Search results for 'neuroethics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Enrique Bonete (2013). Neuroethics in Spain: Neurological Determinism or Moral Freedom? Neuroethics 6 (1):225-232.score: 21.0
    Spanish culture has recently shown interest about Neuroethics, a new line of research and reflection. It can be said that two general, and somewhat opposing, perspectives are currently being developed in Spain about neuroethics-related topics. One originates from the neuroscientific field and the other from the philosophical field. We will see, throughout this article, that the Spanish authors, who I am going to select here, deal with very diverse neuroethical topics and that they analyse them from different intellectual (...)
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  2. Sheri Alpert (2008). Neuroethics and Nanoethics: Do We Risk Ethical Myopia? [REVIEW] Neuroethics 1 (1):55-68.score: 21.0
    In recent years, two distinct trajectories of bioethical inquiry have emerged: neuroethics and nanoethics. The former deals with issues in neuroscience, whereas the latter deals with issues in nanoscience and nanotechnology. In both cases, the ethical inquiries have coalesced in response to rapidly increasing scientific and engineering developments in each field. Both also present major issues for contemplation in bioethics. However, the questions are (1) how different are the ethical issues raised, and (2) is it beneficial for neuroethics (...)
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  3. Arne Rasmusson (2009). Neuroethics as a Brain-Based Philosophy of Life: The Case of Michael S. Gazzaniga. Neuroethics 2 (1):3-11.score: 21.0
    Michael S. Gazzaniga, a pioneer and world leader in cognitive neuroscience, has made an initial attempt to develop neuroethics into a brain-based philosophy of life that he hopes will replace the irrational religious and political belief-systems that still partly govern modern societies. This article critically examines Gazzaniga’s proposal and shows that his actual moral arguments have little to do with neuroscience. Instead, they are based on unexamined political, cultural and moral conceptions, narratives and values. A more promising way of (...)
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  4. James Giordano (2013). Unpacking Neuroscience and Neurotechnology - Instructions Not Included: Neuroethics Required. Neuroethics 6 (2):411-414.score: 21.0
    Using a metaphorical reminiscence upon holiday toys - and the hopes, challenges and possibilities they presented - this essay addresses the ways that the heuristics, outcomes and products of neuroscience have effected change in the human condition, predicament, and being. A note of caution is offered to pragmatically assess what can be done with neurotechnology, what can't, and what should and shouldn't - based upon the capacities and limitations of both the science, and our collective ability to handle knowledge, power (...)
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  5. Joseph P. DeMarco & Paul J. Ford (forthcoming). Neuroethics and the Ethical Parity Principle. Neuroethics:1-9.score: 21.0
    Neil Levy offers the most prominent moral principles that are specifically and exclusively designed to apply to neuroethics. His two closely related principles, labeled as versions of the ethical parity principle (EPP), are intended to resolve moral concerns about neurological modification and enhancement [1]. Though EPP is appealing and potentially illuminating, we reject the first version and substantially modify the second. Since his first principle, called EPP (strong), is dependent on the contention that the mind literally extends into external (...)
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  6. Katrina Sifferd (2011). Neuroethics. In Vilayanur Ramachandran (ed.), Encyclopedia of Human Behavior, 2e. Elsevier.score: 18.0
    According to Adina Roskies, the neuroscience of ethics is concerned with a neuroscientific understanding of the brain processes that underpin moral judgment and behavior. The ethics of neuroscience, on the other hand, includes the potential impact advances in neuroscience may have on social, moral and philosophical ideas and institutions, as well as the ethical principles that should guide brain research, treatment of brain disease, and cognitive enhancement. This entry discusses these different aspects of neuroethics, with a special focus on (...)
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  7. Christian G. Huber & Johannes Huber (2009). Epistemological Considerations on Neuroimaging – a Crucial Prerequisite for Neuroethics. Bioethics 23 (6):340-348.score: 18.0
    Purpose: Whereas ethical considerations on imaging techniques and interpretations of neuroimaging results flourish, there is not much work on their preconditions. In this paper, therefore, we discuss epistemological considerations on neuroimaging and their implications for neuroethics. Results: Neuroimaging uses indirect methods to generate data about surrogate parameters for mental processes, and there are many determinants influencing the results, including current hypotheses and the state of knowledge. This leads to an interdependence between hypotheses and data. Additionally, different levels of description (...)
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  8. Mariale Hardiman, Luke Rinne, Emma Gregory & Julia Yarmolinskaya (2012). Neuroethics, Neuroeducation, and Classroom Teaching: Where the Brain Sciences Meet Pedagogy. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 5 (2):135-143.score: 18.0
    The popularization of neuroscientific ideas about learning—sometimes legitimate, sometimes merely commercial—poses a real challenge for classroom teachers who want to understand how children learn. Until teacher preparation programs are reconceived to incorporate relevant research from the neuro- and cognitive sciences, teachers need translation and guidance to effectively use information about the brain and cognition. Absent such guidance, teachers, schools, and school districts may waste time and money pursuing so called brain-based interventions that lack a firm basis in research. Meanwhile, the (...)
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  9. Sofia Lombera & Judy Illes (2009). The International Dimensions of Neuroethics. Developing World Bioethics 9 (2):57-64.score: 18.0
    Neuroethics, in its modern form, investigates the impact of brain science in four basic dimensions: the self, social policy, practice and discourse. In this study, we analyzed a set of 461 peer-reviewed articles with neuroethics content, published by authors from 32 countries. We analyzed the data for: (1) trends in the development of international neuroethics over time, and (2) how challenges at the intersection of ethics and neuroscience are viewed in countries that are considered developed by International (...)
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  10. Michael Robertson (2011). Symposium: Neuroethics and Mental Health—Old Wine in New Bottles or a Legitimate New Field of Bioethical Inquiry. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (1):13-14.score: 18.0
    Neuroethics is a relatively novel field of investigation. Applied to mental health practice and research, neuroethics would seem to enlighten many traditional ethical connundra. This editorial introduces this symposium on neuroethics in the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry.
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  11. Carissa Véliz (2011). Review of Enrique Bonete, Neuroetica Practica ( Practical Neuroethics ). [REVIEW] Neuroethics 4 (3):267-270.score: 18.0
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  12. Ebrahim Moosa (2012). Translating Neuroethics: Reflections From Muslim Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):519-528.score: 18.0
    Muslim ethics is cautiously engaging developments in neuroscience. In their encounters with developments in neuroscience such as brain death and functional magnetic resonance imaging procedures, Muslim ethicists might be on the cusp of spirited debates. Science and religion perform different kinds of work and ought not to be conflated. Cultural translation is central to negotiating the complex life worlds of religious communities, Muslims included. Cultural translation involves lived encounters with modernity and its byproduct, modern science. Serious ethical debate requires more (...)
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  13. Carissa Véliz (2011). Review of Enrique Bonete, Neuroética Práctica ( Practical Neuroethics ). [REVIEW] Neuroethics 4 (3):267-270.score: 18.0
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  14. Michael Kalichman, Dena Plemmons & Stephanie J. Bird (2012). Editors' Overview: Neuroethics: Many Voices and Many Stories. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):423-432.score: 18.0
    Advances in neuroscience continue to enhance understanding of the brain and provide new tools to take advantage of that understanding. These changes are poised to profoundly alter society. Given that the impact will be felt not only by neuroscientists, but by diverse members of society, it is imperative that conversations engage all stakeholders. Doing so will allow for the sharing of diverse views and perspectives to understand and frame the science, better educate and prepare the public for new developments, and (...)
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  15. Dieter Birnbacher (2009). Neuroethics and Stem Cell Transplantation. Medicine Studies 1 (1):67-76.score: 18.0
    Is there anything special about the ethical problems of intracerebral stem-cell transplantation and other forms of cell or tissue transplantation in the brain that provides neuroethics with a distinctive normative profile, setting it apart from other branches of medical ethics? This is examined with reference to some of the ethical problems associated with interventions in the brain such as potential changes in personal identity and potential changes in personality. It is argued that these problems are not sufficiently specific to (...)
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  16. Liana Buniak, Martina Darragh & James Giordano (2014). A Four-Part Working Bibliography of Neuroethics: Part 1: Overview and Reviews – Defining and Describing the Field and its Practices. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 9 (1):9.score: 18.0
    Neuroethics entails investigations of neurocognitive mechanisms of morality and ethics; and studies and address of the ethical issues spawned by the use of neuroscience and its technologies to investigate cognition, emotion and actions. These two principal emphases, or what have been called “traditions” of neuroethics both mirror traditional bioethical discussions (such as debates about the safety of technological and pharmaceutical advances and ethical implications of new scientific and technological discoveries), and engage discourse about neuroscientific investigations of (proto-moral and (...)
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  17. John R. Shook & James Giordano (2014). A Principled and Cosmopolitan Neuroethics: Considerations for International Relevance. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 9 (1):1.score: 18.0
    Neuroethics applies cognitive neuroscience for prescribing alterations to conceptions of self and society, and for prescriptively judging the ethical applications of neurotechnologies. Plentiful normative premises are available to ground such prescriptivity, however prescriptive neuroethics may remain fragmented by social conventions, cultural ideologies, and ethical theories. Herein we offer that an objectively principled neuroethics for international relevance requires a new meta-ethics: understanding how morality works, and how humans manage and improve morality, as objectively based on the brain and (...)
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  18. Shaun Stevenson, B. L. Beattie, Richard Vedan, Emily Dwosh, Lindsey Bruce & Judy Illes (2013). Neuroethics, Confidentiality, and a Cultural Imperative in Early Onset Alzheimer Disease: A Case Study with a First Nation Population. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8 (1):15.score: 18.0
    The meaningful consideration of cultural practices, values and beliefs is a necessary component in the effective translation of advancements in neuroscience to clinical practice and public discourse. Society’s immense investment in biomedical science and technology, in conjunction with an increasingly diverse socio-cultural landscape, necessitates the study of how potential discoveries in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease are perceived and utilized across cultures. Building on the work of neuroscientists, ethicists and philosophers, we argue that the growing field of neuroethics (...)
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  19. Karma Lekshe Tsomo (2012). Compassion, Ethics, and Neuroscience: Neuroethics Through Buddhist Eyes. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):529-537.score: 16.0
    As scientists advance knowledge of the brain and develop technologies to measure, evaluate, and manipulate brain function, numerous questions arise for religious adherents. If neuroscientists can conclusively establish that there is a functional network between neural impulses and an individual’s capacity for moral evaluation of situations, this will naturally lead to questions about the relationship between such a network and constructions of moral value and ethical human behavior. For example, if cognitive neuroscience can show that there is a neurophysiological basis (...)
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  20. Andrew Fenton (2009). Buddhism and Neuroethics: The Ethics of Pharmaceutical Cognitive Enhancement. Developing World Bioethics 9 (2):47-56.score: 15.0
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  21. Nir Lipsman, Rebecca Zener & Mark Bernstein (2009). Personal Identity, Enhancement and Neurosurgery: A Qualitative Study in Applied Neuroethics. Bioethics 23 (6):375-383.score: 15.0
    Recent developments in the field of neurosurgery, specifically those dealing with the modification of mood and affect as part of psychiatric disease, have led some researchers to discuss the ethical implications of surgery to alter personality and personal identity. As knowledge and technology advance, discussions of surgery to alter undesirable traits, or possibly the enhancement of normal traits, will play an increasingly larger role in the ethical literature. So far, identity and enhancement have yet to be explored in a neurosurgical (...)
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  22. James Giordano (2010). The Neuroscience of Pain, and a Neuroethics of Pain Care. Neuroethics 3 (1):89-94.score: 15.0
    Neuroscience, together with a broadened concept of “mind” has instigated pragmatic and ethical concerns about the experience and treatment of pain. If pain medicine is to be authentic, it requires knowledge of the brain-mind, pain, and the relative and appropriate “goodness” of potential interventions that can and/or should be provided. This speaks to the need for an ethics that reflects and is relevant to the contemporary neuroscience of pain, acknowledgment and appreciation of the sentient being in pain, effects of environment (...)
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  23. Robin Mackenzie (2011). The Neuroethics of Pleasure and Addiction in Public Health Strategies Moving Beyond Harm Reduction: Funding the Creation of Non-Addictive Drugs and Taxonomies of Pleasure. Neuroethics 4 (2):103-117.score: 15.0
    We are unlikely to stop seeking pleasure, as this would prejudice our health and well-being. Yet many psychoactive substances providing pleasure are outlawed as illicit recreational drugs, despite the fact that only some of them are addictive to some people. Efforts to redress their prohibition, or to reform legislation so that penalties are proportionate to harm have largely failed. Yet, if choices over seeking pleasure are ethical insofar as they avoid harm to oneself or others, public health strategies should foster (...)
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  24. Deboleena Roy (2012). Neuroethics, Gender and the Response to Difference. Neuroethics 5 (3):217-230.score: 15.0
    This paper examines how the new field of neuroethics is responding to the old problem of difference, particularly to those ideas of biological difference emerging from neuroimaging research that purports to further delineate our understanding of sex and/or gender differences in the brain. As the field develops, it is important to ask what is new about neuroethics compared to bioethics in this regard, and whether the concept of difference is being problematized within broader contexts of power and representation. (...)
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  25. Jay Lombard (2008). Synchrnoic Consciousness From a Neurological Point of View: The Philosophical Foundations for Neuroethics. Synthese 162 (3):439 - 450.score: 15.0
    Daniel Kolak’s theory of synchronic consciousness according to which the entire range of dissociative phenomena, from pathologies such as MPD and schizophrenia to normal dream states, are best explained in terms of consciousness becoming simultaneously identified as many selves, has revolutionary therapeutic implications for neurology and psychiatry. All these selves, according to Kolak—even the purely imaginary ones that exist as such only in our dreams—are not just conscious but also self-conscious, with beliefs, intentions, living lives informed by memories (confabulatory, in (...)
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  26. Stuart Henry & Dena Plemmons (2012). Neuroscience, Neuropolitics and Neuroethics: The Complex Case of Crime, Deception and fMRI. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):573-591.score: 15.0
    Scientific developments take place in a socio-political context but scientists often ignore the ways their innovations will be both interpreted by the media and used by policy makers. In the rush to neuroscientific discovery important questions are overlooked, such as the ways: (1) the brain, environment and behavior are related; (2) biological changes are mediated by social organization; (3) institutional bias in the application of technical procedures ignores race, class and gender dimensions of society; (4) knowledge is used to the (...)
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  27. Stephanie J. Bird (2012). Potential for Bias in the Context of Neuroethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):593-600.score: 15.0
    Neuroscience research, like all science, is vulnerable to the influence of extraneous values in the practice of research, whether in research design or the selection, analysis and interpretation of data. This is particularly problematic for research into the biological mechanisms that underlie behavior, and especially the neurobiological underpinnings of moral development and ethical reasoning, decision-making and behavior, and the other elements of what is often called the neuroscience of ethics. The problem arises because neuroscientists, like most everyone, bring to their (...)
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  28. Neil Levy (2009). Neuroethics: Ethics and the Sciences of the Mind. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):69-81.score: 12.0
    Neuroethics is a rapidly growing subfield, straddling applied ethics, moral psychology and philosophy of mind. It has clear affinities to bioethics, inasmuch as both are responses to new developments in science and technology, but its scope is far broader and more ambitious because neuroethics is as much concerned with how the sciences of the mind illuminate traditional philosophical questions as it is with questions concerning the permissibility of using technologies stemming from these sciences. In this article, I sketch (...)
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  29. Neil Levy (2007). Rethinking Neuroethics in the Light of the Extended Mind Thesis. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (9):3-11.score: 12.0
    The extended mind thesis is the claim that mental states extend beyond the skulls of the agents whose states they are. This seemingly obscure and bizarre claim has far-reaching implications for neuroethics, I argue. In the first half of this article, I sketch the extended mind thesis and defend it against criticisms. In the second half, I turn to its neuroethical implications. I argue that the extended mind thesis entails the falsity of the claim that interventions into the brain (...)
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  30. Chris Kaposy (2009). Will Neuroscientific Discoveries About Free Will and Selfhood Change Our Ethical Practices? Neuroethics 2 (1):51-59.score: 12.0
    Over the past few years, a number of authors in the new field of neuroethics have claimed that there is an ethical challenge presented by the likelihood that the findings of neuroscience will undermine many common assumptions about human agency and selfhood. These authors claim that neuroscience shows that human agents have no free will, and that our sense of being a “self” is an illusory construction of our brains. Furthermore, some commentators predict that our ethical practices of assigning (...)
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  31. Eric Racine & Cynthia Forlini (2010). Cognitive Enhancement, Lifestyle Choice or Misuse of Prescription Drugs? Neuroethics 3 (1):1-4.score: 12.0
    The prospects of enhancing cognitive or motor functions using neuroscience in otherwise healthy individuals has attracted considerable attention and interest in neuroethics (Farah et al., Nature Reviews Neuroscience 5:421–425, 2004; Glannon Journal of Medical Ethics 32:74–78, 2006). The use of stimulants is one of the areas which has propelled the discussion on the potential for neuroscience to yield cognition-enhancing products. However, we have found in our review of the literature that the paradigms used to discuss the non-medical use of (...)
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  32. Neil Levy (2008). Introducing Neuroethics. Neuroethics 1 (1):1-8.score: 12.0
  33. Carolyn Suchy-Dicey (2009). It Takes Two: Ethical Dualism in the Vegetative State. Neuroethics 2 (3):125-136.score: 12.0
    To aid neuroscientists in determining the ethical limits of their work and its applications, neuroethical problems need to be identified, catalogued, and analyzed from the standpoint of an ethical framework. Many hospitals have already established either autonomy or welfare-centered theories as their adopted ethical framework. Unfortunately, the choice of an ethical framework resists resolution: each of these two moral theories claims priority at the exclusion of the other, but for patients with neurological pathologies, concerns about the patient’s welfare are treated (...)
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  34. Martha J. Farah (2008). Neuroethics and the Problem of Other Minds: Implications of Neuroscience for the Moral Status of Brain-Damaged Patients and Nonhuman Animals. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 1 (1):9-18.score: 12.0
    Our ethical obligations to another being depend at least in part on that being’s capacity for a mental life. Our usual approach to inferring the mental state of another is to reason by analogy: If another being behaves as I do in a circumstance that engenders a certain mental state in me, I conclude that it has engendered the same mental state in him or her. Unfortunately, as philosophers have long noted, this analogy is fallible because behavior and mental states (...)
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  35. Walter Glannon (2011). Review of Martha J. Farah, Ed., Neuroethics: An Introduction with Readings. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 4 (3):263-265.score: 12.0
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  36. Neil Levy (2011). Neuroethics: A New Way of Doing Ethics. AJOB Neuroscience 2 (2):3-9.score: 12.0
    The aim of this article is to argue, by example, for neuroethics as a new way of doing ethics. Rather than simply giving us a new subject matter—the ethical issues arising from neuroscience—to attend to, neuroethics offers us the opportunity to refine the tools we use. Ethicists often need to appeal to the intuitions provoked by consideration of cases to evaluate the permissibility of types of actions; data from the sciences of the mind give us reason to believe (...)
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  37. Peggy DesAutels (2010). Sex Differences and Neuroethics. Philosophical Psychology 23 (1):95-111.score: 12.0
    Discussions in neuroethics to date have ignored an ever-increasing neuroscientific lilterature on sex differences in brains. If, indeed, there are significant differences in the brains of men versus women and in the brains of boys versus girls, the ethical and social implications loom very large. I argue that recent neuroscientific findings on sex-based brain differences have significant implications for theories of morality and for our understandings of the neuroscience of moral cognition and behavior.
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  38. Molly C. Chalfin, Emily R. Murphy & Katrina A. Karkazis (2008). Women's Neuroethics? Why Sex Matters for Neuroethics. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (1):1 – 2.score: 12.0
    The Neuroethics Affinity Group of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH) met for the third time in October 2007 to review progress in the field of neuroethics and consider high-impact priorities for the future. Closely aligned with ASBH's own goals of recruiting junior scholars to bioethics and mentoring them to successful careers, the Neuroethics Affinity Group placed a call for new ideas to be presented at the Group meeting, specifically by junior attendees. One group responded (...)
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  39. Adrian Carter, Polly Ambermoon & Wayne D. Hall (2011). Drug-Induced Impulse Control Disorders: A Prospectus for Neuroethical Analysis. Neuroethics 4 (2):91-102.score: 12.0
    There is growing evidence that dopamine replacement therapy (DRT) used to treat Parkinson’s Disease can cause compulsive behaviours and impulse control disorders (ICDs), such as pathological gambling, compulsive buying and hypersexuality. Like more familiar drug-based forms of addiction, these iatrogenic disorders can cause significant harm and distress for sufferers and their families. In some cases, people treated with DRT have lost their homes and businesses, or have been prosecuted for criminal sexual behaviours. In this article we first examine the evidence (...)
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  40. Judy Illes & Eric Racine (2005). Imaging or Imagining? A Neuroethics Challenge Informed by Genetics. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):5 – 18.score: 12.0
    From a twenty-first century partnership between bioethics and neuroscience, the modern field of neuroethics is emerging, and technologies enabling functional neuroimaging with unprecedented sensitivity have brought new ethical, social and legal issues to the forefront. Some issues, akin to those surrounding modern genetics, raise critical questions regarding prediction of disease, privacy and identity. However, with new and still-evolving insights into our neurobiology and previously unquantifiable features of profoundly personal behaviors such as social attitude, value and moral agency, the difficulty (...)
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  41. Andrew Fenton (2013). Neuroscience and the Problem of Other Animal Minds: Why It May Not Matter So Much for Neuroethics. The Monist 95 (3):463-485.score: 12.0
    A recent argument in the neuroethics literature has suggested that brain-mental-state identities (one popular expression of what is commonly known as neuroreductionism) promise to settle epistemological uncertainties about nonhuman animal minds. What’s more, these brain-mental-state identities offer the further promise of dismantling the deadlock over the moral status of nonhuman animals, to positive affect in such areas as agriculture and laboratory animal science. I will argue that neuroscientific claims assuming brain-mental-state identities do not so much resolve the problem of (...)
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  42. Eran Klein (2011). Is There a Need for Clinical Neuroskepticism? Neuroethics 4 (3):251-259.score: 12.0
    Clinical neuroethics and neuroskepticism are recent entrants to the vocabulary of neuroethics. Clinical neuroethics has been used to distinguish problems of clinical relevance arising from developments in brain science from problems arising in neuroscience research proper. Neuroskepticism has been proposed as a counterweight to claims about the value and likely implications of developments in neuroscience. These two emergent streams of thought intersect within the practice of neurology. Neurologists face many traditional problems in bioethics, like end of life (...)
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  43. Veljko Dubljević (2013). Cognitive Enhancement, Rational Choice and Justification. Neuroethics 6 (1):179-187.score: 12.0
    This paper examines the claims in the debate on cognitive enhancement in neuroethics that society wide pressure to enhance can be expected in the near future. The author uses rational choice modeling to test these claims and proceeds with the analysis of proposed types of solutions. The discourage use, laissez-faire and prohibition types of policy are scrutinized for effectiveness, legitimacy and associated costs. Special attention is given to the moderately liberal discourage use policy (and the gate-keeper and taxation approaches (...)
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  44. Grant Gillett (2009). The Subjective Brain, Identity, and Neuroethics. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (9):5-13.score: 12.0
    The human brain is subjective and reflects the life of a being-in-the-world-with-others whose identity reflects that complex engaged reality. Human subjectivity is shaped and in-formed (formed by inner processes) that are adapted to the human life-world and embody meaning and the relatedness of a human being. Questions of identity relate to this complex and dynamic reality to reflect the fact that biology, human ecology, culture, and one's historic-political situation are inscribed in one's neural network and have configured its architecture so (...)
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  45. Judy Illes (ed.) (2005). Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy. OUP Oxford.score: 12.0
    Recent advances in the brain sciences have dramatically improved our understanding of brain function. As we find out more and more about what makes us tick, we must stop and consider the ethical implications of this new found knowledge. Will having a new biology of the brain through imaging make us less responsible for our behavior and lose our free will? Should certain brain scan studies be disallowed on the basis of moral grounds? Why is the media so interested in (...)
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  46. Tuija Takala (2010). Guest Editorial: Introduction to Philosophical Issues in Neuroethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (02):161-.score: 12.0
    Neuroethics studies the ethical, social, and legal issues raised by actual or expected advances in neuroscience. The relevant fields in neuroscience include, but are not limited to, neuroimaging, cognitive neuroscience, neuropsychopharmacology, neurogenetics, and neuropsychiatry. For many, neuroethics is best understood as a subcategory of bioethics, and although not all agree, for the purposes of the present collection of articles, this definition is assumed. Although bioethics as a field of study started in the early 1970s as a normative enterprise, (...)
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  47. Carissa Véliz (2011). Review of Enrique Bonete, Neuroética Práctica (Practical Neuroethics). [REVIEW] Neuroethics 4 (3):267-270.score: 12.0
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  48. Francesca Minerva (2013). Neuroetica, a Look at the Development of the Italian Debate on Neuroethics. Neuroethics 6 (1):233-236.score: 12.0
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  49. Michael S. Gazzaniga (2005). Facts, Fictions and the Future of Neuroethics. In Judy Illes (ed.), Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy. Oup Oxford.score: 12.0
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  50. Kimberly Sheridan, Elena Zinchenko & Howard Gardner (forthcoming). Neuroethics in Education. Neuroethics: Defining the Issues in Theory, Practice, and Policy:265--275.score: 12.0
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