Search results for 'open texture' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Brian Bix (1991). H. L. A. Hart and the “Open Texture” of Language. Law and Philosophy 10 (1):51 - 72.score: 60.0
    H. L. A. Hart and the "Open Texture" of Language tries to clarify the writings of both Hart and Friedrich Waismann on "open texture". In Waismann's work, "open texture" referred to the potential vagueness of words under extreme (hypothetical) circumstances. Hart's use of the term was quite different, and his work has been misunderstood because those differences were underestimated. Hart should not be read as basing his argument for judicial discretion on the nature of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Stephen Yablo (2000). Textbook Kripkeanism and the Open Texture of Concepts. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 81 (1):98–122.score: 45.0
    Kripke, argued like this: it seems possible that E; the appearance can't be explained away as really pertaining to a "presentation" of E; so, pending a different explanation, it is possible that E. Textbook Kripkeans see in the contrast between E and its presentation intimations of a quite general distinction between two sorts of meaning. E's secondary or a posteriori meaning is the set of all worlds w which E, as employed here, truly describes. Its primary or a priori meaning (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Hanne Andersen (2000). Kuhn's Account of Family Resemblance: A Solution to the Problem of Wide-Open Texture. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 52 (3):313-337.score: 45.0
    It is a commonly raised argument against thefamily resemblance account of concepts that, on thisaccount, there is no limit to a concept's extension.An account of family resemblance which attempts toprovide a solution to this problem by including bothsimilarity among instances and dissimilarity tonon-instances has been developed by the philosopher ofscience Thomas Kuhn. Similar solutions have beenhinted at in the literature on family resemblanceconcepts, but the solution has never received adetailed investigation. I shall provide areconstruction of Kuhn's theory and argue that (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Martin Montminy (2010). Two Contextualist Fallacies. Synthese 173 (3):317 - 333.score: 45.0
    I examine the radical contextualists’ two main arguments for the semantic underdeterminacy thesis, according to which all, or almost all, English sentences lack context-independent truth conditions. I show that both arguments are fallacious. The first argument, which I call the fallacy of the many understandings , mistakenly infers that a sentence S is semantically incomplete from the fact that S can be used to mean different things in different contexts. The second argument, which I call the open texture (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. D. Lyons (1999). Open Texture and the Possibility of Legal Interpretation. Law and Philosophy 18 (3):297-309.score: 45.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Andreas Hamfelt (1995). Formalizing Multiple Interpretation of Legal Knowledge. Artificial Intelligence and Law 3 (4):221-265.score: 45.0
    A representation methodology for knowledge allowing multiple interpretations is described. It is based on the following conception of legal knowledge and its open texture. Since indeterminate, legal knowledge must be adapted to fit the circumstances of the cases to which it is applied. Whether a certain adaptation is lawful or not is measured by metaknowledge. But as this too is indeterminate, its adaptation to the case must be measured by metametaknowledge, etc. This hierarchical model of law is quite (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Eddy M. Zemach (1983). Identity and Open Texture. Philosophia 13 (3-4):255-262.score: 45.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Thomas R. Kearns (1972). Open Texture and Judicial Law-Making. Social Theory and Practice 2 (2):177-187.score: 45.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Desmond L. Bell (1978). The Open Texture of Moral Concepts. Philosophical Studies 26:318-322.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Paul Helm (1968). Defeasibility and Open Texture. Analysis 28 (5):173 - 175.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Stewart Shapiro (2013). Vagueness, Open-Texture, and Retrievability. Inquiry 56 (2-3):307-326.score: 45.0
    Just about every theorist holds that vague terms are context-sensitive to some extent. What counts as ?tall?, ?rich?, and ?bald? depends on the ambient comparison class, paradigm cases, and/or the like. To take a stock example, a given person might be tall with respect to European entrepreneurs and downright short with respect to professional basketball players. It is also generally agreed that vagueness remains even after comparison class, paradigm cases, etc. are fixed, and so this context sensitivity does not solve (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Bruce L. Miller (1972). Open Texture and Judicial Decision. Social Theory and Practice 2 (2):163-175.score: 45.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. John V. Apczynski (1979). The Open-Texture of Moral Concepts. Tradition and Discovery 6 (2):1-2.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Robert J. Henle (1978). "The Open-Texture of Moral Concepts," by John M. Brennan. The Modern Schoolman 55 (4):401-403.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Kenneth R. Westphal (1998). ‘Transcendental Reflections on Pragmatic Realism’. In K. R. Westphal (ed.), Pragmatism, Reason, & Norms: A Realistic Assessment. Fordham UP. 17--58.score: 45.0
    By deepening Austin’s reflections on the ‘open texture’ of empirical concepts, Frederick L. Will defends an ‘externalist’ account of mental content: as human beings we could not think, were we not in fact cognizant of a natural world structured by events and objects with identifiable and repeatable similarities and differences. I explicate and defend Will’s insight by developing a parallel critique of Kant’s and Carnap’s rejections of realism, both of whom cannot account properly for the content of experience. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. A. S. C. (1978). The Open Texture of Moral Concepts. Review of Metaphysics 32 (2):352-353.score: 45.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Liliana Albertazzi (1997). The Open Texture of Concepts: Felix Kaufmann and the Brentanists. In F. Stadler (ed.), Phenomenology and Logical Empirism. Springer.score: 45.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Brian H. Bix (2012). Defeasibility and Open Texture. In Jordi Ferrer Beltrán & Giovanni Battista Ratti (eds.), The Logic of Legal Requirements: Essays on Defeasibility. Oxford University Press.score: 45.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. J. M. Brennan (1977). The Open-Texture of Moral Concepts. Macmillan.score: 45.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Geoffrey Harrison (1978). The OpenTexture of Moral Concepts. Philosophical Books 19 (3):116-117.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Avishai Margalit (1979). Open Texture. In. In A. Margalit (ed.), Meaning and Use. Reidel. 141--152.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Stewart Shapiro (2007). Computability, Proof, and Open-Texture. In ¸ Iteolszewskietal:Cta. 420--55.score: 45.0
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. K. Wallace (1972). Waismann on Open Texture. Journal of Thought 7 (1):39-45.score: 45.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. F. Atria (1999). Legal Reasoning and Legal Theory Revisited. Law and Philosophy 18 (5):537-577.score: 30.0
    This article deals with the relation between a theory of law and a theory of legal reasoning. Starting from a close reading of Chapter VII of H. L. A. Hart's The Concept of Law, it claims that a theory of law like Hart's requires a particular theory of legal reasoning, or at least a theory of legal reasoning with some particular characteristics. It then goes on to say that any theory of legal reasoning that satisfies those requirements is highly implausible, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. J. M. Shorter (1962). More About Bodily Continuity and Personal Identity. Analysis 22 (March):79-85.score: 30.0
  26. P. Garbacz (2004). Subsumption and Relative Identity. Axiomathes 14 (4):341-360.score: 30.0
    This paper is a modification of Nicola Guarino and Christopher Welty's conception of the subsumption relation. Guarino and Welty require that that whether one property may subsume the other should depend on the modal metaproperties of those properties. I argue that the part of their account that concerns the metaproperty carrying a criterion of identity is essentially flawed. Subsequently, I propose to constrain the subsumption relation not, as Guarino and Welty require, by means of incompatible criteria of absolute identity but (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. James Franklin (2013). Arguments Whose Strength Depends on Continuous Variation. Informal Logic 33 (1):33-56.score: 30.0
    Both the traditional Aristotelian and modern symbolic approaches to logic have seen logic in terms of discrete symbol processing. Yet there are several kinds of argument whose validity depends on some topological notion of continuous variation, which is not well captured by discrete symbols. Examples include extrapolation and slippery slope arguments, sorites, fuzzy logic, and those involving closeness of possible worlds. It is argued that the natural first attempts to analyze these notions and explain their relation to reasoning fail, so (...)
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Matthew Lister (2014). Review of Defeasibility in Philosophy: Knowledge, Agency, Responsibility, and the Law; Claudia Blöser, Mikael Janvid, Hannes Ole Matthiessen, and Marcus Willaschek (Eds.). [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2014.score: 30.0
    This volume is based on papers presented at a conference on defeasibility in ethics, epistemology, law, and logic that took place at the Goethe University in Frankfurt in 2010. The subtitle (“Knowledge, Agency, Responsibility, and the Law”) better reflects the content than does the title of the original conference. None of the papers focuses directly or primarily on defeasible reasoning in logic, though a few touch on this indirectly. Nor are the papers evenly split among the topics. Six are primarily (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Stefania Costantini & Gaetano Aurelio Lanzarone (1995). Explanation-Based Interpretation of Open-Textured Concepts in Logical Models of Legislation. Artificial Intelligence and Law 3 (3):191-208.score: 28.0
    In this paper we discuss a view of the Machine Learning technique called Explanation-Based Learning (EBL) or Explanation-Based Generalization (EBG) as a process for the interpretation of vague concepts in logic-based models of law.The open-textured nature of legal terms is a well-known open problem in the building of knowledge-based legal systems. EBG is a technique which creates generalizations of given examples on the basis of background domain knowledge. We relate these two topics by considering EBG''s domain knowledge as (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Kathryn E. Sanders (2001). CHIRON: Planning in an Open-Textured Domain. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 9 (4):225-269.score: 28.0
    Planning problems arise in law when an individual (or corporation)wants to perform a sequence of actions that raises legal issues. Manylawyers make their living planning transactions, and a system thathelped them to solve these problems would be in demand.The designer of such a system in a common-law domain must addressseveral difficult issues, including the open-textured nature of legal rules,the relationship between legal rules and cases, the adversarial nature ofthe domain, and the role of argument. In addition, the system's design (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Richard J. Sclafani (1971). 'Art', Wittgenstein, and Open-Textured Concepts. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 29 (3):333-341.score: 21.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Elizabeth Barnes & Ross Cameron (2009). The Open Future: Bivalence, Determinism and Ontology. Philosophical Studies 146 (2):291 - 309.score: 18.0
    In this paper we aim to disentangle the thesis that the future is open from theses that often get associated or even conflated with it. In particular, we argue that the open future thesis is compatible with both the unrestricted principle of bivalence and determinism with respect to the laws of nature. We also argue that whether or not the future (and indeed the past) is open has no consequences as to the existence of (past and) future (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Caj Strandberg (2004). In Defence of the Open Question Argument. Journal of Ethics 8 (2):179-196.score: 18.0
    The purpose of this paper is to defend G. E. Moore's open question argument, understood as an argument directed against analytic reductionism, the view that moral properties are analytically reducible to non-moral properties. In the first section I revise Moore's argument in order to make it as plausible and resistant against objections as possible. In the following two sections I develop the argument further and defend it against the most prominent objections raised against it. The conclusion of my line (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Clint Ballinger (2007). Initial Conditions and the 'Open Systems' Argument Against Laws of Nature. Metaphysica 9 (1):17-31.score: 18.0
    This article attacks “open systems” arguments that because constant conjunctions are not generally observed in the real world of open systems we should be highly skeptical that universal laws exist. This work differs from other critiques of open system arguments against laws of nature by not focusing on laws themselves, but rather on the inference from open systems. We argue that open system arguments fail for two related reasons; 1) because they cannot account for the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Paul B. de Laat (2012). Open Source Production of Encyclopedias: Editorial Policies at the Intersection of Organizational and Epistemological Trust. Social Epistemology 26 (1):71-103.score: 18.0
    The ideas behind open source software are currently applied to the production of encyclopedias. A sample of six English text-based, neutral-point-of-view, online encyclopedias of the kind are identified: h2g2, Wikipedia, Scholarpedia, Encyclopedia of Earth, Citizendium and Knol. How do these projects deal with the problem of trusting their participants to behave as competent and loyal encyclopedists? Editorial policies for soliciting and processing content are shown to range from high discretion to low discretion; that is, from granting unlimited trust to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Alan Rhoda (2007). The Philosophical Case for Open Theism. Philosophia 35 (3-4):301-311.score: 18.0
    The goal of this paper is to defend open theism vis-à-vis its main competitors within the family of broadly classical theisms, namely, theological determinism and the various forms of non-open free-will theism, such as Molinism and Ockhamism. After isolating two core theses over which open theists and their opponents differ, I argue for the open theist position on both points. Specifically, I argue against theological determinists that there are future contingents. And I argue against non-open (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Paul B. de Laat (2001). Open Source Software: A New Mertonian Ethos? In Anton Vedder (ed.), Ethics and the Internet. Intersentia.score: 18.0
    Hacker communities of the 1970s and 1980s developed a quite characteristic work ethos. Its norms are explored and shown to be quite similar to those which Robert Merton suggested govern academic life: communism, universalism, disinterestedness, and organized scepticism. In the 1990s the Internet multiplied the scale of these communities, allowing them to create successful software programs like Linux and Apache. After renaming themselves the `open source software' movement, with an emphasis on software quality, they succeeded in gaining corporate interest. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Peter Higgins (2008). Open Borders and the Right to Immigration. Human Rights Review 9 (4):525-535.score: 18.0
    This paper argues that the relevant unit of analysis for assessing the justice of an immigration policy is the socially-situated individual (as opposed to the individual simpliciter or the nation-state, for example). This methodological principle is demonstrated indirectly by showing how some liberal, cosmopolitan defenses of "open borders" and the alleged right of immigration fail by their own standards, owing to the implicit adoption of an inappropriate unit of analysis.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Richard Rice (2007). Trinity, Temporality, and Open Theism. Philosophia 35 (3-4):321-328.score: 18.0
    A number of thinkers today, including open theists, find reasons to attribute temporality to God. According to Robert W. Jenson, the Trinity is indispensable to a Christian concept of God, and divine temporality is essential to the meaning of the Trinity. Following the lead of early Christian thought, Jenson argues that the persons of the Trinity are relations, and these relations are temporal. Jenson’s insights are obscured, however, by problematic references to time as a sphere to which God is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Wayne Riggs (2010). Open-Mindedness. Metaphilosophy 41 (1):172-188.score: 18.0
    Abstract: Open-mindedness is typically at the top of any list of the intellectual or "epistemic" virtues. Yet, providing an account that simultaneously explains why open-mindedness is an epistemically valuable trait to have and how such a trait is compatible with full-blooded belief turns out to be a challenge. Building on the work of William Hare and Jonathan Adler, I defend a view of open-mindedness that meets this challenge. On this view, open-mindedness is primarily an attitude toward (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Mark Eli Kalderon (2004). Open Questions and the Manifest Image. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (2):251–289.score: 18.0
    The essay argues that, on their usual metalinguistic reconstructions, the open question argument and Frege’s puzzle are variants of the same argument. Each are arguments to a conclusion about a difference in meaning; each deploy compositionality as a premise; and each deploy a premise linking epistemic features of sentences with their meaning (which, given certain meaning-platonist assumptions, can be interpreted as a universal instantiation of Leibniz’s law). Given these parallels, each is sound just in case the other is. They (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Philippe Huneman (2012). Determinism, Predictability and Open-Ended Evolution: Lessons From Computational Emergence. Synthese 185 (2):195-214.score: 18.0
    Among many properties distinguishing emergence, such as novelty, irreducibility and unpredictability, computational accounts of emergence in terms of computational incompressibility aim first at making sense of such unpredictability. Those accounts prove to be more objective than usual accounts in terms of levels of mereology, which often face objections of being too epistemic. The present paper defends computational accounts against some objections, and develops what such notions bring to the usual idea of unpredictability. I distinguish the objective unpredictability, compatible with determinism (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Corine Besson & Anandi Hattiangadi (2014). The Open Future, Bivalence and Assertion. Philosophical Studies 167 (2):251-271.score: 18.0
    It is highly now intuitive that the future is open and the past is closed now—whereas it is unsettled whether there will be a fourth world war, it is settled that there was a first. Recently, it has become increasingly popular to claim that the intuitive openness of the future implies that contingent statements about the future, such as ‘There will be a sea battle tomorrow,’ are non-bivalent (neither true nor false). In this paper, we argue that the non-bivalence (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Daniel Kodaj (2013). Open Future and Modal Anti-Realism. Philosophical Studies 168 (2):1-22.score: 18.0
    Open future is incompatible with realism about possible worlds. Since realistically conceived (concrete or abstract) possible worlds are maximal in the sense that they contain/represent the full history of a possible spacetime, past and future included, if such a world is actual now, the future is fully settled now, which rules out openness. The kind of metaphysical indeterminacy required for open future is incompatible with the kind of maximality which is built into the concept of possible worlds. The (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Gordon Knight (2006). Universalism for Open Theists. Religious Studies 42 (2):213-223.score: 18.0
    In this paper I argue that the denial of middle knowledge and emphasis on human freedom characteristic of open theism makes the traditional concept of hell even more morally problematic than it would otherwise be. But these same features of open theism present serious difficulties for the view that all will necessarily be saved. I conclude by arguing that the most promising approach for open theists is to adopt a version of contingent, as opposed to necessary, universalism. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Carl Mitcham (2009). Convivial Software: An End-User Perspective on Free and Open Source Software. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 11 (4):299-310.score: 18.0
    The free and open source software (Foss) movement deserves to be placed in an historico-ethical perspective that emphasizes the end user. Such an emphasis is able to enhance and support the Foss movement by arguing the ways it is heir to a tradition of professional ethical idealism and potentially related to important issues in the history of science, technology, and society relations. The focus on software from an end-user’s perspective also leads to the concept of program conviviality. From a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Paul B. de Laat (2010). How Can Contributors to Open-Source Communities Be Trusted? On the Assumption, Inference, and Substitution of Trust. Ethics and Information Technology 12 (4):327-341.score: 18.0
    Open-source communities that focus on content rely squarely on the contributions of invisible strangers in cyberspace. How do such communities handle the problem of trusting that strangers have good intentions and adequate competence? This question is explored in relation to communities in which such trust is a vital issue: peer production of software (FreeBSD and Mozilla in particular) and encyclopaedia entries (Wikipedia in particular). In the context of open-source software, it is argued that trust was inferred from an (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Chong Ju Choi, Sae Won Kim & Shui Yu (2009). Global Ethics of Collective Internet Governance: Intrinsic Motivation and Open Source Software. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (4):523 - 531.score: 18.0
    The ethical governance of the global Internet is an accelerating global phenomenon. A key paradox of the global Internet is that it allows individual and collective decision making to co-exist with each other. Open source software (OSS) communities are a globally accelerating phenomenon. OSS refers to groups of programs that allow the free use of the software and further the code sharing to the general and corporate users of the software. The combination of private provision and public knowledge and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Alan R. Rhoda (2008). Generic Open Theism and Some Varieties Thereof. Religious Studies 44 (2):225-234.score: 18.0
    The goal of this paper is to facilitate ongoing dialogue between open and non-open theists. First, I try to make precise what open theism is by distinguishing the core commitments of the position from other secondary and optional commitments. The result is a characterization of ‘generic open theism’, the minimal set of commitments that any open theist, qua open theist, must affirm. Second, within the framework of generic open theism I distinguish three important (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Stephanie Yue Cottee & Paul Petersan (2009). Animal Welfare and Organic Aquaculture in Open Systems. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (5):437-461.score: 18.0
    The principles of organic farming espouse a holistic approach to agriculture that promotes sustainable and harmonious relationships amongst the natural environment, plants, and animals, as well as regard for animals’ physiological and behavioral needs. However, open aquaculture systems—both organic and conventional—present unresolved and significant challenges to the welfare of farmed and wild fish, as well as other wildlife, and to environmental integrity, due to water quality issues, escapes, parasites, predator control, and feed-source sustainability. Without addressing these issues, it is (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000