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  1. Jan Westerhoff (2008). Nāgārjuna's Arguments on Motion Revisited. Journal of Indian Philosophy 36 (4):455-479.score: 24.0
    This paper discusses a somewhat neglected reading of the second chapter of Nāgārjuna’s Mūlamadhyamakakārikā, arguing that the main focus of a crucial part is a particular theory of properties and their relation to individuals they instantiate, rather than the refutation of specific assumptions about the nature of space and time. Some of Nāgārjuna’s key arguments about motion should be understood as argument templates in which notions other than mover, motion, and so forth could be substituted. The remainder of (...)
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  2. Christoph Hoerl (2012). Seeing Motion and Apparent Motion. European Journal of Philosophy (2).score: 24.0
    In apparent motion experiments, participants are presented with what is in fact a succession of two brief stationary stimuli at two different locations, but they report an impression of movement. Philosophers have recently debated whether apparent motion provides evidence in favour of a particular account of the nature of temporal experience. I argue that the existing discussion in this area is premised on a mistaken view of the phenomenology of apparent motion and, as a result, the space (...)
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  3. O. Oron & L. P. Horwitz (2005). Relativistic Brownian Motion and Gravity as an Eikonal Approximation to a Quantum Evolution Equation. Foundations of Physics 35 (7):1181-1203.score: 24.0
    We solve the problem of formulating Brownian motion in a relativistically covariant framework in 3+1 dimensions. We obtain covariant Fokker–Planck equations with (for the isotropic case) a differential operator of invariant d’Alembert form. Treating the spacelike and timelike fluctuations separately in order to maintain the covariance property, we show that it is essential to take into account the analytic continuation of “unphysical” fluctuations.
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  4. Oded Balaban (1995). The Modern Misunderstanding of Aristotle's Theory of Motion. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 26 (1):1 - 10.score: 24.0
    In the Physics, Aristotle defines motion as 'the actuality of what is potentially, qua potential' (Phys. 201b5). This definition has been interpreted countless times and has been the subject of heated controvery. At issue today is whether ὲντελέχεια refers to motions as a process or a state. Accordingly, if the idea of ὲντελέχεια is believed to refer to a process, it is translated to mean actualization. If on the other hand it is taken to refer to a state, it (...)
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  5. S. Deser (2005). A Note on Stress-Tensors, Conservation and Equations of Motion. Foundations of Physics 35 (11):1935-1940.score: 24.0
    Some unusual relations between stress tensors, conservation and equations of motion are briefly reviewed.
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  6. Ian Phillips (2014). Breaking the Silence: Motion Silencing and Experience of Change. Philosophical Studies 168 (3):693-707.score: 24.0
    The naïve view of temporal experience (Phillips, in: Lloyd D, Arstila V (eds) Subjective time: the philosophy, psychology, and neuroscience of temporality, forthcoming-a) comprises two claims. First, that we are perceptually aware of temporal properties, such as succession and change. Second, that for any temporal property apparently presented in experience, our experience itself possesses that temporal property. In his paper ‘Silencing the experience of change’ (forthcoming), Watzl argues that this second naïve inheritance thesis faces a novel counter-example in the form (...)
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  7. Johan Blomberg & Jordan Zlatev (2014). Actual and Non-Actual Motion: Why Experientialist Semantics Needs Phenomenology (and Vice Versa). [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):395-418.score: 24.0
    Experientialist semantics has contributed to a broader notion of linguistic meaning by emphasizing notions such as construal, perspective, metaphor, and embodiment, but has suffered from an individualist concept of meaning and has conflated experiential motivations with conventional semantics. We argue that these problems can be redressed by methods and concepts from phenomenology, on the basis of a case study of sentences of non-actual motion such as “The mountain range goes all the way from Mexico to Canada.” Through a phenomenological (...)
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  8. Jacob Rosen (2012). Motion and Change in Aristotles Physics 5. 1. Phronesis 57 (1):63-99.score: 24.0
    Abstract This paper illustrates how Aristotle's topological theses about change in Physics 5-6 can help address metaphysical issues. Two distinctions from Physics 5. 1 are discussed: changing per se versus changing per aliud ; motion versus change. Change from white to black is motion and alteration, whereas change from white to not white is neither. But is not every change from white to black identical with a change from white to not white? Theses from Physics 6 refute the (...)
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  9. Marius Stan (2009). Kant's Early Theory of Motion. The Leibniz Review 19:29-61.score: 24.0
    This paper examines the young Kant’s claim that all motion is relative, and argues that it is the core of a metaphysical dynamics of impact inspired by Leibniz and Wolff. I start with some background to Kant’s early dynamics, and show that he rejects Newton’s absolute space as a foundation for it. Then I reconstruct the exact meaning of Kant’s relativity, and the model of impact he wants it to support. I detail (in Section II and III) his polemic (...)
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  10. Ofer Gal & Raz Chen-Morris (2012). Nature's Drawing: Problems and Resolutions in the Mathematization of Motion. Synthese 185 (3):429-466.score: 24.0
    The mathematical nature of modern science is an outcome of a contingent historical process, whose most critical stages occurred in the seventeenth century. ‘The mathematization of nature’ (Koyré 1957 , From the closed world to the infinite universe , 5) is commonly hailed as the great achievement of the ‘scientific revolution’, but for the agents affecting this development it was not a clear insight into the structure of the universe or into the proper way of studying it. Rather, it was (...)
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  11. Stephen Puryear (2012). Motion in Leibniz's Middle Years: A Compatibilist Approach. Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 6:135-170.score: 24.0
    In the texts of the middle years (roughly, the 1680s and 90s), Leibniz appears to endorse two incompatible approaches to motion, one a realist approach, the other a phenomenalist approach. I argue that once we attend to certain nuances in his account we can see that in fact he has only one, coherent approach to motion during this period. I conclude by considering whether the view of motion I want to impute to Leibniz during his middle years (...)
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  12. Chunghyoung Lee (2011). Infinity and Newton's Three Laws of Motion. Foundations of Physics 41 (12):1810-1828.score: 24.0
    It is shown that the following three common understandings of Newton’s laws of motion do not hold for systems of infinitely many components. First, Newton’s third law, or the law of action and reaction, is universally believed to imply that the total sum of internal forces in a system is always zero. Several examples are presented to show that this belief fails to hold for infinite systems. Second, two of these examples are of an infinitely divisible continuous body with (...)
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  13. Simon Oliver (2005). Philosophy, God, and Motion. Routledge.score: 24.0
    In the post-Newtonian world motion is assumed to be a simple category which relates to the locomotion of bodies in space, and is usually associated only with physics. Philosophy, God and Motion shows that this is a relatively recent understanding of motion and that prior to the scientific revolution motion was a much broader and more mysterious category, applying to moral as well as physical movements. Simon Oliver presents fresh interpretations of key figures in the (...)
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  14. Anna Papafragou (2010). Source-Goal Asymmetries in Motion Representation: Implications for Language Production and Comprehension. Cognitive Science 34 (6):1064-1092.score: 24.0
    Recent research has demonstrated an asymmetry between the origins and endpoints of motion events, with preferential attention given to endpoints rather than beginnings of motion in both language and memory. Two experiments explore this asymmetry further and test its implications for language production and comprehension. Experiment 1 shows that both adults and 4-year-old children detect fewer within-category changes in source than goal objects when tested for memory of motion events; furthermore, these groups produce fewer references to source (...)
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  15. Panos Athanasopoulos & Emanuel Bylund (2013). Does Grammatical Aspect Affect Motion Event Cognition? A Cross-Linguistic Comparison of English and Swedish Speakers. Cognitive Science 37 (2):286-309.score: 24.0
    In this article, we explore whether cross-linguistic differences in grammatical aspect encoding may give rise to differences in memory and cognition. We compared native speakers of two languages that encode aspect differently (English and Swedish) in four tasks that examined verbal descriptions of stimuli, online triads matching, and memory-based triads matching with and without verbal interference. Results showed between-group differences in verbal descriptions and in memory-based triads matching. However, no differences were found in online triads matching and in memory-based triads (...)
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  16. Jerrold Franklin (2013). Rigid Body Motion in Special Relativity. Foundations of Physics 43 (12):1489-1501.score: 24.0
    We study the acceleration and collisions of rigid bodies in special relativity. After a brief historical review, we give a physical definition of the term ‘rigid body’ in relativistic straight line motion. We show that the definition of ‘rigid body’ in relativity differs from the usual classical definition, so there is no difficulty in dealing with rigid bodies in relativistic motion. We then describe The motion of a rigid body undergoing constant acceleration to a given velocity.The acceleration (...)
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  17. Anja Jauernig (2008). Leibniz on Motion and the Equivalence of Hypotheses. The Leibniz Review 18:1-40.score: 24.0
    Contrary to popular belief, I argue that Leibniz is not hopelessly confused about motion: Leibniz is indeed both a relativist and an absolutist about motion, as suggested by the textual evidence, but, appearances to the contrary, this is not a problem; Leibniz’s infamous doctrine of the equivalence of hypotheses is well-supported and well-integrated within Leibniz’s physical theory; Leibniz’s assertion that the simplest hypothesis of several equivalent hypotheses can be held to be true can be explicated in such a (...)
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  18. Line Brandt (2009). Subjectivity in the Act of Representing: The Case for Subjective Motion and Change. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):573-601.score: 24.0
    The objective in the present paper is to analyze the aspect of subjectivity having to do with construing motion and change where no motion and change exists outside the representation, that is, in cases where the conceptualizer does not intend to convey the idea that these properties exist in the state of affairs described. In the process of doing so, I will elaborate on a critique of the notion of fictivity as it is currently being used in cognitive (...)
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  19. Laura Lakusta & Barbara Landau (2012). Language and Memory for Motion Events: Origins of the Asymmetry Between Source and Goal Paths. Cognitive Science 36 (3):517-544.score: 24.0
    When people describe motion events, their path expressions are biased toward inclusion of goal paths (e.g., into the house) and omission of source paths (e.g., out of the house). In this paper, we explored whether this asymmetry has its origins in people’s non-linguistic representations of events. In three experiments, 4-year-old children and adults described or remembered manner of motion events that represented animate/intentional and physical events. The results suggest that the linguistic asymmetry between goals and sources is not (...)
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  20. Claudio Calosi & Vincenzo Fano (2014). Arrows, Balls and the Metaphysics of Motion. Axiomathes 24 (4):499-515.score: 24.0
    The arrow paradox is an argument purported to show that objects do not really move. The two main metaphysics of motion, the At–At theory of motion and velocity primitivism, solve the paradox differently. It is argued that neither solution is completely satisfactory. In particular it is contended that there are no decisive arguments in favor of the claim that velocity as it is constructed in the At–At theory is a truly instantaneous property, which is a crucial assumption to (...)
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  21. Jen-Tsung Hsiang, Tai-Hung Wu & Da-Shin Lee (2011). Brownian Motion of a Charged Particle in Electromagnetic Fluctuations at Finite Temperature. Foundations of Physics 41 (1):77-87.score: 24.0
    The fluctuation-dissipation theorem is a central theorem in nonequilibrium statistical mechanics by which the evolution of velocity fluctuations of the Brownian particle under a fluctuating environment is intimately related to its dissipative behavior. This can be illuminated in particular by an example of Brownian motion in an ohmic environment where the dissipative effect can be accounted for by the first-order time derivative of the position. Here we explore the dynamics of the Brownian particle coupled to a supraohmic environment by (...)
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  22. Phillip Bricker (1990). Absolute Time Versus Absolute Motion: Comments on Lawrence Sklar. In Phillip Bricker & R. I. G. Hughes (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives on Newtonian Science. Mit Press. 77--91.score: 24.0
    An attempt to clarify how the problem of absolute time and the problem of absolute motion relate to one another, especially with respect to causal attributions involving time and motion.
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  23. Richard D. Wright & Michael R. W. Dawson (1994). To What Extent Do Beliefs Affect Apparent Motion? Philosophical Psychology 7 (4):471-491.score: 24.0
    A number of studies in the apparent motion literature were examined using the cognitive penetrability criterion to determine the extent to which beliefs affect the perception of apparent motion. It was found that the interaction between the perceptual processes mediating apparent motion and higher order processes appears to be limited. In addition, perceptual and inferential beliefs appear to have different effects on perceived motion optimality and direction. Our findings suggest that the system underlying apparent motion (...)
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  24. Anja Jauernig (2009). Leibniz on Motion – Reply to Edward Slowik. The Leibniz Review 19:139-147.score: 24.0
    Response to critical comments by Edward Slowik on my article 'Leibniz on Motion and the Equivalence of Hypotheses' in The Leibniz Review 18 (2008).
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  25. Dominic H. Ffytche Caitlín N. M. Hastings, Philip J. Brittain (2013). An Asymmetry of Translational Biological Motion Perception in Schizophrenia. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Background Biological motion perception is served by a network of regions in the occipital, posterior temporal and parietal lobe, overlapping areas of reduced cortical volume in schizophrenia. The atrophy in these regions is assumed to account for deficits in biological motion perception described in schizophrenia but it is unknown whether the asymmetry of atrophy described in previous studies has a perceptual correlate. Here we look for possible differences in sensitivity to leftwards and rightwards translation of point-light biological (...) in data collected for a previous study and explore its underlying neurobiology using functional imaging. Methods n=64 patients with schizophrenia and n=64 controls performed a task requiring the detection of leftward or rightward biological motion using a standard psychophysical staircase procedure. 6 control subjects took part in the functional imaging experiment. Results We found a deficit of leftward but not rightward biological motion (leftward biological motion % accuracy patients = 57.9%±14.3; controls = 63.6%±11.3 p=0.01; rightward biological motion patients = 62.7%±12.4; controls = 64.1%±11.7; p>0.05). The deficit reflected differences in distribution of leftward and rightward accuracy bias in the two populations. Directional bias correlated with functional outcome as measured by the Role Functioning Scale in the patient group when co-varying for negative symptoms (r=-0.272, p=0.016). Cortical regions with preferential activation for leftwards or rightwards translation were identified in both hemispheres suggesting the psychophysical findings could not be accounted for by selective atrophy or functional change in one hemisphere alone. Conclusions The findings point to translational direction as a novel functional probe to help understand the underlying neural mechanisms of wider cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. (shrink)
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  26. Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (forthcoming). Desert, Bell Motion, and Fairness. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-17.score: 24.0
    In this critical review, I address two themes from Shelly Kagan’s path-breaking The Geometry of Desert. First I explain the so-called “bell motion” of desert mountains—a notion reflecting that, ceteris paribus, as people get more virtuous it becomes more important not to give them too little of whatever they deserve than not to give them too much. Having argued that Kagan’s defense of it is unsatisfactory, I offer two objections to the existence of the bell motion. Second, I (...)
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  27. Eugenie Roudaia, Allison B. Sekuler, Patrick J. Bennett & Robert W. Sekuler (2013). Aging and Audio-Visual and Multi-Cue Integration in Motion. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    The perception of naturalistic events relies on the ability to integrate information from multiple sensory systems, an ability that may change with healthy aging. When two objects move toward and then past one another, their trajectories are perceptually ambiguous: the objects may seem to stream past one another or bounce off one another. Previous research showed that auditory or visual events that occur at the time of discs' coincidence could bias the percept toward bouncing or streaming. We exploited this malleable (...)
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  28. Eunice L. Jung, Asieh Zadbood, Sang-Hun Lee, Andrew J. Tomarken & Randolph Blake (2013). Individual Differences in the Perception of Biological Motion and Fragmented Figures Are Not Correlated. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    We live in a cluttered, dynamic visual environment that poses a challenge for the visual system: for objects, including those that move about, to be perceived, information specifying those objects must be integrated over space and over time. Does a single, omnibus mechanism perform this grouping operation, or does grouping depend on separate processes specialized for different feature aspects of the object? To address this question, we tested a large group of healthy young adults on their abilities to perceive static (...)
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  29. Katsumi Watanabe Ricky K. C. Au, Fuminori Ono (2012). Time Dilation Induced by Object Motion is Based on Spatiotopic but Not Retinotopic Positions. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Time perception of visual events depends on the visual attributes of the scene. Previous studies reported that motion of object can induce an illusion of lengthened time. In the present study, we asked the question whether such time dilation effect depends on the actual physical motion of the object (spatiotopic coordinate), or its relative motion with respect to the retina (retinotopic coordinate). Observers were presented with a moving stimulus and a static reference stimulus in separate intervals, and (...)
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  30. Joseph Bright Skemp (1942). The Theory of Motion in Plato's Later Dialogues. Cambridge [Eng.]The University Press.score: 24.0
    CHAPTER 1 PLATO'S LATER PHILOSOPHY OF MOTION To speak of Plato's “ later” philosophy of motion is not to imply that he held an “earlier” doctrine and modified it in the cosmology of the T imaeus and in the natural theology of the Laws.
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  31. Lotta Winter, Tillmann H. C. Kruger, Jean Laurens, Harald Engler, Manfred Schedlowski, Dominik Straumann & M. Axel Wollmer (2012). Vestibular Stimulation on a Motion-Simulator Impacts on Mood States. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    We are familiar with both pleasant and unpleasant psychotropic effects of movements associated with vestibular stimulation. However, there has been no attempt to scientifically explore the impact of different kinds of vestibular stimulation on mood states and biomarkers. A sample of 23 healthy volunteers were subjected to a random sequence of three different passive rotational (yaw, pitch, roll) and translational (heave, sway, surge) vestibular stimulation paradigms using a motion-simulator (hexapod). Mood states were measured by means of questionnaires and visual (...)
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  32. Francis Macdonald Cornford (1931). The Laws of Motion in Ancient Thought. Cambridge [Eng.]The University Press.score: 24.0
    An Inaugural Lecture Francis Macdonald Cornford. LAWS of MOTION in ANCIENT THOUGHT AN INAUGURAL LECTURE BY F. M. CORNFORD ' Laurence Professor of Ancient Philosophy in the University of Cambridge CAMBRIDGE ...
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  33. David Burr Monica Gori, Giacomo Mazzilli, Giulio Sandini (2011). Cross-Sensory Facilitation Reveals Neural Interactions Between Visual and Tactile Motion in Humans. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 24.0
    Many recent studies show that the human brain integrates information across the different senses and that stimuli of one sensory modality can enhance the perception of other modalities. Here we study the processes that mediate cross-modal facilitation and summation between visual and tactile motion. We find that while summation produced a generic, non-specific improvement of thresholds, probably reflecting higher-order interaction of decision signals, facilitation reveals a strong, direction-specific interaction, which we believe reflects sensory interactions. We measured visual and tactile (...)
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  34. Michael Spivey Sarah E. Anderson, Teenie Matlock (2013). Grammatical Aspect and Temporal Distance in Motion Descriptions. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Grammatical aspect is known to shape event understanding. However, little is known about how it interacts with other important temporal information, such as recent and distant past. The current work uses computer-mouse tracking (Spivey, Grosjean, & Knoblich, 2005) to explore the interaction of aspect and temporal context. Participants in our experiment listened to past motion event descriptions that varied according to aspect (simple past, past progressive) and temporal distance (recent past, distant past) while viewing scenes with paths and implied (...)
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  35. Laura Elizabeth Thomas & Adriane E. Seiffert (2011). How Many Objects Are You Worth? Quantification of the Self-Motion Load on Multiple Object Tracking. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 24.0
    Perhaps walking and chewing gum is effortless, but walking and tracking moving objects is not. Multiple object tracking is impaired by walking from one location to another, suggesting that updating location of the self puts demands on object tracking processes. Here, we quantified the cost of self-motion in terms of the tracking load. Participants in a virtual environment tracked a variable number of targets (1-5) among distractors while either staying in one place or moving along a path that was (...)
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  36. [deleted]David Mattijs Arnoldussen, Jeroen Goossens & Albert Van Den Berg (2013). Differential Responses in Dorsal Visual Cortex to Motion and Disparity Depth Cues. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:815.score: 24.0
    We investigated how interactions between monocular motion parallax and binocular cues to depth vary in human motion areas for wide-field visual motion stimuli (110x100 degrees). We used fMRI with an extensive 2x3x2 factorial blocked design in which we combined two types of self-motion (translation and translation + rotation), with three categories of motion inflicted by the degree of noise (self-motion, distorted self-motion and multiple object-motion), and two different view modes of the flow (...)
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  37. Noël Carroll (2008). The Philosophy of Motion Pictures. Blackwell Pub..score: 24.0
    Philosophy of Motion Pictures is a first-of-its-kind, bottom-up introduction to this bourgeoning field of study. Topics include film as art, medium specificity, defining motion pictures, representation, editing, narrative, emotion and evaluation. Clearly written and supported with a wealth of examples Explores characterizations of key elements of motion pictures –the shot, the sequence, the erotetic narrative, and its modes of affective address.
     
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  38. [deleted]Elizabeth Conlon, Gry Lilleskaret, Craig M. Wright & Anne Stuksrud (2013). Why Do Adults with Dyslexia Have Poor Global Motion Sensitivity? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:859.score: 24.0
    Two experiments aimed to determine why adults with dyslexia have higher global motion thresholds than typically reading controls. In Experiment 1, the dot density and number of animation frames presented in the dot stimulus were manipulated because of findings that use of a high dot density can normalise coherence thresholds in individuals with dyslexia. Dot densities were 14.15 dots/deg2 and 3.54 dots/deg2. These were presented for five (84ms) or eight (134ms) frames. The dyslexia group had higher coherence thresholds in (...)
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  39. [deleted]John A. Pyles Emily D. Grossman, Nicole L. Jardine (2010). fMR-Adaptation Reveals Invariant Coding of Biological Motion on the Human STS. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 24.0
    Neuroimaging studies of biological motion perception have found a network of coordinated brain areas, the hub of which appears to be the human posterior superior temporal sulcus (STSp). Understanding the functional role of the STSp requires characterizing the response tuning of neuronal populations underlying the BOLD response. Thus far our understanding of these response properties comes from single-unit studies of the monkey anterior superior temporal sulcus (STSa), which has individual neurons tuned to body actions, with a small population invariant (...)
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  40. Hongjing Lu Jeroen J. A. Van Boxtel (2013). Impaired Global, and Compensatory Local, Biological Motion Processing in People with High Levels of Autistic Traits. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    People with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are hypothesized to have poor high-level processing but superior low-level processing, causing impaired social recognition, and a focus on non-social stimulus contingencies. Biological motion perception provides an ideal domain to investigate exactly how ASD modulates the interaction between low and high-level processing, because it involves multiple processing stages, and carries many important social cues. We investigated individual differences among typically developing observers in biological motion processing, and whether such individual differences associate with (...)
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  41. Georg Layher, Martin A. Giese & Heiko Neumann (2014). Learning Representations of Animated Motion Sequences—A Neural Model. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (1):170-182.score: 24.0
    The detection and categorization of animate motions is a crucial task underlying social interaction and perceptual decision making. Neural representations of perceived animate objects are partially located in the primate cortical region STS, which is a region that receives convergent input from intermediate-level form and motion representations. Populations of STS cells exist which are selectively responsive to specific animated motion sequences, such as walkers. It is still unclear how and to what extent form and motion information contribute (...)
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  42. [deleted]Stefan Michel Marcia Mendes, Adrian Schwaninger (2013). Can Laptops Be Left Inside Passenger Bags If Motion Imaging is Used in X-Ray Security Screening? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    This paper describes a study where a new X-ray machine for security screening featuring motion imaging (i.e. 5 views of a bag are shown as an image sequence) was evaluated and compared to single view imaging available on conventional X-ray screening systems. More specifically, it was investigated whether with this new technology X-ray screening of passenger bags could be enhanced to such an extent that laptops could be left inside passenger bags, without causing a significant impairment in threat detection (...)
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  43. Harold T. Nefs, Louise O'Hare & Julie M. Harris (2010). Two Independent Mechanisms for Motion-In-Depth Perception: Evidence From Individual Differences. Frontiers in Psychology 1:155-155.score: 24.0
    Our forward-facing eyes allow us the advantage of binocular visual information: using the tiny differences between right and left eye views to learn about depth and location in three dimensions. Our visual systems also contain specialized mechanisms to detect motion-in-depth from binocular vision, but the nature of these mechanisms remains controversial. Binocular motion-in-depth perception could theoretically be based on first detecting binocular disparity and then monitoring how it changes over time. The alternative is to monitor the motion (...)
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  44. [deleted]Chao-Gan Yan, R. Cameron Craddock, Yong He & Michael P. Milham (2013). Addressing Head Motion Dependencies for Small-World Topologies in Functional Connectomics. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:910.score: 24.0
    Graph theoretical explorations of functional interactions within the human connectome, are rapidly advancing our understanding of brain architecture. In particular, global and regional topological parameters are increasingly being employed to quantify and characterize inter-individual differences in human brain function. Head motion remains a significant concern in the accurate determination of resting-state fMRI based assessments of the connectome, including those based on graph theoretical analysis (e.g., motion can increase local efficiency, while decreasing global efficiency and small-worldness). This study provides (...)
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  45. [deleted]Sonja A. Kotz Alexandra A. Ludwig, Rudolf Rübsamen, Gerd J. Dörrscheidt (2012). Age-Related Dissociation of Sensory and Decision-Based Auditory Motion Processing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    Studies on the maturation of auditory motion processing in children have yielded inconsistent reports. The present study combines subjective and objective measurements to investigate how the auditory perceptual abilities of children change during development and whether these changes are paralleled by changes in the event-related brain potential (ERP). We employed the mismatch negativity (MMN) to determine maturational changes in the discrimination of interaural time differences (ITD) that generate lateralized moving auditory percepts. MMNs were elicited in children, teenagers, and adults, (...)
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  46. Axel Kohler Arjen Alink, Felix Euler, Elena Galeano, Alexandra Krugliak, Wolf Singer (2011). Auditory Motion Capturing Ambiguous Visual Motion. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 24.0
    In this study, it is demonstrated that moving sounds have an effect on the direction in which one sees visual stimuli move. During the main experiment sounds were presented consecutively at four speaker locations inducing left- or rightwards auditory apparent motion. On the path of auditory apparent motion, visual apparent motion stimuli were presented with a high degree of directional ambiguity. The main outcome of this experiment is that our participants perceived visual apparent motion stimuli that (...)
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  47. Mazyar Fallah Carolyn J. Perry (2012). Color Improves Speed of Processing But Not Perception in a Motion Illusion. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    When two superimposed surfaces of dots move in different directions, the perceived directions are shifted away from each other. This perceptual illusion has been termed direction repulsion and is thought to be due to mutual inhibition between the representations of the two directions. It has further been shown that a speed difference between the two surfaces attenuates direction repulsion. As speed and direction are both necessary components of representing motion, the reduction in direction repulsion can be attributed to the (...)
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  48. Valentina Cazzato, Serena Siega & Cosimo Urgesi (2012). “What Women Like”: Influence of Motion and Form on Esthetic Body Perception. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Several studies have shown the distinct contribution of motion and form to the esthetic evaluation of female bodies. Here, we investigated how variations of implied motion and body size interact in the esthetic evaluation of female and male bodies in a sample of young healthy women. Participants provided attractiveness, beauty, and liking ratings for the shape and posture of virtual renderings of human bodies with variable body size and implied motion. The esthetic judgments for both shape and (...)
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  49. Swethasri Dravida, Rebecca Saxe & Marina Bedny (2013). People Can Understand Descriptions of Motion Without Activating Visual Motion Brain Regions. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    What is the relationship between our perceptual and linguistic representations of the same event? We approached this question by asking to whether visual perception of motion and understanding linguistic depictions of motion rely on the same neural architecture. The same group of participants took part in two language tasks and one visual task. In task 1, participants made semantic similarity judgments with high (e.g. “to bounce”) and low motion (e.g. “to look”) words. In task 2, participants made (...)
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  50. Akiyoshi Kitaoka Jasmina Stevanov, Branka Spehar, Hiroshi Ashida (2012). Anomalous Motion Illusion Contributes to Visual Preference. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    This study investigated the relationship between the magnitude of illusory motion in the variants of the ‘Rotating Snakes’ pattern and the visual preference among such patterns. In Experiment 1 we manipulated the outer contour and the internal geometrical structure of the figure to test for corresponding modulations in the perceived illusion magnitude. The strength of illusory motion was estimated by the method of adjustment where the speed of a standard moving figure was matched to the speed of the (...)
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