Search results for 'passage of time' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Simon Prosser (2007). Could We Experience the Passage of Time? Ratio 20 (1):75-90.score: 720.0
    This is an expanded and revised discussion of the argument briefly put forward in my 'A New Problem for the A-Theory of Time', where it is claimed that it is impossible to experience real temporal passage and that no such phenomenon exists. In the first half of the paper the premises of the argument are discussed in more detail than before. In the second half responses are given to several possible objections, none of which were addressed in the (...)
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  2. Jiri Benovsky (2012). The Causal Efficiency of the Passage of Time. Philosophia 40 (4):763-769.score: 720.0
    Does mere passage of time have causal powers ? Are properties like "being n days past" causally efficient ? A pervasive intuition among metaphysicians seems to be that they don't. Events and/or objects change, and they cause or are caused by other events and/or objects; but one does not see how just the mere passage of time could cause any difference in the world. In this paper, I shall discuss a case where it seems that mere (...)
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  3. Gal Yehezkel (forthcoming). The Illusion of the Experience of the Passage of Time. The Illusion of the Experience of the Passage of Time 5 (35):67-80.score: 582.0
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  4. Oliver Pooley (2013). Relativity, the Open Future, and the Passage of Time. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 113 (3pt3):321-363.score: 549.0
    Is the objective passage of time compatible with relativistic physics? There are two easy routes to an affirmative answer: (1) provide a deflationary analysis of passage compatible with the block universe, or (2) argue that a privileged global present is compatible with relativity. (1) does not take passage seriously. (2) does not take relativity seriously. This paper is concerned with the viability of views that seek to take both passage and relativity seriously. The investigation proceeds (...)
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  5. Bradford Skow (2011). Experience and the Passage of Time. Philosophical Perspectives 25 (1):359-387.score: 540.0
    Some philosophers believe that the passage of time is a real phenomenon. And some of them find a reason to believe this when they attend to features of their conscious experience. In fact this “argument from experience” is supposed to be one of the main arguments for passage. What exactly does this argument look like? Is it any good?
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  6. Eric Olson (2009). The Passage of Time. In Robin Le Poidevin (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Metaphysics. Routledge.score: 540.0
    The prosaic content of these sayings is that events change from future to present and from present to past. Your next birthday is in the future, but with the passage of time it draws nearer and nearer until it is present. 24 hours later it will be in the past, and then lapse forever deeper into history. And things get older: even if they don’t wear out or lose their hair or change in any other way, their chronological (...)
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  7. Ned Markosian (1992). On Language and the Passage of Time. Philosophical Studies 66 (1):1 - 26.score: 540.0
    Since the early part of this century there has been a considerable amount of discussion of the question 'Does time pass?'. A useful way of approaching the debate over the passage of time is to consider the following thesis: The space-time thesis (SPT): Time is similar to the dimensions of space in at least this one respect: there is no set of properties such that (i) these properties are possessed by time, (ii) these properties (...)
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  8. Eric T. Olson (2009). The Rate of Time's Passage. Analysis 69 (1):3-9.score: 522.0
    Many philosophers say that time involves a kind of passage that distinguishes it from space. A traditional objection is that this passage would have to occur at some rate, yet we cannot say what the rate would be. The paper argues that the real problem with time’s passage is different: time would have to pass at one second per second, yet this is not a rate of change. This appears to refute decisively not only (...)
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  9. David Park (1972). The Myth of the Passage of Time. In. In J. T. Fraser, F. Haber & G. Muller (eds.), The Study of Time. Springer-Verlag. 110--121.score: 492.0
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  10. Simon Prosser (2013). The Passage of Time. In Adrian Bardon Heather Dyke (ed.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Time. Wiley-Blackwell. 315-327.score: 492.0
  11. Rögnvaldur Ingthorsson (2013). The Elusive Appearance of Time. In Christer Svennerlind, Jan Almäng & Rögnvaldur Ingthorsson (eds.), ohanssonian Investigations: Essays in Honour of Ingvar Johansson on his Seventieth Birthday. Ontos Verlag. 304–316.score: 487.0
    It is widely assumed that time appears to be tensed, i.e. divided into a future, present and past, and transitory, i.e. involving some kind of ‘flow’ or ‘passage’ of times or events from the future into the present and away into the distant past. In this paper I provide some reasons to doubt that time appears to be tensed and transitory, or at least that philosophers who have suggested that time appears to be that way have (...)
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  12. Darren Bradley (2013). Dynamic Beliefs and the Passage of Time. In A. Capone & N. Feit (eds.), Attitudes De Se. University of Chicago.score: 486.0
    How should our beliefs change over time? Much has been written about how our beliefs should change in the light of new evidence. But that is not the question I’m asking. Sometimes our beliefs change without new evidence. I previously believed it was Sunday. I now believe it’s Monday. In this paper I discuss the implications of such beliefs for philosophy of language. I will argue that we need to allow for ‘dynamic’ beliefs, that we need new norms of (...)
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  13. Adrian M. Haith Tomoko Kitago, Sophia L. Ryan, Pietro Mazzoni, John W. Krakauer (2013). Unlearning Versus Savings in Visuomotor Adaptation: Comparing Effects of Washout, Passage of Time, and Removal of Errors on Motor Memory. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 486.0
    Humans are able to rapidly adapt their movements when a visuomotor or other systematic perturbation is imposed. However, the adaptation is forgotten or unlearned equally rapidly once the perturbation is removed. The ultimate cause of this unlearning remains poorly understood. Unlearning is often considered to be a passive process due to inability to retain an internal model. However, we have recently suggested that it may instead be a process of reversion to habit, without necessarily any forgetting per se. We compared (...)
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  14. Dalbir Bindra & Lois Cameron (1953). Changes in Experimentally Produced Anxiety with the Passage of Time: Incubation Effect. Journal of Experimental Psychology 45 (3):197.score: 477.0
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  15. Peter Forrest (1996). Physical Necessity and the Passage of Time. In P. Riggs (ed.), Natural Kinds, Laws of Nature and Scientific Methodology. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 49--62.score: 459.0
  16. Delwin Cahoon & Ed M. Edmonds (1980). The Watched Pot Still Won't Boil: Expectancy as a Variable in Estimating the Passage of Time. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 16 (2):115-116.score: 459.0
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  17. Michelle Beer (1988). Temporal Indexicals and the Passage of Time. Philosophical Quarterly 38 (151):158-164.score: 450.0
  18. G. Schlesinger (1969). The Two Notions of the Passage of Time. Noûs 3 (1):1-16.score: 450.0
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  19. Ian Phillips (2012). Attention to the Passage of Time. Philosophical Perspectives 26 (1):277-308.score: 450.0
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  20. Roger Teichmann (1995). Clocks and the Passage of Time. The Monist 78 (2):189-206.score: 450.0
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  21. L. Nathan Oaklander (1994). Bigelow, Possible Worlds and the Passage of Time. Analysis 54 (4):244 - 248.score: 450.0
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  22. John Bigelow, The Passage of Time.score: 450.0
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  23. Niels Viggo Hansen (2004). Spacetime and Becoming: Overcoming the Contradiction Between Special Relativity and the Passage of Time. In T. E. Eastman & H. Keeton (eds.), Physics and Whitehead: Quantum, Process, and Experience. Suny Press.score: 450.0
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  24. Eric Hirsch & Sharon Macdonald (2007). Introduction, Creativity and the Passage of Time: History, Tradition and the Life-Course. In Elizabeth Hallam & Tim Ingold (eds.), Creativity and Cultural Improvisation. Berg. 185--192.score: 450.0
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  25. Hedaiatollah Sotodeh (2011). Family and Kinship Relationship in Passage of Time. Social Research 3 (9):191-211.score: 450.0
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  26. M. Oreste Fiocco (2007). Passage, Becoming and the Nature of Temporal Reality. Philosophia 35 (1):1-21.score: 444.0
    I first distinguish several notions that have traditionally been conflated (or otherwise neglected) in discussions of the metaphysics of time. Thus, for example, I distinguish between the passage of time and temporal becoming. The former is, I maintain, a confused notion that does not represent a feature of the world; whereas a proper understanding of the latter provides the key for a plausible and comprehensive account of the nature of temporal reality. There are two general classes of (...)
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  27. Jack W. Meiland (1974). A Two-Dimensional Passage Model of Time for Time Travel. Philosophical Studies 26 (3-4):153 - 173.score: 435.0
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  28. Simon Prosser (2000). A New Problem for the a-Theory of Time. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (201):494-498.score: 432.0
    : I offer a new approach to the increasingly convoluted debate between the A- and B-theories of time, the ‘tensed’ and ‘tenseless’ theories. It is often assumed that the B-theory faces more difficulties than the A-theory in explaining the apparently tensed features of temporal experience. I argue that the A-theory cannot explain these features at all, because on any physicalist or supervenience theory of the mind, in which the nature of experience is fixed by the physical state of the (...)
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  29. David J. King (1978). The Influence of Passage Repetition and Presentation Time on the Learning of Connected Discourse. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 12 (3):229-230.score: 414.0
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  30. Varanasi Ramabrahmam (2005). Being and Becomming: A Physics and Upanishadic Awareness of Time and Thought Process. Ludus Vitalis 13 (24):139-154..score: 384.0
    Understanding of time, construed as movement, change and becoming, is explained taking examples from natural sciences. Durational and metrical aspects of time are elaborated. General assumptions about passage of time are listed. Indian, Chinese and later insights of path of passage of time are figured. Physical and psychological times are differentiated and explained using Energy-Presence (Being) and Energy-Transformation (Becoming) concepts. Concepts of Time at rest and Time in motion are proposed. -/- . (...)
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  31. Robin Le Poidevin (2013). Stopped Clocks, Silent Telephones and Sense Data: Some Problems of Time Perception. [REVIEW] Topoi:1-8.score: 384.0
    When philosophers of perception contemplate concrete examples, the tendency is to choose perceptions whose content does not essentially involve time, but concern how things are at the moment they are perceived. This is true whether the cases are veridical (seeing a tree as a tree) or illusory (misperceiving the colour or spatial properties of an object). Less discussed, and arguably more complex and interesting cases do involve time as an essential element: perceiving movement, for example, or perceiving the (...)
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  32. Christoph Hoerl (forthcoming). Time and the Domain of Consciousness. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences.score: 363.0
    It is often thought that there is little that seems more obvious from experience than that time objectively passes, and that time is, in this respect, quite unlike space. Yet nothing in the physical picture of the world seems to correspond to the idea of such an objective passage of time. In this paper, I discuss some attempts to explain this apparent conflict between appearance and reality. I argue that existing attempts to explain the conflict as (...)
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  33. Peter Ludlow (forthcoming). Tense, the Dynamic Lexicon, and the Flow of Time. Topoi:1-6.score: 363.0
    One of the most gripping intuitions that people have about time is that it, in some sense “flows.” This sense of flow has been articulated in a number of ways, ranging from us moving into the future or the future rushing towards us, and there has been no shortage of metaphors and descriptions to characterize this sense of passage. Despite the many forms of the metaphor and its widespread occurrence, it has been argued that there is a deep (...)
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  34. Steven Savitt (2002). On Absolute Becoming and the Myth of Passage. In Craig Callender (ed.), Time, Reality & Experience. 153-.score: 351.0
    I propose that the passage of time is the successive occurrence of sets of simultaneous events (assuming classical or Newtonian spacetime structure as background). This conception of passage, I claim, is lean enough to survive the criticisms of passage-deniers while robust enough to satisfy the needs of passage-affirmers. I undertake to describe and defend this minimal notion of passage.
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  35. Graeme A. Forbes (forthcoming). Accounting for Experiences as of Passage: Why Topology Isn't Enough. Topoi:1-8.score: 339.0
    Time appears to us to pass. Some philosophers think that we should account for these experiences by appeal to change in what there unrestrictedly is (i.e. ontological change). I argue that such an appeal can only be the beginning of an account of passage. To show this, I consider a minimal type of view—a purely topological view—that attempts to account for experiences as of passage by an appeal to ontological change and topological features of the present. I (...)
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  36. Adrian Bardon (ed.) (2011). The Future of the Philosophy of Time. Routledge.score: 318.0

    The last century has seen enormous progress in our understanding of time. This volume features original essays by the foremost philosophers of time discussing the goals and methodology of the philosophy of time, and examining the best way to move forward with regard to the field's core issues.

    The collection is unique in combining cutting edge work on time with a focus on the big picture of time studies as a discipline. The major questions (...)

    • What are the implications of relativity and quantum physics on our understanding of time?
    • Is the passage of time real, or just a subjective phenomenon?
    • Are the past and future real, or is the present all that exists?
    • If the future is real and unchanging (as contemporary physics seems to suggest), how is free will possible?
    • Since only the present moment is perceived, how does the experience as we know it come about? How does experience take on its character of a continuous flow of moments or events?
    • What explains the apparent one-way direction of time?
    • Is time travel a logical/metaphysical possibility?
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  37. Valtteri Arstila (2012). Time Slows Down During Accidents. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 315.0
    The experienced speed of the passage of time is not constant as time can seem to fly or slow down depending on the circumstances we are in. Anecdotally accidents and other frightening events are extreme examples of the latter; people who have survived from accidents often report altered phenomenology including how everything appeared to happen in slow motion. While the experienced phenomenology has been investigated, there are no explanations about how one can have these experiences. Instead, the (...)
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  38. L. Nathan Oaklander (ed.) (2008). The Philosophy of Time. Routledge.score: 315.0
    What is the nature of temporal passage—the movement of events or moments of time from the future through the present into the past? Is the future and the past as real as the present, or is the present—or perhaps the present and the past—all that exists? What role, if any, does language play in giving us an insight into temporal reality? Is it possible to travel through time into distant regions of the future or the past? What (...)
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  39. Akiko M. Frischhut (2013). What Experience Cannot Teach Us About Time. Topoi:1-13.score: 309.0
    Does the A-theory have an intuitive advantage over the B-theory? Many A-theorists have claimed so, arguing that their theory has a much better explanation for the fact that we all experience the passage of time: we experience time as passing because time really does pass. In this paper I expose and reject the argument behind the A-theorist’s claim. I argue that all parties have conceded far too easily that there is an experience that needs explaining in (...)
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  40. Matej Pavšič (1996). On the Resolution of Time Problem in Quantum Gravity Induced From Unconstrained Membranes. Foundations of Physics 26 (2):159-195.score: 306.0
    The relativistic theory of unconstrained p-dimensional membranes (p-branes) is further developed and then applied to the embedding model of induced gravity. Space-time is considered as a 4-dimensional unconstrained membrane evolving in an N-dimensional embedding space. The parameter of evolution or the evolution time τ is a distinct concept from the coordinate time t=x0. Quantization of the theory is also discussed. A covariant functional Schrödinger equation has a solution for the wave functional such that it is sharply localized (...)
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  41. Roman Frigg, Review of 'the Images of Time. An Essay on Temporal Representation' by Robin le Poidevin. [REVIEW]score: 300.0
    We experience time in different ways, and we construct different kinds of representation of time. What kinds of representation are there and how do they work? In particular, how do we integrate temporal features of the world into our understanding of the mechanisms underlying representations in the media of perception, memory, art, and narrative? Le Poidevin’s well written and carefully argued book is an exploration of these questions. Although interesting in its own right, Le Poidevin pursues this question (...)
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  42. Katherine Dunlop (2009). The Unity of Time's Measure: Kant's Reply to Locke. Philosophers' Imprint 9 (4):1-31.score: 297.0
    In a crucial passage of the second-edition Transcendental Deduction, Kant claims that the concept of motion is central to our understanding of change and temporal order. I show that this seemingly idle claim is really integral to the Deduction, understood as a replacement for Locke’s “physiological” epistemology (cf. A86-7/B119). Béatrice Longuenesse has shown that Kant’s notion of distinctively inner receptivity derives from Locke. To explain the a priori application of concepts such as succession to this mode of sensibility, Kant (...)
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  43. Barry Dainton (2011). Time, Passage and Immediate Experience. In Craig Callender (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Time. Oxford University Press. 382.score: 294.0
  44. Tony Roark (2011). Aristotle on Time: A Study of the Physics. Cambridge University Press.score: 285.0
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Introduction; Part I. Times New and Old: 1. McTaggart's systems; 2. Countenancing the Doxai; Part II. The Mater of Time: Motion: 3. Time is not motion; 4. Aristotelian motion (Kinesis); 5. 'The before and after in motion'; Part III. The Form of Time: Perception: 6. Number (Arithmos) and perception (Aisthesis); 7. On a moment's notice; 8. The role of imagination; 9. Time and the common perceptibles; 10. The hylomorphic interpretation illustrated; Part (...)
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  45. Cord Friebe (2012). Twins' Paradox and Closed Timelike Curves: The Role of Proper Time and the Presentist View on Spacetime. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 43 (2):313-326.score: 276.0
    Relativity allegedly contradicts presentism, the dynamic view of time and reality, according to which temporal passage is conceived of as an existentially distinguished ‘moving’ now. Against this common belief, the paper motivates a presentist interpretation of spacetime: It is argued that the fundamental concept of time—proper time—cannot be characterized by the earlier-later relation, i.e., not in the B-theoretical sense. Only the presentist can provide a temporal understanding of the twins’ paradox and of universes with closed timelike (...)
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  46. L. Nathan Oaklander (1993). On the Experience of Tenseless Time. Journal of Philosophical Research 18:159-166.score: 276.0
    Defending the tenseless theory of time requires dealing adequately with the experience of temporal becoming. The issue centers on whether the defender of tenseless time can provide an adequate analysis of the presence of experience and the appropriateness of certain of our attitudes toward future and past events. By responding to a recent article, ‘Passage and the Presenee of Experience’, by H . Scott Hestevold, I shall attempt to show that adequate analysis of tenseless time is (...)
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  47. Gilbert Plumer (1987). Expressions of Passage. Philosophical Quarterly 37 (149):341-354.score: 273.0
    It seems a contradiction to hold of something both that it took a while and that no time elapsed or passed between its start and finish; there is a connection between the ideas of temporal extendedness and passage. The article develops this connection into a defense of the passage view of time and shows how without this sort of defense, conclusions of arguments putatively in support of the passage view may be reinterpreted as not in (...)
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  48. Matt Farr (2012). On A- and B-Theoretic Elements of Branching Spacetimes. Synthese 188 (1):85-116.score: 267.0
    This paper assesses branching spacetime theories in light of metaphysical considerations concerning time. I present the A, B, and C series in terms of the temporal structure they impose on sets of events, and raise problems for two elements of extant branching spacetime theories—McCall’s ‘branch attrition’, and the ‘no backward branching’ feature of Belnap’s ‘branching space-time’—in terms of their respective A- and B-theoretic nature. I argue that McCall’s presentation of branch attrition can only be coherently formulated on a (...)
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  49. Natalja Deng (2013). Our Experience of Passage on the B-Theory. Erkenntnis 78 (4):713-726.score: 267.0
    Elsewhere I have suggested that the B-theory includes a notion of passage, by virtue of including succession. Here, I provide further support for that claim by showing that uncontroversial elements of the B-theory straightforwardly ground a veridical sense of passage. First, I argue that the B-theory predicts that subjects of experience have a sense of passivity with respect to time that they do not have with respect to space, which they are right to have, even according to (...)
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  50. L. Nathan Oaklander (2004). Absolute Becoming and the Myth of Passage. Philo 7 (1):36-46.score: 267.0
    In a recent paper, Steven Savitt attempts to demonstrate that there is an area of common ground between one classic proponent of temporal passage, C.D. Broad, and one classic opponent of passage, D.C. Williams. According to Savitt, Broad's notion of “absolute becoming” as the ordered occurrence of (simultaneity sets of) events, and Williams’ notion of “literal passage,” as the happening of events strung along the four-dimensional space-time manifold, are indistinguishable. Savitt recognizes that some might think it (...)
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