Search results for 'particular' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Phillip Bricker (2006). The Relation Between General and Particular: Entailment Vs. Supervenience. In Dean Zimmerman (ed.), Oxford Papers in Metaphysics, vol. 3. Oxford University Press. 251-287.score: 24.0
    Some argue, following Bertrand Russell, that because general truths are not entailed by particular truths, general facts must be posited to exist in addition to particular facts. I argue on the contrary that because general truths (globally) supervene on particular truths, general facts are not needed in addition to particular facts; indeed, if one accepts the Humean denial of necessary connections between distinct existents, one can further conclude that there are no general facts. When entailment and (...)
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  2. Ioannis Trisokkas (2011/12). Hegel on the Particular in the Science of Logic. The Owl of Minerva 43 (1/2):1-40.score: 24.0
    Hegel begins the third main part of the Science of Logic, the “logic of the concept,” with the dialectic of universality. This dialectic, however, proves to be insufficient for the exposition of the fundamental structure of being-as-concept, because it is dominated by the perspective of self-identity. For this reason speculative logic develops a dialectic of particularity whose domain is dominated by the perspective of difference. While the dialectic of universality made explicit the meaning of the proposition-of-reason being-as-concept is universal, the (...)
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  3. Aaron Preston (2005). Quality Instances and the Structure of the Concrete Particular. Axiomathes 15 (2):267-292.score: 20.0
    In this paper, I examine a puzzle that emerges from what J. P. Moreland has called the traditional realist view of quality instances. Briefly put, the puzzle is to figure out how quality instances fit into the overall structure of a concrete particular, given that the traditional realist view of quality instances prima facie seems incompatible with what might be called the traditional realist view of concrete particulars. After having discussed the traditional realist views involved and the puzzle that (...)
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  4. Fraser MacBride (2005). The Particular–Universal Distinction: A Dogma of Metaphysics? Mind 114 (455):565-614.score: 18.0
    Is the assumption of a fundamental distinction between particulars and universals another unsupported dogma of metaphysics? F. P. Ramsey famously rejected the particular–universal distinction but neglected to consider the many different conceptions of the distinction that have been advanced. As a contribution to the (inevitably) piecemeal investigation of this issue three interrelated conceptions of the particular–universal distinction are examined: (i) universals, by contrast to particulars, are unigrade; (ii) particulars are related to universals by an asymmetric tie of exemplification; (...)
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  5. John Bolender (2006). Nomic Universals and Particular Causal Relations: Which Are Basic and Which Are Derived? Philosophia 34 (4):405-410.score: 18.0
    Armstrong holds that a law of nature is a certain sort of structural universal which, in turn, fixes causal relations between particular states of affairs. His claim that these nomic structural universals explain causal relations commits him to saying that such universals are irreducible, not supervenient upon the particular causal relations they fix. However, Armstrong also wants to avoid Plato’s view that a universal can exist without being instantiated, a view which he regards as incompatible with naturalism. This (...)
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  6. Graham Priest (2008). The Closing of the Mind: How the Particular Quantifier Became Existentially Loaded Behind Our Backs. Review of Symbolic Logic 1 (1):42-55.score: 18.0
    The paper argues that the view that the particular quantifier is is a relatively new one historically and that it has become entrenched in modern philosophical logic for less than happy reasons.
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  7. Brendan Clarke (2011). Causality in Medicine with Particular Reference to the Viral Causation of Cancers. Dissertation, University College Londonscore: 18.0
    In this thesis, I give a metascientific account of causality in medicine. I begin with two historical cases of causal discovery. These are the discovery of the causation of Burkitt’s lymphoma by the Epstein-Barr virus, and of the various viral causes suggested for cervical cancer. These historical cases then support a philosophical discussion of causality in medicine. This begins with an introduction to the Russo- Williamson thesis (RWT), and discussion of a range of counter-arguments against it. Despite these, I argue (...)
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  8. William J. FitzPatrick (2004). Reasons, Value, and Particular Agents: Normative Relevance Without Motivational Internalism. Mind 113 (450):285-318.score: 18.0
    While differing widely in other respects, both neo-Humean and neo-Kantian approaches to normativity embrace an internalist thesis linking reasons for acting to potential motivation. This thesis pushes in different directions depending on the underlying view of the powers of practical reason, but either way it sets the stage for an attack on realist attempts to ground reasons directly in facts about value. How can reasons that are not somehow grounded in motivational features of the agent nonetheless count as reasons for (...)
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  9. Bradford Skow (2013). Are There Non-Causal Explanations (of Particular Events)? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (3):axs047.score: 18.0
    Philosophers have proposed many alleged examples of non-causal explanations of particular events. I discuss several well-known examples and argue that they fail to be non-causal. 1 Questions2 Preliminaries3 Explanations That Cite Causally Inert Entities4 Explanations That Merely Cite Laws I5 Stellar Collapse6 Explanations That Merely Cite Laws II7 A Final Example8 Conclusion.
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  10. Hannah Ginsborg (2006). Thinking the Particular as Contained Under the Universal. In Rebecca Kukla (ed.), Aesthetics and Cognition in Kant's Critical Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    In a well-known passage from the Introduction to Kant’s Critique of Judgment, Kant defines the power or faculty of judgment [Urteilskraft] as "the capacity to think the particular as contained under the universal" (Introduction IV, 5:179).1 He then distinguishes two ways in which this faculty can be exercised, namely as determining or as reflecting. These two ways are defined as follows: "If the universal (the rule, the principle, the law) is given, then judgment, which subsumes the particular under (...)
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  11. David Sedley (2006). Form–Particular Resemblance in Plato's Phaedo. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 106 (3):309–325.score: 18.0
    This paper is a critical re-examination of the argument in Plato's "Phaedo" for the thesis that all learning is recollection of prenatal knowledge. Plato's speaker Socrates concentrates on the case of 'equal sticks and stones', viewed as striving without complete success to resemble a Form, the Equal itself. The paper argues that (a) this is a rather special case, focused on geometry; (b) Plato is at pains to emphasize that the Form-particular relation need not be one of resemblance at (...)
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  12. Kevin Inston (2009). Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Ernesto Laclau and the Somewhat Particular Universal. Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (5):555-587.score: 18.0
    Rousseau's general will is mostly interpreted as promoting social unity at the expense of plurality. Conversely, this article argues that the general will depends on, and preserves, plurality for its formation and legitimacy. The general and the particular are not fixed opposites, for Rousseau, but are interdependent and contextually defined. The Rousseauian universal anticipates Laclau's notion of universality. The absence of any natural foundations for society deprives the universal of any pre-given identity. Likewise, the Laclauian universal names the lack (...)
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  13. Guido J. M. Verstraeten & Willem W. Verstraeten (2014). From Particular Times and Spaces to Metaphysics of Leopold´s Ethics of the Land. Asian Journal of Humanities and Social Studies (No 1).score: 18.0
    Modern rationalism transformed the modern homeland to a discursive space and time by means of institutes governing the modern society in all its walks. Based on the Newtonian and Kantian conception of space and time the discursive field is just a scene wherein any human individual adopts stewardship to create progress by reducing landscape and non-human life to auxiliary items for human’s benefit. In contrast, Aldo Leopold considered humans, non human life and the landscape as mutually influencing participants and enlarged (...)
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  14. Sebastian Löbner (2000). Polarity in Natural Language: Predication, Quantification and Negation in Particular and Characterizing Sentences. [REVIEW] Linguistics and Philosophy 23 (3):213-308.score: 18.0
    The present paper is an attempt at the investigation of the nature of polarity contrast in natural languages. Truth conditions for natural language sentences are incomplete unless they include a proper definition of the conditions under which they are false. It is argued that the tertium non datur principle of classical bivalent logical systems is empirically invalid for natural languages: falsity cannot be equated with non-truth. Lacking a direct intuition about the conditions under which a sentence is false, we need (...)
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  15. Patrick Tomlin (2012). Should We Be Utopophobes About Democracy in Particular? Political Studies Review 10 (1):36-47.score: 18.0
    In his book Democratic Authority, David Estlund puts forward a case for democracy, which he labels epistemic proceduralism, that relies on democracy's ability to produce good – that is, substantively just – results. Alongside this case for democracy Estlund attacks what he labels ‘utopophobia’, an aversion to idealistic political theory. In this article I make two points. The first is a general point about what the correct level of ‘idealisation’ is in political theory. Various debates are emerging on this question (...)
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  16. Yusef Waghid & Paul Smeyers (2012). Reconsidering Ubuntu: On the Educational Potential of a Particular Ethic of Care. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (s2):6-20.score: 18.0
    In this article we argue that ubuntu (human interdependence) is not some form of essentialist notion that unfolds in exactly the same way as some critics of ubuntu might want to suggest. Rather, we offer a philosophical position that (re)considers the situation of the self in relation to others. The article starts from the general issues at stake in the debate concerning particularity and universalist ethics. We then reconsider the general position of the ethics of care, and particularly how it (...)
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  17. Alan Haworth (2005). Liberalism, Abstract Individualism, and the Problem of Particular Obligations. Res Publica 11 (4):371-401.score: 18.0
    In the following I take issue with the allegation that liberalism must inevitably be guilty of ‘abstract individualism’. I treat Michael Sandel’s well-known claim that there are ‘loyalties and convictions whose moral force consists partly in the fact that living by them is inseparable from understanding ourselves as the particular persons we are’ as representative of this widely held view. Specifically, I argue: (i) that Sandel’s account of the manner in which ‘constitutive’ loyalties function as reasons for action presupposes (...)
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  18. Jonas Olson & Frans Svensson (2003). A Particular Consequentialism: Why Moral Particularism and Consequentialism Need Not Conflict. Utilitas 15 (2):194-205.score: 18.0
    Moral particularism is commonly presented as an alternative to approaches to ethics, such as consequentialism or Kantianism. This paper argues that particularists' aversions to consequentialism stem not from a structural feature of consequentialism per se, but from substantial and structural axiological views traditionally associated with consequentialism. Given a particular approach to (intrinsic) value, there need be no conflict between moral particularism and consequentialism. We consider and reject a number of challenges holding that there is after all such a conflict. (...)
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  19. William P. Alston (1971). The Place of the Explanation of Particular Facts in Science. Philosophy of Science 38 (1):13-34.score: 18.0
    On the critical side it is argued that, contrary to a widespread view, the explanation of particular facts does not play a central role in pure science and hence that philosophers of science are misguided in supposing that the understanding of such explanations is one of the central tasks of the philosophy of science. It is suggested that the view being attacked may stem in part from an impression that the establishing of a general law is tantamount to the (...)
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  20. Francis Cornish (1986). Anaphoric Pronouns: Under Linguistic Control or Signalling Particular Discourse Representations? Journal of Semantics 5 (3):233-260.score: 18.0
    The article is a contribution to the debate between Tasmowski & Verluyten (1982, 1985) and Bosch (1983, 1984, 1987) as to how the form as well as the interpretation of anaphoric pronouns is determined. TV rightly criticize B's tests as to whether a particular third-person pronoun is functioning semantico-syntactically or referential-anaphorically; however, their examples and arguments do not warrant the conclusion that there is no substantive distinction to be drawn between the two types of pronoun use. Many of TV's (...)
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  21. Ulrich Krohs (2006). Philosophies of Particular Biological Research Programs. Biological Theory 1 (2):182-187.score: 18.0
    There is a trend within philosophy of biology to concentrate on questions that are strongly related to particular biological research programs rather than on the general scope of the field and its relation to other sciences. Projects of the latter kind, of course, are followed as well but will not be the topic of this review. Shifting the focus to particular research programs reflects philosophers’ increased interest in knowledge of, and contribution to, actual biological research, which is organized (...)
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  22. Martin Drenthen (2011). NIMBY and the Ethics of the Particular. Ethics, Policy and Environment 13 (3):321-323.score: 18.0
    In “Why Not NIMBY?” Derek Turner and Simon Feldman fail to address that many NIMBY protesters are not just concerned with concrete decision making, but also introduce a ‘metaphysical’ issue that liberal-democracy considers an inappropriate subject for the political debate. The type of rationality dominating political discourse requires one to reason in terms of 'common good' or personal preferences that can be weighted against other preferences. NIMBY’s do neither; rather they reframe the debate, starting from a radically different approach to (...)
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  23. Andrés Mejía (2010). The General in the Particular. Journal of Philosophy of Education 44 (1):93-107.score: 18.0
    Traditionally, research has been seen as a process in which particular cases are studied in order to produce generalisations that can later be applied to other situations. This is arguably the case, for instance, of plain statistical generalisation from samples to populations, but also of grounded theory, local theory and democratic theory. Other research approaches, such as case study research and action research, have challenged this conception and have formulated a process in which transfer takes place directly from (...) cases to other particular cases, thus bypassing generalisations. Nevertheless, I argue that, even in research on single cases, and regardless of whether it is descriptive, explanatory or normative, any piece of research unavoidably produces, supports, modifies, qualifies or refines generalisations in the course of a research project. These generalisations are constitutive of the very descriptions, explanations and normative justifications used to talk about the particular. Nevertheless, they vary in their degree of explicitness, certainty and complexity, as well as in the substantive dimensions they generalise on. The neglect of this characteristic in the educational literature may stem from the inductive assumption that knowledge in research is produced when one first finds something about one or more cases or situations, and then generalises (or does not generalise) the results to other contexts. But generalisation exists all along the process. (shrink)
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  24. John J. Markey (2003). Clarifying the Relationship Between the Universal and the Particular Churches Through the Philosophy of Josiah Royce. Philosophy and Theology 15 (2):299-320.score: 18.0
    In a series of recently published lectures and essays two Roman Catholic Cardinals—Cardinals Ratzinger and Kasper—have offered significantly different positions of the issue of the relationship of the Universal to the Particular Churches. Cardinal Kasper locates the root of the disagreement in the philosophical foundations of the two views in privileging the Universal over the Particular (or vice versa) as the starting point for ecclesiology. I will explain why I find Josiah Royce’s late work (as informed by C. (...)
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  25. Bruce B. Janz, Between the Particular and the Universal.score: 18.0
    specific cultural forms from the charge of ethnophilosophy. It is possible for philosophy to address the particulars of cultural experience without losing its »universal« character. The papers in this volume address three major themes in an effort to illustrate the encounter between philosophy and culture – the nature of persons, the nature of k nowledge, and the nature of change. The essays in the volume vary in their success at reaching the stated goal, inasmuch as some are more successful than (...)
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  26. Don O'Leary (2011). The Inevitability of Particular Interpretations: Catholicism and Science. [REVIEW] Metascience 20 (2):313-315.score: 18.0
    The inevitability of particular interpretations: catholicism and science Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9426-z Authors Don O’Leary, Department of Anatomy, Biosciences Institute, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  27. R. G. Swinburne (1971). The Probability of Particular Events. Philosophy of Science 38 (3):327-343.score: 18.0
    The paper investigates what are the proper procedures for calculating the probability on certain evidence of a particular object e having a property, Q, e.g. of Eclipse winning the Derby. Let `α ' denote the conjunction of properties known to be possessed by e, and P(Q)/α the probability of an object which is α being Q. One view is that the probability of e being Q is given by the best confirmed value of P(Q)/α . This view is shown (...)
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  28. Nikolai Krementsov (2007). A Particular Synthesis: Aleksandr Promptov and Speciation in Birds. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 40 (4):637 - 682.score: 18.0
    During the 1930s, Aleksandr Promptov—a student of the founder of Russian population genetics Sergei Chetverikov—developed an elaborate concept of speciation in birds. He conducted field investigations aimed at giving a naturalistic content to the theoretical formulations and laboratory models of evolutionary processes advanced within the framework of population genetics, placing particular emphasis on the evolutionary role of bird behavior. Yet, although highly synthetic in combining biogeographical, taxonomic, genetic, ecological, and behavioral studies, Promptov's speciation concept was ignored by the architects (...)
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  29. S. Doubabi (1998). Study of Oscillations in a Particular Case of Yates-Pardee-Goodwin Metabolic Pathway with Coupling. Acta Biotheoretica 46 (4).score: 18.0
    The aim of this work is to study the effect of coupling on a metabolic pathway. Specifically we assume that metabolites can exchange matter with outside pools via passive diffusion. The existence of periodic solutions in such a system is considered and resolved using the dual input describing function method. In one particular case of coupling for all permissible parameter sets the minimum dimension is given so that it is possible to detect a periodic solution. The results obtained are (...)
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  30. Sue Kirvan (1999). Women and Asylum: A Particular Social Group. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 7 (3):333-342.score: 18.0
    This note examines the judgement of the House of Lords in the cases of Islam andShah, particularly with regard to their conclusion that women in Pakistan who were victims of domestic violence and not protected by their state could qualify as members of a particular social group under the Geneva Convention, and therefore attain refugee status. The note considers the Refugee Women's Legal Group's Gender Guidelines for the Determination of Asylum Claims in the U.K. and discusses the problems faced (...)
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  31. Claudio Michelon (2014). Virtuous Circularity: Positive Law and Particular Justice. Ratio Juris 27 (2):271-287.score: 18.0
    This paper argues that the positive allocative decisions paradigmatically carried out by the application of legal rules are a necessary condition for arguments about particular justice (i.e., distributive and commutative justice) to make sense. If one shifts the focus from the distinction between distributive and commutative justice to what the two aspects of particular justice are for, namely, providing criteria to judge the allocation of goods, it becomes clear that the distinction is conceptually unstable. The paper argues that (...)
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  32. Marietta Stepaniants (2007). The General and the Particular in Moral Philosophy (The Golden Mean Metaphor). The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 7:137-140.score: 18.0
    The golden mean metaphor is suggested as a key to understanding the universal and the particular in moral philosophy since finding metaphorical links provides a way of seeing different traditions in a manner that does not erect absolute boundaries. The choice of the golden mean is made keeping in mind that all cultures recognize the worth of moderation. The prime reason for that lies in human nature which sets human beings apart from all the other living creatures by a (...)
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  33. Tomás Balduíno (2012). O Vaticano II na prática da igreja particular de Goiás - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2011v9n24p1341. Horizonte 9 (24):1341-1360.score: 18.0
    Apresenta-se nesse texto as repercussões do Concílio Vaticano II na Igreja particular de Goiás. A fidelidade ao Concílio produziu efetiva participação de todos – presbíteros, religiosas e religiosos, leigos e leigas. Tomando como referências a vivência e experiência de pastor nessa diocese (1967-1998) e diversos estudos, Dom Tomás mostra os aspectos mais relevantes dessa história: as assembléias diocesanas, com participação de leitos (1968); as CEBs e a concretização da opção pelos pobres; as Escolas Bíblicas; a defesa da posse da (...)
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  34. Christian P. Weber (2012). Particular Universals—Universal Particulars: Biopolitical Metaphors and the Emergence of Nationalism in Europe (1650–1815). [REVIEW] History of European Ideas 39 (3):426-448.score: 18.0
    Summary Based on Max Weber's concept of Kulturnation and Hans Blumenberg's project of metaphorology, this essay argues that modern nations follow distinct cultural programmes that are inherent to their national ideas. Each national idea is propagated by a particular biopolitical metaphor, which performs a transfer from practical or scientific ideas about how nature structures and organises life to cultural ideas about how human lives should be socially and politically organised. The essay examines the emergence of the principal metaphors of (...)
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  35. Pawel Bo¿Yk (1986). The Structure of European Economy with Particular Reference to East European Countries and East-West Relations. World Futures 22 (1):85-117.score: 18.0
    (1986). The structure of European economy with particular reference to east European countries and east‐west relations. World Futures: Vol. 22, No. 1-4, pp. 85-117.
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  36. Michael G. F. Martin (2002). Particular Thoughts and Singular Thought. In Anthony O'Hear (ed.), Logic, Thought, and Language. Cambridge University Press. 173-214.score: 17.0
    Book description: Much contemporary philosophical debate centres on the topics of logic, thought and language, and on the connections between these topics. This collection of articles is based on the Royal Institute of Philosophy’s annual lecture series for 2000–2001. Its contributors include a number of those working at the forefront of the field, and in their papers they reflect their own current pre-occupations. As such, the volume will be of interest to all philosophers, whether their own work is within the (...)
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  37. Emilios A. Christodoulidis (1999). The Irrationality of Merciful Legal Judgement: Exclusionary Reasoning and the Question of the Particular. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 18 (3):215 - 241.score: 16.0
    In this paper I attempt to bring together (at least) two very different debates: one on justice, mercy and particularity, the other on the play of exclusionary reasons. My aim is to show how the discussion of the uneasy co-existence of justice and mercy pivots on the question of particularity. And, secondly, that the debate on exclusionary reasons can show us why law may fail to do justice in this context.
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  38. Fred I. Dretske (1964). Particular Reidentification. Philosophy of Science 31 (2):133-142.score: 16.0
    A certain dilemma is inherent in relational accounts of space and time. If any objects endure through change, then temporal elements other than relations are required to describe them. If, on the other hand, no objects endure through change, no permanent reference system is available in terms of which to define the "same place" at different times. An argument which, by exploiting this latter difficulty, attempts to show that "objects with some endurance through time" must be accepted as fundamental is (...)
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  39. A. E. (1999). The Irrationality of Merciful Legal Judgement: Exclusionary Reasoning and the Question of the Particular. Law and Philosophy 18 (3):215-241.score: 16.0
    In this paper I attempt to bring together (at least) two very different debates: one on justice, mercy and particularity, the other on the play of exclusionary reasons. My aim is to show how the discussion of the uneasy co-existence of justice and mercy pivots on the question of particularity. And, secondly, that the debate on exclusionary reasons can show us why law may fail to do justice in this context.
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  40. Kenneth L. Noller & Roger Bibace (2005). The Centralityof the Clinician: A View of Medicine From the General to the Particular. In Roger Bibace (ed.), Science and Medicine in Dialogue: Thinking Through Particulars and Universals. Praeger. 99.score: 16.0
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  41. Eric Palmer (1999). Descartes on Nothing in Particular. In Rocco Gennaro & Charles Huenemann (eds.), New Essays on the Rationalists. Oxford. 26-47.score: 16.0
    How coherent is Descartes' conception of vacuum in the Principles? Descartes' arguments attacking the possibility of vacuum are difficult to read and to understand because they reply to several distinct threads of discussion. I separate two strands that have received little careful attention: the scholastic topic of annihilation of space, particularly represented in Albert of Saxony, and the physical arguments concerning vacuum in Galileo that are also continued after the publication of the Principles in Pascal. The distinctness of the two (...)
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  42. D. Chelmow (2005). Evidence-Based Medicine: Quantitatively Moving From the Universal to the Particular. In Roger Bibace (ed.), Science and Medicine in Dialogue: Thinking Through Particulars and Universals. Praeger. 139--158.score: 16.0
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  43. Verity Harte (2010). What's a Particular, and What Makes It So? : Some Thoughts, Mainly About Aristotle. In R. W. Sharples (ed.), Particulars in Greek Philosophy: The Seventh S.V. Keeling Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy. Brill.score: 16.0
     
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  44. Carlo Natali (2010). Particular Virtues in the Nicomachean Ethics of Aristotle. In R. W. Sharples (ed.), Particulars in Greek Philosophy: The Seventh S.V. Keeling Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy. Brill.score: 16.0
     
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  45. Micheline Silva (2005). Generic Disease and Particular Lives: A Systemic and Dynamic Approach to Childhood Cancer. In Roger Bibace (ed.), Science and Medicine in Dialogue: Thinking Through Particulars and Universals. Praeger. 197.score: 16.0
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  46. Jane Chambers-Evansis (2011). Robyn Bluhm is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Philosophy and Reli-Gious Studies and Co-Director of the Institute for Ethics and Public Affairs at Old Dominion University. Her Research Examines Philosophical Issues in Medicine and Psychiatry, with a Particular Focus on the Relationship Between Ethical and Epistemological Questions Arising in Medical Research or Clinical Practice. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (2).score: 15.0
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  47. Benjamin Bagley (forthcoming). Loving Someone in Particular. Ethics.score: 15.0
    People loved for their beauty and cheerfulness are not loved as irreplaceable, yet people loved for “what their souls are made of” are. Or so literary romance implies; leading philosophical accounts, however, deny the distinction, holding that reasons for love either do not exist or do not include the beloved’s distinguishing features. In this, I argue, they deny an essential species of love. To account for it while preserving the beloved’s irreplaceability, I defend a model of agency on which people (...)
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  48. Gerald J. Postema (2006). Interests, Universal and Particular: Bentham's Utilitarian Theory of Value. Utilitas 18 (2):109-133.score: 15.0
    The basic concept of Bentham's moral and political philosophy was public utility. He linked it directly with the concept of the universal interest, which comprises a distinctive partnership of the interests of all members of the community. The ultimate end of government and aim of all of morality is ‘the advancement of the universal interest’. This essay articulates the structure of Bentham's notion of universal interest and locates it in his theory of value.
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  49. Selim Berker (2007). Particular Reasons. Ethics 118 (1):109-139.score: 15.0
    Moral particularists argue that because reasons for action are irreducibly context-dependent, the traditional quest in ethics for true and exceptionless moral principles is hopelessly misguided. In making this claim, particularists assume a general framework according to which reasons are the ground floor normative units undergirding all other normative properties and relations. They then argue that there is no cashing out in finite terms either (i) when a given non-normative feature gives rise to a reason for or against action, or (ii) (...)
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  50. Imogen Dickie (2010). The Generality of Particular Thought. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (240):508-531.score: 15.0
    This paper is about the claim that, necessarily, a subject who can think that a is F must also have the capacities to think that a is G, a is H, a is I, and so on (for some reasonable range of G, H, I), and that b is F, c is F, d is F, and so on (for some reasonable range of b, c, d). I set out, and raise objections to, two arguments for a strong version of (...)
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