Search results for 'military ethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Asa Kasher & Amos Yadlin (2006). Military Ethics of Fighting Terror: Principles. Philosophia 34 (1):75-84.
    The purpose of the present document is to briefly present principles that constitute a new doctrine within the sphere of Military Ethics : The Just War Doctrine of Fighting Terror.The doctrine has been developed by a team we have headed at the Israel Defense Force College of National Defense. However, the work has been done on the general levels of moral, ethical and legal considerations that should guide a democratic state when it faces terrorist activities committed against its (...)
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  2. Peter Olsthoorn (2010). Military Ethics and Virtues: An Interdisciplinary Approach for the 21st Century. Routledge.
    This book examines the role of military virtues in today's armed forces. -/- Although long-established military virtues, such as honor, courage and loyalty, are what most armed forces today still use as guiding principles in an effort to enhance the moral behavior of soldiers, much depends on whether the military virtues adhered to by these militaries suit a particular mission or military operation. Clearly, the beneficiaries of these military virtues are the soldiers themselves, fellow-soldiers, and (...)
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  3.  3
    Ted van Baarda & Désirée Verweij (eds.) (2006). Military Ethics: The Dutch Approach: A Practical Guide. Martinus Nijhoff.
    This collection is a unique joint venture of teachers in, and practitioners of military ethics.
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  4.  71
    M. B. Ramose (2008). Military Ethics of Fighting Terror: A Response to Kasher and Yadlin. Philosophia 36 (2):209-212.
    Asa Kasher and Amos Yadlin’s article is a penetrating and well argued presentation of the Israeli perspective on the military ethics of terror. It does not claim to be official Israeli policy. Yet, its philosophic theoretical exposition is evident in the Israeli practice of fighting terror. On this basis it is a practical guide to action inspired by a lucid, coherent and compelling theoretical argumentation.
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  5. Bill Rhodes (2009). An Introduction to Military Ethics: A Reference Handbook. Praeger.
    Introduction : Ethics in the real world -- An overview of applied ethics for the military -- Just war thinking (JWT) in historical perspective -- Philosophical foundations of military ethics -- Jus ad bellum today -- Jus in bello today -- Adapting to contemporary challenges -- Cultural ethical issues -- Modern military identity.
     
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  6. Peter Olsthoorn (2011). Intentions and Consequences in Military Ethics. Journal of Military Ethics 10 (2):81-93.
    Utilitarianism is the strand of moral philosophy that holds that judgment of whether an act is morally right or wrong, hence whether it ought to be done or not, is primarily based upon the foreseen consequences of the act in question. It has a bad reputation in military ethics because it would supposedly make military expedience override all other concerns. Given that the utilitarian credo of the greatest happiness for the greatest number is in fact agent-neutral, meaning (...)
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  7.  19
    Malham M. Wakin, Kenneth H. Wenker & James Kempf (eds.) (1987). Military Ethics: Reflections on Principles--The Profession of Arms, Military Leadership, Ethical Practices, War and Morality, Educating the Citizen-Soldier. National Defense University Press.
    Manuel M. Davenport PROFESSIONALS OR HIRED GUNS? LOYALTIES ARE THE DIFFERENCE . In The Contemporary literature of professional ethics, two different ways of ...
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  8.  5
    Eva Wortel & Jolanda Bosch (2011). Strengthening Moral Competence: A 'Train the Trainer' Course on Military Ethics. Journal of Military Ethics 10 (1):17-35.
    If one of the most important aims of education on military ethics is to strengthen moral competence, we argue that it is important to base ethics education on virtue ethics, the Socratic attitude and the process of ?living learning?. This article illustrates this position by means of the example of a ?train the trainer? course on military ethics for Non-Commissioned Officers (NCOs), which is developed at the Netherlands Defence Academy, and uses a number of (...)
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  9.  48
    Asa Kasher & Amos Yadlin (2005). Military Ethics of Fighting Terror: An Israeli Perspective†. Journal of Military Ethics 4 (1):3-32.
    The present paper is devoted to a detailed presentation of a new Military Ethics doctrine of fighting terror. It is proposed as an extension of the classical Just War Theory, which has been meant to apply to ordinary international conflicts. Since the conditions of a fight against terror are essentially different from the conditions that are assumed to hold in the classical war (military) paradigm or in the law enforcement (police) paradigm, a third model is needed. The (...)
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  10. Roger Wertheimer (2010). The Morality of Military Ethics Education. In Empowering Our Military Conscience.
    Professional Military Ethics Education (PMEE) must transmit and promote military professionalism, so it must continuously.
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  11.  53
    N. Fotion (1986). Military Ethics: Guidelines for Peace and War. Routledge & K. Paul.
    Forfatterne søger at opstille et etisk system for anvendelse af militære magtmidler, såvel i fred som under krig, byggende på normer, som efter erfaringen ...
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  12. Paolo Tripodi & Jessica Wolfendale (eds.) (2011). New Wars and New Soldiers: Military Ethics in the Contemporary World. Ashgate.
     
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  13.  18
    Asa Kasher & Amos Yadlin (2005). Military Ethics of Fighting Terror: Response†. Journal of Military Ethics 4 (1):60-70.
    We are grateful to Professors Nick Fotion, Bashshar Haydar and David L. Perry for their illuminating discussions of our paper, ?Military ethics of fighting terror: An Israeli perspective?, published in the present issue of the Journal of Military Ethics. We also thank the editors of the Journal for allowing us to add the present response. Professors Fotion, Haydar and Perry raise many significant issues. We will, however, presently address just a few of them, leaving the discussion (...)
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  14.  9
    Brigadier General H. R. McMaster (2010). Remaining True to Our Values – Reflections on Military Ethics in Trying Times. Journal of Military Ethics 9 (3):183-194.
    (2010). Remaining True to Our Values – Reflections on Military Ethics in Trying Times. Journal of Military Ethics: Vol. 9, No. 3, pp. 183-194. doi: 10.1080/15027570.2010.510850.
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  15. Richard A. Gabriel (1982). To Serve with Honor: A Treatise on Military Ethics and the Way of the Soldier. Greenwood Press.
     
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  16.  3
    Chad W. Seagren (2015). Military Ethics and Moral Blame Across Agency Lines. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (2):177-193.
    ABSTRACTIn this article, I examine the extent to which military officers are morally responsible for the actions of others by virtue of shared membership in various groups. I argue that career military officers share membership in morally relevant groups that include their branch of service, Department of Defense and the entire Executive Branch of Government, and I outline the circumstances under which career officers bear moral culpability for the actions of members of this group. A number of implications (...)
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  17.  15
    Susan Martinelli-Fernandez (2005). George R. Lucas, Jr. & W. Rick Rubel's (Eds) Ethics and the Military Profession: The Moral Foundations of Leadership and Case Studies in Military Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Military Ethics 4 (3):214-219.
    (2005). George R. Lucas, Jr. & W. Rick Rubel's (Eds) Ethics and the Military Profession: The Moral Foundations of Leadership and Case Studies in Military Ethics. Journal of Military Ethics: Vol. 4, No. 3, pp. 214-219. doi: 10.1080/15027570500197453.
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  18.  6
    Christopher Toner (2006). Military Service as a Practice: Integrating the Sword and Shield Approaches to Military Ethics. Journal of Military Ethics 5 (3):183-200.
    The military's purpose centrally includes fighting its nation's wars, serving as the nation's sword. The dominant approach to military ethics today, which I will call the ?sword approach?, focuses on this purpose and builds an ethic out of the requirements the purpose imposes on soldiers. Yet recently philosophers such as Shannon French and Nancy Sherman have developed an alternative that I will call the ?shield approach?, which focuses on articulating a warrior code as a moral shield that (...)
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  19. James Brown & Michael J. Collins (eds.) (1981). Military Ethics and Professionalism: A Collection of Essays. Supt. Of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., Distributor].
     
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  20. C. A. J. Coady & Igor Primoratz (eds.) (2008). Military Ethics. Ashgate Pub. Co..
     
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  21. Pauline M. Kaurin (2014). The Warrior, Military Ethics and Contemporary Warfare: Achilles Goes Asymmetrical. Ashgate Pub. Company.
     
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  22. Lloyd J. Matthews & Dale E. Brown (eds.) (1989). The Parameters of Military Ethics. Pergamon-Brassey's International Defense Publishers.
     
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  23. Edwin R. Micewski & Hubert Annen (eds.) (2005). Military Ethics in Professional Military Education--Revisited. Peter Lang.
     
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  24.  32
    Ted van Baarda & Désirée Verweij (eds.) (2009). The Moral Dimension of Asymmetrical Warfare: Counter-Terrorism, Democratic Values and Military Ethics. Martinus Nijhoff.
    PART I The superpower and asymmetry PART II Jus ad bellum, jus in bello, jus post bellum PART III Leadership and accountability PART IV Soldiersa (TM) ...
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  25.  32
    Jessica Wolfendale & Paolo Tripodi (eds.) (2011). New Wars and New Soldiers: Military Ethics in the Contemporary World. Ashgate.
  26. Yi-Ming Yu (2014). Military Ethics Education in Taiwan: A Multi-Channel Approach. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (4):350-362.
    Three methods for ethics instruction are used in Taiwanese military education: the ‘bag-of-virtues’, value-clarification and virtue-ethics methods. This article explains, analyzes and discusses each of these, thereby giving an introduction to how military ethics is taught – and thought of – within the Taiwanese military system. Recommendations are given for how to improve the parts of the system that do not seem to live up to the stated intentions.
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  27. Peter Olsthoorn (2013). Virtue Ethics in the Military. In Stan van Hooft (ed.), The Handbook of Virtue Ethics. Acumen 365-374.
    In addition to the traditional reliance on rules and codes in regulating the conduct of military personnel, most of today’s militaries put their money on character building in trying to make their soldiers virtuous. Especially in recent years it has time and again been argued that virtue ethics, with its emphasis on character building, provides a better basis for military ethics than deontological ethics or utilitarian ethics. Although virtue ethics comes in many varieties (...)
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  28.  5
    Martin L. Cook (2004). The Moral Warrior: Ethics and Service in the U.S. Military. State University of New York Press.
    Explores the moral dimensions of the current global role of the U.S. military.
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  29.  34
    Michael L. Gross (2011). Comradery, Community, and Care in Military Medical Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (5):337-350.
    Medical ethics prohibits caregivers from discriminating and providing preferential care to their compatriots and comrades. In military medicine, particularly during war and when resources may be scarce, ethical principles may dictate priority care for compatriot soldiers. The principle of nondiscrimination is central to utilitarian and deontological theories of justice, but communitarianism and the ethics of care and friendship stipulate a different set of duties for community members, friends, and family. Similar duties exist among the small cohesive groups (...)
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  30. Peter Olsthoorn, Myriame Bollen & Robert Beeres (2013). Dual Loyalties in Military Medical Care – Between Ethics and Effectiveness. In Herman Amersfoort, Rene Moelker, Joseph Soeters & Desiree Verweij (eds.), Moral Responsibility & Military Effectiveness. Asser
  31.  42
    Mark Coeckelbergh (2011). From Killer Machines to Doctrines and Swarms, or Why Ethics of Military Robotics Is Not (Necessarily) About Robots. Philosophy and Technology 24 (3):269-278.
    Ethical reflections on military robotics can be enriched by a better understanding of the nature and role of these technologies and by putting robotics into context in various ways. Discussing a range of ethical questions, this paper challenges the prevalent assumptions that military robotics is about military technology as a mere means to an end, about single killer machines, and about “military” developments. It recommends that ethics of robotics attend to how military technology changes (...)
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  32.  22
    Steven H. Miles (2013). The New Military Medical Ethics: Legacies of the Gulf Wars and the War on Terror. Bioethics 27 (3):117-123.
    United States military medical ethics evolved during its involvement in two recent wars, Gulf War I (1990–1991) and the War on Terror (2001–). Norms of conduct for military clinicians with regard to the treatment of prisoners of war and the administration of non-therapeutic bioactive agents to soldiers were set aside because of the sense of being in a ‘new kind of war’. Concurrently, the use of radioactive metal in weaponry and the ability to measure the health consequences (...)
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  33. Daniel Messelken & Hans U. Baer (2013). Hovering Between Roles: Military Medical Ethics. In Michael L. Gross & Don Carrick (eds.), Military Medical Ethics for the 21st Century. Ashgate
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  34.  9
    Martin Cook & Henrik Syse (2010). What Should We Mean by 'Military Ethics'? Journal of Military Ethics 9 (2):119-122.
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  35.  10
    John Mark Mattox (2013). Additive Manufacturing and its Implications for Military Ethics. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (3):225-234.
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  36.  5
    Yi-Ming Yu (2013). Between an Example and a Precept, Which Has Greater Importance? A Comparison of the Channels of Socialization in Military Ethics. Ethics and Behavior 23 (5):341-359.
    In this study, I examined what channels of socialization influence the moral behavior of cadets. We conducted a regression analysis of the effects of parents' attitudes to moral education, the standard and potential curriculum of schools, peer groups, and communication media on individual ethics and discipline using 399 sample participants. The participants were recruited through a questionnaire survey on cadets from academy of military, naval, and air force, and four-year based students from R.O.C. National Defense University. The analysis (...)
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  37. David Whetham (ed.) (2011). Ethics, Law, and Military Operations. Palgrave Macmillan.
     
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  38.  23
    Diederik Kolff (2003). 'Missile Strike Carried Out With Yemeni Cooperation'—Using UCAVs to Kill Alleged Terrorists: A Professional Approach to the Normative Bases of Military Ethics. Journal of Military Ethics 2 (3):240-244.
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  39.  1
    J. Carl Ficarrotta (2010). Kantian Thinking About Military Ethics. Ashgate.
    This is a collection of essays on various issues in military ethics, undertaken by the author in a broadly Kantian spirit.
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  40.  2
    H. R. McMaster (2010). Remaining True to Our Values–Reflections on Military Ethics in Trying Times. Journal of Military Ethics 9 (3):183-194.
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  41.  4
    George R. Lucas Jr (2015). Response to Michael Gross: Military Ethics, Insurgency, and the Rise of ‘Soft War’. Journal of Military Ethics 14 (3-4):251-254.
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  42.  4
    René Moelker & Peter Olsthoorn (2007). Virtue Ethics and Military Ethics. Journal of Military Ethics 6 (4):257-258.
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  43.  7
    Wayne Beyer (2013). Military Ethics: An Introduction with Case Studies. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (1):88-89.
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  44.  5
    Lieutenant Colonel Chris Mayer (2013). Military Ethics: An Introduction with Case Studies/The Ethics of War and Peace: An Introduction. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (2):197 - 199.
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  45.  12
    Reed Bonadonna (2008). Doing Military Ethics with War Literature. Journal of Military Ethics 7 (3):231-242.
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  46.  9
    James Turner Johnson (2012). On Giving Birth to a New Organism and Helping to Shape a Discipline: Reflections on the Idea of Thejournal of Military Ethicsand its Relation to Developing Thinking About Ethics and War. Journal of Military Ethics 11 (1):2-9.
    Abstract [Remarks at the 10th-anniversary conference for the Journal of Military Ethics, Oslo, Norway, 9 September 2011, arranged by the journal in collaboration with the Norwegian Defence University College, the Peace Research Institute Oslo, and Bj?rknes College.].
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  47.  11
    Gregory Reichberg & Henrik Syse (2006). Thucydides, Civil War, and Military Ethics. Journal of Military Ethics 5 (4):241-242.
  48.  4
    Lt Col Wayne Beyer (2013). Military Ethics: An Introduction with Case Studies. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (1):88-89.
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  49.  5
    Amy Eckert (2009). Military Ethics. Journal of Military Ethics 8 (4):307-309.
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  50.  2
    Chris Mayer (2013). Military Ethics: An Introduction with Case Studies/The Ethics of War and Peace: An Introduction. Journal of Military Ethics 12 (2):197-199.
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