Search results for 'perception of causality' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Howard E. Gruber, Charles D. Fink & Vernon Damm (1957). Effects of Experience on Perception of Causality. Journal of Experimental Psychology 53 (2):89.score: 153.0
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  2. Timothy L. Hubbard (2013). Launching, Entraining, and Representational Momentum: Evidence Consistent with an Impetus Heuristic in Perception of Causality. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 23 (4):633-643.score: 131.0
    Displacements in the remembered location of stimuli in displays based on Michotte’s (1946/1963) launching effect and entraining effect were examined. A moving object contacted an initially stationary target, and the target began moving. After contacting the target, the mover became stationary (launching trials) or continued moving in the same direction and remained adjacent to the target (entraining trials). In launching trials, forward displacement was smaller for targets than for movers; in entraining trials, forward displacement was smaller for movers than for (...)
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  3. Riccardo Luccio & Donata Milloni (2004). Perception of Causality: A Dynamical Analysis. In Alberto Peruzzi (ed.), Mind and Causality. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. 55--19.score: 117.0
  4. Naomi Eilan (2013). A Relational Response to Newman's Objection to Russell's Causal Theory of Perception. Theoria 80 (2).score: 102.0
    The causal theory of perception (CTP) has come under a great deal of critical scrutiny from philosophers of mind interested in the nature of perception. M. H. Newman's set-theoretic objection to Russell's structuralist version of the CTP, in his 1928 paper “Mr Russell's Causal Theory of Perception” has not, to my knowledge, figured in these discussions. In this paper I aim to show that it should: Newman's objection can be generalized to yield a particularly powerful and incisive (...)
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  5. Anjan Chatterjee Benjamin Straube (2010). Space and Time in Perceptual Causality. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 99.0
    Inferring causality is a fundamental feature of human cognition that allows us to theorize about and predict future states of the world. Michotte suggested that humans automatically perceive causality based on certain perceptual features of events. However, individual differences in judgments of perceptual causality cast doubt on Michotte’s view. To gain insights in the neural basis of individual difference in the perception of causality, our participants judged causal relationships in animations of a blue ball colliding (...)
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  6. R. J. B. (1964). The Perception of Causality. Review of Metaphysics 18 (1):180-181.score: 93.0
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  7. John K. Kruschke & Michael M. Fragassi (1996). The Perception of Causality: Feature Binding in Interacting Objects. In. In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. 441--446.score: 93.0
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  8. David R. Shanks (1985). Hume on the Perception of Causality. Hume Studies 11 (1):94-108.score: 90.0
  9. David Premack & Guy Woodruff (1978). Chimpanzee Theory of Mind: Part I. Perception of Causality and Purpose in the Child and Chimpanzee. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (4):616.score: 90.0
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  10. Anne Schlottmann (2000). Is Perception of Causality Modular? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (12):441-442.score: 90.0
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  11. Ann Taylor (1964). The Perception of Causality. Philosophical Books 5 (1):12-13.score: 90.0
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  12. Dustin Stokes (2014). Cognitive Penetration and the Perception of Art. Dialectica 68 (1):1-34.score: 89.0
    There are good, even if inconclusive, reasons to think that cognitive penetration of perception occurs: that cognitive states like belief causally affect, in a relatively direct way, the contents of perceptual experience. The supposed importance of – indeed as it is suggested here, what is definitive of – this possible phenomenon is that it would result in important epistemic and scientific consequences. One interesting and intuitive consequence entirely unremarked in the extant literature concerns the perception of art. Intuition (...)
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  13. Richard Brook, Berkeley and the Causality of Ideas; a Look at PHK 25.score: 89.0
    I argue that Berkeley's distinctive idealism/immaterialism can't support his view that objects of sense, immediately or mediately perceived, are causally inert. (The Passivity of Ideas thesis or PI) Neither appeal to ordinary perception, nor traditional arguments, for example, that causal connections are necessary, and we can't perceive such connections, are helpful. More likely it is theological concerns,e.g., how to have second causes if God upholds by continuously creating the world, that's in the background. This puts Berkeley closer to Malebranche (...)
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  14. David M. Eagleman & Alex O. Holcombe (2002). Causality and the Perception of Time. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (8):323-325.score: 87.0
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  15. Gabriele Kitzmüller, Terttu Häggström & Kenneth Asplund (2013). Living an Unfamiliar Body: The Significance of the Long-Term Influence of Bodily Changes on the Perception of Self After Stroke. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (1):19-29.score: 84.0
    The aim of this study is to illuminate the significance of the long-term influence of bodily changes on the perception of self after stroke by means of narrative interviews with 23 stroke survivors. A phenomenological-hermeneutic approach inspired by the philosophy of Merleau-Ponty and Ricoeur is the methodological framework. Zahavi’s understanding of the embodied self and Leder’s concept of dys-appearance along with earlier research on identity guide the comprehensive understanding of the theme. The meaning of bodily changes after stroke can (...)
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  16. Rainer Mausfeld (2010). The Perception of Material Qualities and the Internal Semantics of the Perceptual System. In Albertazzi Liliana, Tonder Gert & Vishwanath Dhanraj (eds.), Perception beyond Inference. The Information Content of Visual Processes. MIT Press.score: 82.0
  17. Timothy L. Hubbard (2013). Phenomenal Causality II: Integration and Implication. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 23 (3):485-524.score: 81.0
    The empirical literature on phenomenal causality (the notion that causality can be perceived) is reviewed. Different potential types of phenomenal causality and variables that influence phenomenal causality were considered in Part I (Hubbard 2012b) of this two-part series. In Part II, broader questions regarding properties of phenomenal causality and connections of phenomenal causality to other perceptual or cognitive phenomena (different types of phenomenal causality, effects of spatial and temporal variance, phenomenal causality in (...)
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  18. Timothy L. Hubbard (2013). Phenomenal Causality I: Varieties and Variables. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 23 (1):1-42.score: 81.0
    The empirical literature on phenomenal causality (i.e., the notion that causality can be perceived) is reviewed. In Part I of this two-part series, different potential types of phenomenal causality (launching, triggering, reaction, tool, entraining, traction, braking, enforced disintegration and bursting, coordinated movement, penetration, expulsion) are described. Stimulus variables (temporal gap, spatial gap, spatial overlap, direction, absolute velocity, velocity ratio, trajectory length, radius of action, size, motion type, modality, animacy) and observer variables (attention, eye movements and fixation, prior (...)
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  19. Marina White Anne Schlottmann, Katy Cole, Rhianna Watts (2013). Domain-Specific Perceptual Causality in Children Depends on the Spatio-Temporal Configuration, Not Motion Onset. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 81.0
    Humans, even babies, perceive causality when one shape moves briefly and linearly after another. Motion timing is crucial in this and causal impressions disappear with short delays between motions. However, the role of temporal information is more complex: It is both a cue to causality and a factor that constrains processing. It affects ability to distinguish causality from non-causality, and social from mechanical causality. Here we study both issues with 3- to 7-year-olds and adults who (...)
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  20. Valtteri Arstila & Kalle Pihlainen (2009). The Causal Theory of Perception Revisited. Erkenntnis 70 (3):397 - 417.score: 80.0
    It is generally agreed upon that Grice's causal theory of perception describes a necessary condition for perception. It does not describe sufficient conditions, however, since there are entities in causal chains that we do not perceive and not all causal chains yield perceptions. One strategy for overcoming these problems is that of strengthening the notion of causality (as done by David Lewis). Another is that of specifying the criteria according to which perceptual experiences should match the way (...)
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  21. Alba Papa-Grimaldi (2008). Temporal Relations Vs. Logical Reduction: A Phenomenal Theory of Causality. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 18 (3):339-358.score: 80.0
    Kant, in various parts of his treatment of causality, refers to determinism or the principle of sufficient reason as an inescapable principle. In fact, in the Second Analogy we find the elements to reconstruct a purely phenomenal determinism as a logical and tautological truth. I endeavour in this article to gather these elements into an organic theory of phenomenal causality and then show, in the third section, with a specific argument which I call the “paradox of phenomenal observation”, (...)
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  22. Mohan Matthen (forthcoming). Active Perception and the Representation of Space. In Dustin Stokes, Stephen Biggs & Mohan Matthen (eds.), Perception and Its Modalities. Oxford University Press.score: 79.0
    Kant argued that the perceptual representations of space and time were templates for the perceived spatiotemporal ordering of objects, and common to all modalities. His idea is that these perceptual representations were specific to no modality, but prior to all—they are pre-modal, so to speak. In this paper, it is argued that active perception—purposeful interactive exploration of the environment by the senses—demands premodal representations of time and space.
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  23. Santiago Echeverri (2013). Is Perception a Source of Reasons? Theoria 79 (1):22-56.score: 77.0
    It is widely assumed that perception is a source of reasons (SR). There is a weak sense in which this claim is trivially true: even if one characterizes perception in purely causal terms, perceptual beliefs originate from the mind's interaction with the world. When philosophers argue for (SR), however, they have a stronger view in mind: they claim that perception provides pre- or non-doxastic reasons for belief. In this article I examine some ways of developing this view (...)
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  24. Leonardo Badino, Alessandro D'Ausilio, Luciano Fadiga & Giorgio Metta (2014). Computational Validation of the Motor Contribution to Speech Perception. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (2).score: 77.0
    Action perception and recognition are core abilities fundamental for human social interaction. A parieto-frontal network (the mirror neuron system) matches visually presented biological motion information onto observers' motor representations. This process of matching the actions of others onto our own sensorimotor repertoire is thought to be important for action recognition, providing a non-mediated “motor perception” based on a bidirectional flow of information along the mirror parieto-frontal circuits. State-of-the-art machine learning strategies for hand action identification have shown better performances (...)
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  25. Jean-Rémy Martin (2013). Experiences of Activity and Causality in Schizophrenia: When Predictive Deficits Lead to a Retrospective Over-Binding. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1361-1374.score: 76.0
    In this paper I discuss an intriguing and relatively little studied symptomatic expression of schizophrenia known as experiences of activity in which patients form the delusion that they can control some external events by the sole means of their mind. I argue that experiences of activity result from patients being prone to aberrantly infer causal relations between unrelated events in a retrospective way owing to widespread predictive deficits. Moreover, I suggest that such deficits may, in addition, lead to an aberrant (...)
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  26. Martin Jean-Rémy (2013). Experiences of Activity and Causality in Schizophrenia: When Predictive Deficits Lead to a Retrospective Over-Binding. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1361-1374.score: 76.0
    In this paper I discuss an intriguing and relatively little studied symptomatic expression of schizophrenia known as experiences of activity in which patients form the delusion that they can control some external events by the sole means of their mind. I argue that experiences of activity result from patients being prone to aberrantly infer causal relations between unrelated events in a retrospective way owing to widespread predictive deficits. Moreover, I suggest that such deficits may, in addition, lead to an aberrant (...)
     
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  27. John Hyman (1992). The Causal Theory of Perception. Philosophical Quarterly 42 (168):277-296.score: 75.0
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  28. Nathaniel F. Barrett & Wesley J. Wildman (2009). Seeing is Believing? How Reinterpreting Perception as Dynamic Engagement Alters the Justificatory Force of Religious Experience. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 66 (2):71 - 86.score: 75.0
    William Alston’s Theory of Appearing has attracted considerable attention in recent years, both for its elegant interpretation of direct realism in light of the presentational character of perceptual experience and for its central role in his defense of the justificatory force of Christian mystical experiences. There are different ways to account for presentational character, however, and in this article we argue that a superior interpretation of direct realism can be given by a theory of perception as dynamic engagement. The (...)
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  29. Patricia Kauark-Leite (2009). The Transcendental Role of the Principle of Anticipations of Perception in Quantum Mechanics. In Michel Bitbol, Jean Petitot & Pierre Kerszberg (eds.), CONSTITUTING OBJECTIVITY The Western Ontario Series in Philosophy of Science.score: 75.0
    The aim of this work is to analyse the diffrerences between the formal structure of anticipation of perception in classical and in quantum context. I argue that a transcendental point of view can be supported in quantum context if objectivity is defined by an invariant anticipative structure, which has only a predictive character. The classical objectivity, which defined a set of properties having a descriptive meaning must be abandoned in quantum context. I will focus my analysis on Kant's Principle (...)
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  30. Bence Nanay (forthcoming). Philosophy of Perception as a Guide to Aesthetics. In Greg Currie, Aaron Meskin, Matthew Kieran & Jon Robson (eds.), Aesthetics and the Sciences of the Mind.score: 75.0
    The aim of this paper is to argue that it is a promising avenue of research to consider philosophy of perception to be a guide to aesthetics. More precisely, my claim is that many, maybe even most, traditional problems in aesthetics are in fact about philosophy of perception that can, as a result, be fruitfully addressed with the help of the conceptual apparatus of philosophy of perception. This claim may sound provocative, but after qualifying what I mean (...)
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  31. Pawel Grabarczyk (forthcoming). How to Talk (Precisely) About Visual Perception. The Case of the Duck/Rabbit. In Piotr Stalmaszczyk (ed.), Philosophy of Language and Linguistics. The Legacy of Frege, Russell, and Wittgenstein. De Guyter.score: 75.0
    In Remarks on the philosophy of psychology Wittgenstein uses ambiguous illusions to investigate the problematic relation of perception and interpretation. I use this problem as a starting point for developing a conceptual framework capable of expressing problems associated with visual perception in a precise manner. I do this by discerning between subjective and objective meaning of the term “to see” and by specifying the beliefs which are to be ascribed to the observer when we assert that she sees (...)
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  32. Robert A. Oakes (1978). How to Rescue the Traditional Causal Theory of Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 38 (March):370-383.score: 75.0
  33. L. Jonathan Cohen (1977). The Causal Theory of Perception. Aristotelian Society 127:127-141.score: 75.0
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  34. F. R. Pickering (1974). A Refutation of an Objection to the Causal Theory of Perception. Analysis 34 (March):129-132.score: 75.0
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  35. Aaron Allen Schiller (2012). The Primacy of Fact Perception. Philosophical Psychology 25 (4):575 - 593.score: 74.0
    After outlining an enactive account of fact perception, I consider J. L. Austin's discussion of the argument from illusion. From it I draw the conclusion that when fact perception is primary the objects perceived are those involved in the fact. A consideration of Adelson's checkershadow illusion shows that properties as basic as luminance are perceived in the contexts of facts as well. I thus conclude that when facts are perceived they structure our perception of objects and properties. (...)
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  36. Jose Filipe Silva & Juhana Toivanen (2011). The Active Nature of the Soul in Sense Perception: Robert Kilwardby and Peter Olivi. Vivarium 48 (3-4):245-278.score: 74.0
    This article discusses the theories of perception of Robert Kilwardby and Peter of John Olivi. Our aim is to show how in challenging certain assumptions of medieval Aristotelian theories of perception they drew on Augustine and argued for the active nature of the soul in sense perception. For both Kilwardby and Olivi, the soul is not passive with respect to perceived objects; rather, it causes its own cognitive acts with respect to external objects and thus allows the (...)
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  37. Christian Lotz (2007). Depiction and Plastic Perception. A Critique of Husserl's Theory of Picture Consciousness. Continental Philosophy Review 40 (2):171-185.score: 74.0
    In this paper, I will present an argument against Husserl’s analysis of picture consciousness. Husserl’s analysis of picture consciousness (as it can be found primarily in the recently translated volume Husserliana 23) moves from a theory of depiction in general to a theory of perceptual imagination. Though, I think that Husserl’s thesis that picture consciousness is different from depictive and linguistic consciousness is legitimate, and that Husserl’s phenomenology avoids the errors of linguistic theories, such as Goodman’s, I submit that his (...)
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  38. Walter Horn (2012). Note on Two Snowdon Criticisms of the Causal Theory of Perception. Acta Analytica 27 (4):441-447.score: 74.0
    Two arguments Paul Snowdon has brought against the causal theory of perception are examined. One involves the claim that, based on the phenomenology of perceptual situations, it cannot be the case that perception is an essentially causal concept. The other is a reductio , according to which causal theorists’ arguments imply that a proposition Snowdon takes to be obviously non-causal ( A is married to B ) can be analyzed into some sort of indefinite ‘spousal connection’ plus a (...)
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  39. Nivedita Gangopadhyay & Katsunori Miyahara (2014). Perception and the Problem of Access to Other Minds. Philosophical Psychology:1-20.score: 74.0
    In opposition to mainstream theory of mind approaches, some contemporary perceptual accounts of social cognition do not consider the central question of social cognition to be the problem of access to other minds. These perceptual accounts draw heavily on phenomenological philosophy and propose that others' mental states are “directly” given in the perception of the others' expressive behavior. Furthermore, these accounts contend that phenomenological insights into the nature of social perception lead to the dissolution of the access problem. (...)
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  40. Stuart Appelle & Jacqueline J. Goodnow (1970). Haptic and Visual Perception of Proportion. Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (1):47.score: 73.0
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  41. G. C. Gupta (1973). Effect of Lateral Body Tilts and Visual Frames on Perception of the Apparent Vertical. Journal of Experimental Psychology 100 (1):162.score: 73.0
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  42. Harlan Lane & Francois Grosjean (1973). Perception of Reading Rate by Speakers and Listeners. Journal of Experimental Psychology 97 (2):141.score: 73.0
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  43. Larry M. Raskin (1969). Long-Term Memory Effects in the Perception of Apparent Movement. Journal of Experimental Psychology 79 (1p1):97.score: 73.0
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  44. Herbert S. Terrace (1959). The Effects of Retinal Locus and Attention on the Perception of Words. Journal of Experimental Psychology 58 (5):382.score: 73.0
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  45. Arnold Wilkins & Anne Stewart (1974). The Time Course of Lateral Asymmetries in Visual Perception of Letters. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (5):905.score: 73.0
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  46. Myron L. Braunstein (1971). Perception of Rotation in Figures with Rectangular and Trapezoidal Features. Journal of Experimental Psychology 91 (1):25.score: 73.0
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  47. Albert S. Bregman & Jeffrey Campbell (1971). Primary Auditory Stream Segregation and Perception of Order in Rapid Sequences of Tones. Journal of Experimental Psychology 89 (2):244.score: 73.0
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  48. J. Deregowski & Hadyn D. Ellis (1972). Effect of Stimulus Orientation Upon Haptic Perception of the Horizontal-Vertical Illusion. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (1):14.score: 73.0
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  49. George A. Gescheider & John H. Wright (1969). Effects of Vibrotactile Adaptation on the Perception of Stimuli of Varied Intensity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (3):449.score: 73.0
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  50. B. J. Gillam (1968). Perception of Slant When Perspective and Stereopsis Conflict: Experiments with Aniseikonic Lenses. Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (2p1):299.score: 73.0
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