Search results for 'naive theories of perception' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sean Enda Power (2013). Perceiving External Things and the Time-Lag Argument. European Journal of Philosophy 21 (1):94-117.score: 464.0
    : We seem to directly perceive external things. But can we? According to the time-lag argument, we cannot. What we directly perceive happens now. There is a time-lag between our perceptions and the external things we seem to directly perceive; these external things happen in the past; thus, what we directly perceive must be something else, for example, sense-data, and we can only at best indirectly perceive other things. This paper examines the time-lag argument given contemporary metaphysics. I argue that (...)
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  2. Joel Norman (2001). Two Visual Systems and Two Theories of Perception: An Attempt to Reconcile the Constructivist and Ecological Approaches. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):73-96.score: 416.3
    The two contrasting theoretical approaches to visual perception, the constructivist and the ecological, are briefly presented and illustrated through their analyses of space and size perception. Earlier calls for their reconciliation and unification are reviewed. Neurophysiological, neuropsychological, and psychophysical evidence for the existence of two quite distinct visual systems, the ventral and the dorsal, is presented. These two perceptual systems differ in their functions; the ventral system's central function is that of identification, while the dorsal system is mainly (...)
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  3. David-Hillel Ruben (2008). Disjunctive Theories of Perception and Action. In Adrian Haddock & Fiona Macpherson (eds.), Disjunctivism: Perception, Action, Knowledge. Oxford University Press. 227--243.score: 396.8
    A comparison of disjunctive theories of action and perception. The development of a theory of action that warrants the name, a disjunctive theory. On this theory, there is an exclusive disjunction: either an action or an event (in one sense). It follows that in that sense basic actions do not have events intrinsic to them.
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  4. Ryan Perkins (2012). Vagueness and the Philosophy of Perception. Dissertation, University of Oxfordscore: 390.0
    This dissertation explores several illuminating points of intersection between the philosophy of perception and the philosophy of vagueness. Among other things, I argue: (i) that it is entirely unhelpful to theorize about perception or consciousness using Nagelian "what it's like" talk; (ii) that a popular recent account of perceptual phenomenology (representationalism) conflicts with our best theory of vagueness (supervaluationism); (iii) that there are no vague properties, for Evans-esque reasons; (iv) that it is impossible to insert "determinacy" operators into (...)
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  5. Joerg Fingerhut (2011). Sensorimotor Signature, Skill, and Synaesthesia. Two Challenges for Enactive Theories of Perception. In Synaesthesia and Kinaesthetics. Habitus in Habitat III. Peter Lang.score: 384.8
    The condition of ‘genuine perceptual synaesthesia’ has been a focus of attention in research in psychology and neuroscience over the last decades. For subjects in this condition stimulation in one modality automatically and consistently over the subject’s lifespan triggers a percept in another modality. In hearing→colour synaesthesia, for example, a specific sound experience evokes a perception of a specific colour. In this paper, I discuss questions and challenges that the phenomenon of synaesthetic experience raises for theories of perceptual (...)
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  6. Sonam Thakchoe (2012). Candrakīrti’s Theory of Perception: A Case for Non-Foundationalist Epistemology in Madhyamaka. Acta Orientalia Vilnensia 11 (1):93-125.score: 369.0
    Some argue that Candrakīrti is committed to rejecting all theories of perception in virtue of the rejection of the foundationalisms of the Nyāya and the Pramāṇika. Others argue that Candrakīrti endorses the Nyāya theory of perception. In this paper, I will propose an alternative non-foundationalist theory of perception for Candrakīriti. I will show that Candrakrti’s works provide us sufficient evidence to defend a typical Prāsagika’s account of perception that, I argue, complements his core non-foundationalist ontology.
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  7. Simo Knuuttila & Pekka Kärkkäinen (eds.) (2008). Theories of Perception in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Springer.score: 369.0
    In recent years, the rich tradition of various philosophical theories of perception has been increasingly studied by scholars of the history of philosophy of ...
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  8. Matthew Soteriou, Review of Perception, by Robinson, H. [REVIEW]score: 363.0
    Howard Robinson's Perception is now rightly regarded as essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the sense-datum theory of perception and its motivations. It should also be regarded as essential reading for those with a more general philosophical interest in perception and sensory consciousness. As well as discussing the history of the sense-datum theory, and the nature of sense-data and their relation to the physical world, Robinson offers critiques of physicalist theories of perception, intentional/representational (...), adverbial theories, and naive realist/disjunctivist theories. Along the way he also discusses Wittgenstein's private language argument and the nature of secondary qualities. Over the course of the book we are presented with a sustained, and forthright, defence of a sense-datum theory in its traditional form. The arguments are clear, briskly delivered, and challenging. Here I highlight two key elements in Robinson's case for a sense-datum theory, which I think pose an especially serious challenge for his opponents. These are his articulation and defence of the ‘phenomenal principle’ and his ‘revised’ causal argument for sense-data. (shrink)
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  9. Gary Hatfield (1991). The Natural and the Normative: Theories of Spatial Perception From Kant to Helmholtz. Cambridge: MIT Press.score: 360.0
    Gary Hatfield examines theories of spatial perception from the seventeenth to the nineteenth century and provides a detailed analysis of the works of Kant and...
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  10. Elizabeth de Freitas (2014). How Theories of Perception Deploy the Line: Reconfiguring Students' Bodies Through Topo‐Philosophy. Educational Theory 64 (3):285-301.score: 354.0
    In this essay Elizabeth de Freitas follows Tim Ingold's groundbreaking anthropological work on lines and their cultural and material significance to argue that the line is the engine of theory, be it the drawn line of inscription or mathematical measure, the exclusionary line of delineation, or the undulating generative line of flight. De Freitas focuses on contemporary theories of perception that deploy the line — and mobilize the force of theory — so as to encode and reconfigure the (...)
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  11. Nini Praetorius (2007). The Problems of Consciousness and Content in Theories of Perception. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (3):349-367.score: 351.0
    The paper aims to show, first, that O’Regan’s and Noë’s Sensorimotor Theory of Vision and Visual Experiences suffers from circularity, and that evidence from empirical research within perception psychology unequivocally invalidates their theory. Secondly, to show that the circularity in O’Regan’s and Noë’s theory of vision and in other general causal and functional theories of perception (i.e. Gibson’s and Marr’s theories of perception) is the inevitable consequence of mutually conflicting assumption of Cartesian dualism underlying these (...)
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  12. James G. Phillips, James W. Meehan & Tom J. Triggs (2001). Two Theories of Perception: Internal Consistency, Separability and Interaction Between Processing Modes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):114-115.score: 348.8
    Comparisons are drawn between two theories of visual perception and two modes of information processing. Characteristics delineating dorsal and ventral visual systems lack internal consistency, probably because they are not completely separable. Mechanism is inherent when distinguishing these systems, and becomes more apparent with different processing domains. What is lacking is a more explicit means of linking these theories.
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  13. James Genone (2014). Appearance and Illusion. Mind:1-38.score: 345.0
    Recent debates between representational and relational theories of perceptual experience sometimes fail to clarify in what respect the two views differ. In this essay, I explain that the relational view rejects two related claims endorsed by most representationalists: the claim that perceptual experiences can be erroneous, and the claim that having the same representational content is what explains the indiscriminability of veridical perceptions and phenomenally matching illusions or hallucinations. I then show how the relational view can claim that errors (...)
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  14. Steven Davis (ed.) (1983). Causal Theories Of Mind: Action, Knowledge, Memory, Perception, And Reference. Ny: De Gruyter.score: 315.0
    INTRODUCTION SECTION I In the last 20 years or so philosophers in the analytic tradition have taken an increasing interest in causal theories of a wide ...
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  15. Christian Lotz (2007). Depiction and Plastic Perception. A Critique of Husserl's Theory of Picture Consciousness. Continental Philosophy Review 40 (2):171-185.score: 312.0
    In this paper, I will present an argument against Husserl’s analysis of picture consciousness. Husserl’s analysis of picture consciousness (as it can be found primarily in the recently translated volume Husserliana 23) moves from a theory of depiction in general to a theory of perceptual imagination. Though, I think that Husserl’s thesis that picture consciousness is different from depictive and linguistic consciousness is legitimate, and that Husserl’s phenomenology avoids the errors of linguistic theories, such as Goodman’s, I submit that (...)
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  16. John A. Taber (2005). A Hindu Critique of Buddhist Epistemology: Kumārila on Perception: The "Determinatin of Perception" Chapter of Kumārila Bhaṭṭa's Ślokavārttika. Routledgecurzon.score: 312.0
    This is a translation of the chapter on perception by Kumarilabhatta's magnum opus, the Slokavarttika , which is one of the central texts of the Hindu response to the criticism of the logical-epistemological school of Buddhist thought. It is crucial for understanding the debates between Hindus and Buddhists about metaphysical, epistemological and linguistic questions during the classical period. In an extensive commentary, the author explains the course of the argument from verse to verse and alludes to other theories (...)
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  17. Søren Overgaard & Joel Krueger (2013). Social Perception and “Spectator Theories” of Other Minds. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):434 - 435.score: 309.0
    We resist Schilbach et al.’s characterization of the “social perception” approach to social cognition as a “spectator theory” of other minds. We show how the social perception view acknowledges the crucial role interaction plays in enabling social understanding. We also highlight a dilemma Schilbach et al. face in attempting to distinguish their second person approach from the social perception view.
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  18. Bimal Krishna Matilal (1986). Perception: An Essay on Classical Indian Theories of Knowledge. Oxford University Press.score: 304.5
    This book is a defence of a form of realism which stands closest to that upheld by the Nyãya-Vaid'sesika school in classical India. The author presents the Nyãya view and critically examines it against that of its traditional opponent, the Buddhist version of phenomenalism and idealism. His reconstruction of Nyãya arguments meets not only traditional Buddhist objections but also those of modern sense-data representationalists.
     
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  19. William P. Alston (1990). Externalist Theories of Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50:73-97.score: 299.3
    The title refers to theories that require a certain sort of relation between X and an experience of S in order that S perceive X. The relation might be causal, counterfactual, doxastic, or otherwise. It is argued against such theories that there are possible cases in which X stands in the required relation to an experience of S and S does not perceive X and cases in which X is perceived though it does not stand in the required (...)
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  20. Anil Gomes (2014). Kant on Perception: Naive Realism, Non-Conceptualism, and the B-Deduction. Philosophical Quarterly 64 (254):1-19.score: 285.0
    According to non-conceptualist interpretations, Kant held that the application of concepts is not necessary for perceptual experience. Some have motivated non-conceptualism by noting the affinities between Kant's account of perception and contemporary relational theories of perception. In this paper I argue (i) that non-conceptualism cannot provide an account of the Transcendental Deduction and thus ought to be rejected; and (ii) that this has no bearing on the issue of whether Kant endorsed a relational account of perceptual experience.
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  21. Ryan Perkins & Tim Bayne (2013). Representationalism and the Problem of Vagueness. Philosophical Studies 162 (1):71-86.score: 283.5
    This paper develops a novel problem for representationalism (also known as "intentionalism"), a popular contemporary account of perception. We argue that representationalism is incompatible with supervaluationism, the leading contemporary account of vagueness. The problem generalizes to naive realism and related views, which are also incompatible with supervaluationism.
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  22. Naomi Eilan (2013). A Relational Response to Newman's Objection to Russell's Causal Theory of Perception. Theoria 80 (2).score: 283.5
    The causal theory of perception (CTP) has come under a great deal of critical scrutiny from philosophers of mind interested in the nature of perception. M. H. Newman's set-theoretic objection to Russell's structuralist version of the CTP, in his 1928 paper “Mr Russell's Causal Theory of Perception” has not, to my knowledge, figured in these discussions. In this paper I aim to show that it should: Newman's objection can be generalized to yield a particularly powerful and incisive (...)
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  23. Alan Weir (2004). An Ultra-Realist Theory of Perception. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (2):105-128.score: 282.0
    In this paper I argue for a theory of perception distinct both from classical sense-datum theories and from intentionalist theories, that is theories according to which one perceives external objects by dint of a relation with a propositional content. The alternative I propose completely rejects any representational element in perception. When one sees that an object has a property, the situation or state of affairs of its having that property is one's perception, so that (...)
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  24. David W. Hamlyn (1957). The Psychology Of Perception: A Philosophical Examination Of Gestalt Theory And Derivative Theories Of Perception. The Humanities Press.score: 281.3
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  25. Paul Coates (1996). Idealism and Theories of Perception. In Current Issues in Idealism. Bristol: Thoemmes.score: 281.3
     
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  26. Pacherie (1999). Leibhaftigkeit and Representational Theories of Perception. In Ronald McIntyre (ed.), Naturalizing Phenomenology. Stanford: Stanford University Press. 148--160.score: 281.3
  27. George S. Pappas (1979). Epistemic Theories of Perception. Philosophical Inquiry 1:220-228.score: 281.3
     
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  28. Hilary Putnam (2013). The Revival of Naïve Realism. Rivista di Filosofia 104 (3):505-522.score: 279.0
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  29. Pawel Boski & Floyd W. Rudmin (1989). Ichheiser's Theories of Personality and Person Perception: A Classic That Still Inspires. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 19 (3):263–296.score: 276.0
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  30. J. R. Smythies & Vilayanur S. Ramachandran (1997). An Empirical Refutation of the Direct Realist Theory of Perception. Inquiry 40 (4):437-438.score: 274.5
    There are currently two main philosophical theories of perception - Direct Realism and the Representative Theory. The former is supported by most contemporary philosophers, whereas the latter forms the groundwork for most scientific theories in this area. The paper describes a recent experiment involving retinal and cortical rivalry that provides strong empirical evidence that the Direct Realist theory is incorrect. There are of course a large number of related experiments on visual perception that would tend to (...)
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  31. Sofia Miguens (2002). Qualia or Non Epistemic Perception: D. Dennett's and F. Dretske's Representational Theories of Consciousness. Agora 21 (2):193-208.score: 274.5
  32. Gary Hatfield (2005). Rationalist Theories of Sense Perception and Mind-Body Relation. In A Companion to Rationalism (Blackwell Companions to Philosophy). Blackwell.score: 274.5
  33. Michael Podro (1972). The Manifold in Perception: Theories of Art From Kant to Hildebrand. Oxford,Clarendon Press.score: 274.5
  34. Nicholas Pastore (1971). Selective History Of Theories Of Visual Perception, 1650-1950. Oxford University Press.score: 274.5
  35. Walter Horn (2012). Note on Two Snowdon Criticisms of the Causal Theory of Perception. Acta Analytica 27 (4):441-447.score: 273.0
    Two arguments Paul Snowdon has brought against the causal theory of perception are examined. One involves the claim that, based on the phenomenology of perceptual situations, it cannot be the case that perception is an essentially causal concept. The other is a reductio , according to which causal theorists’ arguments imply that a proposition Snowdon takes to be obviously non-causal ( A is married to B ) can be analyzed into some sort of indefinite ‘spousal connection’ plus a (...)
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  36. Lewis Edwin Hahn (1939). Neutral, Indubitable Sense-Data as the Starting Point for Theories of Perception. Journal of Philosophy 36 (22):589-600.score: 272.3
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  37. Gary Hatfield (1988). Representation and Content in Some (Actual) Theories of Perception. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 19 (2):175-214.score: 272.3
  38. H. Wildon Carr, F. B. Jevons, William Brown & G. Dawes Hicks (1911). Symposium: The Time Difficulty in Realist Theories of Perception. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 12:124 - 187.score: 272.3
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  39. R. H. (1955). Theories of Perception and the Concept of Structure. Review of Metaphysics 9 (1):156-156.score: 272.3
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  40. M. D. Conduct (2008). Naïve Realism, Adverbialism and Perceptual Error. Acta Analytica 23 (2):147-159.score: 272.0
    My paper has three parts. First I will outline the act/object theory of perceptual experience and its commitments to (a) a relational view of experience and (b) a view of phenomenal character according to which it is constituted by the character of the objects of experience. I present the traditional adverbial response to this, in which experience is not to be understood as a relation to some object, but as a way of sensing. In the second part I argue that (...)
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  41. Michael Sollberger (2012). Causation in Perception: A Challenge to Naïve Realism. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (4):581-595.score: 270.0
    Defending a form of naïve realism about visual experiences is quite popular these days. Those naïve realists who I will be concerned with in this paper make a central claim about the subjective aspects of perceptual experiences. They argue that how it is with the perceiver subjectively when she sees worldly objects is literally determined by those objects. This way of thinking leads them to endorse a form of disjunctivism, according to which the fundamental psychological nature of seeings and hallucinations (...)
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  42. Jose Filipe Silva & Juhana Toivanen (2011). The Active Nature of the Soul in Sense Perception: Robert Kilwardby and Peter Olivi. Vivarium 48 (3-4):245-278.score: 267.8
    This article discusses the theories of perception of Robert Kilwardby and Peter of John Olivi. Our aim is to show how in challenging certain assumptions of medieval Aristotelian theories of perception they drew on Augustine and argued for the active nature of the soul in sense perception. For both Kilwardby and Olivi, the soul is not passive with respect to perceived objects; rather, it causes its own cognitive acts with respect to external objects and thus (...)
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  43. John Dilworth (2006). A Reflexive Dispositional Analysis of Mechanistic Perception. Minds and Machines 16 (4):479-493.score: 266.3
    The field of machine perception is based on standard informational and computational approaches to perception. But naturalistic informational theories are widely regarded as being inadequate, while purely syntactic computational approaches give no account of perceptual content. Thus there is a significant need for a novel, purely naturalistic perceptual theory not based on informational or computational concepts, which could provide a new paradigm for mechanistic perception. Now specifically evolutionary naturalistic approaches to perception have been—perhaps surprisingly—almost completely (...)
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  44. Michael Strevens (2000). The Essentialist Aspect of Naive Theories. Cognition 74 (149):175.score: 265.5
    Recent work on children’s inferences concerning biological and chemical categories has suggested that children (and perhaps adults) are essentialists— a view known as psychological essentialism. I distinguish three varieties of psychological essentialism and investigate the ways in which essentialism explains the inferences for which it is supposed to account. Essentialism succeeds in explaining the inferences, I argue, because it attributes to the child belief in causal laws connecting category membership and the possession of certain characteristic appearances and behavior. This suggests (...)
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  45. Alma Clara Rands (1970). Thomas Brown's Theories of Association and Perception as They Relate to His Theories of Poetry. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 28 (4):473-483.score: 265.5
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  46. Rolf A. George (1974). Book Review:Selective History of Theories of Visual Perception: 1650-1950 Nicholas Pastore. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 41 (3):296-.score: 265.5
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  47. Carl Ratner (forthcoming). A Sociohistorical Critique of Naturalistic Theories of Color Perception. Journal of Mind and Behavior.score: 265.5
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  48. S. P. Fullinwider (1993). The Natural and the Normative: Theories of Spatial Perception From Kant to Helmholtz: Gary Hatfield,(Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1990), Xii+ 366 Pp. ISBN 0-262-08086-9 Cloth $35.00. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 24 (3):485-491.score: 265.5
     
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  49. Pekka Kärkkäinen (2011). Sense Perception, Theories Of. In. In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. 1182--1185.score: 265.5
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  50. Ram Neta (2009). Causal Theories of Knowledge and Perception. In Helen Beebee, Christopher Hitchcock & Peter Menzies (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Causation. Oup Oxford.score: 265.5
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