Search results for 'perceptual consciousness' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mohan Matthen (2014). Review of Thomas Natsoulas, Consciousness and Perceptual Experience. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2014.score: 144.0
    A review of Thomas Natsoulas's "Consciousness and Perceptual Experience.".
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  2. Austen Clark (2007). Sensory and Perceptual Consciousness. In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell.score: 126.0
    Asked on the Dick Cavett show about her former Stalinist comrade Lillian Hellman, Mary McCarthy replied, "Every word she says is a lie, including 'and' and 'the'." The language used to describe sensory and perceptual consciousness is worthy of about the same level of trust. One must adapt oneself to the fact that every ordinary word used to describe this domain is ambiguous; that different theoreticians use the same words in very different ways; and that every speaker naturally (...)
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  3. Ned Block (2011). Perceptual Consciousness Overflows Cognitive Access. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (12):567-575.score: 120.0
    One of the most important issues concerning the foundations ofconscious perception centerson thequestion of whether perceptual consciousness is rich or sparse. The overflow argument uses a form of ‘iconic memory’ toarguethatperceptual consciousnessisricher (i.e.,has a higher capacity) than cognitive access: when observing a complex scene we are conscious of more than we can report or think about. Recently, the overflow argumenthas been challenged both empirically and conceptually. This paper reviews the controversy, arguing that proponents of sparse perception are committed (...)
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  4. Susanna Siegel (2006). Direct Realism and Perceptual Consciousness. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 73 (2):378-410.score: 120.0
    In The Problem of Perception, A.D. Smith’s central aim is to defend the view that we can directly perceive ordinary objects, such as cups, keys and the like.1 The book is organized around the two arguments that Smith considers to be serious threats to the possibility of direct perception: the argument from illusion, and the argument from hallucination. The argument from illusion threatens this possibility because it concludes that indirect realism is true. Indirect realism is the view that we perceive (...)
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  5. Naomi M. Eilan (2006). On the Role of Perceptual Consciousness in Explaining the Goals and Mechanisms of Vision: A Convergence on Attention? Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 80 (1):67-88.score: 120.0
    The strong sensorimotor account of perception gives self-induced movements two constitutive roles in explaining visual consciousness. The first says that self-induced movements are vehicles of visual awareness, and for this reason consciousness ‘does not happen in the brain only’. The second says that the phenomenal nature of visual experiences is consists in the action-directing content of vision. In response I suggest, first, that the sense in which visual awareness is active should be explained by appeal to the role (...)
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  6. David Forman (2010). Second Nature and Spirit: Hegel on the Role of Habit in the Appearance of Perceptual Consciousness. Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (4):325-352.score: 120.0
    Hegel's discussion of the concept of “habit” appears at a crucial point in his Encyclopedia system, namely, in the transition from the topic of “nature” to the topic of “spirit” (Geist): it is through habit that the subject both distinguishes itself from its various sensory states as an absolute unity (the I) and, at the same time, preserves those sensory states as the content of sensory consciousness. By calling habit a “second nature,” Hegel highlights the fact that incipient spirit (...)
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  7. Rolf Reber & Norbert Schwarz (2001). The Hot Fringes of Consciousness: Perceptual Fluency and Affect. Consciousness and Emotion 2 (2):223-231.score: 114.0
    High figure-ground contrast usually results in more positive evaluations of visual stimuli. This may either reflect that high figure-ground contrast per se is a desirable attribute or that this attribute facilitates fluent processing. In the latter case, the influence of high figure-ground contrast should be most pronounced under short exposure times, that is, under conditions where the facilitative influence on perceptual fluency is most pronounced. Supporting this hypothesis, ratings of the prettiness of visual stimuli increased with figure-ground contrast under (...)
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  8. Massimo Grassia (2004). Consciousness and Perceptual Attention: A Methodological Argument. Essays in Philosophy 5 (1):1-23.score: 108.0
    Our perception of external features comprises, among others, functional and phenomenological levels. At the functional level, the perceiver’s mind processes external features according to its own causal- functional organization. At the phenomenological level, the perceiver has consciousness of external features. The question of this paper is: How do the functional and the phenomenological levels of perception relate to each other? The answer I propose is that functional states of specifically perceptual attention constitute the necessary basis for the arising (...)
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  9. Erik Myin & J. Kevin O'Regan (2002). Perceptual Consciousness, Access to Modality and Skill Theories: A Way to Naturalize Phenomenology? Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (1):27-45.score: 108.0
  10. Paul Coates (2004). Wilfrid Sellars, Perceptual Consciousness, and Theory of Attention. Essays in Philosophy 5 (1):1-25.score: 102.0
    The problem of the richness of visual experience is that of finding principled grounds for claims about how much of the world a person actually sees at any given moment. It is argued that there are suggestive parallels between the two-component analysis of experience defended by Wilfrid Sellars, and certain recently advanced information processing accounts of visual perception. Sellars' later account of experience is examined in detail, and it is argued that there are good reasons in support of the claim (...)
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  11. Ralph Baergen (1992). Perceptual Consciousness and Perceptual Evidence. Philosophical Papers 21 (2):107-119.score: 102.0
  12. Jacob Berger (2013). Perceptual Justification Outside of Consciousness. In Richard Brown (ed.), Consciousness Inside and Out: Phenomenology, Neuroscience, and the Nature of Experience. Springer. 137-145.score: 102.0
    In his (2011) paper “There It Is” and his (2014) précis “There It Was,” Benj Hellie develops a sophisticated semantics for perceptual justification according to which perceptions in good cases can be explained by intentional psychology and can justify beliefs, whereas bad cases of perception are defective and so cannot justify beliefs. Importantly, Hellie also affords consciousness a central role in rationality insofar as only those good cases of perception within consciousness can play a justificatory function. In (...)
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  13. Thomas Natsoulas (1997). The Presence of Environmental Objects to Perceptual Consciousness: An Integrative, Ecological and Phenomenological Approach. Journal of Mind and Behavior 18 (4):371-390.score: 102.0
  14. Gordon Globus & Stephen Franklin (1980). Prospects for the Scientific Observer of Perceptual Consciousness. In. In J. M. Davidson & Richard J. Davidson (eds.), The Psychobiology of Consciousness. Plenum. 465--481.score: 96.0
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  15. Christopher S. Hill (2006). Perceptual Consciousness: How It Opens Directly Onto the World, Preferring the World to Itself. In Uriah Kriegel & Kenneth Williford (eds.), Self-Representational Approaches to Consciousness. MIT Press. 249--272.score: 96.0
     
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  16. Ben Phillips (2014). Indirect Representation and the Self-Representational Theory of Consciousness. Philosophical Studies 167 (2):273-290.score: 90.0
    According to Uriah Kriegel’s self-representational theory of consciousness, mental state M is conscious just in case it is a complex with suitably integrated proper parts, M 1 and M 2, such that M 1 is a higher-order representation of lower-order representation M 2. Kriegel claims that M thereby “indirectly” represents itself, and he attempts to motivate this claim by appealing to what he regards as intuitive cases of indirect perceptual and pictorial representation. For example, Kriegel claims that it’s (...)
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  17. Michael Sollberger (2008). Naïve Realism and the Problem of Causation. Disputatio 3 (25):1-19.score: 90.0
    In the present paper, I shall argue that disjunctively construed naïve realism about the nature of perceptual experiences succumbs to the empirically inspired causal argument. The causal argument highlights as a first step that local action necessitates the presence of a type-identical common kind of mental state shared by all perceptual experiences. In a second step, it sets out that the property of being a veridical perception cannot be a mental property. It results that the mental nature of (...)
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  18. H. Logue (2011). The Metaphysics of Perception: Wilfrid Sellars, Perceptual Consciousness and Critical Realism * by Paul Coates. Analysis 71 (4):780-783.score: 90.0
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  19. Michael Sollberger (2007). The Causal Argument Against Disjunctivism. Facta Philosophica 9 (1):245-267.score: 90.0
    In this paper, I will ask whether naïve realists have the conceptual resources for meeting the challenge stemming from the causal argument. As I interpret it, naïve realism is committed to disjunctivism. Therefore, I first set out in detail how one has to formulate the causal argument against the background of disjunctivism. This discussion is above all supposed to work out the key assumptions at stake in the causal argument. I will then go on to sketch out several possible rejoinders (...)
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  20. Naomi M. Eilan (1998). Perceptual Intentionality, Attention and Consciousness. In Anthony O'Hear (ed.), Current Issues in Philosophy of Mind. New York: Cambridge University Press. 181-202.score: 90.0
    of presence cannot be explained by appeal to the notion of non-representational of experience. world see John Campbell, 'The Role of Physical Objects in Thinking', in Representation: Problems Perceptual Intentionality, and.
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  21. Ted Honderich (2003). Perceptual, Reflective, and Affective Consciousness as Existence. In Anthony O'Hear (ed.), Minds and Persons. Cambridge University Press. 1-24.score: 90.0
    This is a further improved version of a paper previously called `Reflective and Affective Consciousness'. It is better now -- more or less comprehensible if still imperfect. It is the fourth in a series of papers, and continues the idea that consciousness needs to be analysed not in any of the boring ways: by way of the plain or 17th Century materialism that is still with us in new packages, or immaterialism, or dualistic identity theory, or functionalism and (...)
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  22. W. Fish (2010). The Metaphysics of Perception: Wilfrid Sellars, Perceptual Consciousness and Critical Realism, by Paul Coates. Mind 119 (473):206-210.score: 90.0
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  23. Rolf Reber, P. Wurtz & Thomas E. Zimmermann (2004). Exploring "Fringe" Consciousness: The Subjective Experience of Perceptual Fluency and its Objective Bases. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):47-60.score: 90.0
  24. Thomas Natsoulas (1983). What Are the Objects of Perceptual Consciousness? American Journal of Psychology 96:435-67.score: 90.0
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  25. Elizabeth Schier (2009). The Metaphysics of Perception: Wilfrid Sellars, Perceptual Consciousness and Critical Realism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (4):689-690.score: 90.0
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  26. J. Eriksson, A. Larsson, K. Alstrom & Lars Nyberg (2004). Visual Consciousness: Dissociating the Neural Correlates of Perceptual Transitions From Sustained Perception with fMRI. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):61-72.score: 90.0
  27. Arthur Collins (forthcoming). The Objects of Perceptual Consciousness in Philosophical Thought. Social Research.score: 90.0
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  28. Konstantinos Moutoussis (2012). Asynchrony in Visual Consciousness and the Possible Involvement of Attention. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 90.0
    When subjects are asked to perceptually bind rapidly alternating colour and motion stimuli, the pairings they report are different from the ones actually occurring in physical reality. A possible explanation for this misbinding is that the time necessary for perception is different for different visual attributes. Such an explanation is in logical harmony with the fact that the visual brain is characterized by different, functionally specialized systems, with different processing times for each; this type of organization naturally leads to different (...)
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  29. John W. Yolton (1969). Perceptual Consciousness. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 3:34-50.score: 90.0
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  30. Paul Coates (2009). The Metaphysics of Perception: Wilfrid Sellars, Perceptual Consciousness and Critical Realism. Routledge.score: 90.0
    This book is an important study in the philosophy of the mind; drawing on the work of philosopher Wilfrid Sellars and the theory of critical realism to develop a novel argument for understanding perception and metaphysics.
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  31. Fern (1999). Perceptual Consciousness and the Reflexive Character of Attention. In Jos Falguera (ed.), La Filosof. Santiago de Compostela: S.I.E.U..score: 90.0
     
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  32. J. N. Mohanty (1978). Remarks on Wilfrid Sellars' Paper on Perceptual Consciousness. In. In Ronald Bruzina & Bruce W. Wilshire (eds.), Crosscurrents in Phenomenology. Martinus Nijhoff. 186--198.score: 90.0
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  33. Thomas Natsoulas (2002). The Experiential Presence of Objects to Perceptual Consciousness: Wilfrid Sellars, Sense Impressions, and Perceptual Takings. Journal of Mind and Behavior 23 (3):293-316.score: 90.0
  34. T. Natsoulas (1996). The Presence of Environmental Objects to Perceptual Consciousness: Consideration of the Problem with Special Reference to Husserl's Phenomenological Account. Journal of Mind and Behavior 17 (2):161-184.score: 90.0
     
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  35. Olga Prat Fernández (1999). Perceptual Consciousness and the Reflexive Character of Attention. In La Filosofia Analitica En El Cambio de Milenio. Santiago de Compostela: S.I.E.U.score: 90.0
     
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  36. Wilfrid Sellars (1978). Some Reflections on Perceptual Consciousness. In. In Ronald Bruzina & Bruce W. Wilshire (eds.), Crosscurrents in Phenomenology. Martinus Nijhoff. 169--185.score: 90.0
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  37. Petra Stoerig & Alan Cowey (1993). Blindsight and Perceptual Consciousness: Neuropsychological Aspects of Striate Cortical Function. In B. Gulyas, D. Ottoson & P. Rol (eds.), Functional Organization of the Human Visual Cortex. Pergamon Press.score: 90.0
  38. Jan Sleutels (1998). Phenomenal Consciousness: Epiphenomenalism, Naturalism and Perceptual Plasticity. Communication and Cognition 31 (1):21-55.score: 84.0
  39. Hillel D. Braude (2012). Conciliating Cognition and Consciousness: The Perceptual Foundations of Clinical Reasoning. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):945-950.score: 84.0
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  40. Thomas Natsoulas (1985). An Introduction to the Perceptual Kind of Conception of Direct (Reflective) Consciousness. Journal of Mind and Behavior 6 (3):333-356.score: 84.0
     
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  41. Morten Overgaard, Bert Timmermans, Kristian Sandberg & Axel Cleeremans (2010). Optimizing Subjective Measures of Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):682-684.score: 78.0
    Dienes and Seth (2010) conclude that confidence ratings and post-decision wagering are two comparable and recommendable measures of conscious experience. In a recently submitted paper, we have however found that both methods are problematic and seem less suited to measure consciousness than a direct introspective measure. Here, we discuss the methodology and conclusions put forward by Dienes and Seth, and why we think the two experiments end up with so different recommendations.
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  42. Stan Franklin, Sidney D'Mello, Bernard J. Baars & Uma Ramamurthy (2009). Evolutionary Pressures for Perceptual Stability and Self as Guides to Machine Consciousness. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 1 (01):99-110.score: 78.0
  43. Rolf Reber, Pascal Wurtz & Thomas D. Zimmermann (2004). Exploring “Fringe” Consciousness: The Subjective Experience of Perceptual Fluency and its Objective Bases. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):47-60.score: 78.0
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  44. Bernard J. Baars (1995). Surprisingly Small Subcortical Structures Are Needed for the State of Waking Consciousness, While Cortical Projection Areas Seem to Provide Perceptual Contents of Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (2):159-62.score: 78.0
  45. Tara W. Lumpkin (2001). Perceptual Diversity: Is Polyphasic Consciousness Necessary for Global Survival? Anthropology of Consciousness 12 (1):37-70.score: 78.0
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  46. Johan Eriksson, Anne Larsson, Katrine Riklund Åhlström & Lars Nyberg (2004). Visual Consciousness: Dissociating the Neural Correlates of Perceptual Transitions From Sustained Perception with fMRI. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):61-72.score: 78.0
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  47. Toomas Kirt & Talis Bachmann (2013). Perceptual Retouch Theory Derived Modeling of Interactions in the Processing of Successive Visual Objects for Consciousness: Two-Stage Synchronization of Neuronal Oscillators. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (1):330-347.score: 78.0
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  48. Anne Treisman (2003). Consciousness and Perceptual Binding. In Axel Cleeremans (ed.), The Unity of Consciousness. Oxford University Press. 95--113.score: 78.0
  49. Boyd Millar (2011). Sensory Phenomenology and Perceptual Content. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (244):558-576.score: 72.0
    The consensus in contemporary philosophy of mind is that how a perceptual experience represents the world to be is built into its sensory phenomenology. I defend an opposing view which I call ‘moderate separatism’, that an experience's sensory phenomenology does not determine how it represents the world to be. I argue for moderate separatism by pointing to two ordinary experiences which instantiate the same sensory phenomenology but differ with regard to their intentional content. Two experiences of an object reflected (...)
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  50. Luiz Pessoa, Evan Thompson & Alva Noë (1998). Finding Out About Filling-In: A Guide to Perceptual Completion for Visual Science and the Philosophy of Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (21):723–802.score: 72.0
    In visual science the term filling-inis used in different ways, which often leads to confusion. This target article presents a taxonomy of perceptual completion phenomena to organize and clarify theoretical and empirical discussion. Examples of boundary completion (illusory contours) and featural completion (color, brightness, motion, texture, and depth) are examined, and single-cell studies relevant to filling-in are reviewed and assessed. Filling-in issues must be understood in relation to theoretical issues about neuralignoring an absencejumping to a conclusionanalytic isomorphismCartesian materialism, a (...)
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