Search results for 'moralism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Aaron Smuts (2013). The Salacious and the Satirical: In Defense of Symmetric Comic Moralism. Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (4):45-62.score: 24.0
    A common view holds that humor and morality are antithetical: Moral flaws enhance amusement, and moral virtues detract. I reject both of these claims. If we distinguish between merely outrageous jokes and immoral jokes, the problems with the common view become apparent. What we find is that genuine morals flaws tend to inhibit amusement. Further, by looking at satire, we can see that moral virtues sometimes enhance amusement. The position I defend is called symmetric comic moralism. It is widely (...)
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  2. Jeffrie G. Murphy (2006). Legal Moralism and Retribution Revisited. Criminal Law and Philosophy 1 (1):5-20.score: 24.0
    This is a slightly revised text of Jeffrie G. Murphy’s Presidential Address delivered to the American Philosophical Association, Pacific Division, in March 2006. In the essay the author reconsiders two positions he had previously defended—the liberal attack on legal moralism and robust versions of the retributive theory of punishment—and now finds these positions much more vulnerable to legitimate attack than he had previously realized. In the first part of the essay, he argues that the use of Mill’s liberal harm (...)
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  3. Thomas Søbirk Petersen (2010). New Legal Moralism: Some Strengths and Challenges. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (2):215-232.score: 24.0
    The aim of this paper is to critically discuss the plausibility of legal moralism with an emphasis on some central and recent versions. First, this paper puts forward and defends the thesis that recently developed varieties of legal moralism promoted by Robert P. George, John Kekes and Michael Moore are more plausible than Lord Devlin's traditional account. The main argument for this thesis is that in its more modern versions legal moralism is immune to some of the (...)
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  4. Aaron Smuts (forthcoming). How Not to Defend Response Moralism. Journal of Aesthetic Education.score: 24.0
    Response moralism holds that audience reactions to works of fiction can be morally bad. This position might appear implausible: How could it be bad to enjoy fictional suffering? It's just fiction. My goal is to sketch the most compelling argument in support of the theory. I show both how and how not to defend response moralism. First I argue that the best defenses in the literature fail. Then I offer a suggestion for how to support the theory. Finally, (...)
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  5. R. A. Duff (2014). Towards a Modest Legal Moralism. Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (1):217-235.score: 24.0
    After distinguishing different species of Legal Moralism (positive vs. negative; modest vs. ambitious) I outline and defend a modest, positive Legal Moralism, according to which we have good reason to criminalize some type of conduct if (and only if) it constitutes a public wrong. Some of the central elements of the argument will be: the need to remember that the criminal law is a political, not a (merely) moral practice, and therefore that in asking what kinds of conduct (...)
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  6. C. A. J. Coady (2012). Moralism and Anti-Moralism: Aspects of Bonhoeffer's Christian Ethic. Sophia 51 (4):449-464.score: 24.0
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer's thinking about ethics and Christianity is a fascinating attempt to combine different, and often conflicting, strands in the Christian intellectual tradition. In this article, I outline his thinking, analyse the advantages and disadvantages in his approach, and relate it to developments in contemporary philosophy. His critique of an excessive stress upon principles and abstraction in opposition to a concern for concrete circumstances is, I argue, best seen as a necessary critique of what I call moralism rather than (...)
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  7. Scott Clifton (2014). Non-Branching Moderate Moralism. Philosophia 42 (1):95-111.score: 24.0
    Noël Carroll’s (“Moderate Moralism”) conceptual framework includes four positions: radical autonomism, moderate autonomism, moderate moralism, and radical moralism. Alessandro Giovanelli (“The Ethical Criticism of Art: A New Mapping of the Territory”) argues that the radical positions, as Carroll defines them, have no modern day adherents. Therefore, the framework should be adapted such that we can see interestingly new distinctions. On Giovanelli’s new framework Carroll’s account is a moderate autonomist view. In this paper I adopt Giovanelli’s framework and (...)
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  8. Danny Scoccia (2013). In Defense of “Pure” Legal Moralism. Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (3):513-530.score: 24.0
    In this paper I argue that Joel Feinberg was wrong to suppose that liberals must oppose any criminalization of “harmless immorality”. The problem with a theory that permits criminalization only on the basis of his harm and offense principles is that it is underinclusive, ruling out laws that most liberals believe are justified. One objection (Arthur Ripstein’s) is that Feinberg’s theory is unable to account for the criminalization of harmless personal grievances. Another (Larry Alexander’s and Robert George’s) is that it (...)
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  9. F. Meyer (2014). Towards a Modest Legal Moralism: Concept, Open Questions, and Potential Extension. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (1):237-244.score: 24.0
    The article introduces and critiques Antony Duff’s Modest Legal Moralism from a strictly analytical angle. It seeks to illuminate its core tenets and modestly addresses a number of aspects that deserve further elaboration from the author’s point of view. Notwithstanding these points of contention the main thrust of the article is the exploration of the constructive potential of Duff’s concept. It will be shown that its core elements are well-equipped to come to grips with the lacuna of theorization of (...)
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  10. Charles T. Mathewes (2000). Agency, Nature, Transcendence, and Moralism: A Review of Recent Work in Moral Psychology. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 28 (2):297 - 328.score: 22.0
    Recent work in moral and philosophical psychology provides valuable resources for religious ethicists, and this review examines contributions by Julia Annas, Annette Baier, John Bowlin, John McDowell, and William Wainwright. This literature raises important questions about the character of human moral being as naturalistic, about whether an explicitly supernatural morality can be other than inevitably "moralistic," and about how that might be so. Nonetheless, religious ethicists should appropriate it only with care, particularly in its emphasis on naturalism, and the partiality (...)
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  11. Noël Carroll (1996). Moderate Moralism. British Journal of Aesthetics 36 (3):223-238.score: 21.0
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  12. Aaron Smuts (2011). Grounding Moralism: Moral Flaws and Aesthetic Properties. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (4):34-53.score: 18.0
    My goal in this article is to provide support for the claim that moral flaws can be detrimental to an artwork's aesthetic value. I argue that moral flaws can become aesthetic flaws when they defeat the operation of good-making aesthetic properties. I do not defend a new theory of aesthetic properties or aesthetic value; instead, I attempt to show that on both the response-dependence and the supervenience account of aesthetic properties, moral flaws with an artwork are relevant to what aesthetic (...)
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  13. Craig Taylor (2009). Art and Moralism. Philosophy 84 (3):341-353.score: 18.0
    Mrs. Digby told me that when she lived in London with her sister, Mrs. Brooke, they were every now and then honoured by the visits of Dr. Johnson. He called on them one day soon after the publication of his immortal dictionary. The two ladies paid him due compliments on the occasion. Amongst other topics of praise they very much commended the omission of all naughty words. 'What! my dears! then you have been looking for them?' said the moralist. The (...)
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  14. Allan Hazlett (2009). How to Defend Response Moralism. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (3):241-255.score: 18.0
    Here I defend response moralism, the view that some emotional responses to fi ctions are morally right, and others morally wrong, from the objection that responses to merely fi ctional characters and events cannot be morally evaluated. I defend the view that emotional responses to fi ctions can be morally evaluated only to the extent that said responses are responses to real people and events.
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  15. Ha Poong Kim (2006). Confucius's Aesthetic Concept of Noble Man: Beyond Moralism. Asian Philosophy 16 (2):111 – 121.score: 18.0
    The prevailing interpretation of ren (humanness) in the Analects is ethical. One consequence of this interpretation is the one-dimensional image of the Confucian junzi (noble man) as a rigid moralist, a fastidious observer of li (ritual). But there are numerous passages in the Analects that resist such a one-sided representation of the junzi, especially Confucius's remarks related to the (Book of) Songs and music. My basic thesis is that Confucius's concept of junji is aesthetic. This is implied by his notion (...)
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  16. E. M. Dadlez & Jeanette Bicknell (2013). Not Moderately Moral: Why Hume Is Not a "Moderate Moralist&Quot;. Philosophy and Literature 37 (2):330-342.score: 18.0
    If philosophers held popularity contests, David Hume would be a perennial winner. Witty, a bon vivant, and champion of reason over bigotry and superstition, it is not surprising that many contemporary thinkers want to recruit him as an ally or claim his views as precursors to their own. In the debate over the moral content of artworks and its possible relevance for artistic and aesthetic value, the group whose views are known variously as “ethicism,” “moralism,” or “moderate moralism (...)
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  17. Michael D. Barber (2006). Rorty's Ethical de-Divinization of the Moralist Self. Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 (1):135-147.score: 18.0
    This article examines Richard Rorty's approach to the self in Contingency, Irony, and Solidarity . In spite of their differing philosophical bases, Rorty and Emmanuel Levinas converge methodologically in their treatments of the self by avoiding paradigmatic notions of human nature and a philosophical project of justification. Although Rorty refuses to prioritize a moralist account of the self over its romanticist rivals, his presentation relies on the reader's response to the ethical appeal of the other as depicted by Levinas: Rorty (...)
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  18. Albert R. Jonsen (1991). American Moralism and the Origin of Bioethics in the United States. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (1):113-130.score: 18.0
    The theology of John Calvin has deeply affected the American mentality through two streams of thought, Puritanism and Jansenism. These traditions formulate moral problems in terms of absolute, clear principles and avoid casuistic analysis of moral problems. This approach is designated American moralism. This article suggests that the bioethics movement in the United States was stimulated by the moralistic mentality but that the work of the bioethics has departed from this viewpoint. Keywords: bioethics, Calvinism, casuistry, Jansenism, moralism, moral (...)
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  19. Carl F. Cranor (1979). Legal Moralism Reconsidered. Ethics 89 (2):147-164.score: 18.0
    In section i, I sketch the main arguments to date for legal moralism, And show the ways in which they are unpersuasive. In sections ii and iii, I sketch and evaluate a seemingly compelling argument, Dependent on the concept of wrongful conduct, For the weak thesis that the immorality of conduct is a reason, But not a sufficient reason for making it illegal. Despite the apparent persuasiveness of this argument, The particular conclusions of the legal moralist, That various non-Harmful (...)
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  20. Joel Feinberg (1980). Legal Moralism and Freefloating Evils. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 61.score: 18.0
    This article distinguishes and evaluates the various forms of legal moralism from a liberal vantage point. It devotes special attention to the most plausible form of the theory, That which is often called "the conservative thesis," and to that supporting argument which is based on the need to prevent "freefloating social-Change evils." freefloating evils are defined as evils that are imputable to human beings but which do not give rise to personal grievances as harms, Offenses, And "harmless exploitative injustices" (...)
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  21. George G. Brenkert (1995). The Environment, The Moralist, The Corporation and Its Culture. Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (4):675-697.score: 18.0
    Contemporary society faces a wide range of environmental problems. In what ways might business be part of the solution, rather than the problem? The Moralist Model is one general response. It tends to focus on particular corporations which it treats as moral agents operating within our common moral system. As a consequence, it claims that, with various (usually modest) changes, corporations may become environmentally responsible.This paper contends, on the contrary, that business has its own special “ethics,” which relates not simply (...)
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  22. Alessandro Giovannelli (2013). Ethical Criticism in Perspective: A Defense of Radical Moralism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (4):335-348.score: 18.0
    I defend the ethical fittingness theory (EFT), the thesis that whenever it is legitimate ethically to evaluate a representational artwork for the perspective it embodies, such evaluation systematically bears on the work's artistic value. EFT is a form of radical moralism, claiming that the systematic relationship between the selected type of ethical evaluation and artistic evaluation always obtains, for works of any kind. The argument for EFT spells out the implications of ethically judging an artwork for its perspective, where (...)
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  23. J. Horton (2010). Realism, Liberal Moralism and a Political Theory of Modus Vivendi. European Journal of Political Theory 9 (4):431-448.score: 18.0
    This article sets out some of the key features of a realist critique of liberal moralism, identifying descriptive inadequacy and normative irrelevance as the two fundamental lines of criticism. It then sketches an outline of a political theory of modus vivendi as an alternative, realist approach to political theory. On this account a modus vivendi should be understood as any political settlement that involves the preservation of peace and security and is generally acceptable to those who are party to (...)
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  24. Stephen Mulhall (2010). The Cat and the Camel a Hesitant Response to “Morality or Moralism?”. Common Knowledge 16 (2):331-338.score: 18.0
    This response to “Morality or Moralism?” by Émilie Hache and Bruno Latour, while accepting the plausibility and importance of their critique of moralism in the name of morality, identifies a number of questionable steps and assumptions in their development of it. Mulhall's response questions an ambiguity in their specifications of what morality and moralism are—an unexplained tendency on their part to occlude distinctively nonhuman animal life in favor of the inanimate when advocating a concern for the nonhuman, (...)
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  25. R. N. Berki (1992). The Realism of Moralism: The Political Philosophy of Istvan Bibo. History of Political Thought 13 (3):513-534.score: 18.0
    It is a safe prediction that, especially now with cultural contacts freely flowing between East and West in both directions, the Hungarian thinker Istvan Bibo will soon be given full accolade as one of the most outstanding political theorists of this century, in stature equal to the �greats� in the entire European tradition of political thought. Bibo's significance far exceeds local, parochial interests. While profoundly original and organically stemming from Hungarian culture, Bibo belongs also to the �West�. If his political (...)
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  26. Émilie Hache & Bruno Latour (2010). MORALITY OR MORALISM? An Exercise in Sensitization. Common Knowledge 16 (2):311-330.score: 18.0
    The field of “science studies” has often been suspected of dubious moral grounds because of its intensive concern with nonhumans; the accusation is made by those who use a roughly Kantian definition of what it is to occupy the moral high ground. By evaluating four contrasting texts (by Comte-Sponville, Kant, Serres, and Lovelock) in tandem, this article explores what an “objective morality” would look like, and it considers how to compare the Kantian axiology with the actor-network theory's possible definition of (...)
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  27. Robert E. Goodin (2010). An Epistemic Case for Legal Moralism. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 30 (4):615-633.score: 18.0
    Ignorance of the law is no excuse, or so we are told. But why not? The statute books run to hundreds of volumes. How can an ordinary citizen know what is in them? The best way might be for law (at least in its wide-scope duty-conferring aspects) to track broad moral principles that ordinary citizens can know and apply for themselves. In contrast to more high-minded and deeply principled arguments, this epistemic argument for legal moralism is purely pragmatic—but importantly (...)
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  28. M. Bagaric (2002). Internalism and the Part-Time Moralist: An Essay About the Objectivity of Moral Judgments. Consciousness and Emotion 2 (2):255-271.score: 16.0
    This paper contends that internalism with respect moral motivation (the view that we are always moved to act in accordance with our moral judgments) is wrong. While internalism can accommodate amoralists, it cannot explain the phenomenon of ‘part-time moralists’ — the person who is (ostensibly at least) moved by some of his or her moral judgments but not others — and hence should be rejected. This suggests that moral judgments are beliefs (or conscious representations) as opposed to desires. It is (...)
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  29. Larry R. Churchill & Alan W. Cross (1986). Moralist, Technician, Sophist, Teacher/Learner: Reflections on the Ethicist in the Clinical Setting. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 7 (1).score: 16.0
    The ethicist's role in the clinical context is not presently well defined. Ethicists can be thought of as moralists, technicians, Sophists, or as teachers and learners. Each of these roles is examined in turn. An argument is made for the ethicist as a teacher who must also learn a great deal about the clinical setting in order to encourage an effective critical examination of basic values. Four specific tasks of this teaching role are discussed: describing moral experience, eliciting assumptions, considering (...)
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  30. Richard Dean (2012). A Plausible Kantian Argument Against Moralism. Social Theory and Practice 38 (4):577-597.score: 16.0
    There seems to be something wrong with passing moralistic judgments on others’ moral character. Immanuel Kant’s ethics provides insight into an underexplored way in which moralistic judgments are problematic, namely, that they are both a sign of fundamentally poor character in the moralistic person herself and an obstacle to that person’s own moral self-improvement. Kant’s positions on these issues provide a basically compelling argument against moralistic judgment of others, an argument that can be detached from the most controversial elements of (...)
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  31. Thomas Søbirk Petersen (2011). What is Legal Moralism? SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 12 (1):80-88.score: 15.0
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  32. Joshua Knobe (2010). Person as Scientist, Person as Moralist. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):315.score: 15.0
    It has often been suggested that people’s ordinary capacities for understanding the world make use of much the same methods one might find in a formal scientific investigation. A series of recent experimental results offer a challenge to this widely-held view, suggesting that people’s moral judgments can actually influence the intuitions they hold both in folk psychology and in causal cognition. The present target article distinguishes two basic approaches to explaining such effects. One approach would be to say that the (...)
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  33. Annette C. Baier (1993). Moralism and Cruelty: Reflections on Hume and Kant. Ethics 103 (3):436-457.score: 15.0
    Both a morality, like Kant's, which relies on wrongdoers' guilt feelings and expectation of punishment, as enforcement for its requirements, and one which, like Hume's, relies on the feelings of shame and expectation of their fellows' contempt which will be felt by those showing lack of the moral virtues, seem to merit the charge that morality is an intrinsically cruel institution. The prospects for a gentle non-punitive morality are explored, and Hume's views found more promising, for this purpose, than Kant's.
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  34. Noel Carroll (1998). Moderate Moralism Versus Moderate Autonomism. British Journal of Aesthetics 38 (4):419-424.score: 15.0
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  35. Charles Pigden (2003). Bertrand Russell: Moral Philosopher or UnPhilosophical Moralist? In Nicholas Griffin (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Bertrand Russell. Cambridge University Press. 475-506.score: 15.0
    Until very recently the received wisdom on Russell’s moral philosophy was that it is uninspired and derivative, from Moore in its first phase and from Hume and the emotivists in its second. In my view this is a consensus of error. In the latter part of this essay I contend: 1) that Russell’s ‘work in moral philosophy’ had at least three, and (depending how you look at it) up to six ‘main phases’; 2) that in some of those phases, it (...)
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  36. Heta Häyry (1991). Liberalism and Legal Moralism: The Hart-Devlin Debate and Beyond. Ratio Juris 4 (2):202-218.score: 15.0
  37. Arthur Kuflik (2005). Liberalism, Legal Moralism and Moral Disagreement. Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (2):185–198.score: 15.0
  38. Arthur Ripstein (2007). Legal Moralism and the Harm Principle: A Rejoinder. Philosophy and Public Affairs 35 (2):195–201.score: 15.0
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  39. Nicholas Dixon (2001). Boxing, Paternalism, and Legal Moralism. Social Theory and Practice 27 (2):323-344.score: 15.0
    324 "we should impose a single legal restriction that would effectively eliminate boxing's main medical risk: a complete ban on blows to the head" against Mill's harm principle, is not possible to justify paternalism requires other paternalistic arguments 325 "the entire paternalism v. respect for autonomy debate as it applied to boxing is cast in nonconsequentialist terms" do we have any reason to suppose that boxers' decisions to enter the profession are lacking in autonomy? many fail the first hurdle: "having (...)
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  40. Joel Marks (2011). Confessions of an Ex-Moralist. The New York Times.score: 15.0
  41. Julia Driver (2005). Moralism. Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (2):137–151.score: 15.0
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  42. Sandrine Berges (2006). The Hardboiled Detective as Moralist : Ethics in Crime Fiction. In T. D. J. Chappell (ed.), Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 15.0
    In this paper I want to investigate further a claim made by Martha Nussbaum and Wayne Booth, amongst others, that good literature can be morally valuable, by applying it to a certain kind of genre fiction: the modern harboiled detective novel.
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  43. Heta Häyry (1992). Legal Paternalism and Legal Moralism: Devlin, Hart and Ten. Ratio Juris 5 (2):191-201.score: 15.0
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  44. Bernard Yack (2006). Bernard Williams, In the Beginning Was the Deed: Realism and Moralism in Political Argument:In the Beginning Was the Deed: Realism and Moralism in Political Argument. Ethics 116 (3):615-618.score: 15.0
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  45. Robert K. Fullinwider (2005). On Moralism. Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (2):105–120.score: 15.0
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  46. Marcus Vinícius C. Baldo & Anouk Barberousse (2010). Person as Moralist and Scientist. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):331.score: 15.0
    Scientific inquiry possibly shares with people's ordinary understanding the same evolutionary determinants, and affect-laden intuitions that shape moral judgments also play a decisive role in decision-making, planning, and scientific reasoning. Therefore, if ordinary understanding does differ from scientific inquiry, the reason does not reside in the fact that the former (but not the latter) is endowed with moral considerations.
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  47. Theodore M. Benditt (2003). The Virtue of Pride: Jane Austen as Moralist. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 37 (2):245-257.score: 15.0
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  48. Robert B. Pippin (2007). Bernard Williams: In the Beginning Was the Deed: Realism and Moralism in Political Argument. Journal of Philosophy 104 (10).score: 15.0
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  49. Duncan Ivison (2005). The Moralism of Multiculturalism. Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (2):171–184.score: 15.0
  50. O. Connolly (2000). Ethicism and Moderate Moralism. British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (3):302-316.score: 15.0
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