Search results for 'moral nihilism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michael Almeida (2010). Two Challenges to Moral Nihilism. The Monist 93 (1):96-105.score: 150.0
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  2. Neil Cooper (1973). Moral Nihilism. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 74:75 - 90.score: 150.0
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  3. Quentin Smith (2003). Moral Realism and Infinite Spacetime Imply Moral Nihilism. In Heather Dyke (ed.), Time and Ethics: Essays at the Intersection. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 43--54.score: 150.0
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  4. Jesse Kalin (1977). Philosophy Needs Literature: John Barth and Moral Nihilism. Philosophy and Literature 1 (2):170-182.score: 150.0
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  5. Jamie Dreier (2006). Moral Relativism and Moral Nihilism. In David Copp (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory. Oxford University Press.score: 150.0
     
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  6. Louis Pojman (1993). Do Animal Rights Entail Moral Nihilism? Public Affairs Quarterly 7 (2):165-185.score: 150.0
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  7. Deborah Brown (2008). Gary Steiner. Descartes as a Moral Thinker: Christianity, Technology, Nihilism. JHP Book Series. Amherst, NY: Humanity Books, 2004. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (1):173-175.score: 138.0
    Finding inspiration in Heidegger's lament, "In what soil do the roots of (Descartes's) tree of philosophy find their support?" (and not allowing that the tree might be hydroponic), Steiner proceeds to ground the "concrete content and absolute authority" of Descartes's moral principles in his Christian faith (13). Caught between the two, Descartes's thinking is pulled in opposing directions, towards the "earthly ethos" and its twin ideals of technological mastery over nature and the autonomy of reason, and the "angelic ideal"-a (...)
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  8. Anthony F. Beavers (forthcoming). Moral Machines and the Threat of Ethical Nihilism. In Patrick Lin, George Bekey & Keith Abney (eds.), Robot Ethics: The Ethical and Social Implication of Robotics.score: 126.0
    In his famous 1950 paper where he presents what became the benchmark for success in artificial intelligence, Turing notes that "at the end of the century the use of words and general educated opinion will have altered so much that one will be able to speak of machines thinking without expecting to be contradicted" (Turing 1950, 442). Kurzweil (1990) suggests that Turing's prediction was correct, even if no machine has yet to pass the Turing Test. In the wake of the (...)
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  9. Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (1995). Nihilism and Scepticism About Moral Obligations. Utilitas 7 (02):228-236.score: 120.0
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  10. Jorge Secada (2007). Descartes as a Moral Thinker: Christianity, Technology, and Nihilism—Gary Steiner. International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (1):113-114.score: 120.0
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  11. Deborah Jean Brown (2008). Descartes as a Moral Thinker: Christianity, Technology, Nihilism (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (1):173-175.score: 120.0
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  12. Frederick P. Van De Pitte (2006). Gary Steiner, Descartes as a Moral Thinker: Christianity, Technology, Nihilism Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 26 (1):64-66.score: 120.0
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  13. Joshua May (2013). Skeptical Hypotheses and Moral Skepticism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 43 (3):341-359.score: 108.0
    Moral skeptics maintain that we do not have moral knowledge. Traditionally they haven’t argued via skeptical hypotheses like those provided by perceptual skeptics about the external world, such as Descartes’ deceiving demon. But some believe this can be done by appealing to hypotheses like moral nihilism. Moreover, some claim that skeptical hypotheses have special force in the moral case. But I argue that skeptics have failed to specify an adequate skeptical scenario, which reveals a general (...)
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  14. Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (2000). From 'Is' to 'Ought' in Moral Epistemology. Argumentation 14 (2):159-74.score: 108.0
    Many philosophers claim that no formally valid argument can have purely non-normative premises and a normative or moral conclusion that occurs essentially. Mark Nelson recently proposed a new counterexample to this Humean doctrine:All of Dahlia's beliefs are true.Dahlia believes that Bertie morally ought to marry Madeleine.―∴ Bertie morally ought to marry Madeleine.I argue that Nelson's universal premise has no normative content, that Nelson's argument is valid formally, and that Nelson's moral conclusion occurs essentially and not vacuously. Nonetheless, I (...)
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  15. Nigel Blake (ed.) (2000). Education in an Age of Nihilism. Routledge/Falmer.score: 102.0
    This timely book addresses concerns about educational and moral standards in a world characterised by a growing nihilism.
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  16. Christian Coons (2011). How to Prove That Some Acts Are Wrong (Without Using Substantive Moral Premises). Philosophical Studies 155 (1):83–98.score: 84.0
    I first argue that there are many true claims of the form: x-ing would be morally required, if anything is. I then explain why the following conditional-type is true: If x-ing would be morally required, if anything is, then x-ing is actually morally required. These results allow us to construct valid proofs for the existence of some substantive moral facts—proofs that some particular acts really are morally required. Most importantly, none of my argumentation presupposes any substantive moral claim; (...)
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  17. Michael Wreen (1998). Nihilism, Relativism, and Engelhardt. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (1):73-88.score: 78.0
    This paper is a critical analysis of Tristram Engelhardt''s attempts to avoid unrestricted nihilism and relativism. The focus of attention is his recent book, The Foundations of Bioethics (Oxford University Press, 1996). No substantive or content-full bioethics (e.g., that of Roman Catholicism or the Samurai) has an intersubjectively verifiable and universally binding foundation, Engelhardt thinks, for unaided secular reason cannot show that any particular substantive morality (or moral code) is correct. He thus seems to be committed to either (...)
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  18. Charles R. Pigden (2007). Nihilism, Nietzsche and the Doppelganger Problem. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (5):441 - 456.score: 72.0
    Nihilism, Nietzsche and the Doppelganger Problem Was Nietzsche a nihilist? Yes, because, like J. L. Mackie, he was an error-theorist about morality, including the elitist morality to which he himself subscribed. But he was variously a diagnostician, an opponent and a survivor of certain other kinds of nihilism. Schacht argues that Nietzsche cannot have been an error theorist, since meta-ethical nihilism is inconsistent with the moral commitment that Nietzsche displayed. Schacht’s exegetical argument parallels the substantive argument (...)
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  19. Vicente Serrano (2013). Vida, naturaleza, y nihilismo afectivo en Fichte. Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 30 (1):91-106.score: 72.0
    This paper considers Fichte’s philosophy from the standpoint of the concept of nihilism: I contend that Fichte subordinates the emotional life to the moral imperative. After leaving Jena, Fichte would have tried to answer Jacobi’s objections, making the concept of life his central philosophical concern. This attempt at reconciling the primacy of the moral imperative and a relevant concept of life (in response to Jacobi) would allow us to understand Fichte’s philosophy in the Berlin period and, in (...)
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  20. Terence Cuneo (2007). The Normative Web: An Argument for Moral Realism. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    Moral realism of a paradigmatic sort -- Defending the parallel -- The parity premise -- Epistemic nihilism -- Epistemic expressivism : traditional views -- Epistemic expressivism : nontraditional views -- Epistemic reductionism -- Three objections to the core argument.
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  21. Jon Fennell (1999). Bloom and His Critics: Nietzsche, Nihilism, and the Aims of Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 18 (6):405-434.score: 66.0
    The central questions raised by Allan Bloom's The Closing of theAmerican Mind are often overlooked. Among the most important ofBloom's themes is the impact of nihilism upon education. Bloom condemnsnihilism. Interestingly, we find among his critics two alternativejudgments. Richard Schacht, citing Nietzsche, asserts that nihilism,while fruitless in and of itself, is a necessary prerequisite tosomething higher. Harry Neumann, affirming the accuracy of nihilism,declares that both Bloom and Nietzsche reject nihilism out of ignoranceborn of weakness. All three (...)
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  22. David Phillips (2014). Sympathy for the Error Theorist: Parfit and Mackie. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (3):559-566.score: 66.0
    Derek Parfit claims that “Williams and Mackie…do not use the normative concepts that I and other Non-Naturalists use.” Whatever we think of Parfit’s interpretation of Williams, his interpretation of Mackie should be rejected. For understandable historical reasons, Mackie’s texts are ambiguous. But if we apply to the interpretation of Mackie the same principle of charity Parfit employs in interpreting Williams, we find decisive reason to interpret Mackie as using the same normative concepts as Non-Naturalists.
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  23. Nicholas Capaldi (1995). Scientism, Deconstruction, and Nihilism. Argumentation 9 (4):563-575.score: 66.0
    I show how scientism leads to deconstruction and both, in turn, lead to nihilism. Nihilism constitutes a denial both of the existence of fallacious moral reasoning and the existence of a moral dimension to fallacious reasoning. I argue against all of these positions by maintaining that (1) there is a pre-theoretical framework of norms within which technical thinking function, (2) the pre-theoretical framework cannot itself be technically conceptualized, and (3) the explication of this framework permits us (...)
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  24. Robert P. Lovering (2004). Divine Hiddenness and Inculpable Ignorance. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 56 (2/3):89 - 107.score: 62.0
    J. L. Schellenberg claims that the weakness of evidence for God’s existence is not merely a sign that God is hidden, “it is a revelation that God does not exist.” In Divine Hiddenness: New Essays, Michael J. Murray provides a “soul-making” defense of God’s hiddenness, arguing that if God were not hidden, then some of us would lose what many theists deem a (very) good thing: the ability to develop morally significant characters. In this paper, I argue that Murray’s soul-making (...)
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  25. Joel Marks (2010). An Amoral Manifesto Part I. Philosophy Now (80):30-33.score: 60.0
  26. Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (2006). Moral Skepticisms. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    All contentious moral issues--from gay marriage to abortion and affirmative action--raise difficult questions about the justification of moral beliefs. How can we be justified in holding on to our own moral beliefs while recognizing that other intelligent people feel quite differently and that many moral beliefs are distorted by self-interest and by corrupt cultures? Even when almost everyone agrees--e.g. that experimental surgery without consent is immoral--can we know that such beliefs are true? If so, how? These (...)
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  27. Joel Marks (2011). Atheism, Amorality, and Animals. The New York Times.score: 60.0
  28. Richard Joyce, Nihilism.score: 60.0
    Nihilism” (from the Latin “nihil” meaning nothing) is not a well-defined term. One can be a nihilist about just about anything: A philosopher who does not believe in the existence of knowledge, for example, might be called an “epistemological nihilist”; an atheist might be called a “religious nihilist.” In the vicinity of ethics, one should take care to distinguish moral nihilism from political nihilism and from existential nihilism. These last two will be briefly discussed below, (...)
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  29. Joel Marks (2010). An Amoral Manifesto Part II. Philosophy Now (81):23-26.score: 60.0
  30. Joel Marks (2011). Confessions of an Ex-Moralist. The New York Times.score: 60.0
  31. Lawrence Vogel (1995). Hans Jonas's Diagnosis of Nihilism: The Case of Heidegger. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 3 (1):55 – 72.score: 60.0
    I show how Hans Jonas, one of Heidegger's most distinguished Jewish students, traces his mentor's susceptibility to Nazism to a moral nihilism at the heart of Heidegger's teaching in "Being and Time". I then demonstrate how Jonas's own "existential interpretation of the biological facts" and metaphysical grounding of "an imperative of responsibility" provide one of the most systematic and challenging rejoinders to the moral failings of Heidegger's thought.
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  32. Paul Standish (2001). Ethics Before Equality: Moral Education After Levinas. Journal of Moral Education 30 (4):339-347.score: 60.0
    Emptiness, indeed nihilism, is a characteristic of so much contemporary discourse regarding morality and moral education. This is found in facile notions of teaching right and wrong but also in the prevalence of rights-talk, with its sacrosanct assumptions about equality. This article examines this discourse in the light of Levinas' account of the primacy of ethics - of my absolute responsibility in the face of the other, of the asymmetry of my relation to the other. It seeks an (...)
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  33. Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (1999). Explanation and Justification in Moral Epistemology. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1:117-127.score: 60.0
    Recent exchanges among Harman, Thomson, and their critics about moral explanations have done much to clarify this two-decades-old debate. I discuss some points in these exchanges along with five different kinds of moral explanations that have been proposed. I conclude that moral explanations cannot provide evidence within an unlimited contrast class that includes moral nihilism, but some moral explanations can still provide evidence within limited contrast classes where all competitors accept the necessary presuppositions. This (...)
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  34. Andrew Stables (2005). Multiculturalism and Moral Education: Individual Positioning, Dialogue and Cultural Practice. Journal of Moral Education 34 (2):185-197.score: 60.0
    Multicultural education can be seen as generally premised on two assumptions. The first is often made explicit: that children should learn not to discriminate unfairly on grounds of ethnicity or culture. To this degree, multiculturalism is clearly morally educative, encouraging children to see others in terms of their common humanity rather than their cultural differences. The second is more implicit and diffuse: that sensitivity to cultural and ethnic difference ipso facto promotes social justice and/or harmony between people(s) and thus is (...)
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  35. J. T. Hyland (1986). Instruction, Rationality and Learning to Be Moral. Journal of Moral Education 15 (2):127-138.score: 60.0
    Abstract Moral education programmes which concentrate exclusively on the process of developing critical thinking skills are criticized for their one?sided and incomplete conception of the rational enterprise. Rational moral thinking calls for both criticism and conformity to standards, and critical thinking is vacuous and impotent until it is linked with the prima?facie intuitions which constitute a moral way of life. The fostering of rational moral behaviour, therefore, requires, in addition to the development of critical skills, an (...)
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  36. John Marmysz (1996). From Night to Day: Nihilism and the Living Dead. Film and Philosophy 3:138-143.score: 54.0
    Upon its release in 1968, George Romero's Night of the Living Dead was attacked by many critics as an exploitative low budget film of questionable moral value. I argue in this paper that Night of the Living Dead is indeed nihilistic, but in a deeper philosophical sense than the critics had in mind.
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  37. Jon Tresan (2010). Question Authority: In Defense of Moral Naturalism Without Clout. Philosophical Studies 150 (2):221 - 238.score: 54.0
    Metaethicists of all stripes should read and learn from Richard Joyce's book The Evolution of Morality. This includes moral realists, despite Joyce's own nihilism. Joyce thinks that moral obligations, prohibitions, and the like are myths. But that is just a bit of a rich, broad account of moral attitudes and practices, the bulk of which can comfortably be accepted by realists. In fact, other than nihilism itself, there's only one claim of Joyce's which realists must (...)
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  38. Douglas Butler (1988). Meaning and Metaphysics in the Moral Realism Debate. Southern Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):9-27.score: 54.0
    Semantic formulations of various moral realisms and nonrealisms are to be categorized not only by their differing metaphysical commitments, e.g., realism's rejection of relativism, dummett's antirealism and nihilism, but also by certain of their linguistic commitments. relevant linguistic commitments involve giving priority in the explanation of moral language to, variously, reference, truth conditions, inferential role or illocutionary force. the latter two are illustrated, respectively, by a social pragmatism resembling rorty's and a noncognitivism such as hare's.
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  39. Manuel Vargas (2013). Building Better Beings: A Theory of Moral Responsibility. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    Part I: Building blocks. 1. Folk convictions -- 2. Doubts about libertarianism -- 3. Nihilism and revisionism -- 4. Building a better theory -- Part II. A theory of moral responsibility. 5. The primacy of reasons -- 6. Justifying the practice -- 7. Responsible agency -- 8. Blame and desert -- 9. History and manipulation --10. Some conclusions.
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  40. Theodor W. Adorno (2000). Problems of Moral Philosophy. Stanford University Press.score: 54.0
    These seventeen lectures given in 1963 focus largely on Kant, 'a thinker in whose work the question of morality is most sharply contrasted with other spheres of existence'. After discussing a number of the Kantian categories of moral philosophy, Adorno considers other, seemingly more immediate general problems, such as the nature of moral norms, the good life, and the relation of relativism and nihilism. In the course of the lectures, Adorno addresses a wide range of topics, including: (...)
     
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  41. Stephen Maitzen (2006). The Impossibility of Local Skepticism. Philosophia 34 (4):453-464.score: 48.0
    According to global skepticism, we know nothing. According to local skepticism, we know nothing in some particular area or domain of discourse. Unlike their global counterparts, local skeptics think they can contain our invincible ignorance within limited bounds. I argue that they are mistaken. Local skepticism, particularly the kinds that most often get defended, cannot stay local: if there are domains whose truths we cannot know, then there must be claims outside those domains that we cannot know even if they (...)
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  42. Stephen Maitzen (2008). Anti-Autonomism Defended: A Reply to Hill. Philosophia 36 (4):567-574.score: 48.0
    In the current issue of this journal, Scott Hill critiques some of my work on the “is”-“ought” controversy, the Hume-inspired debate over whether an ethical conclusion can be soundly, or even validly, derived from only non-ethical premises. I’ve argued that it can be; Hill is unconvinced. I reply to Hill’s critique, focusing on four key questions to which he and I give different answers.
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  43. Manuel Salguero (2011). El debilitamiento del vínculo social. Anales de la Cátedra Francisco Suárez 45:363 - 382.score: 48.0
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  44. Nadeem Hussain (2010). Error Theory and Fictionalism. In John Skorupski (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Ethics. Routledge.score: 42.0
    This paper surveys contemporary accounts of error theory and fictionalism. It introduces these categories to those new to metaethics by beginning with moral nihilism, the view that nothing really is right or wrong. One main motivation is that the scientific worldview seems to have no place for rightness or wrongness. Within contemporary metaethics there is a family of theories that makes similar claims. These are the theories that are usually classified as forms of error theory or fictionalism though (...)
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  45. Richard Joyce (2009). Is Moral Projectivism Empirically Tractable? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (1):53 - 75.score: 42.0
    Different versions of moral projectivism are delineated: minimal, metaphysical, nihilistic, and noncognitivist. Minimal projectivism (the focus of this paper) is the conjunction of two subtheses: (1) that we experience morality as an objective aspect of the world and (2) that this experience has its origin in an affective attitude (e.g., an emotion) rather than in perceptual faculties. Both are empirical claims and must be tested as such. This paper does not offer ideas on any specific test procedures, but rather (...)
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  46. Jeffrey Metzger (2009). How Deep Are the Roots of Nihilism? : Nietzsche on the Creative Power of Nature and Morality. In Jeffrey A. Metzger (ed.), Nietzsche, Nihilism, and the Philosophy of the Future. Continuum.score: 42.0
     
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  47. Raymond D. Bradley, &Quot;can There Be an Objective Morality Without God?&Quot; By.score: 40.0
    The question before us is "Can there be an objective morality without God?" By the term "God" we shall mean the God in whom Christians believe, the God of the Bible, not some abstract Higher Power or New Age deity. Dr. Chamberlain believes that the biblical God exists, and that if he didn't exist, there could be no objective moral truths. For myself, I once believed in such a God, but no longer do. My non-belief, however, doesn't mean that (...)
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  48. Harold Langsam (1997). How to Combat Nihilism: Reflections on Nietzsche's Critique of Morality. History of Philosophy Quarterly 14 (2):235 - 253.score: 40.0
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  49. Jianliang Xu (2009). The Universal Sentiment of Daoist Morality. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (4):524-536.score: 40.0
    Daoism has often been misunderstood as moral nihilism or anti-moralism, but the true Daoism indeed adopts a positive attitude towards morality. At the foundation of its universal sentiment is an affirmation of morality. Daoism takes all things as the starting point of its values in moral philosophy, and ziran 自然 (sponstaneously so) as the foundation of its philosophy with the universal commitment. Daoism hopes to use “ Dao to create the best environment for survival, and to fulfill (...)
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