Search results for 'pathophysiology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. A. H. Louie (2013). Explications of Functional Entailment in Relational Pathophysiology. Axiomathes 23 (1):81-107.score: 18.0
    I explicate how various relational interactions between (M,R)-systems may have realizations in pathophysiology, and how the possible reversals of the effects of these interactions then become therapeutic models. Functional entailment receives a rigorous category-theoretic treatment, and plays a crucial role in this continuing saga of relational biology.
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  2. Yue Chen (2003). Spatial Integration in Perception and Cognition: An Empirical Approach to the Pathophysiology of Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):86-87.score: 12.0
    Evidence for a dysfunction in cognitive coordination in schizophrenia is emerging, but it is not specific enough to prove (or disprove) this long-standing hypothesis. Many aspects of the external world are spatially mapped in the brain. A comprehensive internal representation relies on integration of information across space. Focus on spatial integration in the perceptual and cognitive processes will generate empirical data that shed light on the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.
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  3. Laurence Foss (1998). The Biomedical Paradigm and the Nobel Prize: Is It Time for a Change? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (6):621-644.score: 9.0
    An examination of the early history of Nobel Committee deliberations, coupled with a survey of discoveries for which prizes have been awarded to date – and, equally revealing, discoveries for which prizes have not been awarded – reveals a pattern. This pattern suggests that Committee members may have internalized the received, biomedical model and conferred awards in accord with the physicalistic premises that ground this model. I consider the prospect of a paradigm change in medical science and the possible repercussions (...)
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  4. Joseph L. Price & Wayne C. Drevets (2012). Neural Circuits Underlying the Pathophysiology of Mood Disorders. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (1):61-71.score: 9.0
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  5. Srinivasa N. Raja & Ursula Wesselmann (1997). Sympathetically Maintained Pain: Confusing Classification, Ill-Defined Diagnostic Criteria, and Puzzling Pathophysiology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (3):462-462.score: 9.0
    Recent studies indicate a role of the sympathetic nervous system in acute and chronic pain. However, the terminology of the clinical sympathetically maintained pain (SMP) syndromes continues to be confusing and the criteria for diagnosis of SMP are being refined. (blumberg et al.) Despite significant progress in recent years, the mechanisms of the interaction between the sympathetic and sensory systems in SMP remain puzzling.
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  6. Verleger Rolf (2011). The Response-Locked P3 Component as Indicator of Pathophysiology in Parkinson's Disease. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 9.0
  7. E. G. Lakatta (1988). Chaotic Behavior of Myocardial Cells: Possible Implications Regarding the Pathophysiology of Heart Failure. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 32 (3):421-433.score: 9.0
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  8. Christophe Antczak, Ingrid De Meester & Brigitte Bauvois (2001). Ectopeptidases in pathophysiology. Bioessays 23 (3):251-260.score: 9.0
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  9. Alexander Bürkle (2001). Physiology and Pathophysiology of Poly(ADP‐Ribosyl)Ation. Bioessays 23 (9):795-806.score: 9.0
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  10. M. Corbetta, M. J. Kincade & G. L. Shulman (2002). Two Neural Systems for Visual Orienting and the Pathophysiology of Unilateral Spatial Neglect. In Hans-Otto Karnath, David Milner & Giuseppe Vallar (eds.), The Cognitive and Neural Bases of Spatial Neglect. Oxford University Press. 259--273.score: 9.0
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  11. Klaus Poeck (1969). Pathophysiology of Emotional Disorders Associated with Brain Damage. In P. Vinken & G. Bruyn (eds.), Handbook of Clinical Neurology. North Holland. 3--343.score: 9.0
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  12. Joseph C. Wu, Benjamin V. Siegel, Richard J. Haier & Monte S. Buchsbaum (1990). Testing the Swerdlow/Koob Model of Schizophrena Pathophysiology Using Positron Emission Tomography. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):168-170.score: 9.0
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  13. Joseph T. Giacino & J. T. Whyte (2005). The Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States: Current Knowledge and Remaining Questions. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilation 20 (1):30-50.score: 6.0
  14. Anand Kumar & Barry Smith (2003). The Unified Medical Language System and the Gene Ontology: Some Critical Reflections. In KI 2003: Advances in Artificial Intelligence.score: 3.0
    The Unified Medical Language System and the Gene Ontology are among the most widely used terminology resources in the biomedical domain. However, when we evaluate them in the light of simple principles for wellconstructed ontologies we find a number of characteristic inadequacies. Employing the theory of granular partitions, a new approach to the understanding of ontologies and of the relationships ontologies bear to instances in reality, we provide an application of this theory in relation to an example drawn from the (...)
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  15. Rajendra D. Badgaiyan (2009). Theory of Mind and Schizophrenia☆. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):320-322.score: 3.0
    A number of cognitive and behavioral variables influence the performance in tasks of theory of mind (ToM). Since two of the most important variables, memory and explicit expression, are impaired in schizophrenic patients, the ToM appears inconsistent in these patients. An ideal instrument of ToM should therefore account for deficient memory and impaired ability of these patients to explicitly express intentions. If such an instrument is developed, it should provide information that can be used not only to understand the (...) but also to monitor patients. (shrink)
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  16. Helena Sunvisson, Barbara Habermann, Sara Weiss & Patricia Benner (2009). Augmenting the Cartesian Medical Discourse with an Understanding of the Person's Lifeworld, Lived Body, Life Story and Social Identity. Nursing Philosophy 10 (4):241-252.score: 3.0
    Using three paradigm cases of persons living with Parkinson's Disease (PD) the authors make a case for augmenting and enriching a Cartesian medical account of the pathophysiology of PD with an enriched understanding of the lived body experience of PD, the lived implications of PD for a particular person's concerns and coping with the illness. Linking and adding a thick description of the lived experience of PD can enrich caregiving imagination and attunement to the patient's possibilities, concerns and constraints. (...)
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  17. Kai Vogeley, M. Moskopp Kurthen, P. Falkai & W. Maier (1999). Essential Functions of the Human Self Model Are Implemented in the Prefrontal Cortex. Consciousness and Cognition 8 (3):343-363.score: 3.0
    The human self model comprises essential features such as the experiences of ownership, of body-centered spatial perspectivity, and of a long-term unity of beliefs and attitudes. In the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, it is suggested that clinical subsyndromes like cognitive disorganization and derealization syndromes reflect disorders of this self model. These features are neurobiologically instantiated as an episodically active complex neural activation pattern and can be mapped to the brain, given adequate operationalizations of self model features. In its unique capability (...)
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  18. John C. Marshall, Jennifer M. Gurd & Gereon R. Fink (2002). Catatonia, Motor Neglect, and Hysterical Paralysis: Some Similarities and Differences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):587-588.score: 3.0
    We outline some ways in which motor neglect (the underutilization of a limb despite adequate strength) and hysterical paralysis (failure to move a limb despite no relevant structural damage or disease) may throw light on the pathophysiology of catatonia. We also comment on the manifold inadequacies of distinguishing too firmly between symptoms of “neurologic origin” and of “psychiatric origin.”.
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  19. Jürgen Zielasek & Wolfgang Gaebel (2008). Modularity in Philosophy, the Neurosciences, and Psychiatry. Poiesis and Praxis 6 (1-2):93-108.score: 3.0
    The neurosciences are generating new findings regarding genetic and neurobiological aspects of the pathophysiology of mental disorders. Especially, certain genetic risk factors like neuregulin-1 seem to predispose individuals to a psychotic phenotype beyond the limits of traditional classificatory boundaries between organic psychoses in Alzheimer’s disease, bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia. Little, however, is known about how such genetic risk factors actually confer an increased risk for psychosis in an individual patient. A gap between neuroscientific findings and psychopathological phenomena exists. (...)
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  20. Gregory Fricchione (2002). Catatonia: A Disorder of Motivation and Movement. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):584-585.score: 3.0
    Georg Northoff employs a comparison with Parkinson's disease in an effort to tease apart the underlying pathophysiology of psychogenic catatonia. Northoff's extensive treatment of the subject is abetted by his own research as well as the research of others. Nevertheless, a number of points concerning basal ganglia/thalamocortical processing need to be raised, some adding support to his hypothesis and others detracting from it.
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  21. Mohamed Y. Rady & Joseph L. Verheijde (2010). Retraction: End-of-Life Discontinuation of Destination Therapy with Cardiac and Ventilatory Support Medical Devices: Physician-Assisted Death or Allowing the Patient to Die? BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):20-.score: 3.0
    BackgroundBioethics and law distinguish between the practices of "physician-assisted death" and "allowing the patient to die."DiscussionAdvances in biotechnology have allowed medical devices to be used as destination therapy that are designed for the permanent support of cardiac function and/or respiration after irreversible loss of these spontaneous vital functions. For permanent support of cardiac function, single ventricle or biventricular mechanical assist devices and total artificial hearts are implanted in the body. Mechanical ventilators extrinsic to the body are used for permanent support (...)
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  22. Bernhard Bogerts (2002). Does Catatonia Have a Specific Brain Biology? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):580-581.score: 3.0
    Dr. Northoff's comprehensive comparison of clinical symptoms and neurobiological findings in catatonia with that of Parkinson's disease through integration of various levels of investigation, from neurochemistry up to the subjective experience, is a good example of the new strategies we need to improve our understanding of psychiatric disorders. His multimodal approach, leading to the hypothesis that different pathophysiologies of transcortical “horizontal modulation” and “bottom-up/top-down” – orbitofrontal/basal ganglia – “vertical modulations,” may explain many clinical aspects of catatonia and Parkinson's disease, and (...)
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  23. Niall Shanks, Ray Greek & Jean Greek (2009). Are Animal Models Predictive for Humans? Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 4 (1):2.score: 3.0
    It is one of the central aims of the philosophy of science to elucidate the meanings of scientific terms and also to think critically about their application. The focus of this essay is the scientific term predict and whether there is credible evidence that animal models, especially in toxicology and pathophysiology, can be used to predict human outcomes. Whether animals can be used to predict human response to drugs and other chemicals is apparently a contentious issue. However, when one (...)
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  24. Alfonso Troisi & Francesca R. D'Amato (2005). Deficits in Affiliative Reward: An Endophenotype for Psychiatric Disorders? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):365-366.score: 3.0
    Depue & Morrone-Strupinsky's (D&M-S's) model of affiliation meets the criteria advanced for the definition of behavior systems and endophenotypes. We argue that its application in psychiatry could be useful for identifying a biological pathophysiology common to a variety of conditions that are currently classified in very different categories of psychiatric nosography, including autism, schizoid personality, primary psychopathy, and dismissing attachment.
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  25. Agnès Aubert, Robert Costalat, Hugues Duffau & Habib Benali (2002). Modeling of Pathophysiological Coupling Between Brain Electrical Activation, Energy Metabolism and Hemodynamics: Insights for the Interpretation of Intracerebral Tumor Imaging. Acta Biotheoretica 50 (4).score: 3.0
    Gliomas can display marked changes in the concentrations of energy metabolism molecules such as creatine (Cr), phosphocreatine (PCr) and lactate, as measured using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Moreover, the BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) contrast enhancement in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be reduced or missing within or near gliomas, while neural activity is not significantly reduced (so-called neurovascular decoupling), so that the location of functionally eloquent areas using fMRI can be erroneous. In this paper, we adapt a previously (...)
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  26. William T. Carpenter Jr (2012). The Future of Schizophrenia Pharmacotherapeutics: Not so Bleak. Mens Sana Monographs 10 (1):13.score: 3.0
    Chlorpromazine efficacy in schizophrenia was observed 60 years ago. Advances in pharmacotherapy of this disorder have been modest with effectiveness still limited to the psychosis psychopathology and mechanism still dependent on dopamine antagonism. While a look backward may generate pessimism, future discovery may be far more robust. The near future will see significant changes in paradigms applied in discovery. Rather than viewing schizophrenia as a disease entity represented by psychosis, the construct will be deconstructed into component psychopathology domains. Each domain (...)
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  27. Else Daniel Kondziella, Klaus Hansen R. Danielsen, Erik Carsten Thomsen & Peter Arlien-Soeborg C. Jansen (2009). 1 H Mr Spectroscopy of Gray and White Matter in Carbon Monoxide Poisoning. Journal of Neurology 256 (6).score: 3.0
    Carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication leads to acute and chronic neurological deficits, but little is known about the specific noxious mechanisms. 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) may allow insight into the pathophysiology of CO poisoning by monitoring neurochemical disturbances, yet only limited information is available to date on the use of this protocol in determining the neurological effects of CO poisoning. To further examine the short-term and long-term effects of CO on (...)
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  28. William A. Phillips & Steven M. Silverstein (2004). Unity and Diversity in Disorders of Cognitive Coordination. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):594-599.score: 3.0
    Studies of aging and autism as outlined by Bertone, Mottron, & Faubert (Bertone et al.) and by Faubert & Bertone suggest that disorders of cognitive coordination involving impairments of dynamic gestalt grouping and context-sensitivity may be common to several different disorders. We agree that such studies may shed light on these processes and their neuronal bases. However, we also emphasize that dynamic grouping and context-sensitivity can fail in various ways, and that, although the underlying pathophysiology may often involve NMDA-receptor (...)
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  29. Yutaka Sato, Koichi Mori, Toshizo Koizumi, Yasuyo Minagawa-Kawai, Akihiro Tanaka, Emi Ozawa, Yoko Wakaba & Reiko Mazuka (2011). Functional Lateralization of Speech Processing in Adults and Children Who Stutter. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 3.0
    Developmental stuttering is a speech disorder in fluency characterized by repetitions, prolongations and silent blocks, especially in the initial parts of utterances. Although their symptoms are motor related, people who stutter show abnormal patterns of cerebral hemispheric dominance in both anterior and posterior language areas. It is unknown whether the abnormal functional lateralization in the posterior language area starts during childhood or emerges as a consequence of many years of stuttering. In order to address this issue, we measured the lateralization (...)
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  30. Andrew J. E. Seely (2013). Embracing the Certainty of Uncertainty: Implications for Health Care and Research. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 56 (1):65-77.score: 3.0
    Centuries of scientific progress have been devoted to reducing uncertainty. Newtonian physics, introduced over 300 years ago, allowed for precise prediction of planetary and tidal motion, falling bodies and infinitely more, in addition to allowing the construction of the material world. The 20th century witnessed a revolution in our understanding of organ and cellular function and dysfunction, elucidation of pathways, mediators, receptors, and molecular interactions, and breakthroughs in the characterization of replication, transcription, and translation, all of which has been integral (...)
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  31. Hidenori Aizawa, Wanpeng Cui, Kohichi Tanaka & Hitoshi Okamoto (2013). Hyperactivation in the Habenula as a Link Between Depression and Sleep Disturbance. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 3.0
    Depression occurs frequently with sleep disturbance such as insomnia. Sleep in depression is associated with disinhibition of the rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Despite the coincidence of the depression and sleep disturbance, neural substrate for depressive behaviors and sleep regulation remains unknown. Habenula is an epithalamic structure regulating the activities of monoaminergic neurons in the brain stem. Since the imaging studies showed blood flow increase in the habenula of depressive patients, hyperactivation of the habenula has been implicated in the (...) of the depression. Recent electrophysiological studies reported a novel role of the habenular structure in regulation of REM sleep. In this article, we propose possible cellular mechanisms which could elicit the hyperactivation of the habenular neurons and a hypothesis that dysfunction in the habenular circuit causes the behavioral and sleep disturbance in depression. Analysis of the animals with hyperactivated habenula would open the door to understand roles of the habenula in the heterogeneous symptoms such as reduced motor behavior and altered REM sleep in depression. (shrink)
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  32. D. E. Linden & A. J. Fallgatter (2008). Neuroimaging in Psychiatry: From Bench to Bedside. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3:49-49.score: 3.0
    This perspective considers the present and the future role of different neuroimaging techniques in the field of psychiatry. After identifying shortcomings of the mainly symptom-focussed diagnostic processes and treatment decisions in modern psychiatry, we suggest topics where neuroimaging methods have the potential to help. These include better understanding of the pathophysiology, improved diagnoses, assistance in therapeutic decisions and the supervision of treatment success by direct assessment of improvement in disease-related brain functions. These different questions are illustrated by examples from (...)
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  33. A. R. Singh & S. A. Singh (2009). Notes on a Few Issues in the Philosophy of Psychiatry. Mens Sana Monographs 7 (1):128.score: 3.0
    _The first part called the Preamble tackles: (a) the issues of silence and speech, and life and disease; (b) whether we need to know some or all of the truth, and how are exact science and philosophical reason related; (c) the phenomenon of Why, How, and What; (d) how are mind and brain related; (e) what is robust eclecticism, empirical/scientific enquiry, replicability/refutability, and the role of diagnosis and medical model in psychiatry; (f) bioethics and the four principles of beneficence, non-malfeasance, (...)
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  34. Peter V. Tishler (2013). The Rise of Pathophysiologic Research in the United States: The Role of Two Harvard Hospitals. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 56 (2):244-250.score: 3.0
    At the end of the 19th century, medical research in the United States was descriptive and rudimentary. American physician-investigators were primarily defining and categorizing disease entities. However, seeds of more mechanistic research had been laid in Europe, particularly in Germany, including the germ theory of disease etiology resulting from Pasteur and Koch's discoveries and the detailed descriptive pathology of the human body by Virchow and others. Prior to World War I, a graduate of an American medical school with an interest (...)
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  35. Carrie E. Bearden & John R. Monterosso (2002). Catatonia Isn't Ready for a Unified Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):579-580.score: 3.0
    Northoff's target article presents a unifying theory of the pathophysiology of catatonia, as compared to Parkinson's disease. We address two arguments in particular that do not appear justified by available evidence: (1) The physiological basis of catatonia is the breakdown of right hemisphere prefrontal-parietal cortical connectivity, and (2) Dysfunction in this system results in specific deficits in termination of action.
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  36. Geoffrey Burnstock (2012). Purinergic Signalling: Its Unpopular Beginning, its Acceptance and its Exciting Future. Bioessays 34 (3):218-225.score: 3.0
    Adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) was identified in 1970 as the transmitter responsible for non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic neurotransmission in the gut and bladder and the term ‘purinergic’ was coined. Purinergic cotransmission was proposed in 1976 and ATP is now recognized as a cotransmitter in all nerves in the peripheral and central nervous systems. P1 (adenosine) and P2 (ATP) receptors were distinguished in 1978. Cloning of these receptors in the early 1990s was a turning point in the acceptance of the purinergic signalling hypothesis. There (...)
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  37. Kevin D'ostilio & Gaëtan Garraux (2012). Brain Mechanisms Underlying Automatic and Unconscious Control of Motor Action. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 3.0
    Are we in command of our motor acts? The popular belief holds that our conscious decisions are the direct causes of our actions. However, overwhelming evidence from neurosciences demonstrates that our actions are instead largely driven by brain processes that unfold outside of our consciousness. To study these brain processes, scientists have used a range of different functional brain imaging techniques and experimental protocols, such as subliminal priming. Here, we review recent advances in the field and propose a theoretical model (...)
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  38. Gaëtan Garraux Kevin D'Ostilio (2012). Brain Mechanisms Underlying Automatic and Unconscious Control of Motor Action. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 3.0
    Are we in command of our motor acts? The popular belief holds that our conscious decisions are the direct causes of our actions. However, overwhelming evidence from neurosciences demonstrates that our actions are instead largely driven by brain processes that unfold outside of our consciousness. To study these brain processes, scientists have used a range of different functional brain imaging techniques and experimental protocols, such as subliminal priming. Here, we review recent advances in the field and propose a theoretical model (...)
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  39. André Lee, Shinichi Furuya, Matthias Karst & Eckart Altenmüller (2013). Alteration in Forward Model Prediction of Sensory Outcome of Motor Action in Focal Hand Dystonia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 3.0
    Focal hand dystonia in musicians is a movement disorder affecting highly trained movements. Rather than being a pure motor disorder related to movement execution only, movement planning, error prediction and sensorimotor integration are also impaired. Internal models, of which two types, forward and inverse models have been described and most likely processed in the cerebellum, are known to be involved in these tasks. Recent results indicate that the cerebellum may be involved in the pathophysiology of focal dystonia. Thus the (...)
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  40. Godfrey Pearlson & Vince D. Calhoun (2009). Convergent Approaches for Defining Functional Imaging Endophenotypes in Schizophrenia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 3.0
    In complex genetic disorders such as schizophrenia, endophenotypes have potential utility both in identifying risk genes and in illuminating pathophysiology. This is due to their presumed status as closer in the etiopathological pathway to the causative genes than is the currently defining clinical phenomenology of the illness and thus their simpler genetic architecture than that of the full syndrome. There, many genes conferring slight individual risk are additive or epistatic (interactive) with regard to cumulative schizophrenia risk. In addition the (...)
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  41. Debra Titone & J. Bruno Debruille (2003). Guarding Against Over-Inclusive Notions of “Context”: Psycholinguistic and Electrophysiological Studies of Specific Context Functions in Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):108-109.score: 3.0
    Phillips & Silverstein offer an exciting synthesis of ongoing efforts to link the clinical and cognitive manifestations of schizophrenia with cellular accounts of its pathophysiology. We applaud their efforts but wonder whether the highly inclusive notion of “context” adequately captures some important details regarding schizophrenia and NMDA/glutamate function that are suggested by work on language processing and cognitive electrophysiology.
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  42. Philip E. Cryer (2006). Hypoglycemia in Diabetes: Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Diurnal Variation. In Susana Martinez-Conde, S. L. Macknik, L. M. Martinez, J.-M. Alonso & P. U. Tse (eds.), Progress in Brain Research. Elsevier Science. 153--361.score: 3.0
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  43. S. Goldman, Regional Cerebral Glucose Metabolism in Akinetic Catatonia and After Remission.score: 3.0
    K L Kahlbaum published in 1874 the first recorded description of catatonia. Akinetic catatonia is now defined as a neuropsychiatric syndrome principally characterised by akinesia, mutism, stupor, and catalepsy. 1 Even if some advances have been made in the recognition of catatonia, in particular by the development of different rating scales, 1 the pathophysiology of this syndrome is not clearly established. A right handed 14 year old girl presented with akinetic catatonia during an episode of depression in the context (...)
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  44. Inga Griskova & Sidse M. Arnfred (2008). An Electrophysiological Approach to Investigations of Sensory Dysfunction in Schizophrenia. Poiesis and Praxis 6 (3-4):175-189.score: 3.0
    Sensory dysfunction has been shown to be a part of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Nowadays we have an objective, non-invasive tool with which to measure neural manifestations of sensory dysfunction. Defined as time-locked changes to external stimuli in the EEG, event-related potentials (ERPs) provide an objective index of information processing in the human brain. Importantly, ERPs may be analyzed through a variety of approaches such as conventional ERP analysis, analysis in the time-frequency domain, microstate segmentation and topographical analysis, as (...)
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  45. H. H. Jasper (1966). Pathophysiological Studies of Brain Mechanisms in Different States of Consciousness. In. In John C. Eccles (ed.), Brain and Conscious Experience. Springer. 256--282.score: 3.0
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  46. H. H. Jasper (1966). Pathophysiological Studies of Brain. In John C. Eccles (ed.), Brain and Conscious Experience. Springer. 256.score: 3.0
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  47. Dara S. Manoach & Robert Stickgold (2009). Does Abnormal Sleep Impair Memory Consolidation in Schizophrenia? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 3.0
    Although disturbed sleep is a prominent feature of schizophrenia, its relation to the pathophysiology, signs, and symptoms of schizophrenia remains poorly understood. Sleep disturbances are well known to impair cognition in healthy individuals. Yet, in spite of its ubiquity in schizophrenia, abnormal sleep has generally been overlooked as a potential contributor to cognitive deficits. Amelioration of cognitive deficits is a current priority of the schizophrenia research community, but most efforts to define, characterize, and quantify cognitive deficits focus on cross-sectional (...)
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  48. Christian Sorg Masoud Tahmasian, David C. Knight, Andrei Manoliu, Dirk Schwerthöffer, Martin Scherr, Chun Meng, Junming Shao, Henning Peters, Anselm Doll, Habibolah Khazaie, Alexander Drzezga, Josef Bäuml, Claus Zimmer, Hans Förstl, Afra M. Wohlschläger, Valentin Riedl (2013). Aberrant Intrinsic Connectivity of Hippocampus and Amygdala Overlap in the Fronto-Insular and Dorsomedial-Prefrontal Cortex in Major Depressive Disorder. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 3.0
    Neuroimaging studies of major depressive disorder (MDD) have consistently observed functional and structural changes of the hippocampus (HP) and amygdale (AY). Thus, these brain regions appear to be critical elements of the pathophysiology of MDD. The HP and AY directly interact and show broad and overlapping intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) to other brain regions. Therefore, we hypothesized the HP and AY would show a corresponding pattern of aberrant intrinsic connectivity in MDD. Resting-state functional MRI was acquired from 21 patients (...)
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  49. K. Omote (1997). Are Intrinsic Inhibitory Systems Activated or Inhibited in Pathological Pain States? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (3):461-462.score: 3.0
    Neuroplastic changes in the inhibitory systems contribute to pathological pains such as hyperalgesia. Activation or inhibition of the intrinsic inhibitory systems may depend on the pathophysiology which induces a sustained pain state. The mechanisms of hyperalgesia, opioid insensitivity following nerve injury, and opioid tolerance may be related to common neuroplastic changes. [wiesenfeld-hallin et al.].
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  50. R. P. Behrendt & C. Young (2004). Hallucinations in Schizophrenia, Sensory Impairment, and Brain Disease: A Unifying Model. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):771-787.score: 1.0
    Based on recent insight into the thalamocortical system and its role in perception and conscious experience, a unified pathophysiological framework for hallucinations in neurological and psychiatric conditions is proposed, which integrates previously unrelated neurobiological and psychological findings. Gamma-frequency rhythms of discharge activity from thalamic and cortical neurons are facilitated by cholinergic arousal and resonate in networks of thalamocortical circuits, thereby transiently forming assemblies of coherent gamma oscillations under constraints of afferent sensory input and prefrontal attentional mechanisms. If perception is based (...)
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