Search results for 'naive theories of perception' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  58
    Robert Briscoe & Rick Grush (2015). Action-Based Theories of Perception. In The Stanford Encylcopedia of Philosophy. 1-66.
    Action is a means of acquiring perceptual information about the environment. Turning around, for example, alters your spatial relations to surrounding objects and, hence, which of their properties you visually perceive. Moving your hand over an object’s surface enables you to feel its shape, temperature, and texture. Sniffing and walking around a room enables you to track down the source of an unpleasant smell. Active or passive movements of the body can also generate useful sources of perceptual information (Gibson 1966, (...)
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  2.  90
    Mitchell Herschbach (2015). Direct Social Perception and Dual Process Theories of Mindreading. Consciousness and Cognition 36:483-497.
    The direct social perception thesis claims that we can directly perceive some mental states of other people. The direct perception of mental states has been formulated phenomenologically and psychologically, and typically restricted to the mental state types of intentions and emotions. I will compare DSP to another account of mindreading: dual process accounts that posit a fast, automatic “Type 1” form of mindreading and a slow, effortful “Type 2” form. I will here analyze whether dual process accounts’ Type (...)
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  3. Joel Norman (2001). Two Visual Systems and Two Theories of Perception: An Attempt to Reconcile the Constructivist and Ecological Approaches. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):73-96.
    The two contrasting theoretical approaches to visual perception, the constructivist and the ecological, are briefly presented and illustrated through their analyses of space and size perception. Earlier calls for their reconciliation and unification are reviewed. Neurophysiological, neuropsychological, and psychophysical evidence for the existence of two quite distinct visual systems, the ventral and the dorsal, is presented. These two perceptual systems differ in their functions; the ventral system's central function is that of identification, while the dorsal system is mainly (...)
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  4. David-Hillel Ruben (2008). Disjunctive Theories of Perception and Action. In Adrian Haddock & Fiona Macpherson (eds.), Disjunctivism: Perception, Action, Knowledge. Oxford University Press 227--243.
    A comparison of disjunctive theories of action and perception. The development of a theory of action that warrants the name, a disjunctive theory. On this theory, there is an exclusive disjunction: either an action or an event (in one sense). It follows that in that sense basic actions do not have events intrinsic to them.
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  5.  79
    Gary Hatfield (1991). The Natural and the Normative: Theories of Spatial Perception From Kant to Helmholtz. Cambridge: MIT Press.
    Gary Hatfield examines theories of spatial perception from the seventeenth to the nineteenth century and provides a detailed analysis of the works of Kant and Helmholtz, who adopted opposing stances on whether central questions about spatial perception were fully amenable to natural-scientific treatment. At stake were the proper understanding of the relationships among sensation, perception, and experience, and the proper methodological framework for investigating the mental activities of judgment, understanding, and reason issues which remain at the (...)
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  6.  72
    Marcello Frixione & Antonio Lieto (2014). Concepts, Perception and the Dual Process Theories of Mind. The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 9 (1).
    In this article we argue that the problem of the relationships between concepts and perception in cognitive science is blurred by the fact that the very notion of concept is rather confused. Since it is not always clear exactly what concepts are, it is not easy to say, for example, whether and in what measure concept possession involves entertaining and manipulating perceptual representations, whether concepts are entirely different from perceptual representations, and so on. As a paradigmatic example of this (...)
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  7.  4
    William F. Brewer (1999). Scientific Theories and Naive Theories as Forms of Mental Representation: Psychologism Revived. Science and Education 8 (5):489-505.
    This paper analyzes recent work in psychology on the nature of the representation of complex forms of knowledge with the goal of understanding how theories are represented. The analysis suggests that, as a psychological form of representation, theories are mental structures that include theoretical entities (usually nonobservable), relationships among the theoretical entities, and relationships of the theoretical entities to the phenomena of some domain. A theory explains the phenomena in its domain by providing a conceptual framework for the (...)
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  8.  47
    Joerg Fingerhut (2011). Sensorimotor Signature, Skill, and Synaesthesia. Two Challenges for Enactive Theories of Perception. In Synaesthesia and Kinaesthetics. Habitus in Habitat III. Peter Lang
    The condition of ‘genuine perceptual synaesthesia’ has been a focus of attention in research in psychology and neuroscience over the last decades. For subjects in this condition stimulation in one modality automatically and consistently over the subject’s lifespan triggers a percept in another modality. In hearing→colour synaesthesia, for example, a specific sound experience evokes a perception of a specific colour. In this paper, I discuss questions and challenges that the phenomenon of synaesthetic experience raises for theories of perceptual (...)
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  9.  35
    Nini Praetorius (2007). The Problems of Consciousness and Content in Theories of Perception. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 6 (3):349-367.
    The paper aims to show, first, that O’Regan’s and Noë’s Sensorimotor Theory of Vision and Visual Experiences suffers from circularity, and that evidence from empirical research within perception psychology unequivocally invalidates their theory. Secondly, to show that the circularity in O’Regan’s and Noë’s theory of vision and in other general causal and functional theories of perception (i.e. Gibson’s and Marr’s theories of perception) is the inevitable consequence of mutually conflicting assumption of Cartesian dualism underlying these (...)
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  10.  62
    Simo Knuuttila & Pekka Kärkkäinen (eds.) (2008). Theories of Perception in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Springer.
    In recent years, the rich tradition of various philosophical theories of perception has been increasingly studied by scholars of the history of philosophy of ...
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  11.  12
    Gary Hatfield (2014). Activity and Passivity in Theories of Perception: Descartes to Kant. In José Filipe Silva & Mikko Yrjönsuuri (eds.), Active Perception in the History of Philosophy: From Plato to Modern Philosophy. Springer 275–89.
    In the early modern period, many authors held that sensation or sensory reception is in some way passive and that perception is in some way active. The notion of a more passive and a more active aspect of perception is already present in Aristotle: the senses receive forms without matter more or less passively, but the “primary sense” also recognizes the salience of present objects. Ibn al-Haytham distinguished “pure sensation” from other aspects of sense perception, achieved by (...)
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  12.  19
    Gary Hatfield (2005). Rationalist Theories of Sense Perception and Mind-Body Relation. In Alan Nelson (ed.), A Companion to Rationalism (Blackwell Companions to Philosophy). Blackwell 31-60.
    This chapter compares rationalist theories of sense perception to previously held theories of perception (especially of vision) and examines rationalist accounts of sensory qualities and sensory representation, of the role of the sense-based passions in guiding behavior, of the epistemological benefits and dangers of sense perception, and of mind–body relations. Each section begins with Descartes, the first major rationalist of the seventeenth century. The other major rationalists, Malebranche, Spinoza, and Leibniz, and also lesser known figures (...)
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  13.  3
    Elizabeth de Freitas (2014). How Theories of Perception Deploy the Line: Reconfiguring Students' Bodies Through Topo‐Philosophy. Educational Theory 64 (3):285-301.
    In this essay Elizabeth de Freitas follows Tim Ingold's groundbreaking anthropological work on lines and their cultural and material significance to argue that the line is the engine of theory, be it the drawn line of inscription or mathematical measure, the exclusionary line of delineation, or the undulating generative line of flight. De Freitas focuses on contemporary theories of perception that deploy the line — and mobilize the force of theory — so as to encode and reconfigure the (...)
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  14.  1
    James G. Phillips, James W. Meehan & Tom J. Triggs (2001). Two Theories of Perception: Internal Consistency, Separability and Interaction Between Processing Modes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):114-115.
    Comparisons are drawn between two theories of visual perception and two modes of information processing. Characteristics delineating dorsal and ventral visual systems lack internal consistency, probably because they are not completely separable. Mechanism is inherent when distinguishing these systems, and becomes more apparent with different processing domains. What is lacking is a more explicit means of linking these theories.
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  15.  61
    Dimitris Platchias (2004). The Veil of Perception and Contextual Relativism. Sorites 15 (December):76-86.
    In this paper I point out main shortfalls of the three main families of theories of perception and I propose a sort of inferential realism. In addition, I argue that there cannot be a scientific variant of direct realism and illustrate this point with reference to P.F.Strawson's attempt to reconcile, not naïve realism and the scientific variant as he amounts to, but rather, direct and indirect realism. I draw the distinction between four cases of illusion, and I refer (...)
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  16.  2
    Heiko Hecht (2000). The Failings of Three Event Perception Theories. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 30 (1):1–25.
    Empirical research on the perception of physical events is rarely designed to test a particular theory. The research often fails to be embedded in a larger theoretical context or it is carried out with the implicit goal to support a particular theoretical approach. I argue that this is not very productive. While three theories are relevant for our understanding of events, their limits have rarely been addressed. I expose these limits. The three theories or approaches are direct (...)
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  17.  54
    Steven Davis (ed.) (1983). Causal Theories Of Mind: Action, Knowledge, Memory, Perception, And Reference. Ny: De Gruyter.
    INTRODUCTION SECTION I In the last 20 years or so philosophers in the analytic tradition have taken an increasing interest in causal theories of a wide ...
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  18.  49
    Søren Overgaard & Joel Krueger (2013). Social Perception and “Spectator Theories” of Other Minds. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):434 - 435.
    We resist Schilbach et al.’s characterization of the “social perception” approach to social cognition as a “spectator theory” of other minds. We show how the social perception view acknowledges the crucial role interaction plays in enabling social understanding. We also highlight a dilemma Schilbach et al. face in attempting to distinguish their second person approach from the social perception view.
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  19. Bimal Krishna Matilal (1986). Perception: An Essay on Classical Indian Theories of Knowledge. Oxford University Press.
    This book is a defence of a form of realism which stands closest to that upheld by the Nyãya-Vaid'sesika school in classical India. The author presents the Nyãya view and critically examines it against that of its traditional opponent, the Buddhist version of phenomenalism and idealism. His reconstruction of Nyãya arguments meets not only traditional Buddhist objections but also those of modern sense-data representationalists.
     
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  20.  60
    William P. Alston (1990). Externalist Theories of Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50:73-97.
    The title refers to theories that require a certain sort of relation between X and an experience of S in order that S perceive X. The relation might be causal, counterfactual, doxastic, or otherwise. It is argued against such theories that there are possible cases in which X stands in the required relation to an experience of S and S does not perceive X and cases in which X is perceived though it does not stand in the required (...)
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  21.  2
    Carl Ratner (1989). A Sociohistorical Critique Of Naturalistic Theories Of Color Perception. Journal of Mind and Behavior 10 (4):361-372.
    Naturalistic experiments of color perception are critically evaluated. The review concludes that they fail to confirm a natural determination of color perception. Rather than demonstrating universal sensitivity to focal colors, the experiments actually yielded enormous cultural variation in response. This variation is interpreted as supporting a sociohistorical psychological explanation of color perception.
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  22.  21
    Matthew Soteriou, Review of Perception, by Robinson, H. [REVIEW]
    Howard Robinson's Perception is now rightly regarded as essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the sense-datum theory of perception and its motivations. It should also be regarded as essential reading for those with a more general philosophical interest in perception and sensory consciousness. As well as discussing the history of the sense-datum theory, and the nature of sense-data and their relation to the physical world, Robinson offers critiques of physicalist theories of perception, intentional/representational (...), adverbial theories, and naive realist/disjunctivist theories. Along the way he also discusses Wittgenstein's private language argument and the nature of secondary qualities. Over the course of the book we are presented with a sustained, and forthright, defence of a sense-datum theory in its traditional form. The arguments are clear, briskly delivered, and challenging. Here I highlight two key elements in Robinson's case for a sense-datum theory, which I think pose an especially serious challenge for his opponents. These are his articulation and defence of the ‘phenomenal principle’ and his ‘revised’ causal argument for sense-data. (shrink)
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  23. David W. Hamlyn (1957). The Psychology Of Perception: A Philosophical Examination Of Gestalt Theory And Derivative Theories Of Perception. The Humanities Press.
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  24. Paul Coates (1996). Idealism and Theories of Perception. In Current Issues in Idealism. Bristol: Thoemmes
     
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  25. Pacherie (1999). Leibhaftigkeit and Representational Theories of Perception. In Ronald McIntyre (ed.), Naturalizing Phenomenology. Stanford: Stanford University Press 148--160.
  26. George S. Pappas (1979). Epistemic Theories of Perception. Philosophical Inquiry 1:220-228.
     
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  27.  14
    Nicholas Pastore (1971). Selective History Of Theories Of Visual Perception, 1650-1950. Oxford University Press.
  28.  35
    Michael Strevens (2000). The Essentialist Aspect of Naive Theories. Cognition 74 (149):175.
    Recent work on children’s inferences concerning biological and chemical categories has suggested that children (and perhaps adults) are essentialists— a view known as psychological essentialism. I distinguish three varieties of psychological essentialism and investigate the ways in which essentialism explains the inferences for which it is supposed to account. Essentialism succeeds in explaining the inferences, I argue, because it attributes to the child belief in causal laws connecting category membership and the possession of certain characteristic appearances and behavior. This suggests (...)
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  29.  13
    John F. A. Taylor (1958). The Psychology of Perception: A Philosophical Examination of Gestalt Theory and Derivative Theories of Perception. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 55 (2):77-81.
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  30.  16
    Gary Hatfield (1988). Representation and Content in Some (Actual) Theories of Perception. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 19 (2):175-214.
  31.  20
    R. H. (1955). Theories of Perception and the Concept of Structure. Review of Metaphysics 9 (1):156-156.
  32.  3
    H. R. (1955). Theories of Perception and the Concept of Structure: A Review and Critical Analysis with an Introduction to a Dynamic-Structural Theory of Behavior. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 9 (1):156-156.
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  33.  20
    Lewis Edwin Hahn (1939). Neutral, Indubitable Sense-Data as the Starting Point for Theories of Perception. Journal of Philosophy 36 (22):589-600.
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  34.  8
    H. Wildon Carr, F. B. Jevons, William Brown & G. Dawes Hicks (1911). Symposium: The Time Difficulty in Realist Theories of Perception. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 12:124 - 187.
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  35.  79
    Sofia Miguens (2002). Qualia or Non Epistemic Perception: D. Dennett's and F. Dretske's Representational Theories of Consciousness. Agora 21 (2):193-208.
  36.  10
    Michael Podro (1972). The Manifold in Perception: Theories of Art From Kant to Hildebrand. Oxford,Clarendon Press.
  37. Nigel J. T. Thomas (1999). Are Theories of Imagery Theories of Imagination? An Active Perception Approach to Conscious Mental Content. Cognitive Science 23 (2):207-245.
  38.  18
    Gary Hatfield (1989). Computation, Representation and Content in Noncognitive Theories of Perception. In Stuart Silvers (ed.), ReRepresentation. Kluwer
  39.  3
    Joel Norman (1983). Are the Direct and Indirect Theories of Perception Incompatible? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (4):729.
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  40. John Wild (1953). Berkeley's Theories of Perception: A Phenomenological Critique. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 7 (1/2=23/24):134-151.
     
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  41. P. C. Dodwell (1985). Theories of Perception as Experimental Epistemology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (2):291.
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  42.  91
    Sean Enda Power (2013). Perceiving External Things and the Time-Lag Argument. European Journal of Philosophy 21 (1):94-117.
    : We seem to directly perceive external things. But can we? According to the time-lag argument, we cannot. What we directly perceive happens now. There is a time-lag between our perceptions and the external things we seem to directly perceive; these external things happen in the past; thus, what we directly perceive must be something else, for example, sense-data, and we can only at best indirectly perceive other things. This paper examines the time-lag argument given contemporary metaphysics. I argue that (...)
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  43.  1
    M. Strevens (2000). The Naive Aspect of Essentialist Theories. Cognition 74:149-175.
    Recent work on children's inferences concerning biological and chemical categories has suggested that children (and perhaps adults) are essentialists -- a view known as psychological essentialism. I distinguish three varieties of psychological essentialism and investigate the ways in which essentialism explains the inferences for which it is supposed to account. Essentialism succeeds in explaining the inferences, I argue, because it attributes to the child belief in causal laws connecting category membership and the possession of certain characteristic appearances and behavior. This (...)
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  44.  2
    Marcie A. Wallace (1994). Implicit Perception in Visual Neglect: Implications for Theories of Attention. In Martha J. Farah & G. Ratcliff (eds.), The Neuropsychology of High-Level Vision. Lawrence Erlbaum 359.
  45.  2
    A. D. Smith (1993). The Natural and the Normative: Theories of Spatial Perception From Kant to Helmholtz. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Science 26 (1):93-95.
  46.  10
    Alma Clara Rands (1970). Thomas Brown's Theories of Association and Perception as They Relate to His Theories of Poetry. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 28 (4):473-483.
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  47.  1
    Pekka Kärkkäinen (2011). Sense Perception, Theories Of. In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer 1182--1185.
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  48.  4
    Rolf A. George (1974). Book Review:Selective History of Theories of Visual Perception: 1650-1950 Nicholas Pastore. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 41 (3):296-.
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  49.  6
    Pawel Boski & Floyd W. Rudmin (1989). Ichheiser's Theories of Personality and Person Perception: A Classic That Still Inspires. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 19 (3):263–296.
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  50. Marcello Frixione & Antonio Lieto (2014). Concepts, Perception and the Dual Process Theories of Mind. Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 9 (1).
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