Search results for 'model organisms' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Sabina Leonelli & Rachel Ankeny (2011). What’s so Special About Model Organisms? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 42 (2):313-323.score: 90.0
    This paper aims to identify the key characteristics of model organisms that make them a specific type of model within the contemporary life sciences: in particular, we argue that the term “model organism” does not apply to all organisms used for the purposes of experimental research. We explore the differences between experimental and model organisms in terms of their material and epistemic features, and argue that it is essential to distinguish between their representational (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Arnon Levy & Adrian Currie (forthcoming). Model Organisms Are Not (Theoretical) Models. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axt055.score: 74.0
    Many biological investigations are organized around a small group of species, often referred to as ‘model organisms’, such as the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The terms ‘model’ and ‘modelling’ also occur in biology in association with mathematical and mechanistic theorizing, as in the Lotka–Volterra model of predator-prey dynamics. What is the relation between theoretical models and model organisms? Are these models in the same sense? We offer an account on which the two practices are (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Kenneth F. Schaffner (1998). Model Organisms and Behavioral Genetics: A Rejoinder. Philosophy of Science 65 (2):276-288.score: 60.0
    In this rejoinder to the three preceding comments, I provide some additional philosophical warrant for the biomedical sciences' focus on model organisms. I then relate the inquiries on model systems to the concept of 'deep homology', and indicate that the issues that appear to divide my commentators and myself are in part empirical ones. I cite recent work on model organisms, and especially C. elegans that supports my views. Finally, I briefly readdress some of the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Rachel A. Ankeny (2001). Model Organisms as Models: Understanding the 'Lingua Franca' of the Human Genome Project. Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2001 (3):S251-.score: 60.0
    Through an examination of the actual research strategies and assumptions underlying the Human Genome Project (HGP), it is argued that the epistemic basis of the initial model organism programs is not best understood as reasoning via causal analog models (CAMs). In order to answer a series of questions about what is being modeled and what claims about the models are warranted, a descriptive epistemological method is employed that uses historical techniques to develop detailed accounts which, in turn, help to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Andrée C. Ehresmann & Jean-Paul Vanbremeersch (2006). The Memory Evolutive Systems as a Model of Rosen's Organisms – (Metabolic, Replication) Systems. Axiomathes 16 (1-2):137-154.score: 48.0
    Robert Rosen has proposed several characteristics to distinguish “simple” physical systems (or “mechanisms”) from “complex” systems, such as living systems, which he calls “organisms”. The Memory Evolutive Systems (MES) introduced by the authors in preceding papers are shown to provide a mathematical model, based on category theory, which satisfies his characteristics of organisms, in particular the merger of the Aristotelian causes. Moreover they identify the condition for the emergence of objects and systems of increasing complexity. As an (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Andrea Loettgers (2007). Model Organisms and Mathematical and Synthetic Models to Explore Gene Regulation Mechanisms. Biological Theory 2 (2):134-142.score: 45.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Rachel A. Ankeny & Sabina Leonelli (2011). What's so Special About Model Organisms? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (2):313-323.score: 45.0
  8. Alan C. Love & Michael Travisano (2013). Microbes Modeling Ontogeny. Biology and Philosophy 28 (2):161-188.score: 45.0
    Model organisms are central to contemporary biology and studies of embryogenesis in particular. Biologists utilize only a small number of species to experimentally elucidate the phenomena and mechanisms of development. Critics have questioned whether these experimental models are good representatives of their targets because of the inherent biases involved in their selection (e.g., rapid development and short generation time). A standard response is that the manipulative molecular techniques available for experimental analysis mitigate, if not counterbalance, this concern. But (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Joel B. Hagen (2010). A History of Model Organisms. Bioscience 60 (5):389-390.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Rachel A. Ankeny (forthcoming). Historiographic Reflections on Model Organisms: Or How the Mureaucracy May Be Limiting Our Understanding of Contemporary Genetics and Genomics. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences.score: 45.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. John Carson (1999). Research Materials and Model Organisms in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences-Minding Matter/Mattering Mind: Knowledge and the Subject in Nineteenth-Century Psychology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science-Part C 30 (3):345-376.score: 45.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Angela N. H. Creager (1999). Research Materials and Model Organisms in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences-'What Blood Told Dr Cohn': World War II, Plasma Fractionation, and the Growth of Human Blood Research. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science-Part C 30 (3):377-406.score: 45.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Gerald L. Geison & Angela N. H. Creager (1999). Research Materials and Model Organisms in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences-Introduction: Research Materials and Model Organisms in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science-Part C 30 (3):315-318.score: 45.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Mario Looso (2014). Opening the Genetic Toolbox of Niche Model Organisms with High Throughput Techniques: Novel Proteins in Regeneration as a Case Study. Bioessays 36 (4):407-418.score: 45.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Karen A. Rader (1999). Research Materials and Model Organisms in the Biological and Biomedical Sciences-Of Mice, Medicine, and Genetics: CC Little's Creation of the Inbred Laboratory Mouse, 1909-1918. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science-Part C 30 (3):319-344.score: 45.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. David Shuker, Jeremy Lynch & Aitana Peire Morais (2003). Moving From Model to Non-Model Organisms? Lessons fromNasonia Wasps. Bioessays 25 (12):1247-1248.score: 45.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Massimo Pigliucci (2004). Studying the Plasticity of Phenotypic Integration in a Model Organism. In M. Pigliucci K. Preston (ed.), The Evolutionary Biology of Complex Phenotypes. Oxford University Press.score: 42.0
    How to use a model organism to study phenotypic integration and constraints on evolution.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Sabina Leonelli & Rachel A. Ankeny (2012). Re-Thinking Organisms: The Impact of Databases on Model Organism Biology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (1):29-36.score: 36.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Thomas C. Kane, Robert C. Richardson & Daniel W. Fong (1990). The Phenotype as the Level of Selection: Cave Organisms as Model Systems. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:151 - 164.score: 36.0
    Selection operates at many levels. Robert Brandon has distinguished the question of the level of selection from the unit of selection, arguing that the phenotype is commonly the target of selection, whatever the unit of selection might be. He uses "screening off" as a criterion for distinguishing the level of selection. Cave animals show a common morphological pattern which includes hypertrophy of some structures and reduction or loss of others. In a study of a cave dwelling crustacean, Gammarus minus, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. F. Michael Akeroyd (2000). Why Was a Fuzzy Model so Successful in Physical Organic Chemistry? Hyle 6 (2):161 - 173.score: 36.0
    This paper examines a facet of the rise of the Hughes-Ingold Theory of Nucleophilic Substitution in Organic Chemistry 1933-1942, arguing that the SN1/SN2 model of reaction mechanism used by Hughes and Ingold is an example of a fuzzy model. Many real world 'Fuzzy Logic' Controlling Devices gave better results compared to classical logic controlling devices in the period 1975-1985. I propose that the adoption of fuzzy principles in the Hughes-Ingold program 1933-1940 led to scientific advance at a time (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. T. Tarockova (1998). The Model of Human Beings as Human Organisms and the Theory of Life Goals. Filozofia 53 (5):322-327.score: 36.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Tanja Rabl & Torsten M. Kühlmann (2008). Understanding Corruption in Organizations – Development and Empirical Assessment of an Action Model. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):477 - 495.score: 33.0
    Despite a strong sensitization to the corruption problem and a large body of interdisciplinary research, scientists have only rarely investigated which motivational, volitional, emotional, and cognitive components make decision makers in companies act corruptly. Thus, we examined how their interrelation leads to corruption by proposing an action model. We tested the model using a business simulation game with students as participants. Results of the PLS structural equation modeling showed that both an attitude and subjective norm favoring corruption led (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Fabian Neuhaus & Barry Smith (2008). Modelling Principles and Methodologies: Relations in Anatomical Ontologies. In Albert Burger, Duncan Davidson & Richard Baldock (eds.), Anatomy Ontologies for Bioinformatics: Principles and Practice. Springer.score: 33.0
    It is now increasingly accepted that many existing biological and medical ontologies can be improved by adopting tools and methods that bring a greater degree of logical and ontological rigor. In this chapter we will focus on the merits of a logically sound approach to ontologies from a methodological point of view. As we shall see, one crucial feature of a logically sound approach is that we have clear and functional definitions of the relational expressions such as ‘is a’ and (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Judy Johns Schloegel (1999). From Anomaly to Unification: Tracy Sonneborn and the Species Problem in Protozoa, 1954-1957. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 32 (1):93 - 132.score: 33.0
    This article examines the critique of the biological species concept advanced by protozoan geneticist Tracy Sonneborn at the 1955 AAAS symposium on "the species problem," published subsequently in 1957. Although Sonneborn was a strong proponent of a population genetical conception of species, he became critical of the biological species concept for its failure to incorporate asexual and obligatory inbreeding organisms. It is argued that Sonneborn's intimate knowledge of the ciliate protozoan Paramecium aurelia species complex brought him into conflict with (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Rony Armon (2012). Between Biochemists and Embryologists - The Biochemical Study of Embryonic Induction in the 1930s. Journal of the History of Biology 45 (1):65 - 108.score: 31.0
    The discovery by Hans Spemann of the “organizer” tissue and its ability to induce the formation of the amphibian embryo's neural tube inspired leading embryologists to attempt to elucidate embryonic inductions’ underlying mechanism. Joseph Needham, who during the 1930s conducted research in biochemical embryology, proposed that embryonic induction is mediated by a specific chemical entity embedded in the inducing tissue, surmising that chemical to be a hormone of sterol-like structure. Along with embryologist Conrad H. Waddington, they conducted research aimed at (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. W. Edward Stead, Dan L. Worrell & Jean Garner Stead (1990). An Integrative Model for Understanding and Managing Ethical Behavior in Business Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 9 (3):233 - 242.score: 24.0
    Managing ethical behavior is a one of the most pervasive and complex problems facing business organizations today. Employees' decisions to behave ethically or unethically are influenced by a myriad of individual and situational factors. Background, personality, decision history, managerial philosophy, and reinforcement are but a few of the factors which have been identified by researchers as determinants of employees' behavior when faced with ethical dilemmas. The literature related to ethical behavior is reviewed in this article, and a model for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Chris Robertson & Paul A. Fadil (1999). Ethical Decision Making in Multinational Organizations: A Culture-Based Model. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 19 (4):385 - 392.score: 24.0
    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the relationship between national culture and ethical decision making. Established theories of ethics and moral development are reviewed and a culture-based model of ethical decision making in organizations is derived. Although the body of knowledge in both cross-cultural management and ethics is well documented, researchers have failed to integrate the influence of cultural values into the ethical decision-making paradigm. A conceptual understanding of how managers from different nations make decisions about highly (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. L. G. & D. M. (2001). The Varied Lives of Organisms: Variation in the Historiography of the Biological Sciences. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (1):1-29.score: 24.0
    This paper emphasizes the crucial role of variation, at several different levels, for a detailed historical understanding of the development of the biomedical sciences. Going beyond valuable recent studies that focus on model organisms, experimental systems and instruments, we argue that all of these categories can be accommodated within our approach, which pays special attention to organismal and cultural variation. Our empirical examples are drawn in particular from recent historical studies of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century genetics and physiology. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Gordana Dodig-Crnkovic (2011). Significance of Models of Computation, From Turing Model to Natural Computation. Minds and Machines 21 (2):301-322.score: 23.0
    The increased interactivity and connectivity of computational devices along with the spreading of computational tools and computational thinking across the fields, has changed our understanding of the nature of computing. In the course of this development computing models have been extended from the initial abstract symbol manipulating mechanisms of stand-alone, discrete sequential machines, to the models of natural computing in the physical world, generally concurrent asynchronous processes capable of modelling living systems, their informational structures and dynamics on both symbolic and (...)
    Direct download (16 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Jaegwon Kim (2002). The Layered Model: Metaphysical Considerations. Philosophical Explorations 5 (1):2 – 20.score: 21.0
    This paper examines the idea, commonly presupposed but seldom explicitly stated in discussions of certain philosophical problems, that the objects and phenomena of the world are structured in a hierarchy of "levels", from the bottom level of microparticles to the levels of cells and biological organisms and then to the levels of creatures with mentality and social groups of such creatures. Parallel to this "layered model" of the natural world is an ordering of the sciences, with physics as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Richard Campbell (2009). A Process-Based Model for an Interactive Ontology. Synthese 166 (3):453 - 477.score: 21.0
    The paper proposes a process-based model for an ontology that encompasses the emergence of process systems generated by increasingly complex levels of organization. Starting with a division of processes into those that are persistent and those that are fleeting, the model builds through a series of exclusive and exhaustive disjunctions. The crucial distinction is between those persistent and cohesive systems that are energy wells, and those that are far-from-equilibrium. The latter are necessarily open; they can persist only by (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Lu Tang (2008). An Integral Model of Collective Action in Organizations and Beyond. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):249 - 261.score: 21.0
    While a large amount of work has been done to understand public good and to construct conceptual models explaining the antecedents of collective action, current literature is flawed in that most of them only examine the lower-level public good and attribute people's participation in collective action to external variables. It pays little to the developmental nature of collective action. Utilizing Ken Wilber's theory of integral psychology, this paper proposes a holistic definition of public good, emphasizing its different levels of development. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Susan J. Harrington (1997). A Test of a Person -- Issue Contingent Model of Ethical Decision Making in Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (4):363-375.score: 21.0
    Despite the existence of a large number of models to explain the ethical decision-making process, rarely have the models been tested. This research validated the use of such models by showing that both issue-contingent variables and individual characteristics affect two commonly-proposed model components: i.e., moral judgment and moral intent. As proposed by Jones' (1991) ethical decision-making model and elaborated on by the author, the main effect of an issue-contingent variable, social consensus, and a closely-related variable, seriousness of consequences, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Yann Devos, Pieter Maeseele, Dirk Reheul, Linda Van Speybroeck & Danny De Waele (2008). Ethics in the Societal Debate on Genetically Modified Organisms: A (Re)Quest for Sense and Sensibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (1):29-61.score: 21.0
    Via a historical reconstruction, this paper primarily demonstrates how the societal debate on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) gradually extended in terms of actors involved and concerns reflected. It is argued that the implementation of recombinant DNA technology out of the laboratory and into civil society entailed a “complex of concerns.” In this complex, distinctions between environmental, agricultural, socio-economic, and ethical issues proved to be blurred. This fueled the confusion between the wider debate on genetic modification and the risk assessment (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. V. Csanyi (1987). The Replicative Model of Evolution: A General Theory. World Futures 23 (1):31-65.score: 21.0
    Formulation of a general model of evolution is presented which is based upon the recognition of the ?biosocial? entity, that is the biosphere and human society, as a component?system. It can be demonstrated that the interactions of the components (moleculas, cells, organisms, ecosystems in the biological realms and people, artifacts and ideas in the societies) have replicative organization. We suggest an explanation for the spontaneous emergence of replicative function and organization, a process called autogenesis. During autogenesis, hierarchical levels (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Athel Cornish-Bowden, Gabriel Piedrafita, Federico Morán, María Luz Cárdenas & Francisco Montero (2013). Simulating a Model of Metabolic Closure. Biological Theory 8 (4):383-390.score: 21.0
    The goal of synthetic biology is to create artificial organisms. To achieve this it is essential to understand what life is. Metabolism-replacement systems, or (M, R)-systems, constitute a theory of life developed by Robert Rosen, characterized in the statement that organisms are closed to efficient causation, which means that they must themselves produce all the catalysts they need. This theory overlaps in part with other current theories, including autopoiesis, the chemoton, and autocatalytic sets, all of them invoking some (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Almo Farina (2008). The Landscape as a Semiotic Interface Between Organisms and Resources. Biosemiotics 1 (1):75-83.score: 21.0
    Despite an impressive number of investigations and indirect evidence, the mechanisms that link patterns and processes across the landscape remain a debated point. A new definition of landscape as a semiotic interface between resources and organisms opens up a new perspective to a better understanding of such mechanisms. If the landscape is considered a source of signals converted by animal cognition into signs, it follows that spatial configurations, extension, shape and contagion are not only landscape patterns but categories of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Nicolas S. Majluf & Carolina M. Navarrete (2011). A Two-Component Compliance and Ethics Program Model: An Empirical Application to Chilean Corporations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 100 (4):567 - 579.score: 21.0
    The rise of ethical scandals in the business world urged corporations to allocate time and resources to emphasize the ethical behavior of their managers and employees. The Model of Ethical Behavior in this article has three main assumptions: (1) the institutionalization of a Compliance and Ethics Program Model is done in terms of just two components: one Explicit and the other Implicit, (2) both components have a significant and direct influence over the ethical behavior of employees, which is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Ali M. Quazi & Dennis O'Brien (2000). An Empirical Test of a Cross-National Model of Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 25 (1):33 - 51.score: 18.0
    Most models of corporate social responsibility revolve around the controversy as to whether business is a single dimensional entity of profit maximization or a multi-dimensional entity serving greater societal interests. Furthermore, the models are mostly descriptive in nature and are based on the experiences of western countries. There has been little attempt to develop a model that accounts for corporate social responsibility in diverse environments with differing socio-cultural and market settings. In this paper an attempt has been made to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Stephen Mumford & Rani Lill Anjum (2011). Spoils to the Vector - How to Model Causes If You Are a Realist About Powers. The Monist 94 (1):54-80.score: 18.0
    A standard way of representing causation is with neuron diagrams. This has become popular since the influential work of David Lewis. But it should not be assumed that such representations are metaphysically neutral and amenable to any theory of causation. On the contrary, this way of representing causation already makes several Humean assumptions about what causation is, and which suit Lewis’s programme of Humean Supervenience. An alternative of a vector diagram is better suited for a powers ontology. Causation should be (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Glenn Carruthers (2012). The Case for the Comparator Model as an Explanation of the Sense of Agency and its Breakdowns. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):30-45.score: 18.0
    I compare Frith and colleagues’ influential comparator account of how the sense of agency is elicited to the multifactorial weighting model advocated by Synofzik and colleagues. I defend the comparator model from the common objection that the actual sensory consequences of action are not needed to elicit the sense of agency. I examine the comparator model’s ability to explain the performance of healthy subjects and those suffering from delusions of alien control on various self-attribution tasks. It transpires (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Cory D. Wright (2000). Eliminativist Undercurrents in the New Wave Model of Psychoneural Reduction. Journal of Mind and Behavior 21 (4):413-436.score: 18.0
    "New wave" reductionism aims at advancing a kind of reduction that is stronger than unilateral dependency of the mental on the physical. It revolves around the idea that reduction between theoretical levels is a matter of degree, and can be laid out on a continuum between a "smooth" pole (theoretical identity) and a "bumpy" pole (extremely revisionary). It also entails that both higher and lower levels of the reductive relationship sustain some degree of explanatory autonomy. The new wave predicts that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Yves Fassin (2009). The Stakeholder Model Refined. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):113 - 135.score: 18.0
    The popularity of the stakeholder model has been achieved thanks to its powerful visual scheme and its very simplicity. Stakeholder management has become an important tool to transfer ethics to management practice and strategy. Nevertheless, legitimate criticism continues to insist on clarification and emphasises on the perfectible nature of the model. Here, rather than building on the discussion from a philosophical or theoretical point of view, a different and innovative approach has been chosen: the analysis will return to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Helena De Preester & Manos Tsakiris (2009). Body-Extension Versus Body-Incorporation: Is There a Need for a Body-Model? [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):307-319.score: 18.0
    This paper investigates the role of a pre-existing body-model that is an enabling constraint for the incorporation of objects into the body. This body-model is also a basis for the distinction between body extensions (e.g., in the case of tool-use) and incorporation (e.g., in the case of successful prosthesis use). It is argued that, in the case of incorporation, changes in the sense of body-ownership involve a reorganization of the body-model, whereas extension of the body with tools (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Peter Godfrey-Smith (2005). Folk Psychology as a Model. Philosophers' Imprint 5 (6):1-16.score: 18.0
    I argue that everyday folk-psychological skill might best be explained in terms of the deployment of something like a model, in a specific sense drawn from recent philosophy of science. Theoretical models in this sense do not make definite commitments about the systems they are used to understand; they are employed with a particular kind of flexibility. This analysis is used to dissolve the eliminativism debate of the 1980s, and to transform a number of other questions about the status (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Slobodan Perovic (2011). Missing Experimental Challenges to the Standard Model of Particle Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 42 (1):32-42.score: 18.0
    The success of particle detection in high energy physics colliders critically depends on the criteria for selecting a small number of interactions from an overwhelming number that occur in the detector. It also depends on the selection of the exact data to be analyzed and the techniques of analysis. The introduction of automation into the detection process has traded the direct involvement of the physicist at each stage of selection and analysis for the efficient handling of vast amounts of data. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Henk Bij de Weg, Reason and the Structure of Davidson's "Desire-Belief Model&Quot;.score: 18.0
    Abstract of “Reason and the structure of Davidson’s ‘Desire-Belief-Model’ ” by Henk bij de Weg -/- In the present discussion in the analytic theory of action, broadly two models for the explanation or justification of actions can be distinguished: the internalist and the externalist model. Against this background, I discuss Davidson’s version of the internalist Desire-Belief Model (DBM). First, I show that what Davidson calls “pro attitude” (a main element of his concept of reason) has two distinct (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Göran Svensson & Greg Wood (2008). A Model of Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):303 - 322.score: 18.0
    It appears that in the 30 years that business ethics has been a discipline in its own right a model of business ethics has not been proffered. No one appears to have tried to explain the phenomenon known as ‚business ethics’ and the ways that we as a society interact with the concept, therefore, the authors have addressed this gap in the literature by proposing a model of business ethics that the authors hope will stimulate debate. The business (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Jürgen Dümont (1999). Putnam's Model-Theoretic Argument(S). A Detailed Reconstruction. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 30 (2):341-364.score: 18.0
    Two of Hilary Putnam's model-theoretic arguments against metaphysical realism are examined in detail. One of them is developed as an extension of a model-theoretic argument against mathematical realism based on considerations concerning the so-called Skolem-Paradox in set theory. This argument against mathematical realism is also treated explicitly. The article concentrates on the fine structure of the arguments because most commentators have concentrated on the major premisses of Putnam's argument and especially on his treatment of metaphysical realism. It is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Willem R. de Jong & Arianna Betti (2010). The Classical Model of Science: A Millennia-Old Model of Scientific Rationality. Synthese 174 (2):185-203.score: 18.0
    Throughout more than two millennia philosophers adhered massively to ideal standards of scientific rationality going back ultimately to Aristotle’s Analytica posteriora . These standards got progressively shaped by and adapted to new scientific needs and tendencies. Nevertheless, a core of conditions capturing the fundamentals of what a proper science should look like remained remarkably constant all along. Call this cluster of conditions the Classical Model of Science . In this paper we will do two things. First of all, we (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000