Search results for 'neuronal mechanism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Duncan MacIntosh (1989). Modality, Mechanism and Translational Indeterminacy. Dialogue 28 (03):391-.score: 78.0
    Ken Warmbrod thinks Quine agrees that translation is determinate if it is determinate what speakers would say in all possible circumstances; that what things would do in merely possible circumstances is determined by what their subvisible constituent mechanisms would dispose them to do on the evidence of what alike actual mechanisms make alike actual things do actually; and that what speakers say is determined by their neural mechanisms. Warmbrod infers that people's neural mechanisms make translation of what people say determinate. (...)
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  2. P. Fries (2005). A Mechanism for Cognitive Dynamics: Neuronal Communication Through Neuronal Coherence. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (10):474-480.score: 76.0
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  3. Trichur Raman Vidyasagar (2013). Reading Into Neuronal Oscillations in the Visual System: Implications for Developmental Dyslexia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:811.score: 54.0
    While phonological impairments are common in developmental dyslexia, there has recently been much debate as to whether there is a causal link between the phonological difficulties and the reading problem. An alternative suggestion has been gaining ground that the core deficit in dyslexia is in visual attentional mechanisms. If so, the visual aetiology may be at any of a number of sites along the afferent magnocellular pathway or in the dorsal cortical stream that are all essential for a visuo-spatial attentional (...)
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  4. Bernard J. Baars, J. B. Newman & John G. Taylor (1998). Neuronal Mechanisms of Consciousness: A Relational Global Workspace Approach. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A.C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press. 269-278.score: 42.0
    This paper explores a remarkable convergence of ideas and evidence, previously presented in separate places by its authors. That convergence has now become so persuasive that we believe we are working within substantially the same broad framework. Taylor's mathematical papers on neuronal systems involved in consciousness dovetail well with work by Newman and Baars on the thalamocortical system, suggesting a brain mechanism much like the global workspace architecture developed by Baars (see references below). This architecture is relational, in (...)
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  5. Kristiina Kompus, Liv E. Falkenberg, Josef J. Bless, Erik Johnsen, Rune A. Kroken, Bodil Kråkvik, Frank Larøi, Else-Marie Løberg, Einar Vedul-Kjelsås, René Westerhausen & Kenneth Hugdahl (2013). The Role of the Primary Auditory Cortex in the Neural Mechanism of Auditory Verbal Hallucinations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 42.0
    Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) are a subjective experience of "hearing voices" in the absence of corresponding physical stimulation in the environment. The most remarkable feature of AVHs is their perceptual quality, that is, the experience is subjectively often as vivid as hearing an actual voice, as opposed to mental imagery or auditory memories. This has lead to propositions that dysregulation of the primary auditory cortex (PAC) is a crucial component of the neural mechanism of AVHs. One possible mechanism (...)
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  6. Kunjumon I. Vadakkan (2013). A Supplementary Circuit Rule-Set for the Neuronal Wiring. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 42.0
    Limitations of known anatomical circuit rules necessitate the identification of supplementary rules. This is essential for explaining how associative sensory stimuli induce nervous system changes that generate internal sensations of memory, concurrent with triggering specific motor activities in response to specific cue stimuli. A candidate mechanism is rapidly reversible, yet stabilizable membrane hemi-fusion formed between the closely apposed postsynaptic membranes of different neurons at locations of convergence of sensory inputs during associative learning. The lateral entry of activity from the (...)
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  7. Hugh MacPherson Aziz U. R. Asghar, Robyn L. Johnson, William Woods, Gary G. R. Green, George Lewith (2012). Oscillatory Neuronal Dynamics Associated with Manual Acupuncture: A Magnetoencephalography Study Using Beamforming Analysis. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 42.0
    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) enables non-invasive recording of neuronal activity, with reconstruction methods providing estimates of underlying brain source locations and oscillatory dynamics from externally recorded neuromagnetic fields. The aim of our study was to use MEG to determine the effect of manual acupuncture on neuronal oscillatory dynamics. A major problem in MEG investigations of manual acupuncture is the absence of onset times for each needle manipulation. Given that beamforming (spatial filtering) analysis is not dependent upon stimulus-driven responses being phase-locked (...)
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  8. Andrew A. Fingelkurts & Alexander A. Fingelkurts (2014). Present Moment, Past, and Future: Mental Kaleidoscope. Frontiers in Psychology 5:395.score: 36.0
    In our Opinion Article we, using the William James’ metaphor of a kaleidoscope, will analyze subjective experiences of the “present moment”, past and future, and will suggest the neurophysiological mechanism responsible for these experiences within the operational architectonics of human brain field. The brain operational architectonics is a framework that shows how the spatial and temporal hierarchy of nested metastable states of neuronal assemblies can serve in real time as a basis for the mental structure and dynamics as (...)
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  9. Chrisantha Fernando (2013). From Blickets to Synapses: Inferring Temporal Causal Networks by Observation. Cognitive Science 37 (8):1426-1470.score: 36.0
    How do human infants learn the causal dependencies between events? Evidence suggests that this remarkable feat can be achieved by observation of only a handful of examples. Many computational models have been produced to explain how infants perform causal inference without explicit teaching about statistics or the scientific method. Here, we propose a spiking neuronal network implementation that can be entrained to form a dynamical model of the temporal and causal relationships between events that it observes. The network uses (...)
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  10. Cristina Meini & Alfredo Paternoster (2012). Mirror Neurons as a Conceptual Mechanism? Mind and Society 11 (2):183-201.score: 30.0
  11. R. D. Orpwood (1994). A Possible Neural Mechanism Underlying Consciousness Based on the Pattern Processing Capabilities of Pyramidal Neurons in the Cerebral Cortex. Journal of Theoretical Biology 169:403-18.score: 30.0
  12. Toyohiko Satoh (1978). Possible Reticular Mechanism Underlying Altered Activity of Cortical Neurons During Sleep. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):504.score: 30.0
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  13. Kenji Kawano Yasuko Sugase-Miyamoto, Narihisa Matsumoto (2011). Role of Temporal Processing Stages by Inferior Temporal Neurons in Facial Recognition. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 30.0
    In this review, we focus on the role of temporal stages of encoded facial information in the visual system, which might enable the efficient determination of species, identity, and expression. Facial recognition is an important function of our brain and is known to be processed in the ventral visual pathway, where visual signals are processed through areas V1, V2, V4, and the inferior temporal (IT) cortex. In the IT cortex, neurons show selective responses to complex visual images such as faces, (...)
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  14. Andrew A. Fingelkurts & Alexander A. Fingelkurts (2001). Operational Architectonics of the Human Brain Biopotential Field: Toward Solving the Mind-Brain Problem. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 2 (3):261-296.score: 24.0
    The understanding of the interrelationship between brain and mind remains far from clear. It is well established that the brain's capacity to integrate information from numerous sources forms the basis for cognitive abilities. However, the core unresolved question is how information about the "objective" physical entities of the external world can be integrated, and how unifiedand coherent mental states (or Gestalts) can be established in the internal entities of distributed neuronal systems. The present paper offers a unified methodological and (...)
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  15. John Sarnecki (2007). Developmental Objections to Evolutionary Modularity. Biology and Philosophy 22 (4):529-546.score: 24.0
    Evolutionary psychologists argue that selective pressures in our ancestral environment yield a highly specialized set of modular cognitive capacities. However, recent papers in developmental psychology and neuroscience claim that evolutionary accounts of modularity are incompatible with the flexibility and plasticity of the developing brain. Instead, they propose cortical and neuronal brain structures are fixed through interactions with our developmental environment. Buller and Gray Hardcastle contend that evolutionary accounts of cognitive development are unacceptably rigid in light of evidence of cortical (...)
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  16. Kunjumon Vadakkan (2010). Framework of Consciousness From Semblance of Activity at Functionally LINKed Postsynaptic Membranes. Frontiers in Consciousness Research 1 (1):1-12.score: 24.0
    Consciousness is seen as a difficult “binding” problem. Binding, a process where different sensations evoked by an item are associated in the nervous system, can be viewed as a process similar to associative learning. Several reports that consciousness is associated with some form of memory imply that different forms of memories have a common feature contributing to consciousness. Based on a proposed synaptic mechanism capable of explaining different forms of memory, we developed a framework for consciousness. It is based (...)
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  17. Ernst Pöppel (1997). Consciousness Versus States of Being Conscious. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (1):155-156.score: 24.0
    States of being conscious (S) can be defined on the basis of temporal information processing. A high-frequency mechanism provides atemporal system states with periods of approximately 30 msec to implement the functional connection of distributed activities allowing the construction of primordial events; a low frequency mechanism characterized by automatic temporal integration sets up temporal windows with approximately 3 seconds duration. This integration mechanism can be used to define S. P-consciousness and A-consciousness as conceived of by Block can (...)
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  18. J. B. Newman & A. A. Grace (1999). Binding Across Time: The Selective Gating of Frontal and Hippocampal Systems Modulating Working Memory and Attentional States. Consciousness and Cognition 8 (2):196-212.score: 24.0
    Temporal binding via 40-Hz synchronization of neuronal discharges in sensory cortices has been hypothesized to be a necessary condition for the rapid selection of perceptually relevant information for further processing in working memory. Binocular rivalry experiments have shown that late stage visual processing associated with the recognition of a stimulus object is highly correlated with discharge rates in inferotemporal cortex. The hippocampus is the primary recipient of inferotemporal outputs and is known to be the substrate for the consolidation of (...)
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  19. Antoine Lutz, Mental Training Enhances Attentional Stability: Neural and Behavioral Evidence.score: 24.0
    The capacity to stabilize the content of attention over time varies among individuals, and its impairment is a hallmark of several mental illnesses. Impairments in sustained attention in patients with attention disorders have been associated with increased trial-to-trial variability in reaction time and event-related potential deficits during attention tasks. At present, it is unclear whether the ability to sustain attention and its underlying brain circuitry are transformable through training. Here, we show, with dichotic listening task performance and electroencephalography, that training (...)
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  20. George Székely (2000). Self-Organisation or Reflex Theory? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):549-550.score: 24.0
    Neuromodelling is one of the techniques of modern neurosciences. The “at a distance” type of triadic synapse is probably the prevailing form of impulse transmission in many parts of the brain. If the genetically controlled cell-to-cell neuronal interconnections are abandoned, self-organisation may be the mechanism of structure formation in the brain. This assumption weakens the position of the reflex arc as the basic functional unit of nervous activities.
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  21. Stephen C. Fowler (2000). Behavioral Tolerance (Contingent Tolerance) Ismediated in Part by Variations in Regional Cerebral Blood Flow. Brain and Mind 1 (1):45-57.score: 24.0
    Concepts and experimental results taken frombehavioral pharmacology, functional brain imaging,brain physiology, and behavioral neuroscience, wereused to develop the hypothesis that behavioraltolerance can, in part, be attributed to cellulartolerance. It is argued that task specific activationof circumscribed neuronal populations gives rise tocorresponding increases in regional cerebral bloodflow such that neurons related to task performance areexposed to higher effective doses of blood-borne drugthan neuronal groups not highly activated by thebehavioral task. Through this cerebral hemodynamicregulatory mechanism cellular tolerance phenomena canat (...)
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  22. N. Katherine Hayles & James J. Pulizzi (2010). Narrating Consciousness: Language, Media and Embodiment. History of the Human Sciences 23 (3):131-148.score: 24.0
    Although there has long been a division in studies of consciousness between a focus on neuronal processes or conversely an emphasis on the ruminations of a conscious self, the long-standing split between mechanism and meaning within the brain was mirrored by a split without, between information as a technical term and the meanings that messages are commonly thought to convey. How to heal this breach has posed formidable problems to researchers. Working through the history of cybernetics, one of (...)
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  23. Ayeesha K. Kamal & Nicholas D. Schiff (2002). Does the Form of Akinetic Mutism Linked to Mesodiencephalic Injuries Bridge the Double Dissociation of Parkinson's Disease and Catatonia? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):586-587.score: 24.0
    Northoff provides a compelling argument supporting a kind of “double dissociation” of Parkinson's disease and catatonia. We discuss a related form of akinetic mutism linked to mesodiencephalic injuries and suggest an alternative to the proposed “horizontal” versus “vertical” modulation distinction. Rather than a “directional” difference in patterned neuronal activity, we propose that both disorders reflect hypersynchrony within typically interdependent but segregated networks facilitated by a common thalamic gating mechanism.
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  24. Pieter R. Roelfsema & Victor A. F. Lamme (2001). Which Brain Mechanism Cannot Count Beyond Four? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):142-143.score: 24.0
    Cowan makes an intriguing case for a fundamental limit in the number of chunks that can be stored in short term memory (STM). Chunks are collections of concepts that have strong associations to one another and much weaker associations to other chunks. A translation of this definition for the visual domain would be that a visual chunk is a collection of features that belong to the same perceptual group (see also Mahoney & Ullman 1988). Here, we will first address (...)
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  25. Arnold Trehub (2013). Where Am I? Redux. Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (1 - 2):207 -225.score: 24.0
    Activation of the brainʼs putative retinoid system has been proposed as the neuronal substrate for our basic sense of being centered within a volumetric surround –- our minimal phenomenal consciousness (Trehub 2007). Here, the assumed properties of the self-locus within the retinoid model are shown to explain recent experimental findings relating to the out-of-body-experience. In addition, selective excursion of the heuristic self-locus is able to explain many important functions of consciousness, including the effective internal representation of a 3D space (...)
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  26. Robert T. Knight Bradley Voytek, Ryan T. Canolty, Avgusta Shestyuk, Nathan E. Crone, Josef Parvizi (2010). Shifts in Gamma Phase–Amplitude Coupling Frequency From Theta to Alpha Over Posterior Cortex During Visual Tasks. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 24.0
    The phase of ongoing theta (4-8 Hz) and alpha (8-12 Hz) electrophysiological oscillations is coupled to high gamma (80-150 Hz) amplitude, which suggests that low frequency oscillations modulate local cortical activity. While this phase-amplitude coupling (PAC) has been demonstrated in a variety of tasks and cortical regions, it has not been shown whether task demands differentially affect the regional distribution of the preferred low-frequency coupling to high gamma. To address this issue we investigated multiple-rhythm theta/alpha phase to high gamma amplitude (...)
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  27. Yonghua Cui, Zhen Jin, Xu Chen, Yong He, Xia Liang & Yi Zheng (2013). Abnormal Baseline Brain Activity in Drug-Naïve Patients with Tourette Syndrome: A Resting-State fMRI Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:913.score: 24.0
    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset chronic disorder characterized by the presence of multiple motor and vocal tics. This study investigated spontaneous low-frequency fluctuations in TS patients during resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans. We obtained resting-state fMRI scans from seventeen drug-naïve TS children and fifteen demographically matched healthy children. We computed the amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and fractional ALFF (fALFF) of resting-state fMRI data to measure spontaneous brain activity, and assessed the between-group differences in ALFF/fALFF and (...)
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  28. Kjell Hole, Frode Svendsen & Arne Tjølsen (1997). Is Learning Involved in Plasticity in Nociceptive Regulation? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (3):452-453.score: 24.0
    Plastic changes in spinal cord function like neuronal wind-up and increased receptive field are too short-lived to explain chronic pain without structural changes. It is possible that learning could be a mechanism for longlasting changes in nociceptive regulation. A learning process localized to the spinal cord has been shown to be important for the development of tolerance to the analgetic effect of ethanol, suggesting that nociceptive control systems may be changed by learning. Long term potentiation (LTP) is regarded (...)
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  29. Panagiota Theodoni, Theofanis I. Panagiotaropoulos, Vishal Kapoor, Nikos K. Logothetis & Gustavo Deco (2011). Cortical Microcircuit Dynamics Mediating Binocular Rivalry: The Role of Adaptation in Inhibition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 24.0
    Perceptual bistability arises when two conflicting interpretations of an ambiguous stimulus or images in binocular rivalry (BR) compete for perceptual dominance. From a computational point of view competition models based on cross-inhibition and adaptation have shown that noise is a crucial force for rivalry and operates in balance with adaptation in order to explain the observed alternations in perception. In particular, noise-driven transitions and adaptation-driven oscillations define two dynamical regimes and the system operates near its boundary. In order to gain (...)
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  30. David Poeppel Xing Tian (2010). Mental Imagery of Speech and Movement Implicates the Dynamics of Internal Forward Models. Frontiers in Psychology 1.score: 24.0
    The classical concept of efference copies in the context of internal forward models has stimulated productive research in cognitive science and neuroscience. There are compelling reasons to argue for such a mechanism, but finding direct evidence in the human brain remains difficult. Here we investigate the dynamics of internal forward models from an unconventional angle: mental imagery, assessed while recording high temporal resolution neuronal activity using magnetoencephalography (MEG). We compare two overt and covert tasks; our covert, mental imagery (...)
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  31. Siobhan M. Leary, Charles A. Davie, Geoff J. M. Parker, Valerie L. Stevenson, Liqun Wang, Gareth J. Barker, David H. Miller & A. J. Thompson (1999). 1 H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Normal Appearing White Matter in Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis. Journal of Neurology 246 (11).score: 24.0
    Recent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathological studies have indicated that axonal loss is a major contributor to disease progression in multiple sclerosis. 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), through measurement of N -acetyl aspartate (NAA), a neuronal marker, provides a unique tool to investigate this. Patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis have few lesions on conventional MRI, suggesting that changes in normal appearing white matter (NAWM), (...)
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  32. Dewen Hu Longfei Su, Lubin Wang, Hui Shen, Guiyu Feng (2013). Discriminative Analysis of Non-Linear Brain Connectivity in Schizophrenia: An fMRI Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Background: Dysfunctional integration of distributed brain networks is believed to be the cause of schizophrenia, and resting-state functional connectivity analyses of schizophrenia have attracted considerable attention in recent years. Unfortunately, existing functional connectivity analyses of schizophrenia have been mostly limited to linear associations. Objective: The objective of the present study is to evaluate the discriminative power of nonlinear functional connectivity and identify its changes in schizophrenia. Method: A novel measure utilizing the extended maximal information coefficient was introduced to construct nonlinear (...)
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  33. Marcelo C. A. Rodrigues Mayara Mendonça-de-Souza, Ubirakitan M. Monteiro, Amana S. Bezerra, Ana P. Silva-de-Oliveira, Belvânia R. Ventura-da-Silva, Marcelo S. Barbosa, Josiane A. De Souza, Elisângela C. Criado, Maria C. M. Ferrarezi, Giselly de A. Alencar, Otávio G. Lins, Maria das G. W. S. Coriolano, Belmira L. S. A. Costa (2012). Resilience in Migraine Brains: Decrease of Coherence After Photic Stimulation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    Background: During migraine attacks, patients generally have photophobia and phonophobia and seek for environments with less sensorial stimulation. Present work aimed to quantify cortical partial directed coherence (PDC) of electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from migraine patients and controls in occipital, parietal and frontal areas with or without photic stimulation. Our hypothesis is that migraine patients with visual aura might have neuronal networks with higher coherence than controls even in interictal periods due to a predisposition in sensory cortical processing. Methods: Eleven (...)
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  34. Sarah Zweynert, Jan Philipp Pade, Torsten Wüstenberg, Philipp Sterzer, Henrik Walter, Constanze I. Seidenbecher, Alan Richardson-Klavehn, Emrah Düzel & Björn H. Schott (2011). Motivational Salience Modulates Hippocampal Repetition Suppression and Functional Connectivity in Humans. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:144.score: 24.0
    Repetition suppression (RS) is a rapid decrease of stimulus-related neuronal responses upon repeated presentation of a stimulus. Previous studies have demonstrated that negative emotional salience of stimuli enhances RS. It is, however, unclear how motivational salience of stimuli, such as reward-predicting value, influences RS for complex visual stimuli, and which brain regions might show differences in RS for reward-predicting and neutral stimuli. Here we investigated the influence of motivational salience on RS of complex scenes using event-related fMRI. Thirty young (...)
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  35. Jochen Triesch (2013). Imitation Learning Based on an Intrinsic Motivation Mechanism for Efficient Coding. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 22.0
    A hypothesis regarding the development of imitation learning is presented that is rooted in intrinsic motivations. It is derived from a recently proposed form of intrinsically motivated learning (IML) for efficient coding in active perception, wherein an agent learns to perform actions with its sense organs to facilitate efficient encoding of the sensory data. To this end, actions of the sense organs that improve the encoding of the sensory data trigger an internally generated reinforcement signal. Here it is argued that (...)
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  36. Daniel J. Nicholson (2012). The Concept of Mechanism in Biology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (1):152-163.score: 18.0
    The concept of mechanism in biology has three distinct meanings. It may refer to a philosophical thesis about the nature of life and biology (‘mechanicism’), to the internal workings of a machine-like structure (‘machine mechanism’), or to the causal explanation of a particular phenomenon (‘causal mechanism’). In this paper I trace the conceptual evolution of ‘mechanism’ in the history of biology, and I examine how the three meanings of this term have come to be featured in (...)
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  37. Jeffrey S. Poland & Barbara Von Eckardt (2004). Mechanism and Explanation in Cognitive Neuroscience. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):972-984.score: 18.0
    The aim of this paper is to examine the usefulness of the Machamer, Darden, and Craver (2000) mechanism approach to gaining an understanding of explanation in cognitive neuroscience. We argue that although the mechanism approach can capture many aspects of explanation in cognitive neuroscience, it cannot capture everything. In particular, it cannot completely capture all aspects of the content and significance of mental representations or the evaluative features constitutive of psychopathology.
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  38. Simon van Rysewyk (2013). Pain is Mechanism. Dissertation, University of Tasmaniascore: 18.0
    What is the relationship between pain and the body? I claim that pain is best explained as a type of personal experience and the bodily response during pain is best explained in terms of a type of mechanical neurophysiologic operation. I apply the radical philosophy of identity theory from philosophy of mind to the relationship between the personal experience of pain and specific neurophysiologic mechanism and argue that the relationship between them is best explained as one of type identity. (...)
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  39. Carl F. Craver (2003). The Making of a Memory Mechanism. Journal of the History of Biology 36 (1):153-95.score: 18.0
    Long-Term Potentiation (LTP) is a kind of synaptic plasticity that many contemporary neuroscientists believe is a component in mechanisms of memory. This essay describes the discovery of LTP and the development of the LTP research program. The story begins in the 1950's with the discovery of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus (a medial temporal lobe structure now associated with memory), and it ends in 1973 with the publication of three papers sketching the future course of the LTP research program. The (...)
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  40. Stewart Shapiro (2003). Mechanism, Truth, and Penrose's New Argument. Journal of Philosophical Logic 32 (1):19-42.score: 18.0
    Sections 3.16 and 3.23 of Roger Penrose's Shadows of the mind (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1994) contain a subtle and intriguing new argument against mechanism, the thesis that the human mind can be accurately modeled by a Turing machine. The argument, based on the incompleteness theorem, is designed to meet standard objections to the original Lucas-Penrose formulations. The new argument, however, seems to invoke an unrestricted truth predicate (and an unrestricted knowability predicate). If so, its premises are inconsistent. The (...)
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  41. Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (2011). Ontological Tensions in Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century Chemistry: Between Mechanism and Vitalism. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 13 (3):173-186.score: 18.0
    The sixteenth and seventeenth centuries marks a period of transition between the vitalistic ontology that had dominated Renaissance natural philosophy and the Early Modern mechanistic paradigm endorsed by, among others, the Cartesians and Newtonians. This paper will focus on how the tensions between vitalism and mechanism played themselves out in the context of sixteenth and seventeenth century chemistry and chemical philosophy, particularly in the works of Paracelsus, Jan Baptista Van Helmont, Robert Fludd, and Robert Boyle. Rather than argue that (...)
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  42. John R. Lucas (1970). Mechanism: A Rejoinder. Philosophy 45 (April):149-51.score: 18.0
    PROFESSOR LEWIS 1 and Professor Coder 2 criticize my use of Gödel's theorem to refute Mechanism. 3 Their criticisms are valuable. In order to meet them I need to show more clearly both what the tactic of my argument is at one crucial point and the general aim of the whole manoeuvre.
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  43. Alexander Mebius (2014). A Weakened Mechanism is Still a Mechanism: On the Causal Role of Absences in Mechanistic Explanation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 45:43-48.score: 18.0
    Much contemporary debate on the nature of mechanisms centers on the issue of modulating negative causes. One type of negative causability, which I refer to as “causation by absence,” appears difficult to incorporate into modern accounts of mechanistic explanation. This paper argues that a recent attempt to resolve this problem, proposed by Benjamin Barros, requires improvement as it overlooks the fact that not all absences qualify as sources of mechanism failure. I suggest that there are a number of additional (...)
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  44. Simon Friederich (forthcoming). A Philosophical Look at the Higgs Mechanism. Journal for General Philosophy of Science:1-16.score: 18.0
    On the occasion of the recent experimental detection of a Higgs-type particle at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the paper reviews philosophical aspects of the Higgs mechanism as the presently preferred account of the generation of particle masses in the Standard Model of elementary particle physics and its most discussed extensions. The paper serves a twofold purpose: on the one hand, it offers an introduction to the Higgs mechanism and its most interesting philosophical aspects to readers not (...)
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  45. Luca Barlassina (2011). After All, It’s Still Replication: A Reply to Jacob on Simulation and Mirror Neurons. Res Cogitans 8 (1):92-111.score: 18.0
    Mindreading is the ability to attribute mental states to other individuals. According to the simulation theory (ST), mindreading is based on the ability the mind has of replicating others' mental states and processes. Mirror neurons (MNs) are a class of neurons that fire both when an agent performs a goal-directed action and when she observes the same type of action performed by another individual. Since MNs appear to form a replicative mechanism in which a portion of the observer's brain (...)
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  46. Nathan Ross (2008). On Mechanism in Hegel's Social and Political Philosophy. Routledge.score: 18.0
    The critique of mechanism in the political philosophy of Herder and German romanticism -- The political function of machine metaphors in Hegel's early writings -- Mechanism in religious practice -- The mechanization of labor and the birth of modern ethicality in Hegel's Jena political writings -- Mechanism and the problem of self-determination in Hegel's logic -- The modern state as absolute mechanism : Hegel's logical insight into the relation of civil society and the state.
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  47. Adrian Wüthrich (2012). Eating Goldstone Bosons in a Phase Transition: A Critical Review of Lyre's Analysis of the Higgs Mechanism. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 43 (2):281-287.score: 18.0
    In this note, I briefly review Lyre’s (2008) analysis and interpretation of the Higgs mechanism. Contrary to Lyre, I maintain that, on the proper understanding of the term, the Higgs mechanism refers to a physical process in the course of which gauge bosons acquire a mass. Since also Lyre’s worries about imaginary masses can be dismissed, a realistic interpretation of the Higgs mechanism seems viable. While it may remain an open empirical question whether the Higgs mechanism (...)
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  48. Jonathan S. Spackman & Stephen C. Yanchar (2014). Embodied Cognition, Representationalism, and Mechanism: A Review and Analysis. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (1):46-79.score: 18.0
    Embodied cognition has attracted significant attention within cognitive science and related fields in recent years. It is most noteworthy for its emphasis on the inextricable connection between mental functioning and embodied activity and thus for its departure from standard cognitive science's implicit commitment to the unembodied mind. This article offers a review of embodied cognition's recent empirical and theoretical contributions and suggests how this movement has moved beyond standard cognitive science. The article then clarifies important respects in which embodied cognition (...)
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  49. Cihua Xu & Hengwei Li (2011). Abduction and Metaphor: An Inquiry Into Common Cognitive Mechanism. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (3):480-491.score: 18.0
    Abduction and metaphor are two significant concepts in cognitive science. It is found that the both mental processes are on the basis of certain similarity. The similarity inspires us to seek the answers to the following two questions: (1) Whether there is a common cognitive mechanism behind abduction and metaphor? And (2) if there is, whether this common mechanism could be interpreted within the unified frame of modern intelligence theory? Centering on these two issues, the paper attempts to (...)
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  50. Johannes Persson (2010). Activity-Based Accounts of Mechanism and the Threat of Polygenic Effects. Erkenntnis 72 (1):135 - 149.score: 18.0
    Accounts of ontic explanation have often been devised so as to provide an understanding of mechanism and of causation. Ontic accounts differ quite radically in their ontologies, and one of the latest additions to this tradition proposed by Peter Machamer, Lindley Darden and Carl Craver reintroduces the concept of activity. In this paper I ask whether this influential and activity-based account of mechanisms is viable as an ontic account. I focus on polygenic scenarios—scenarios in which the causal truths depend (...)
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