Search results for 'non-existent' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Stephen Barker (forthcoming). Expressivism About Reference and Quantification Over the Non-Existent Without Meinongian Metaphysics. Erkenntnis 79:1-20.score: 240.0
    Can we believe that there are non-existent entities without commitment to the Meinongian metaphysics? This paper argues we can. What leads us from quantification over non-existent beings to Meinongianism is a general metaphysical assumption about reality at large, and not merely quantification over the non-existent. Broadly speaking, the assumption is that every being we talk about must have a real definition. It’s this assumption that drives us to enquire into the nature of beings like Pegasus, and what (...)
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  2. Peter Forrest (2012). Truths About Non-Existent Things. Metascience 21 (2):305-307.score: 180.0
    Truths about non-existent things Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9583-8 Authors Peter Forrest, Philosophy, School of Humanities, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  3. Phillip Bricker (2004). McGinn on Non-Existent Objects and Reducing Modality. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 118 (3):439-451.score: 180.0
    In this discussion of Colin McGinn's book, 'Logical Properties', I comment first on the chapter "Existence", then on the chapter "Modality." With respect to existence, I argue that McGinn's view that existence is a property that some objects have and other objects lack requires the property of existence to be fundamentally unlike ordinary qualitative properties. Moreover, it opens up a challenging skeptical problem: how do I know that I exist? With respect to modality, I argue that McGinn's argument that quantificational (...)
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  4. Daniel Murphy (2007). Levinas and Kierkegaard on Divine Transcendence and Ethical Life: Response to Donald L. Turner and Ford Turrell's “The Non-Existent God”. [REVIEW] Philosophia 35 (3-4):383-385.score: 180.0
    This article is a brief commentary on Donald Turner and Ford Turrell’s “The Non-Existent God: Transcendence, Humanity, and Ethics in Emmanuel Levinas.” While I agree with Turner and Turrell’s general presentation of Levinas’s existential conception of God and ethics, I reflect primarily on the reference the authors make to Kierkegaard as an existentialist forefather of Levinas. I show certain basic similarities between Levinas and Kierkegaard as existentialist thinkers, but also note their differences, also taking into consideration the influence of (...)
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  5. William J. Rapaport (1985). Non-Existent Objects and Epistemological Ontology. Grazer Philosophische Studien 25:61-95.score: 180.0
    This essay examines the role of non-existent objects in "epistemological ontology" — the study of the entities that make thinking possible. An earlier revision of Meinong's Theory of Objects is reviewed, Meinong's notions of Quasisein and Außersein are discussed, and a theory of Meinongian objects as "combinatorially possible" entities is presented.
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  6. Thomas Hofweber (2000). Quantification and Non-Existent Objects. In T. Hofweber & A. Everett (eds.), Empty Names, Fiction, and the Puzzles of Non-Existence. Csli Publications.score: 164.0
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  7. Lobsang Dargyay (1990). What is Non-Existent and What is Remanent in Sūnyatā. Journal of Indian Philosophy 18 (1):81-91.score: 156.0
    In the various texts the phrase “something does not exist there” was interpreted in the following way: “elephants, cows, etc.” (Cūlasuññata-sutta) “the imagined, or conceptualized” (Yogācāra tradition), “the five skandhas, the elements, the sensory fields as eternal and solid entities” (Abhidharmasamuccaya), “all conventional phenomena” (Dolpo-pa), “inherent reality” (rGyal-tshab-rje), “accidental pollution with regard to the tathāgatagarbha (Gung-thang). The phrase “something that remains there does exist as a real existent” was interpreted also in different ways: “monks, palace, world, etc” (Cūlasuññata-sutta), “the perfect, (...)
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  8. Donald L. Turner & Ford Turrell (2007). The Non-Existent God: Transcendence, Humanity, and Ethics in the Philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas. Philosophia 35 (3-4):375 - 382.score: 152.0
    This paper considers three essential gestures in Levinas’s theology, highlighting in each case how Levinas’s thinking allows him to either incorporate or sidestep some of the fiercest modern criticisms of traditional theism. First, we present Levinas’s vision of divine transcendence, outlining his ontological atheism and explaining how this obviates proving the existence of God and avoids the tangles of traditional theodicy. Second, we describe Levinas’s idea of the trace, showing how a nonexistent God still leaves its mark in the face (...)
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  9. Tyler Doggett & Andy Egan (2012). How We Feel About Terrible, Non-Existent Mafiosi. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 84 (2):277-306.score: 150.0
    We argue for an imaginative analog of desire from premises about imaginative engagement with fiction. There's a bit about the paradox of fiction, too.
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  10. Alberto Voltolini (2006). Are There Non-Existent Intentionalia? Philosophical Quarterly 56 (224):436-441.score: 150.0
    In his recent book on the philosophy of mind, Tim Crane has maintained that intentional objects are to be conceived as schematic entities, having no particular intrinsic nature. I take this metaphysical thesis as fundamentally correct. Yet in this paper I want to cast some doubts on whether this thesis prevents intentionalia, especially nonexistent ones, from belonging to the general inventory of what there is, as Crane seems to think. If my doubts are grounded, Crane’s treatment of intentionalia may further (...)
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  11. Kit Fine (1984). Critical Review of Parsons' Non-Existent Objects. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 45 (1):95-142.score: 150.0
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  12. Kit Fine (1984). Review: Critical Review of Parsons' "Non-Existent Objects". [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 45 (1):95 - 142.score: 150.0
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  13. Karel Lambert (1985). Non-Existent Objects. Grazer Philosophische Studien 25:439-446.score: 150.0
    This essay argues for the importance of developing theories of nonexistent objects. The grounds are utility and smoothness of logical theory. In the latter case a parallel with the theory of negative and imaginary numbers is exploited. The essay concludes with a counterexample to a general argument against the enterprise of developing theories of nonexistent objects, and outlining the foremost problem an adequate theory of nonexistent objects must solve.
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  14. A. M. Honoré (1971). Reference to the Non-Existent. Philosophy 46 (178):302 - 308.score: 150.0
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  15. Bas C. Van Fraassen (2004). Transcendence of the Ego (The Non-Existent Knight). Ratio 17 (4):453-477.score: 150.0
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  16. Reinhardt Grossmann (1969). Non-Existent Objects: Recent Work on Brentano and Meinong. American Philosophical Quarterly 6 (1):17 - 32.score: 150.0
  17. Chelsea Haramia (2013). Our Responsibility to the Non-Existent. Southwest Philosophy Review 29 (1):249-256.score: 150.0
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  18. Howard Jackson & Richard E. Robinson (1985). Non-Existent Concepts. Dialogue 24 (03):473-.score: 150.0
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  19. Jeong-Hyun Youn (2008). Non-Existent Existing God; Understanding of God From an East Asian Way of Thinking with Specific Reference to the Thought of Dasŏk Yoo Yŏng-Mo. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:881-905.score: 150.0
    This paper is an interpretation of the thought of the twentieth century Korean religious thinker, Yoo Yŏng-mo (柳永模, 1890-1981), a pioneer figure who sought to re-conceptualise a Christian understanding of the Ultimate Reality in the light of a positive openness to the plurality of Korean religions. Yoo Yŏng-mo considered that it was possible to present an overall picture of harmony and complementarity between the three traditions of Korea and Christianity, and this is endorsed by the present thesis. This essay is (...)
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  20. Philip Bricker (2004). Discussion–McGinn on Non-Existent Objects and Reducing Modality. Philosophical Studies 118 (3):439-451.score: 150.0
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  21. William H. Kane (1961). 7. For the Best Listing of the Differences Between Aristotle's Logic and Aristotelian Logic. Or, Alternatively, for the Best Account Showing That the Differences Are Non-Existent or Minor. Review of Metaphysics 15 (2):321-324.score: 150.0
  22. Donald L. Turner & Ford J. Turrell (2013). Emmanuel Levinas's Non-Existent God. In Jeanine Diller & Asa Kasher (eds.), Models of God and Alternative Ultimate Realities. Springer. 727--733.score: 150.0
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  23. Laurent Cesalli (2012). Does Loving Every Mean Loving Every Every, Even Non-Existent Ones? In Mora-Márquez Ana María, Fink Jakob Leth & Hansen Heine (eds.), Logic and Language in the Middle Ages. Brill. 305--336.score: 150.0
  24. William Farr Church (1964). The Influence of the Enlightenment on the French Revolution: Creative, Disastrous, or Non-Existent? Boston, Heath.score: 150.0
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  25. Benoit de Cornulier (1974). A Non-Existent Performative Argument. Foundations of Language 11 (3):413-414.score: 150.0
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  26. John Deely (1975). Reference to the Non-Existent. The Thomist 39 (2):253-308.score: 150.0
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  27. Robert Goedecke (1961). 7. For the Best Listing of the Differences Between Aristotle's Logic and Aristotelian Logic. Or, Alternatively, for the Best Account Showing That the Differences Are Non-Existent or Minor. Review of Metaphysics 15 (2):319-321.score: 150.0
  28. Reinhardt Grossmann (1998). Wittgenstein and the Problem of Non-Existent States of Affairs. Acta Analytica 21:139-146.score: 150.0
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  29. Ivelise Perniola (2011). Dziga Vertov and Cinema as Non-Existent. Ontology of Thought and Iconoclastic Thought in Cinema. Rivista di Estetica 51 (1):123-135.score: 150.0
     
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  30. James Bissett Pratt (1918). Professor Spaulding's Non-Existent Illusions. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 15 (25):688-695.score: 150.0
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  31. Quentin Skinner (2008). Response: Why Is Laughter Almost Non-Existent in Ancient Greek Sculpture? Cogito 8:22.score: 150.0
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  32. Peter van Lith (1991). AI Technology, Non-Existent or Extinct? In P. A. Flach (ed.), Future Directions in Artificial Intelligence. New York: Elsevier Science.score: 150.0
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  33. Tim Crane (2012). What is the Problem of Non-Existence? Philosophia 40 (3):417-434.score: 128.0
    It is widely held that there is a problem of talking about or otherwise representing things that not exist. But what exactly is this problem? This paper presents a formulation of the problem in terms of the conflict between the fact that there are truths about non-existent things and the fact that truths must be answerable to reality, how things are. Given this, the problem of singular negative existential statements is no longer the central or most difficult aspect of (...)
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  34. Rivka Weinberg (2013). Existence: Who Needs It? The Non‐Identity Problem and Merely Possible People. Bioethics 27 (9):471-484.score: 108.0
    In formulating procreative principles, it makes sense to begin by thinking about whose interests ought to matter to us. Obviously, we care about those who exist. Less obviously, but still uncontroversially, we care about those who will exist. Ought we to care about those who might possibly, but will not actually, exist? Recently, unusual positions have been taken regarding merely possible people and the non-identity problem. David Velleman argues that what might have happened to you – an existent person – (...)
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  35. Richard Cross (2010). Henry of Ghent on the Reality of Non-Existing Possibles – Revisited. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 92 (2):115-132.score: 100.0
    According to a well-known interpretation, Henry of Ghent holds that possible but non-existent essences – items merely with what Henry labels ‘ esse essentiae ’ – have some reality external to the divine mind, but short of actual existence ( esse existentiae ). I argue that this reading of Henry is mistaken. Furthermore, Henry identifies any essence, considered independently of its existence as a universal concept or as instantiated in a particular as an item that has some kind of (...)
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  36. Herbert Hochberg (1985). Existence, Non-Existence, and Predication. Grazer Philosophische Studien 25:235-267.score: 100.0
    Two connected themes have been at the core of the old perplexity regarding thinking and speaking about non-existent objects. One involves a question of reference. Can we refer to non-existent objects without, thereby, recognizing, in some sense, non-existent entities as objects of reference? The other involves a question about existence. Is existence a property representable by a predicate in a logically adequate symbohsm? It is argued (1) that existence is not to be construed as an attribute represented (...)
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  37. Lilian Alweiss (2013). Beyond Existence and Non-Existence. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 21 (3):448-469.score: 100.0
    When Husserl speaks of the so-called ?transcendental reduction? or ?phenomenological epoch?? many believe that he is eschewing the question of truth or existence. Two reasons are given for this: First, Husserl explicitly states that when we perform the reduction, we should no longer naively ?accept [the world] as it presents itself to me as factually existing? (Id I ?30, p. 53) and should suspend our judgement with regard to ?the positing of its actual being? (Id I ?88, p. 182). Second, (...)
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  38. Frank Van Den Bossche (1995). Existence and Non-Existence in Haribhadra Sūri's Anekānta-Jaya-Patākā. Journal of Indian Philosophy 23 (4):429-468.score: 100.0
    InPart I of my article I have tried to show how the problem of negation has led the Jains to accept Non-existence and Existence as constituents ordharmas of every real object and to formulate their first dialectical principle:sad-asad-rŪpa $$\underset{\raise0.3em\hbox{$\smash{\scriptscriptstyle\cdot}$}}{m} $$ vastu or ‘Every real object possesses a mode as an existent and as a non-existent’. Their interpretation of negation seems to be based on the ‘primitive’ realistic standpoint that every word in a true proposition, including the word ‘not(-)’, must (...)
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  39. Frederick Kroon (1996). Characterizing Non-Existents. Grazer Philosophische Studien 51:163-193.score: 100.0
    Consider predicates like 'is a fictional character' and 'is a mythical object'. Since their ascription entails a corresponding Negative Existential claim, call these 'NE-characterizing predicates'. Objectualists such as Parsons, Sylvan, van Inwagen, and Zalta think that NE-characterizing properties are genuine properties of genuinely non-existent objects. But how, then, to make room for statements like 'Vulcan is a failed posit' and 'that little green man is a trick of the light'? The predicates involved seem equally NE-characterizing yet on the surface (...)
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  40. Agustin Arrieta Urtizberea (2005). 'Neptune' Between 'Hesperus' and 'Vulcan': On Descriptive Names and Non-Existence. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 20 (3):48-58.score: 96.0
    This work will focus on some aspects of descriptive names. The New Theory of Reference, in line with Kripke, takes descriptive names to be proper names. I will argue in this paper that descriptive names and certain theory in reference to them, even when it disagrees with the New Theory of Reference, can shed light on our understanding of (some) non-existence statements. I define the concept of descriptive name for hypothesised object (DNHO). My thesis being that DNHOs are, as I (...)
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  41. Jens Johansson (2013). Past and Future Non-Existence. Journal of Ethics 17 (1-2):51-64.score: 96.0
    According to the “deprivation approach,” a person’s death is bad for her to the extent that it deprives her of goods. This approach faces the Lucretian problem that prenatal non-existence deprives us of goods just as much as death does, but does not seem bad at all. The two most prominent responses to this challenge—one of which is provided by Frederik Kaufman (inspired by Thomas Nagel) and the other by Anthony Brueckner and John Martin Fischer—claim that prenatal non-existence is relevantly (...)
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  42. Muhammad Kamal (2012). Existence and Non-Existence in Sabzawari's Ontology. Sophia 51 (3):395-406.score: 96.0
    Sabzawari is one of the greatest Muslim philosophers of the nineteenth century. He belongs to Sadrian Existentialism, which became a dominant philosophical tradition during the Qajar dynasty in Iran. This paper critically analyses Sabzawari’s ontological discussion on the dichotomy of existence and quiddity and the relation between existence and non-existence. It argues against Sabzawari by advocating the idea that ‘Existence’ rather than quiddity is the ground for identity as well as for diversity, and that non-existence, like existence, is able to (...)
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  43. John Martin Fischer & Anthony L. Brueckner (2014). Prenatal and Posthumous Non-Existence: A Reply to Johansson. Journal of Ethics 18 (1):1-9.score: 96.0
    We have argued that it is rational to have asymmetric attitudes toward prenatal and posthumous non-existence insofar as this asymmetry is a special case of a more general (and arguably rational) asymmetry in our attitudes toward past and future pleasures. Here we respond to an interesting critique of our view by Jens Johansson. We contend that his critique involves a crucial and illicit switch in temporal perspectives in the process of considering modal claims (sending us to other possible worlds).
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  44. Sperry Andrews & Salka (2014). Mapping The Whole in EveryOne An Essay On: Non-Existence as the Engine and Axis of Existence. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 10 (1):15-33.score: 86.0
    It is argued that an effective way to view consciousness is as a "superposition" of existence and nonexistence, producing an indivisible experience of "nonlocal being", plus who and what we perceive ourselves to be . This relationship between an observer-based localization and the nonlocal whole is examined. Using ideas from general relativity and quantum mechanics , we suggest how a space-time continuum -including QM probability and uncertainty, as properties of consciousness-may have arisen as dynamic complementarities. Opportunities to contemplate the origins (...)
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  45. Andrea Sauchelli (2012). Fictional Objects, Non-Existence, and the Principle of Characterization. Philosophical Studies 159 (1):139-146.score: 84.0
    I advance an objection to Graham Priest’s account of fictional entities as nonexistent objects. According to Priest, fictional characters do not have, in our world, the properties they are represented as having; for example, the property of being a bank clerk is possessed by Joseph K. not in our world but in other worlds. Priest claims that, in this way, his theory can include an unrestricted principle of characterization for objects. Now, some representational properties attributed to fictional characters, a kind (...)
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  46. Erich Rast (2010). Classical Possibilism and Fictional Objects. In Franck Lihoreau (ed.), Fiction in Philosophy.score: 74.0
    An account of non-existing objects called 'classical possibilism', according to which objects that don't actually exist do exist in various other ways, is implemented in a two-dimensional modal logic with non-traditional predication theory. This account is very similar to Priest's, but preserves bivalence and does not endorse dialethism. The power of classical possibilism is illustrated by giving some examples that makes use of a description theory of reference. However, the same effect could also be achieved in a more Millian fashion. (...)
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  47. Petr Hájek (2008). Ontological Proofs of Existence and Non-Existence. Studia Logica 90 (2):257 - 262.score: 72.0
    Caramuels’ proof of non-existence of God is compared with Gödel’s proof of existence.
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  48. Juan-carlos Gómez (2008). The Evolution of Pretence: From Intentional Availability to Intentional Non-Existence. Mind and Language 23 (5):586-606.score: 72.0
    Abstract: I address the issue of how pretence emerged in evolution by reviewing the (mostly negative) evidence about pretend behaviour in non-human primates, and proposing a model of the type of information processing abilities that humans had to evolve in order to be able to pretend. Non-human primates do not typically pretend: there are just a few examples of potential pretend actions mostly produced by apes. The best, but still rare, examples are produced by so-called 'enculturated' apes (reared by humans) (...)
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  49. Erik Curiel, On Tensorial Concomitants and the Non-Existence of a Gravitational Stress-Energy Tensor.score: 64.0
    Based on an analysis of what it may mean for one tensor to depend in the proper way on another, I prove that, under certain natural conditions, there can be no tensor whose interpretation could be that it represents gravitational stress-energy in general relativity. It follows that gravitational energy, such as it is in general relativity, is necessarily non-local. Along the way, I prove a result of some interest in own right about the structure of the associated jet bundles of (...)
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  50. Franck Lihoreau (ed.) (2011). Truth in Fiction. Ontos Verlag.score: 62.0
    The essays collected in this volume are all concerned with the connection between fiction and truth. This question is of utmost importance to metaphysics, philosophy of language, philosophical logic and epistemology, raising in each of these areas and at their intersections a large number of issues related to creation, existence, reference, identity, modality, belief, assertion, imagination, pretense, etc. All these topics and many more are addressed in this collection, which brings together original essays written from various points of view by (...)
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