Search results for 'morphology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Alan C. Love (2003). Evolutionary Morphology, Innovation, and the Synthesis of Evolutionary and Developmental Biology. Biology and Philosophy 18 (2):309-345.score: 18.0
    One foundational question in contemporarybiology is how to `rejoin evolution anddevelopment. The emerging research program(evolutionary developmental biology or`evo-devo) requires a meshing of disciplines,concepts, and explanations that have beendeveloped largely in independence over the pastcentury. In the attempt to comprehend thepresent separation between evolution anddevelopment much attention has been paid to thesplit between genetics and embryology in theearly part of the 20th century with itscodification in the exclusion of embryologyfrom the Modern Synthesis. This encourages acharacterization of evolutionary developmentalbiology as the marriage (...)
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  2. Uwe Hoßfeld & Lennart Olsson (2003). The Road From Haeckel: The Jena Tradition in Evolutionary Morphology and the Origins of “Evo-Devo”. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 18 (2):285-307.score: 18.0
    With Carl Gegenbaur and Ernst Haeckel, inspiredby Darwin and the cell theory, comparativeanatomy and embryology became established andflourished in Jena. This tradition wascontinued and developed further with new ideasand methods devised by some of Haeckelsstudents. This first period of innovative workin evolutionary morphology was followed byperiods of crisis and even a disintegration ofthe discipline in the early twentieth century.This stagnation was caused by a lack ofinterest among morphologists in Mendeliangenetics, and uncertainty about the mechanismsof evolution. Idealistic morphology was (...)
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  3. Joan Steigerwald (2002). Goethe's Morphology: Urphänomene and Aesthetic Appraisal. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 35 (2):291 - 328.score: 18.0
    This paper examines the relationships between Goethe's morphology and his ideas on aesthetic appraisal. Goethe's science of morphology was to provide the method for making evident pure phenomena [Urphänomene], for making intuitable the necessary laws behind the perceptible forms and formation of living nature, through a disciplined perception. This emphasis contrasted with contemporary studies of generation, which focused upon hidden formative processes. It was his views on aesthetic appraisal that informed these epistemological precepts of his science. His study (...)
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  4. Olivier Rieppel, David M. Williams & Malte C. Ebach (2013). Adolf Naef (1883–1949): On Foundational Concepts and Principles of Systematic Morphology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 46 (3):445-510.score: 18.0
    During the early twentieth century, the Swiss Zoologist Adolf Naef (1883–1949) established himself as a leader in German comparative anatomy and higher level systematics. He is generally labeled an ‘idealistic morphologist’, although he himself called his research program ‘systematic morphology’. The idealistic morphology that flourished in German biology during the first half of the twentieth century was a rather heterogeneous movement, within which Adolf Naef worked out a special theoretical system of his own. Following a biographical sketch, we (...)
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  5. Raf De Bont (2008). Evolutionary Morphology in Belgium. Journal of the History of Biology 41 (1):81-118.score: 18.0
    In historical literature, Edouard van Beneden (1846–1910) is mostly remembered for his cytological discoveries. Less well known, however, is that he also introduced evolutionary morphology – and indeed evolutionary theory as such – in the Belgian academic world. The introduction of this research programme cannot be understood without taking both the international and the national context into account. It was clearly the German example of the Jena University that inspired van Beneden in his research interests. The actual launch (...)
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  6. Helen J. Blackman (2007). The Natural Sciences and the Development of Animal Morphology in Late-Victorian Cambridge. Journal of the History of Biology 40 (1):71 - 108.score: 18.0
    During the 1870s animal morphologists and embryologists at Cambridge University came to dominate British zoology, quickly establishing an international reputation. Earlier accounts of the Cambridge school have portrayed this success as short-lived, and attributed the school's failure to a more general movement within the life sciences away from museum-based description, towards laboratory-based experiment. More recent work has shown that the shift in the life sciences to experimental work was locally contingent and highly varied, often drawing on and incorporating aspects of (...)
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  7. Giovanni Camardi (2001). Richard Owen, Morphology and Evolution. Journal of the History of Biology 34 (3):481 - 515.score: 18.0
    Richard Owen has been condemned by Darwinians as an anti-evolutionist and an essentialist. In recent years he has been the object of a revisionist analysis intended to uncover evolutionary elements in his scientific enterprise. In this paper I will examine Owen's evolutionary hypothesis and its connections with von Baer's idea of divergent development. To give appropriate importance to Owen's evolutionism is the first condition to develop an up-to-date understanding of his scientific enterprise, that is to disentagle Owen's contribution to the (...)
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  8. Dirk Koester (2012). Future Morphology? Summary of Visual Word Identification Effects Draws Attention to Necessary Efforts in Understanding Morphological Processing. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    Future Morphology? Summary of Visual Word Identification Effects Draws Attention to Necessary Efforts in Understanding Morphological Processing.
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  9. Antonio Moreno-Sandoval & José Miguel Goñi-Menoyo (2002). Spanish Inflectional Morphology in DATR. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 11 (1):79-105.score: 18.0
    This paper shows a full description of Spanish inflectional morphology. We have chosen a paradigmatic approach instead of one based on phonological/spelling changes, i.e., the typical two-level model. Such morphological description has been written in the DATR formalism. The result is a network of nodes that makes use of the information inheritance mechanisms – orthogonal node inheritance and default path inheritance – that DATR allows. Some lexical coverage and corpus occurrence figures that support our approach are also given.
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  10. Bruce A. Young (1993). On the Necessity of an Archetypal Concept in Morphology: With Special Reference to the Concepts of “Structure” and “Homology”. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 8 (2):225-248.score: 16.0
    Morphological elements, or structures, are sorted into four categories depending on their level of anatomical isolation and the presence or absence of intrinsically identifying characteristics. These four categories are used to highlight the difficulties with the concept of structure and our ability to identify or define structures. The analysis is extended to the concept of homology through a discussion of the methodological and philosophical problems of the current concept of homology. It is argued that homology is fundamentally a similarity based (...)
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  11. Leslie P. Tolbert, Lynne A. Oland, Thomas C. Christensen & Anita R. Goriely (2003). Neuronal and Glial Morphology in Olfactory Systems: Significance for Information-Processing and Underlying Developmental Mechanisms. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 4 (1):27-49.score: 15.0
    The shapes of neurons and glial cells dictate many important aspects of their functions. In olfactory systems, certain architectural features are characteristics of these two cell types across a wide variety of species. The accumulated evidence suggests that these common features may play fundamental roles in olfactoryinformation processing. For instance, the primary olfactory neuropil in most vertebrate and invertebrate olfactory systems is organized into discrete modules called glomeruli. Inside each glomerulus, sensory axons and CNS neurons branch and synapse in patterns (...)
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  12. Brian K. Hall (2001). Organic Selection: Proximate Environmental Effects on the Evolution of Morphology and Behaviour. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 16 (2):215-237.score: 15.0
    Organic selection (the Baldwin Effect) by which an environmentally elicitedphenotypic adaptation comes under genotypic control following selectionwas proposed independently in 1896 by the psychologists James Baldwinand Conwy Lloyd Morgan and by the paleontologist Henry Fairfield Osborn.Modified forms of organic selection were proposed as autonomization bySchmalhausen in 1938, as genetic assimilation by Waddington in 1942, andas an explanation for evolution in changing environments or for speciationby Matsuda and West-Eberhard in the 1980s. Organic selection as amechanism mediating proximate environmental effects on the (...)
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  13. Miles MacLeod (2011). How to Compare Homology Concepts: Class Reasoning About Evolution and Morphology in Phylogenetics and Developmental Biology. Biological Theory 6 (2):141-153.score: 15.0
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  14. Anastasia Giannakidou & Lisa Cheng (2006). (In)Definiteness, Polarity, and the Role of Wh-Morphology in Free Choice. Journal of Semantics 23 (2):135-183.score: 12.0
    In this paper we reconsider the issue of free choice and the role of the wh-morphology employed in it. We show that the property of being an interrogative wh-word alone is not sufficient for free choice, and that semantic and sometimes even morphological definiteness is a pre-requisite for some free choice items (FCIs) in certain languages, e.g. in Greek and Mandarin Chinese. We propose a theory that explains the polarity behaviour of FCIs cross-linguistically, and allows indefinite (Giannakidou 2001) as (...)
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  15. Arnim von Stechow, German Participles II in Distributed Morphology.score: 12.0
    The semantic claim defended in this article is that the Participle II morphology is not linked to a uniform meaning. The meaning rather co-varies with the syntactic function of the participle. As..
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  16. James Maclaurin (2003). The Good, the Bad and the Impossible: A Critical Notice of 'Theoretical Morphology: The Concept and its Applications' by George McGhee. Biology and Philosophy 18:463-476.score: 12.0
    Philosophers differ widely in the extent to which they condone the exploration of the realms of possibilia. Some are very enamoured of thought experiments in which human intuition is trained upon the products of human imagination. Others are much more sceptical of the fruits of such purely cognitive explorations. That said, it is clear that human beings cannot dispense with modal speculation altogether. Rationality rests upon the ability to make decisions and that in turn rests upon the ability to learn (...)
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  17. Bernard Jeune, Denis Barabé & Christian Lacroix (2006). Classical and Dynamic Morphology: Toward a Synthesis Through the Space of Forms. Acta Biotheoretica 54 (4).score: 12.0
    In plant morphology, most structures of vascular plants can easily be assigned to pre-established organ categories. However, there are also intermediate structures that do not fit those categories associated with a classical approach to morphology. To integrate the diversity of forms in the same general framework, we constructed a theoretical morphospace based on a variety of modalities where it is possible to calculate the morphological distance between plant organs. This paper gives emphasis on shoot, leaf, leaflet and trichomes (...)
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  18. David Resnik (1994). The Rebirth of Rational Morphology. Acta Biotheoretica 42 (1).score: 12.0
    This paper examines a new challenge to neo-Darwinism, a movement known as process structuralism. The process structuralist critique of neo-Darwinism holds 1) that there are general laws in biology and that biologists should search for these laws; 2) that there are general forms of morphology and development and that biologists should attempt to uncover these forms; 3) that organisms are unified wholes that cannot be understood without adopting a holistic perspective; and 4) that no special, causal primacy should be (...)
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  19. D. Turner (2000). The Functions of Fossils: Inference and Explanation in Functional Morphology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 31 (1):193-212.score: 12.0
    This paper offers an account of the relationship between inference and explanation in functional morphology which combines Robert Brandon's theory of adaptation explanation with standard accounts of inference to the best explanation. Inferences of function from structure, it is argued, are inferences to the best adaptation explanation. There are, however, three different approaches to the problem of determining which adaptation explanation is the best. The theory of inference to the best adaptation explanation is then applied to a case study (...)
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  20. Alan Love, Evolutionary Morphology, Innovation, and the Synthesis of Evolution and Development.score: 12.0
    One foundational question in contemporary biology is how to integrate evolution and development. The emerging synthesis (evolutionary developmental biology or ‘evo-devo’) requires a meshing of disciplines, concepts, and explanations (inter alia) that have been developed largely in independence over the past century. The nature of the hoped for synthesis is not wholly agreed upon due to divergent viewpoints resulting from this disciplinary independence and, consequently, the mechanics for accomplishing the task are not clearly specified. This paper utilizes historical investigation for (...)
     
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  21. Rolf Sattler (1990). Towards a More Dynamic Plant Morphology. Acta Biotheoretica 38 (3-4).score: 12.0
    From the point of view of a dynamic morphology, form is not only the result of process(es) — it is process. This process may be analyzed in terms of two pairs of fundamental processes: growth and decay, differentiation and dedifferentiation. Each of these processes can be analyzed in terms of various modalities (parameters) and submodalities. This paper deals with those of growth (see Table 1). For the purpose of systematits and phylogenetic reconstruction the modalities and submodalities can be considered (...)
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  22. Wolf-Ernst Reify, Roger D. K. Thomas & Martin S. Fischer (1985). Constructional Morphology: The Analysis of Constraints in Evolution Dedicated to A. Seilacher in Honour of His 60. Birthday. Acta Biotheoretica 34 (2-4).score: 12.0
    Evolutionary change is opportunistic, but its course is strongly constrained in several fundamental ways. These constraints (historical/phylogenetic, functional/adaptive, constructional/morphogenetic) and their dynamic relationships are discussed here and shown to constitute the conceptual framework of Constructional Morphology. Notwithstanding recent published opinions which claim that the discovery of constraints renders Neodarwinian selection theory obsolete, we regard the insights of Constructional Morphology as being entirely consistent with this theory. As is shown here in the case of the Hyracoidea, formal analysis of (...)
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  23. Stefanie Enriquez-Geppert, Rene J. Huster, Robert Scharfenort, Zacharias Mokom, Christian Figge, Jörg Zimmermann & Christoph S. Herrmann (2013). The Morphology of Midcingulate Cortex Predicts Frontal-Midline Theta Neurofeedback Success. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 12.0
    Humans differ in their ability to learn how to control their own brain activity by neurofeedback. However, neural mechanisms underlying these inter-individual differences, which may determine training success and associated cognitive enhancement, are not well understood. Here, it is asked whether neurofeedback success of frontal-midline (fm) theta, an oscillation related to higher cognitive functions, could be predicted by the morphology of brain structures known to be critically involved in fm-theta generation. Nineteen young, right-handed participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging of (...)
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  24. Robert W. Korn (1994). Hierarchical Ordering in Plant Morphology. Acta Biotheoretica 42 (4).score: 12.0
    Plants are interpreted as structural hierarchies which are real systems organized through descending constraints. Types of hierarchical groups in plants are (a) cluster by integration, (b) support through attachment, (c) enclosure by encasement (d) dissipative by input of energy and (e) control through variable state switching. Most plant hierarchies are mixtures of these types which explains a number of paradoxes in plant morphology. The traditional means of identifying levels, i.e., cell, tissues, organs, uses a compositional group which is not (...)
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  25. Kristijan Krkac (2013). A Custodian of Grammar: Essays on Wittgenstein's Philosophical Morphology. University Press of America.score: 12.0
    Ludwig Wittgenstein was one of the most influential philosophers of the 20th century. This text discusses his philosophical method in his later period, sometimes referred to as morphology.
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  26. Kim Plunkett & Patrick Juola (1999). A Connectionist Model of English Past Tense and Plural Morphology. Cognitive Science 23 (4):463-490.score: 12.0
    The acquisition of English noun and verb morphology is modeled using a single-system connectionist network. The network is trained to produce the plurals and past tense forms of a large corpus of monosyllabic English nouns and verbs. The developmental trajectory of network performance is analyzed in detail and is shown to mimic a number of important features of the acquisition of English noun and verb morphology in young children. These include an initial error-free period of performance on both (...)
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  27. C. D. N. Barel (1993). Concepts of an Architectonic Approach to Transformation Morphology. Acta Biotheoretica 41 (4).score: 12.0
    This paper is about a general methodology for pattern transformation. Patterns are network representations of the relations among structures and functions within an organism. Transformation refers to any realistic or abstract transformation relevant to biology, e.g. ontogeny, evolution and phenotypic clines. The main aim of the paper is a methodology for analyzing the range of effects on a pattern due to perturbing one or more of its structures and/or functions (transformation morphology). Concepts relevant to such an analysis of pattern (...)
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  28. Dirk P. Janssen (1999). The Place of Analogy in Minimalist Morphology and the Irregularity of Regular Forms. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (6):1025-1026.score: 12.0
    Analogy plays an important role in the production of irregular forms but the proposed Minimalist Morphology (MM) representations do not express this. Recent results also show that the regular forms of strong paradigms can have idiosyncratic properties that cannot be accounted for by MM. Methodological problems with an experiment are discussed and a plea for a processing explanation is made.
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  29. H. F. Jelinek, R. M. Cesar & J. J. G. Leandro (2003). Exploring Wavelet Transforms for Morphological Differentiation Between Functionally Different Cat Retinal Ganglion Cells. Brain and Mind 4 (1):67-90.score: 12.0
    Cognition or higher brain activity is sometimes seen as a phenomenon greater than the sum of its parts. This viewpoint however is largely dependent on the state of the art of experimental techniques that endeavor to characterize morphology and its association to function. Retinal ganglion cells are readily accessible for this work and we discuss recent advances in computational techniques in identifying novel parameters that describe structural attributes possibly associated with specific function. These parameters are based on calculating wavelet (...)
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  30. Rudie Trienes (1988). The Influence of German Idealistic Morphology on the Development of C.J. Van der Klaauw's Epistemology. Acta Biotheoretica 37 (2).score: 12.0
    Notwithstanding the general rise of experimental disciplines in biology in the first decades of our century, in Germany and in the Netherlands the interest in the idealistic morphological tradition flourished, and compensated for a reductionistic causal approach to natural phenomena. This article analyses the influence of the German idealistic morphologists W. Lubosch and A. Meyer on the development of C.J. van der Klaauw's epistemology. It discusses the gradual incorporation of non-causal principles into van der Klaauw's concept of biology. Van der (...)
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  31. Robert Beard (1995). Lexeme-Morpheme Base Morphology: A General Theory of Inflection and Word Formation. State University of New York Press.score: 12.0
    This is the first complete theory of the morphology of language, a compendium of information on morphological categories and operations.
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  32. Stephanie Clarke (1998). Sex-Related Differences in Callosal Morphology and Specific Callosal Connectivity: How Far Can We Go? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):329-329.score: 12.0
    The precise relationship between callosal morphology and specific connectivity is not yet known. Callosal axons are often presumed to be arranged according to their origin. In humans, this is true for the genu and the splenium, which convey axons from the prefrontal and occipital cortices, respectively, but not for the body, where axons from wide parts of the cortex are intermingled.
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  33. G. A. Zweers (1985). Greek Classicism in Living Structure? Some Deductive Pathways in Animal Morphology. Acta Biotheoretica 34 (2-4).score: 12.0
    Classical temples in ancient Greece show two deterministic illusionistic principles of architecture, which govern their functional design: geometric proportionalism and a set of illusion-strengthening rules in the proportionalism's stochastic margin. Animal morphology, in its mechanistic-deductive revival, applies just one architectural principle, which is not always satisfactory. Whether a Greek Classical situation occurs in the architecture of living structure is to be investigated by extreme testing with deductive methods.Three deductive methods for explanation of living structure in animal morphology are (...)
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  34. April Nowell (2002). Coincidental Factors of Handaxe Morphology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):413-414.score: 12.0
    Handaxe morphology is thought to be the first example of the imposition of arbitrary form. Handaxes may thus inform researchers about shared mental templates and evolving cognitive abilities. However, many factors, not related to changes in cognition (e.g., material type, function, resharpening processes), influence handaxe shape over time and space. Archaeologists must control for these factors before making inferences concerning cognition.
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  35. Siddharth Ramakrishnan (2013). Morphogenesis, Morphology and Men: Pattern Formation From Embryo to Mind. [REVIEW] AI and Society 28 (4):549-552.score: 11.0
  36. Paul Kiparsky, Accent, Syllable Structure, and Morphology in Ancient Greek.score: 10.0
    In ancient Greek, the pitch accent of most words depends on the syllabification assigned to underlying representations, while a smaller, morphologically identifiable class of derived words is accented on the basis of the surface syllable structure, which results from certain contraction and deletion processes. Noyer 1997 proposes a cyclic analysis of these facts and argues that they are incompatible with parallel OT assumptions. His central claim is that the pre-surface syllabification to which accent is assigned in the bulk of (...)
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  37. Jens Bölte Maria Bronk, Pienie Zwitserlood (2013). Manipulations of Word Frequency Reveal Differences in the Processing of Morphologically Complex and Simple Words in German. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 10.0
    We tested current models of morphological processing in reading with data from four visual lexical decision experiments using German compounds and monomorphemic words. Triplets of two semantically transparent noun-noun compounds and one monomorphemic noun were used in Experiments 1a and 1b. Stimuli within a triplet were matched for full-form frequency. The frequency of the compounds’ constituents was varied. The compounds of a triplet shared one constituent, while the frequency of the unshared constituent was either high or low, but always higher (...)
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  38. Teija Kujala Alina Leminen, Minna Lehtonen, Miika Leminen, Päivi Nevalainen, Jyrki P. Mäkelä (2012). The Role of Attention in Processing Morphologically Complex Spoken Words: An EEG/MEG Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 10.0
    This study determined to what extent morphological processing of spoken inflected and derived words is attention-independent. To answer these questions EEG and MEG responses were recorded from healthy participants while they were presented with spoken Finnish inflected, derived, and monomorphemic words. In the non-attended task, the participants were instructed to ignore the incoming auditory stimuli and concentrate on the silent cartoon. In the attended task, previously reported by Leminen et al. (Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 2011, 5:66), the participants were to (...)
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  39. Maxine Sheets-Johnstone (2012). Movement and Mirror Neurons: A Challenging and Choice Conversation. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (3):385-401.score: 9.0
    This paper raises fundamental questions about the claims of art historian David Freedberg and neuroscientist Vittorio Gallese in their article "Motion, Emotion and Empathy in Esthetic Experience." It does so from several perspectives, all of them rooted in the dynamic realities of movement. It shows on the basis of neuroscientific research how connectivity and pruning are of unmistakable import in the interneuronal dynamic patternings in the human brain from birth onward. In effect, it shows that mirror neurons are contingent on (...)
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  40. Michael T. Ghiselin (1994). Darwin's Language May Seem Teleological, but His Thinking is Another Matter. Biology and Philosophy 9 (4):489-492.score: 9.0
    Darwin''s biology was teleological only if the term teleology is defined in a manner that fails to recognize his contribution to the metaphysics and epistemology of modern science. His use of teleological metaphors in a strictly teleonomic context is irrelevant to the meaning of his discourse. The myth of Darwin''s alleged teleology is partly due to misinterpretations of discussions about whether morphology should be a purely formal science. Merely rejecting such notions as special creation and vitalism does not prevent (...)
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  41. Michael Freeden (1994). Political Concepts and Ideological Morphology. Journal of Political Philosophy 2 (2):140–164.score: 9.0
  42. Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther (2006). Parts and Theories in Compositional Biology. Biology and Philosophy 21 (4):471-499.score: 9.0
    I analyze the importance of parts in the style of biological theorizing that I call compositional biology. I do this by investigating various aspects, including partitioning frames and explanatory accounts, of the theoretical perspectives that fall under and are guided by compositional biology. I ground this general examination in a comparative analysis of three different disciplines with their associated compositional theoretical perspectives: comparative morphology, functional morphology, and developmental biology. I glean data for this analysis from canonical textbooks and (...)
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  43. Anna Papafragou, Evidential Morphology and Theory of Mind.score: 9.0
    The perennial fascination with the relationship between language and thought has generated much research across various disciplines. In recent years, commentators have called for closer examination of the connection between language acquisition and conceptual development (Bowerman & Levinson, 2001). Rather than assuming that language development always presupposes cognitive development, several researchers have started considering whether language learning could transform conceptual structure by making certain concepts available to the learner (e.g., de Villiers & Pyers, 1997; Gopnik & Choi, 1995; Bowerman, 1996).
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  44. Denis Barabé (1991). Chaos in Plant Morphology. Acta Biotheoretica 39 (2).score: 9.0
  45. Paolo Milano (1941). Music in the Film: Notes for a Morphology. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 1 (1):89-94.score: 9.0
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  46. H. G. Alexander (1936). Linguistic Morphology in Relation to Thinking. Journal of Philosophy 33 (10):261-269.score: 9.0
  47. Jelena Mirković, Mark S. Seidenberg & Marc F. Joanisse (2011). Rules Versus Statistics: Insights From a Highly Inflected Language. Cognitive Science 35 (4):638-681.score: 9.0
    Inflectional morphology has been taken as a paradigmatic example of rule-governed grammatical knowledge (Pinker, 1999). The plausibility of this claim may be related to the fact that it is mainly based on studies of English, which has a very simple inflectional system. We examined the representation of inflectional morphology in Serbian, which encodes number, gender, and case for nouns. Linguists standardly characterize this system as a complex set of rules, with disagreements about their exact form. We present analyses (...)
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  48. Lucien Rudrauf (1954). The Morphology of Art and the Psychology of the Artist. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 13 (1):18-36.score: 9.0
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  49. P. B. R. Forbes (1947). Greek Morphology P. Chantraine: Morphologie historique du grec. Pp. x+442. Paris: Klincksieck, 1945. Cloth, 280 fr. J. Humbert: Syntaxe grecque. Pp. 396. Paris: Klincksieck, 1945. Paper, 450 fr. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 61 (02):64-65.score: 9.0
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  50. Marc F. Joanisse & Todd R. Haskell (1999). The Dual-Mechanism Model of Inflectional Morphology: A Connectionist Critique. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (6):1026-1027.score: 9.0
    Clahsen has added to the body of evidence that, on average, regular and irregular inflected words behave differently. However, the dual-mechanism account he supports predicts a crisp distinction; the empirical data instead suggest a fuzzy one, more in line with single-mechanism connectionist models.
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