more forcefully incorrigible rejoinder: ¡Y Si Nos Sacan, Nos Regresamos! [... and if they throw us out, we'll come right back!]. It is quite striking and, as this essay contends, not merely provocative but genuinely (...)
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  17. Myria Fabregat (2009). Défauts de transmission symbolique dans la migration. Dialogue 3:29-42.score: 21.0
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  18. Isam Idris (2009). Cultures, migration et sociétés : destin des loyautés familiales et culturelles chez les enfants de migrants. Dialogue 2:131-140.score: 21.0
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  19. Z. Bauman (2011). Migration and Identities in the Globalized World. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (4):425-435.score: 18.0
    The assumption that human socializing instincts are restricted to the community of birth and upbringing was long accepted without question. But today’s modern states have passed from the nation-building stage into that of multicultural belonging, and fluidity of membership allied to perpetual population shifts is the norm. This article traces changing patterns of global migration: first, territoriality plus rooted identity plus ‘gardening’; second, emigration to supposedly ‘empty’ lands; third, interlocked diasporas. How may we now live with and in the (...)
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  20. P. T. Lenard & C. Straehle (2012). Temporary Labour Migration, Global Redistribution, and Democratic Justice. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 (2):206-230.score: 18.0
    Calls to expand temporary work programmes come from two directions. First, as global justice advocates observe, every year thousands of poor migrants cross borders in search of better opportunities, often in the form of improved employment opportunities. As a result, international organizations now lobby in favour of expanding ‘guest-work’ opportunities, that is, opportunities for citizens of poorer countries to migrate temporarily to wealthier countries to fill labour shortages. Second, temporary work programmes permit domestic governments to respond to two internal, contradictory (...)
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  21. Renan Springer De Freitas (1997). Back to Darwin and Popper: Criticism, Migration of Piecemeal Conceptual Schemes, and the Growth of Knowledge. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 27 (2):157-179.score: 18.0
    Popper's thesis that the growth of knowledge lies in the emergence of problems out of criticism and takes place in an autonomous world of products of the human mind (his so-called world-3) raises two questions: (1) Why does criticism lead to new problems, and (2) Why can only a limited number of tentative solutions arise at a given time? I propose the following answer: Criticism entails an overlooked evolutionary world-3 mechanism, namely, the migration of piece meal conceptual schemes from (...)
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  22. Jeremy Snyder (2009). Is Health Worker Migration a Case of Poaching? American Journal of Bioethics 9 (3):3-7.score: 18.0
    Many nations in the developing world invest scarce funding into training health workers. When these workers migrate to richer countries, particularly when this migration occurs before the source community can recoup the costs of training, the destination community realizes a net gain in resources by obtaining the workers' skills without having to pay for their training. This effect of health worker migration has frequently been condemned as 'poaching' or a case of theft. I assess the charge that the (...)
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  23. Lisa A. Eckenwiler (2009). Care Worker Migration and Transnational Justice. Public Health Ethics 2 (2):171-183.score: 18.0
    Department of Philosophy and Center for Health Policy, Research and Ethics, George Mason University, 4400 University Avenue, MS 2D7, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA. Tel.: +1 703 993 1724; Fax: +1 5703 993 1555; Email: leckenwi{at}gmu.edu ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> . Abstract Here I consider the migration of health workers and propose a conception of transnational justice that can best address the concerns it raises, including the perpetuation of global health inequities. My focus will (...)
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  24. Jeremy Snyder (2009). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Is Health Worker Migration a Case of Poaching?”. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (3):W1 – W2.score: 18.0
    I would like to thank all of the respondents to my article both for their expansions on the theme of health worker migration and for their criticisms of my argument against the use of the term ’poaching’ in the context of international health worker migration. In this response, I will clarify my argument in light of the worries raised primarily by Tache and Schillinger and Ari Zivotofsky and Naomi Zivotofsky.
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  25. D. Sriskandarajah (2006). Migration Madness: Five Policy Dilemmas. Studies in Christian Ethics 19 (1):21-37.score: 18.0
    With migration featuring prominently in political and popular discourse in recent years, this article examines five dilemmas that continue to dog policymakers. It is argued that any cogent and coherent policies in this area need to resolve these five basic challenges in migration policymaking: who can enter and the rules of their entry (admission); what rights and services migrants have access to (entitlements); how effectively they integrate with their host society (integration); what impact their movement has on their (...)
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  26. Peter J. Richerson & Robert Boyd, Migration: An Engine for Social Improvement the Movement of People Into Societies That Offer a Better Way of Life is a More Powerful Driver of Cultural Change Than Conflict and Conquest.score: 18.0
    As cultural evolutionists interested in how culture changes over the long term, we've thought and written a lot about migration, but only recently tumbled to an obvious idea: migration has a profound effect on how societies evolve culturally because it is selective. People move to societies that provide a more attractive way of life, and all other things being equal, this process spreads ideas and institutions that lead to economic efficiency, social order and equality.
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  27. Caroline Rosello, Pascal Ballet, Emmanuelle Planus & Philippe Tracqui (2004). Model Driven Quantification of Individual and Collective Cell Migration. Acta Biotheoretica 52 (4).score: 18.0
    While the control of cell migration by biochemical and biophysical factors is largely documented, a precise quantification of cell migration parameters in different experimental contexts is still questionable. Indeed, these phenomenological parameters can be evaluated from data obtained either at the cell population level or at the individual cell level. However, the range within which both characterizations of cell migration are equivalent remains unclear. We analyse here to which extent both sources of data could be integrated within (...)
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  28. Lisa Eckenwiler, Christine Straehle & Ryoa Chung (2012). Global Solidarity, Migration and Global Health Inequity. Bioethics 26 (7):382-390.score: 18.0
    The grounds for global solidarity have been theorized and conceptualized in recent years, and many have argued that we need a global concept of solidarity. But the question remains: what can motivate efforts of the international community and nation-states? Our focus is the grounding of solidarity with respect to global inequities in health. We explore what considerations could motivate acts of global solidarity in the specific context of health migration, and sketch briefly what form this kind of solidarity could (...)
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  29. Oliver Bakewell, Hein De Haas & Agnieszka Kubal (2013). Migration Systems, Pioneer Migrants and the Role of Agency. Journal of Critical Realism 11 (4):413 - 437.score: 18.0
    The notion of a migration system is often invoked but it is rarely clearly defined or conceptualized. De Haas recently provided a powerful critique of the current literature highlighting some important flaws that recur through it. In particular, migration systems tend to be identified as fully formed entities, and there is no theorization as to how they come into being and how they break down. The internal dynamics which drive such changes are not examined. Such critiques of (...) systems relate to wider critiques of the concept of systems in the broader social science literature, where they are often presented as black boxes in which human agency is largely excluded. The challenge is how to theorize system dynamics in which the actions of people at one time contribute to the emergence of systemic linkages at a later time. This article focuses on the genesis of migration systems and the notion of pioneer migration. It draws attention both to the role of particular individuals, the pioneers, and also the more general activity of pioneering which is undertaken by many migrants. By disentangling different aspects of agency, it is possible to develop hypotheses about how the emergence of migrations systems is related to the nature of the agency exercised by different pioneers or pioneering activities in different contexts. Content Type Journal Article Category Article Pages 413-437 DOI 10.1558/jcr.v11i4.413 Authors Oliver Bakewell, International Migration Institute, University of Oxford Hein De Haas, International Migration Institute, University of Oxford Agnieszka Kubal, International Migration Institute, University of Oxford Journal Journal of Critical Realism Online ISSN 1572-5138 Print ISSN 1476-7430 Journal Volume Volume 11 Journal Issue Volume 11, Number 4 / 2012. (shrink)
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  30. R. Boyd & P. J. Richerson, Voting with Your Feet: Payoff Biased Migration and the Evolution of Group Beneficial Behavior.score: 18.0
    Human migration is nonrandom. In small scale societies of the past, and in the modern world, people tend to move to wealthier, safer, and more just societies from poorer, more violent, less just societies. If immigrants are assimilated, such nonrandom migration can increase the occurrence of culturally transmitted beliefs, values, and institutions that cause societies to be attractive to immigrants. Here we describe and analyze a simple model of this process. This model suggests that long run outcomes depend (...)
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  31. Forrest Clingerman (2008). The Intimate Distance of Herons: Theological Travels Through Nature, Place, and Migration. Ethics, Place and Environment 11 (3):313 – 325.score: 18.0
    In a theological understanding of nature, what is the significance of herons? This article reflects on the question of herons by first describing how bird migration can be included in a theological approach to nature. To explore the theological meaning of migration, theology must model nature as defined by the idea of 'emplacement'. Next, it investigates how the migration of herons challenges and complements our sense of dwelling by detailing the different ways that herons are emplaced as (...)
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  32. Doogab Yi (2008). Cancer, Viruses, and Mass Migration: Paul Berg's Venture Into Eukaryotic Biology and the Advent of Recombinant DNA Research and Technology, 1967-1980. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 41 (4):589 - 636.score: 18.0
    The existing literature on the development of recombinant DNA technology and genetic engineering tends to focus on Stanley Cohen and Herbert Boyer's recombinant DNA cloning technology and its commercialization starting in the mid-1970s. Historians of science, however, have pointedly noted that experimental procedures for making recombinant DNA molecules were initially developed by Stanford biochemist Paul Berg and his colleagues, Peter Lobban and A. Dale Kaiser in the early 1970s. This paper, recognizing the uneasy disjuncture between scientific authorship and legal invention (...)
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  33. Kate E. Tunstall (ed.) (2006). Displacement, Asylum, Migration: The Oxford Amnesty Lectures 2004. OUP Oxford.score: 18.0
    There are few issues more urgently in need of intelligent analysis both in the UK and elsewhere than those relating to displacement, asylum, and migration. In this volume, based on the 2004 Oxford Amnesty Lectures, major figures in philosophy, political science, law, psychoanalysis, sociology, and literature address the challenges that displacement, asylum, and migration pose to our notions of human rights. Each lecture is accompanied by a critical response from another leading thinker in the field. -/- The volume (...)
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  34. Etienne Kouokam, Pierre Auger, Hassan Hbid & Maurice Tchuente (forthcoming). Effect of the Number of Patches in a Multi-Patch SIRS Model with Fast Migration on the Basic Reproduction Rate. Acta Biotheoretica.score: 18.0
    We consider a two-patch epidemiological system where individuals can move from one patch to another, and local interactions between the individuals within a patch are governed by the classical SIRS model. When the time-scale associated with migration is much smaller than the time-scale associated with infection, aggregation methods can be used to simplify the initial complete model formulated as a system of ordinary differential equations. Analysis of the aggregated model then shows that the two-patch basic reproduction rate is smaller (...)
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  35. Christine Straehle (2013). Conditions of Care: Migration, Vulnerability, and Individual Autonomy. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (2):122-140.score: 18.0
    International migration has a female face in the beginning of the twenty-first century; since at least 1990, a total of 49 percent of international migrants have been women (UN 2008).1 Many women relocate in pursuit of goals that they can’t realize in their countries of origin, and many women move on their own to developed countries as caregivers to the very old or the very young, as nurses to attend to the sick in hospitals, and as domestic workers.2 How (...)
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  36. Filomeno Aguilar (2009). Labour Migration and Ties of Relatedness: Diasporic Houses and Investments in Memory in a Rural Philippine Village. Thesis Eleven 98 (1):88-114.score: 18.0
    Putting migrant remittances into house construction and rebuilding is generally seen as either conspicuous consumption or productive investment, but in both cases the perspective is economistic. This article argues that only when the cultural dimension of economic action is understood will it be possible to comprehend migrant spending on houses. Specifically, this article seeks to understand why, in the case of the rural Tagalog village in this study, located in upland Batangas Province in the Philippines, overseas labour migrants build houses (...)
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  37. Colin Grey (2014). The Rights of Migration. Legal Theory 20 (1):25-51.score: 18.0
    This paper argues that neither a general right to exclude migrants nor a general right to migrate freely exists. The extent of the right to exclude or the right to migrate freely must instead, in the majority of cases, be determined indirectly by examining whether a given immigration law or policy would result in the violation of migrants right to exclude migrants is constrained by what the author calls the indirect principle of freedom of migration. Under this principle, if (...)
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  38. Karen D. Johnson-Webb (2004). The Role of Migration, Family Characteristics and English-Language Ability in Latino Academic Achievement. Inquiry 24 (1-2):21-31.score: 18.0
    Latinos comprise the largest minority group in the U.S. and 63 percent are foreign-born. An educational gap exists between Latinos in the U.S. and other groups in the U.S. Lower educational attainment has ramifications for labor market and other socioeconomic outcomes. Factors involving family context have best explained the educational gap, along with English proficiency and migration history. This study, using the Census long-form data, explores the role of socio-economic background, ethnicity, and migration history on educational outcomes of (...)
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  39. A. A. Muhammad Gadit (2008). International Migration of Doctors From Developing Countries: Need to Follow the Commonwealth Code. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (2):67-68.score: 18.0
    There is an ongoing debate on the migration of doctors, especially psychiatrists, from developing countries. It is argued that these countries, which are already running short of psychiatrists, will further be jeopardised and their health systems will collapse if this migration and subsequent recruitment continue. In this paper the author presents a personal view of the ethics and human rights of this matter. He emphasises the importance of migration of doctors in view of the current situation in (...)
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  40. Thomas S. Deisboeck, Tim Demuth & Yuri Mansury (2005). Correlating Velocity Patterns with Spatial Dynamics in Glioma Cell Migration. Acta Biotheoretica 53 (3).score: 18.0
    Highly malignant neuroepithelial tumors are known for their extensive tissue invasion. Investigating the relationship between their spatial behavior and temporal patterns by employing detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), we report here that faster glioma cell motility is accompanied by both greater predictability of the cells' migration velocity and concomitantly, more directionality in the cells' migration paths. Implications of this finding for both experimental and clinical cancer research are discussed.
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  41. Robert Boyd & Peter J. Richerson, Payoff Biased Migration and the Evolution of Group Beneficial Behavior.score: 18.0
    Human migration is nonrandom. In small scale societies of the past, and in the modern world, people tend to move to wealthier, safer, and more just societies from poorer, more violent, less just societies. If immigrants are assimilated, such nonrandom migration can increase the occurrence of culturally transmitted beliefs, values, and institutions that cause societies to be attractive to immigrants. Here we describe and analyze a simple model of this process. This model suggests that long run outcomes depend (...)
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  42. A. G. Fraser (1977). Medical Migration and World Health. Journal of Medical Ethics 3 (4):179-182.score: 18.0
    Everyone knows that British doctors are emigrating and that other doctors, mostly from the third world, are immigrating to Britain. Also everyone thinks that he knows the reasons why. However, the Edinburgh Medical Group thought the various reasons for this medical migration should be examined more closely, and held a symposium (Chairman, Professor A S Duncan, Professor Emeritus of Medical Education in the University of Edinburgh) to examine the causes for medical migration at the present time. Medical teaching (...)
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  43. Ágnes Simon (2012). Intellectual Migration and Economic Thought: Central European Émigré Economists and the History of Modern Economics. History of European Ideas 38 (3):467-482.score: 18.0
    Summary This article examines the life and thought of Thomas Balogh and Nicholas Kaldor, two Hungarian-born British economists, to suggest how the personal background and émigré status of these economists changed their view of the British economy and the economic policy recommendations they put forward as high-profile government advisers in the post-1945 period. This article combines research on inter-war intellectual migration and the history of British economics and economic policy making after the Second World War. It shows how the (...)
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  44. Claudia Wiesner & Anna Björk (2014). Introduction: Citizenship in Europe After World War II—the Challenges of Migration and European Integration. Contributions to the History of Concepts 9 (1):50-59.score: 18.0
    The concept of citizenship in Europe after World War II faces two major challenges: migration and European integration. This introduction precedes a group of articles examining debates and law-making processes related to the concept of citizenship in Europe after World War II. The introduction sketches the historical development of citizenship in European representative democracies, taking into account four basic dimensions (access to citizenship, citizenship rights, citizenship duties, and the active content of citizenship) for analyzing changes in the concept of (...)
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  45. M. Zavattaro, C. Susanne & M. Vercauteren (1997). International Migration and Biodemographical Behaviour: A Study of Italians in Belgium. Journal of Biosocial Science 29 (3):345-354.score: 18.0
    This paper describes the matrimonial and reproductive behaviour of Italians who migrated to Belgium after the Second World War. Migrants were either already married, or later became married, to other Italians. Among the children of migrants, men equally chose Italian or Belgian wives but women tended to prefer Italian partners. Italian-Belgian marriages were more frequent among the better educated groups. Family size is smaller among migrants marrying after migration and in heterogamous marriages. Significant differences in birth intervals are found (...)
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  46. Karin B. Johansson Blight (forthcoming). Medical Doctors Commissioned by Institutions That Regulate and Control Migration in Sweden: Implications for Public Health Ethics, Policy and Practice. Public Health Ethics:phu020.score: 18.0
    Medical doctors are commissioned by the migration authorities and/or border police to assist in decision making about asylum seeker’s requests for residency permits in Sweden. They are asked to: (i) assess the formal written medical opinions made by physicians in support of asylum or humanitarian narratives in the asylum process and/or (ii) to make medical assessments of persons considered for deportation. This arrangement raises questions such as: How is the decision making process carried out? How is medical knowledge used, (...)
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  47. Michael Piper & Melissa Little (2003). Movement Through Slits: Cellular Migration Via the Slit Family. Bioessays 25 (1):32-38.score: 18.0
    First isolated in the fly and now characterised in vertebrates, the Slit proteins have emerged as pivotal components controlling the guidance of axonal growth cones and the directional migration of neuronal precursors. As well as extensive expression during development of the central nervous system (CNS), the Slit proteins exhibit a striking array of expression sites in non-neuronal tissues, including the urogenital system, limb primordia and developing eye. Zebrafish Slit has been shown to mediate mesodermal migration during gastrulation, while (...)
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  48. Ángeles Rincón, Juan Antonio Alonso & Luis Sanz (2009). Reduction of Supercritical Multiregional Stochastic Models with Fast Migration. Acta Biotheoretica 57 (4).score: 18.0
    In this work we study the behavior of a time discrete multiregional stochastic model for a population structured in age classes and spread out in different spatial patches between which individuals can migrate. The dynamics of the population is controlled both by reproduction-survival and by migration. These processes take place at different time scales in the sense of the latter being much faster than the former. We incorporate the effect of demographic stochasticity into the population, which results in both (...)
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  49. Allan Williams (1992). Cultural Contingencies and Economic Behavior: Return Migration in Portugal. World Futures 33 (1):155-164.score: 18.0
    (1992). Cultural contingencies and economic behavior: Return migration in Portugal. World Futures: Vol. 33, Culture and Development: European Experiences and Challenges A Special Research Report of the European Culture Impact Research Consortium (EUROCIRCON), pp. 155-164.
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  50. James Dwyer (2007). What's Wrong with the Global Migration of Health Care Professionals? Individual Rights and International Justice. Hastings Center Report 37 (5):36-43.score: 16.0
    : When health care workers migrate from poor countries to rich countries, they are exercising an important human right and helping rich countries fulfill obligations of social justice. They are also, however, creating problems of social justice in the countries they leave. Solving these problems requires balancing social needs against individual rights and studying the relationship of social justice to international justice.
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