Search results for 'neurobiology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John R. Searle (2001). Free Will as a Problem in Neurobiology. Philosophy 76 (298):491-514.score: 24.0
    The problem of free will arises because of the conflict between two inconsistent impulses, the experience of freedom and the conviction of determinism. Perhaps we can resolve these by examining neurobiological correlates of the experience of freedom. If free will is not to be an illusion, it must have a corresponding neurobiological reality. An explanation of this issue leads us to an account of rationality and the self, as well as how consciousness can move bodies at all. I explore two (...)
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  2. Jacqueline Anne Sullivan (2010). A Role for Representation in Cognitive Neurobiology. Philosophy of Science (Supplement) 77 (5):875-887.score: 24.0
    What role does the concept of representation play in the contexts of experimentation and explanation in cognitive neurobiology? In this article, a distinction is drawn between minimal and substantive roles for representation. It is argued by appeal to a case study that representation currently plays a role in cognitive neurobiology somewhere in between minimal and substantive and that this is problematic given the ultimate explanatory goals of cognitive neurobiological research. It is suggested that what is needed is for (...)
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  3. Marc D. Lewis (2005). Bridging Emotion Theory and Neurobiology Through Dynamic Systems Modeling. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):169-194.score: 24.0
    Efforts to bridge emotion theory with neurobiology can be facilitated by dynamic systems (DS) modeling. DS principles stipulate higher-order wholes emerging from lower-order constituents through bidirectional causal processes cognition relations. I then present a psychological model based on this reconceptualization, identifying trigger, self-amplification, and self-stabilization phases of emotion-appraisal states, leading to consolidating traits. The article goes on to describe neural structures and functions involved in appraisal and emotion, as well as DS mechanisms of integration by which they interact. These (...)
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  4. Martin Sereno (1986). A Program for the Neurobiology of Mind. Inquiry 29 (June):217-240.score: 24.0
    Patricia Smith Churchland's Neurophilosophy argues that a mind is the same thing as the complex patterns of neural activity in a human brain and, furthermore, that we will be able to find out interesting things about the mind by studying the brain. I basically agree with this stance and my comments are divided into four sections. First, comparisons between human and non?human primate brains are discussed in the context, roughly, of where one should locate higher functions. Second, I examine Churchland's (...)
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  5. Ron Bombardi (2013). On the Neurobiology of Truth. Biosemiotics 6 (3):537-546.score: 24.0
    The concept of truth arises from puzzling over distinctions between the real and the apparent, while the origin of these distinctions lies in the neurobiology of mammalian cerebral lateralization, that is, in the evolution of brains that can address the world both indicatively and subjunctively; brains that represent the world both categorically and hypothetically. After some 2,500 years of thinking about it, the Western philosophical tradition has come up with three major theories of truth: correspondence, coherence, and pragmatist. Traditional (...)
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  6. Jonathan Y. Tsou (2012). Intervention, Causal Reasoning, and the Neurobiology of Mental Disorders: Pharmacological Drugs as Experimental Instruments. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (2):542-551.score: 22.0
    In psychiatry, pharmacological drugs play an important experimental role in attempts to identify the neurobiological causes of mental disorders. Besides being developed in applied contexts as potential treatments for patients with mental disorders, pharmacological drugs play a crucial role in research contexts as experimental instruments that facilitate the formulation and revision of neurobiological theories of psychopathology. This paper examines the various epistemic functions that pharmacological drugs serve in the discovery, refinement, testing, and elaboration of neurobiological theories of mental disorders. I (...)
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  7. Daniel H. Mathalon & Judith M. Ford (2012). Neurobiology of Schizophrenia: Search for the Elusive Correlation with Symptoms. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 22.0
    In the last half-century, human neuroscience methods provided a way to study schizophrenia in vivo, and established that it is associated with subtle abnormalities in brain structure and function. However, efforts to understand the neurobiological bases of the clinical symptoms that the diagnosis is based on have been largely unsuccessful. In this paper, we provide an overview of the conceptual and methodological obstacles that undermine efforts to link the severity of specific symptoms to specific neurobiological measures. These obstacles include small (...)
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  8. Walter Glannon (2005). Neurobiology, Neuroimaging, and Free Will. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 29 (1):68-82.score: 21.0
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  9. Richard A. Depue & Paul F. Collins (1999). Neurobiology of the Structure of Personality: Dopamine, Facilitation of Incentive Motivation, and Extraversion. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):491-517.score: 21.0
    Extraversion has two central characteristics: (1) interpersonalengagement, which consists of affiliation (enjoying and valuing close interpersonal bonds, being warm and affectionate) and agency (being socially dominant, enjoying leadership roles, being assertive, being exhibitionistic, and having a sense of potency in accomplishing goals) and (2) impulsivity, which emerges from the interaction of extraversion and a second, independent trait (constraint). Agency is a more general motivational disposition that includes dominance, ambition, mastery, efficacy, and achievement. Positive affect (a combination of positive feelings and (...)
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  10. David J. Buller & Valerie Gray Hardcastle (2000). Evolutionary Psychology, Meet Developmental Neurobiology: Against Promiscuous Modularity. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 1 (3):307-25.score: 21.0
    Evolutionary psychologists claim that the mind contains “hundreds or thousands” of “genetically specified” modules, which are evolutionary adaptations for their cognitive functions. We argue that, while the adult human mind/brain typically contains a degree of modularization, its “modules” are neither genetically specified nor evolutionary adaptations. Rather, they result from the brain’s developmental plasticity, which allows environmental task demands a large role in shaping the brain’s information-processing structures. The brain’s developmental plasticity is our fundamental psychological adaptation, and the “modules” that result (...)
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  11. Bernard J. Baars (2005). Subjective Experience is Probably Not Limited to Humans: The Evidence From Neurobiology and Behavior. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):7-21.score: 21.0
  12. Richard Brockman (2001). Toward a Neurobiology of the Unconscious. Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry 29 (4):601-615.score: 21.0
  13. Paul M. Churchland (1986). Some Reductive Strategies in Cognitive Neurobiology. Mind 95 (July):279-309.score: 21.0
  14. Patricia S. Churchland (1994). Can Neurobiology Teach Us Anything About Consciousness? Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 67 (4):23-40.score: 21.0
  15. Justin Garson (2003). The Introduction of Information Into Neurobiology. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):926-936.score: 21.0
    The first use of the term “information” to describe the content of nervous impulse occurs in Edgar Adrian's The Basis of Sensation (1928). What concept of information does Adrian appeal to, and how can it be situated in relation to contemporary philosophical accounts of the notion of information in biology? The answer requires an explication of Adrian's use and an evaluation of its situation in relation to contemporary accounts of semantic information. I suggest that Adrian's concept of information can be (...)
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  16. Pierre Rainville & Donald D. Price (2003). Hypnosis Phenomenology and the Neurobiology of Consciousness. International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis 51 (2):105-29.score: 21.0
  17. Sean A. Spence (2001). Alien Control: From Phenomenology to Cognitive Neurobiology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (2-3):163-172.score: 21.0
  18. Paul M. Churchland (1986). Cognitive Neurobiology: A Computational Hypothesis for Laminar Cortex. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 1 (1):25-51.score: 21.0
    This paper outlines the functional capacities of a novel scheme for cognitive representation and computation, and it explores the possible implementation of this scheme in the massively parallel organization of the empirical brain. The suggestion is that the brain represents reality by means of positions in suitably constitutes phase spaces; and the brain performs computations on these representations by means of coordinate transformations from one phase space to another. This scheme may be implemented in the brain in two distinct forms: (...)
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  19. Bernard D. Beitman & Jyotsna Nair (2004). Self-Awareness Deficits in Psychiatric Patients: Neurobiology, Assessment, and Treatment. W.W.Norton.score: 21.0
  20. Daniel J. Gilman (1991). The Neurobiology of Observation. Philosophy of Science 58 (3):496-502.score: 21.0
    Paul Churchland has recently argued that empirical evidence strongly suggests that perception is penetrable to the beliefs or theories held by individual perceivers (1988). While there has been much discussion of the sorts of psychological cases he presents, little has been said about his arguments from neurology. I offer a critical examination of his claim that certain efferents in the brain are evidence against perceptual encapsulation. I argue that his neurological evidence is inadequate to his philosophical goals, both by itself (...)
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  21. Guus Labooy (2004). Freedom and Neurobiology: A Scotistic Account. Zygon 39 (4):919-932.score: 21.0
  22. Antonio R. Damasio (2001). Reflections on the Neurobiology of Emotion and Feeling. In João Branquinho (ed.), The Foundations of Cognitive Science. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 99--108.score: 21.0
  23. Carl F. Craver & Lindley Darden (2001). Discovering Mechanisms in Neurobiology: The Case of Spatial Memory. In P.K. Machamer, Rick Grush & Peter McLaughlin (eds.), Theory and Method in Neuroscience. Pittsburgh: University of Pitt Press. 112--137.score: 21.0
  24. Edward James Dale (forthcoming). A Scientific Theory of the Development of Meditation in Practicing Individuals: Patañjali's Yoga, Developmental Psychology, and Neurobiology. Sophia:1-13.score: 21.0
    This article considers the psychology of meditation and other introverted forms of mystical development from a neo-Piagetian perspective, which has commonalities with biogenetic structuralist and neurotheological approaches. Evidence is found that lines of meditative development unfold through Patañjali’s stages at different rates in an echo of the unfolding of lines of cognitive development through Piaget’s stages at different rates. Similar factors predicting the degree of independence of development apply to both conventional cognitive and meditative contents. As the same brain and (...)
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  25. Steven P. R. Rose & Hilary Rose (1973). 'Do Not Adjust Your Mind, There is a Fault in Reality'-Ideology in Neurobiology. Cognition 2 (4):479-502.score: 21.0
  26. Antonio R. Damasio (2000). A Neurobiology for Consciousness. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press.score: 21.0
  27. Allan Hobson (2004). A Model for Madness? Dream Consciousness: Our Understanding of the Neurobiology of Sleep Offers Insight Into Abnormalities in the Waking Brain. Nature 430 (6995):21.score: 21.0
  28. Czeslaw S. Nosal (1991). Neurobiology of Subjective Probability. In Probability and Rationality. Amsterdam: Rodopi.score: 21.0
  29. George I. Viamontes & Bernard D. Beitman (2007). This Issue: The Neurobiology of the Unconscious. Psychiatric Annals 37 (4):222-224.score: 21.0
  30. Elliott White (1992). The End of the Empty Organism: Neurobiology and the Sciences of Human Action. Praeger.score: 21.0
  31. Andrea Hollingsworth (2008). Implications of Interpersonal Neurobiology for a Spirituality of Compassion. Zygon 43 (4):837-860.score: 18.0
    Interpersonal neurobiology (IPNB) is a burgeoning interdisciplinary field that focuses on ways in which relationships shape and transform the architecture and functioning of the human brain. IPNB points to four specific conditions that appear to encourage the emergence of empathy. Further, these conditions, when gathered together, may constitute the core components of a spirituality of compassion. Following definitions and a discussion of interdisciplinary method, this essay delineates IPNB's main tenets and demonstrates ways in which IPNB sheds light on important (...)
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  32. Terence W. Picton & Donald T. Stuss (1994). Neurobiology of Conscious Experience. Current Opinion in Neurobiology 4:256-65.score: 18.0
  33. Stephen Grossberg (2005). STaRT: A Bridge Between Emotion Theory and Neurobiology Through Dynamic System Modeling. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):207-208.score: 18.0
    Lewis proposes a “reconceptualization” of how to link the psychology and neurobiology of emotion and cognitive-emotional interactions. His main proposed themes have actually been actively and quantitatively developed in the neural modeling literature for more than 30 years. This commentary summarizes some of these themes and points to areas of particularly active research in this area.
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  34. Marcel Weber, Indeterminism in Neurobiology: Some Good and Some Bad News.score: 18.0
    I examine some philosophical arguments as well as current empirical research in molecular neurobiology in order to throw some new light on the question of whether neurological processes are deterministic or indeterministic. I begin by showing that the idea of an autonomous biological indeterminism violates the principle of the supervenience of biological properties on physical properties. If supervenience is accepted, quantum mechanics is the only hope for the neuro-indeterminist. But this would require that indeterministic quantum-mechanical effects play a role (...)
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  35. Stephen L. Zegura (1997). Color Categories and Biology: Considerations From Molecular Genetics, Neurobiology, and Evolutionary Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):211-212.score: 18.0
    Evidence from molecular genetics bolsters the claim that color is not a perceptuolinguistic and behavioral universal. Neurobiology continues to fill in many details about the flow of color information from photon reception to central processing in the brain. Humans have the most acute color vision in the biosphere because of natural selection and adaptation, not coincidence.
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  36. Armando D'Agostino, Anna Castelnovo & Silvio Scarone (2013). Dreaming and the Neurobiology of Self: Recent Advances and Implications for Psychiatry. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 18.0
    Dreaming and the neurobiology of self: recent advances and implications for psychiatry.
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  37. Stanley Munsat (1999). Neurobiology: Linguistics' Millennium Bug? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):845-846.score: 18.0
    Gold & Stoljar pose a dilemma for linguistics should neurobiology win out as the science of mind. The dilemma can be avoided by reestablishing linguistics as an autonomous discipline, rather than a branch of the science of mind. Independent considerations for doing this are presented.
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  38. Punit Shah (2012). Toward a Neurobiology of Unrealistic Optimism. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    Toward a Neurobiology of Unrealistic Optimism.
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  39. William D. Casebeer (2005). Neurobiology Supports Virtue Theory on the Role of Heuristics in Moral Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):547-548.score: 16.0
    Sunstein is right that poorly informed heuristics can influence moral judgment. His case could be strengthened by tightening neurobiologically plausible working definitions regarding what a heuristic is, considering a background moral theory that has more strength in wide reflective equilibrium than “weak consequentialism,” and systematically examining what naturalized virtue theory has to say about the role of heuristics in moral reasoning.
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  40. Philip Barnard & Tim Dalgleish (2005). Psychological-Level Systems Theory: The Missing Link in Bridging Emotion Theory and Neurobiology Through Dynamic Systems Modeling. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):196-197.score: 16.0
    Bridging between psychological and neurobiological systems requires that the system components are closely specified at both the psychological and brain levels of analysis. We argue that in developing his dynamic systems theory framework, Lewis has sidestepped the notion of a psychological level systems model altogether, and has taken a partisan approach to his exposition of a brain-level systems model.
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  41. Gesa Lindemann (2009). From Experimental Interaction to the Brain as the Epistemic Object of Neurobiology. Human Studies 32 (2):153 - 181.score: 16.0
    This article argues that understanding everyday practices in neurobiological labs requires us to take into account a variety of different action positions: self-conscious social actors, technical artifacts, conscious organisms, and organisms being merely alive. In order to understand the interactions among such diverse entities, highly differentiated conceptual tools are required. Drawing on the theory of the German philosopher and sociologist Helmuth Plessner, the paper analyzes experimenters as self-conscious social persons who recognize monkeys as conscious organisms. Integrating Plessner’s ideas into the (...)
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  42. Stephanie L. Brown & R. Michael Brown (2005). Social Bonds, Motivational Conflict, and Altruism: Implications for Neurobiology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):351-352.score: 16.0
    Depue & Morrone-Strupinsky (D&M-S) do not address how a reward system accommodates the motivational dilemmas associated with (a) the decision to approach versus avoid conspecifics, and (b) self versus other tradeoffs inherent in behaving altruistically toward bonded relationship partners. We provide an alternative evolutionary view that addresses motivational conflict, and discuss implications for the neurobiological study of affiliative bonds.
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  43. Daniel Tranel & Antonio R. Damasio (1999). The Neurobiology of Knowledge Retrieval. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):303-303.score: 16.0
    Recent investigations have explored how large-scale systems in the brain operate in the processes of retrieving knowledge for words and concepts. Much of the crucial evidence derives from lesion studies, because word retrieval and concept retrieval can be clearly dissociated in brain-damaged individuals. We discuss these findings from the perspective of our neurobiological framework, which is cited in Pulvermüller's target article.
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  44. Zachary P. Norwood (2013). A Survey of Artistic Value: From Analytic Philosophy to Neurobiology. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 6 (2):135-152.score: 16.0
    Analytic philosophers have disputed the nature of “artistic value” for over six decades, bringing much needed clarity and rigor to a subject discussed with fashionable obscurity in other disciplines. This essay frames debates between analytic philosophers on artistic value and suggests new directions for future research. In particular, the problem of “intrinsic value” is considered, that is, whether a work’s value derives from its experienced properties, as a work of art, or from cultural trends outside the work’s properties. It is (...)
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  45. Jennifer Isom & Wendy Heller (1999). Neurobiology of Extraversion: Pieces of the Puzzle Still Missing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):524-524.score: 16.0
    The neurobiological mechanisms associated with affiliation, that Depue & Collins argue are a central component of extraversion are not specified in their model. In addition, only the involvement of the prefrontal cortex in extraversion is discussed, although recent evidence suggests that activity associated with additional cortical regions may be related to this trait. Finally, the assumption that neurobiological mechanisms underlie or play a causal, and therefore, more fundamental role than psychological constructs in the trait is challenged.
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  46. Gail Bruner Murrow & Richard W. Murrow (2013). A Biosemiotic Body of Law: The Neurobiology of Justice. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 26 (2):275-314.score: 16.0
    We offer a theory regarding the symbolism of the human body in legal discourse. The theory blends legal theory, the neuroscience of empathy, and biosemiotics, a branch of semiotics that combines semiotics with theoretical biology. Our theory posits that this symbolism of the body is not solely a metaphor or semiotic sign of how law is cognitively structured in the mind. We propose that it also signifies neurobiological mechanisms of social emotion in the brain that are involved in the social (...)
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  47. Luigi Francesco Agnati, Diego Guidolin, Leontino Battistin, Giuseppe Pagnoni & Kjell Fuxe (2013). The Neurobiology of Imagination: Possible Role of Interaction-Dominant Dynamics and Default Mode Network. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 16.0
    This work aims at presenting some hypotheses about the potential neurobiological substrate of imagery and imagination. For the present purposes, we will define imagery as the production of mental images associated with previous percepts, and imagination as the faculty of forming mental images of a novel character relating to something that has never been actually experienced by the subject but at a great extent emerges from his inner world. The two processes appear intimately related and imagery can arguably be considered (...)
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  48. Louise Bøttcher (2010). An Eye for Possibilities in the Development of Children with Cerebral Palsy: Neurobiology and Neuropsychology in a Cultural-Historical Dynamic Understanding. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 12 (1):3-23.score: 16.0
    Taking children with Cerebral Palsy (CP) as an example, the article seeks an understanding of children with disabilities that connects neuropsychological theories of neural development with the situated cognition perspective and the child as an active participant in its social practices. The early brain lesion of CP is reconceptualised as a neurobiological constraint that exists in the relations between the neural, cognitive and social levels. Through a multi-method study of two children with CP, it is analysed how neurobiological constraints arise, (...)
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  49. Anthony Steven Dick & Michael Andric (2013). The Neurobiology of Receptive-Expressive Language Interdependence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):352 - 353.score: 16.0
    With a focus on receptive language, we examine the neurobiological evidence for the interdependence of receptive and expressive language processes. While we agree that there is compelling evidence for such interdependence, we suggest that Pickering & Garrod's (P&G's) account would be enhanced by considering more-specific situations in which their model does, and does not, apply.
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