Search results for 'parental responsibilities' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Joseph Millum (2008). How Do We Acquire Parental Responsibilities? Social Theory and Practice 34 (1):71-93.score: 180.0
    It is commonly believed that parents have special duties toward their children—weightier duties than they owe other children. How these duties are acquired, however, is not well understood. This is problematic when claims about parental responsibilities are challenged; for example, when people deny that they are morally responsible for their biological offspring. In this paper I present a theory of the origins of parental responsibilities that can resolve such cases of disputed moral parenthood.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Harald Schmidt (2008). Childhood Obesity and Parental Responsibilities. Hastings Center Report 38 (4):p. 3.score: 150.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Richard Hull (2009). Projected Disability and Parental Responsibilities. In Kimberley Brownlee & Adam Cureton (eds.), Disability and Disadvantage. Oup Oxford.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Colin Macleod (2010). Parental Responsibilities in an Unjust World. In David Archard & David Benatar (eds.), Procreation and Parenthood: The Ethics of Bearing and Rearing Children. Oxford University Press. 128.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Bertha Alvarez Manninen (2013). Parental, Medical, and Sociological Responsibilities: “Octomom” as a Case Study in the Ethics of Fertility Treatments. Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 1 (S1).score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. M. E. Winston (1986). Abortion and Parental Responsibility. Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 7 (1):33-56.score: 100.0
    Standard approaches to the morality of abortion typically founder on the question of the “personhood” of the fetus. This paper attempts to avoid this problem by developing an alternative approach in which philosophical positions are derived not from a presumed right to life but from the special moral obligations of parents to nurture their immature children. After a discussion of the notion of parental responsibility, three leading accounts of the acquisition of parental responsibilities are examined: one based (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. J. Fahlquist & I. van de Poel (2012). Technology and Parental Responsibility: The Case of the V-Chip. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):285-300.score: 96.0
    In this paper, the so-called V-chip is analysed from the perspective of responsibility. The V-chip is a technological tool used by parents, on a voluntary basis, to prevent children from watching violent television content. Since 1997 in the United States, the V-chip is installed in all new televisions sets of 12″ and larger. We are interested in the question whether and how the introduction of the V-chip affects who is to be considered responsible for children. In the debate, it has (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. I. van de Poel (2012). Technology and Parental Responsibility: The Case of the V-Chip. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):285-300.score: 96.0
    In this paper, the so-called V-chip is analysed from the perspective of responsibility. The V-chip is a technological tool used by parents, on a voluntary basis, to prevent children from watching violent television content. Since 1997 in the United States, the V-chip is installed in all new televisions sets of 12″ and larger. We are interested in the question whether and how the introduction of the V-chip affects who is to be considered responsible for children. In the debate, it has (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Sally Sheldon (2001). Unmarried Fathers and Parental Responsibility: A Case for Reform? [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 9 (2):93-118.score: 96.0
    Following a Consultation exercise conducted by the Lord Chancellor's Department, the U.K. Government has announced its intention to amend the Children Act 1989 so that the unmarried father who jointly registers the birth with the mother will acquire parental responsibility automatically. In this paper, I draw on the responses made to the L.C.D. Consultation, in order critically to evaluate the arguments for and against reform. A poverty of relevant empirical research makes it impossible to reach a properly informed view (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Leonie le Sage & Doret de Ruyter (2008). Criminal Parental Responsibility: Blaming Parents on the Basis of Their Duty to Control Versus Their Duty to Morally Educate Their Children. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (6):789-802.score: 84.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Liezl van Zyl (2002). Intentional Parenthood: Responsibilities in Surrogate Motherhood. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 10 (2):165-175.score: 84.0
    In recent years, a number of writers dealingwith questions over parenthood that arisein the context of reproductive technologies andsurrogate motherhood, have appealed to thenotion of ``intentional parenthood''. Basingtheir argument on liberal values such asindividual autonomy, the freedom to entercontracts, the right to privacy, and individualself-fulfilment, they argue that contractuallystated intentions, rather than genetic orgestational relationships, should form thebasis of parental rights. Against this I arguethat parental rights do not derive fromcontractual agreements, but are based in theirobligations towards the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Kay Standing (1999). Reasserting Fathers' Rights? Parental Responsibility and Involvement in Education and Lone Mother Families in the UK. Feminist Legal Studies 7 (1):33-46.score: 84.0
  13. Z. E. E. der & Inez de Beaufort (2011). Preconception Care: A Parenting Protocol. A Moral Inquiry Into the Responsibilities of Future Parents Towards Their Future Children. Bioethics 25 (8):451-457.score: 78.0
    In the Netherlands fertility doctors increasingly formulate protocols, which oblige patients to quit their unhealthy lifestyle before they are admitted to IVF procedures. We argue that moral arguments could justify parenting protocols that concern all future parents. In the first part we argue that want-to-be parents have moral responsibilities towards their future children to prevent them from harm by diminishing or eliminating risk factors before as well as during the pregnancy. This is because of the future children's potential to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Catherine Gunzenhauser, Anika Faesche, Wolfgang Friedlmeier & Antje von Suchodoletz (2013). Face It or Hide It: Parental Socialization of Reappraisal and Response Suppression. Frontiers in Psychology 4:992.score: 76.0
    Mastery of cognitive emotion regulation strategies is an important developmental task. This paper focuses on two strategies that occur from preschool age onwards (Stegge & Meerum Terwogt, 2007): reappraisal and response suppression. Parental socialization of these strategies was investigated in a sample of N = 219 parents and their children. Informed by the tripartite model of family impact on children’s emotion regulation, direct relations of emotion socialization processes (modeling and reactions to the child’s negative emotions) and indirect relations of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Søren Holm (2008). Parental Responsibility and Obesity in Children. Public Health Ethics 1 (1):21-29.score: 72.0
    Cardiff Law School, Museum Avenue, Cardiff CF10 3AX, UK. Tel: +44(0)2920875447, Fax: +44(0)2920874097; Email: Holms{at}cardiff.ac.uk ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract The paper presents a brief overview of current knowledge about (i) the link between parental behaviour and lifestyle and childhood obesity, (ii) the many other factors influencing overweight and obesity rates in children and (iii) the effectiveness of interventions in children who are already overweight and obese. On the basis of this, it is (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. E. Macharia & D. Milanovic (2009). Obtaining Consent From Minors with Parental Responsibility. Clinical Ethics 4 (2):102-105.score: 72.0
    Britain has the highest rate of pregnancies in Europe among young women aged 15–19 years. In girls under 16, the rates of pregnancy are rising: in 2006, there were 7.8 conceptions per 1000 girls; in 2007, there were 8.3 conceptions per 1000 girls. Where babies are born with conditions requiring treatment, the clinician may be faced with the task of obtaining consent from a parent who is also a minor. These situations present potential pitfalls. Guidance from legislative acts and case (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Wayne S. McGowan (2005). 'Flexibility', Community and Making Parents Responsible. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (6):885–906.score: 70.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Doret Ruyter Leonie le Sagdee (2008). Criminal Parental Responsibility: Blaming Parents on the Basis of Their Duty to Control Versus Their Duty to Morally Educate Their Children. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (6):789-802.score: 68.0
    Several states in the United States of America and countries in Europe punish parents when their minor child commits a crime. When parents are being punished for the crimes committed by their children, it should be presumed that parents might be held responsible for the deeds of their children. This article addresses the question whether or not this presumption can be sustained. We argue that parents can be blamed for the crimes of their children, not because they have the duty (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Simo Vehmas (2002). Parental Responsibility and the Morality of Selective Abortion. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (4):463-484.score: 66.0
    It is now a common opinion in Western countries that a child's impairment would probably place an unexpected burden on her parents, a burden that the parents have not committed themselves to dealing with. Therefore, selective abortion is in general a morally justified option for the parents. I argue that this view is based on biased information about the quality of life of individuals with impairments and their families. Also, a conscious decision to procreate should bring about conscious assent to (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Boukje Van der Zee & Inez De Beaufort (2011). Preconception Care: A Parenting Protocol. A Moral Inquiry Into the Responsibilities of Future Parents Towards Their Future Children. Bioethics 25 (8):451-457.score: 66.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Alex Rajczi (2009). Abortion, Competing Entitlements, and Parental Responsibility. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (4):379-395.score: 62.0
    Don Marquis offered the most famous philosophical argument against abortion. His argument contained a novel defence of the idea that foetuses have the same moral status as ordinary adults. The first half of this paper contends that even if Marquis has shown that foetuses have this status, he has not proven that abortion is therefore wrong. Instead his argument falls victim to problems similar to those raised by Judith Thomson, problems that have plagued most anti-abortion arguments since. Once Marquis's anti-abortion (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Anca Gheaus (forthcoming). Children's Rights, Parental Agency and the Case for Non-Coercive Responses to Care Drain. In Diana Meyers (ed.), Poverty, Agency, and Human Rights. Oxford University Press.score: 62.0
    Worldwide, many impoverished parents migrate, leaving their children behind. As a result children are deprived of continuity in care and, sometimes, suffer from other forms of emotional and developmental harms. I explain why coercive responses to care drain are illegitimate and likely to be inefficient. Poor parents have a moral right to migrate without their children and restricting their migration would violate the human right to freedom of movement and create a new form of gender injustice. I propose and defend (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Elizabeth Brake (2005). Fatherhood and Child Support: Do Men Have a Right to Choose? Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (1):55–73.score: 60.0
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Jeffrey Blustein (1997). Procreation and Parental Responsibility. Journal of Social Philosophy 28 (2):79-86.score: 60.0
  25. Tim Bayne (2003). Gamete Donation and Parental Responsibility. Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (1):77–87.score: 60.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Anna-Karin Andersson (2014). Parental Responsibility and Entitlement. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (1):49-69.score: 60.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Tom Buller & Stephanie Bauer (2011). Balancing Procreative Autonomy and Parental Responsibility. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (2):268-276.score: 60.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Richard Gelles (2006). Review Essay / Children's Rights and Parents' Responsibilities. Criminal Justice Ethics 25 (2):40-45.score: 60.0
  29. M. J. Brueton (1988). Care of the Handicapped Newborn: Parental Responsibility and Medical Responsibility. Journal of Medical Ethics 14 (1):48-49.score: 60.0
  30. James E. Swain & S. Shaun Ho (2010). Baby Smile Response Circuits of the Parental Brain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):460-461.score: 60.0
    The parent-infant dyad, characterized by contingent social interactions that develop over the first three months postpartum, may depend heavily on parental brain responses to the infant, including the capacity to smile. A range of brain regions may subserve this social key function in parents and contribute to similar capacities in normal infants, capacities that may go awry in circumstances of reduced care.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Alan R. Fleischman (1990). Parental Responsibility and the Infant Bioethics Committee. Hastings Center Report 20 (2):31-32.score: 60.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Sumner B. Twiss Jr (1974). Parental Responsibility For Genetic Health. Hastings Center Report 4 (February):9-11.score: 60.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Pieter Bonte, Guido Pennings & Sigrid Sterckx (2014). Is There a Moral Obligation to Conceive Children Under the Best Possible Conditions? A Preliminary Framework for Identifying the Preconception Responsibilities of Potential Parents. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):5.score: 60.0
    The preventative paradigm of preconception care is receiving increasing attention, yet its boundaries remain vague in three respects: temporally; agentially; and instrumentally. Crucially, it remains unclear just who is to be considered a ‘potential parent’, how soon they should take up preconception responsibilities, and how weighty their responsibilities should be.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Carlton Coulter & Mark Rapley (2011). 'I'm Just, You Know, Joe Bloggs': The Management of Parental Responsibility for First-Episode Psychosis. In Joanna Moncrieff, Mark Rapley & Jacqui Dillon (eds.), De-Medicalizing Misery: Psychiatry, Psychology and the Human Condition. Palgrave Macmillan. 158--173.score: 60.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. R. J. Gelles (2007). Children's Rights and Parents' Responsibilities Martin Guggenheim, What's Wrong With Children's Rights. Criminal Justice Ethics 25 (2):40.score: 60.0
  36. Christine Overall (2010). Indirect Indoctrination, Internalized Religion, and Parental Responsibility. In Peter Caws & Stefani Jones (eds.), Religious Upbringing and the Costs of Freedom: Personal and Philosophical Essays. Pennsylvania State University Press.score: 60.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. James E. Swain & S. Shaun Ho (2012). What's in a Baby-Cry? Locationist and Constructionist Frameworks in Parental Brain Responses. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):167-168.score: 60.0
    Parental brain responses to baby stimuli constitute a unique model to study brain-basis frameworks of emotion. Results for baby-cry and picture stimuli may fit with both locationist and psychological constructionist hypotheses. Furthermore, the utility of either model may depend on postpartum timing and relationship. Endocrine effects may also be critical for accurate models to assess mental health risk and treatment.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Dr M. E. Winston (1986). Abortion and Parental Responsibility. Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 7 (2):153-153.score: 60.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Lisa Bortolotti & Daniela Cutas (2009). Reproductive and Parental Autonomy: An Argument for Compulsory Parental Education. Reproductive Biomedicine Online 19 (ethics suppl.):5-14.score: 58.0
    In this paper we argue that society should make available reliable information about parenting to everybody from an early age. The reason why parental education is important (when offered in a comprehensive and systematic way) is that it can help young people understand better the responsibilities associated with reproduction, and the skills required for parenting. This would allow them to make more informed life-choices about reproduction and parenting, and exercise their autonomy with respect to these choices. We do (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. M. L. J. Wissenburg (2011). Parenting and Intergenerational Justice: Why Collective Obligations Towards Future Generations Take Second Place to Individual Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (6):557-573.score: 52.0
    Theories of intergenerational obligations usually take the shape of theories of distributive (social) justice. The complexities involved in intergenerational obligations force theorists to simplify. In this article I unpack two popular simplifications: the inevitability of future generations, and the Hardinesque assumption that future individuals are a burden on society but a benefit to parents. The first assumption obscures the fact that future generations consist of individuals whose existence can be a matter of voluntary choice, implying that there are individuals who (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Mark V. Flinn, Robert J. Quinlan, Seamus A. Decker, Mark T. Turner & Barry G. England (1996). Male-Female Differences in Effects of Parental Absence on Glucocorticoid Stress Response. Human Nature 7 (2):125-162.score: 52.0
    This study examines the family environments and hormone profiles of 316 individuals aged 2 months-58 years residing in a rural village on the east coast of Dominica, a former British colony in the West Indies. Fieldwork was conducted over an eight-year period (1988–1995). Research methods and techniques include radioimmunoassay of cortisol and testosterone from saliva samples (N=22,340), residence histories, behavioral observations of family interactions, extensive ethnographic interview and participant observation, psychological questionnaires, and medical examinations.Analyses of data indicate complex, sex-specific effects (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Samantha Brennan & Angela White, Responsibility and Children's Rights: The Case for Restricting Parental Smoking.score: 50.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Perry L. Glanzer (2008). Rethinking the Boundaries and Burdens of Parental Authority Over Education: A Response to Rob Reich's Case Study of Homeschooling. Educational Theory 58 (1):1-16.score: 50.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. James J. McKenna (forthcoming). Evolution and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS): I. Infant Responsivity to Parental Contact. Human Nature.score: 50.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Mayra Rafaela Closs Bragotto Barros Peterlevitz (2013). A convergência das responsabilidades parental e política na teoria ética de Hans Jonas. Revista Inquietude 4 (1):110-127.score: 46.0
    Facing the progress of science and technology, Hans Jonas believes that traditional ethical theories are insufficient to guide the actions of contemporary man. To formulate his own theory, the philosopher takes as its basis the responsibilities of parents towards their children and the one the public man has in relation with his community. Despite their differences, these forms of liability are intertwined and complementary. Then arise in jonas' theory the concepts of wholeness, continuity and future, which will cover following (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Aleardo Zanghellini (2010). Lesbian and Gay Parents and Reproductive Technologies: The 2008 Australian and UK Reforms. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 18 (3):227-251.score: 46.0
    This article analyses the laws that govern the allocation of parental responsibility for children conceived through non-coital reproduction by lesbians and gay men in England/Wales and Australia. In 2008 both jurisdictions introduced important reforms affecting this area of law, providing new options for the legal recognition of parent–child relationships in lesbian and gay households. However, the practical usefulness or effectiveness of the reforms may be limited by the excessive complexity or obscurity of the system of parental responsibility thus (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Jason K. M. Hanna (2010). Revisiting Child-Based Objections to Commercial Surrogacy. Bioethics 24 (7):341-347.score: 42.0
    Many critics of commercial surrogate motherhood argue that it violates the rights of children. In this paper, I respond to several versions of this objection. The most common version claims that surrogacy involves child-selling. I argue that while proponents of surrogacy have generally failed to provide an adequate response to this objection, it can be overcome. After showing that the two most prominent arguments for the child-selling objection fail, I explain how the commissioning couple can acquire parental rights by (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Ilina Singh (2005). Response to Commentators on “Will the 'Real Boy' Please Behave: Dosing Dilemmas for Parents of Boys with ADHD”. American Journal of Bioethics 5 (3):W10-W12.score: 40.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Benjamin Baez & Susan Talburt (2008). Governing for Responsibility and with Love: Parents and Children Between Home and School. Educational Theory 58 (1):25-43.score: 40.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000