Search results for 'perceptual system' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Rainer Mausfeld (2011). Intrinsic Multiperspectivity: Conceptual Forms and the Functional Architecture of the Perceptual System. In Welsch Wolfgang, Singer Wolf & Wunder Andre (eds.), Interdisciplinary Anthropology. Springer. 19--54.score: 180.0
    It is a characteristic feature of our mental make-up that the same perceptual input situation can simultaneously elicit conflicting mental perspectives. This ability pervades our perceptual and cognitive domains. Striking examples are the dual character of pictures in picture perception, pretend play, or the ability to employ metaphors and allegories. I argue that traditional approaches, beyond being inadequate on principle grounds, are theoretically ill equipped to deal with these achievements. I then outline a theoretical perspective that has emerged (...)
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  2. Jeffrey S. Bowers (1999). The Visual Categories for Letters and Words Reside Outside Any Informationally Encapsulated Perceptual System. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):368-369.score: 174.0
    According to Pylyshyn, the early visual system is able to categorize perceptual inputs into shape classes based on visual similarity criteria; it is also suggested that written words may be categorized within early vision. This speculation is contradicted by the fact that visually unrelated exemplars of a given letter (e.g., a/A) or word (e.g., read/READ) map onto common visual categories.
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  3. Rainer Mausfeld (2010). The Perception of Material Qualities and the Internal Semantics of the Perceptual System. In Albertazzi Liliana, Tonder Gert & Vishwanath Dhanraj (eds.), Perception beyond Inference. The Information Content of Visual Processes. MIT Press.score: 162.0
  4. Slobodan Markovic (2003). The Soap Bubble: Phenomenal State or Perceptual System Dynamics? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):420-421.score: 156.0
    The Gestalt Bubble model describes a subjective phenomenal experience (what is seen) without taking into account the extraphenomenal constraints of perceptual experience (why it is seen as it is). If it intends to be an explanatory model, then it has to include either stimulus or neural constraints, or both.
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  5. Rainer Mausfeld (2010). Color Within an Internalist Framework : The Role of Color in the Structure of the Perceptual System. In Jonathan D. Cohen & Mohan Matthen (eds.), Color Ontology and Color Science. Mit Press.score: 150.0
  6. Alan Millar (1996). The Perceptual System—A Philosophical and Psychological Perspective. History of European Ideas 22 (2):121-122.score: 150.0
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  7. Ross Cogan (1994). Aaron Ben-Ze'ev, The Perceptual System: A Philosophical and Psychological Perspective Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 14 (5):308-310.score: 150.0
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  8. Jack H. Ornstein (1995). The Perceptual System. Review of Metaphysics 49 (1):122-123.score: 150.0
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  9. John K. Tsotsos (1997). Limited Capacity of Any Realizable Perceptual System Is a Sufficient Reason for Attentive Behavior. Consciousness and Cognition 6 (2-3):429-436.score: 150.0
  10. Aaron Ben-Ze'ev (1993). The Perceptual System: A Philosophical and Psychological Perspective. New York: Lang.score: 150.0
     
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  11. James R. Levenick (1989). A Self-Organizing Perceptual System. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (3):409.score: 150.0
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  12. Manuel Perea & Manuel Carreiras (2012). Perceptual Uncertainty is a Property of the Cognitive System. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):36-37.score: 144.0
    We qualify Frost's proposals regarding letter-position coding in visual word recognition and the universal model of reading. First, we show that perceptual uncertainty regarding letter position is not tied to European languages – instead it is a general property of the cognitive system. Second, we argue that a universal model of reading should incorporate a developmental view of the reading process.
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  13. Lawrence W. Barsalou (1993). Flexibility, Structure, and Linguistic Vagary in Concepts: Manifestations of a Compositional System of Perceptual Symbols. In A. Collins, S. Gathercole, Martin A. Conway & P. E. Morris (eds.), Theories of Memory. Lawrence Erlbaum. 1.score: 120.0
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  14. J. M. Lindholm (1991). Perceptual Consequences of the Filtering Characteristics of the Pursuit System. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (6):477-477.score: 120.0
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  15. K. Roubik & J. Dusek (2004). Evaluation of the Perceptual Image Quality of Compressed Images with a Model of the Human Visual System. In Robert Schwartz (ed.), Perception. Malden Ma: Blackwell Publishing. 33--179.score: 120.0
  16. Ariel S. Cecchi (2014). Cognitive Penetration, Perceptual Learning and Neural Plasticity. Dialectica 68 (1):63-95.score: 108.0
    Cognitive penetration of perception, broadly understood, is the influence that the cognitive system has on a perceptual system (e.g., visual, auditory, haptic). The paper shows a form of cognitive penetration in the visual system (defined as early vision) which I call ‘architectural’. Architectural cognitive penetration is the process whereby the behaviour or the structure of the perceptual system is influenced by the cognitive system, which consequently may have an impact on the content of (...)
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  17. Nicholas Kurshan DeWind & Elizabeth M. Brannon (2012). Malleability of the Approximate Number System: Effects of Feedback and Training. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 102.0
    Prior research demonstrates that animals and humans share an approximate number system (ANS), characterized by ratio dependence and that the precision of this system increases substantially over human development. The goal of the present research was to investigate the malleability of the ANS (as measured by weber fraction) in adult subjects in response to feedback and to explore the relationship between ANS acuity and acuity on another magnitude comparison task. We tested each of 20 subjects over six 1-hour (...)
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  18. Edoardo Zamuner, “Perception of Other People’s Emotions”. ASCS09.score: 90.0
    In this paper I argue that one of the functions of the perceptual system is to detect other people’s emotions when they are expressed in the face. I support this view by developing two separate but interdependent accounts. The first says that facial expressions of emotions carry information about the emotions that produced them, and about some of their properties. The second says that the visual system functions to extract the information that expressions carry about emotions.
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  19. Lawrence W. Barsalou (1999). Perceptual Symbol Systems. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):577-660.score: 84.0
    Prior to the twentieth century, theories of knowledge were inherently perceptual. Since then, developments in logic, statis- tics, and programming languages have inspired amodal theories that rest on principles fundamentally different from those underlying perception. In addition, perceptual approaches have become widely viewed as untenable because they are assumed to implement record- ing systems, not conceptual systems. A perceptual theory of knowledge is developed here in the context of current cognitive science and neuroscience. During perceptual experience, (...)
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  20. Louis C. Charland (1999). Perceptual Symbol Systems and Emotion. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):612-613.score: 84.0
    In his target article, Barsalou cites current work on emotion theory but does not explore its relevance for this project. The connection is worth pursuing, since there is a plausible case to be made that emotions form a distinct symbolic information processing system of their own. On some views, that system is argued to be perceptual: a direct connection with Barsalou's perceptual symbol systems theory. Also relevant is the hypothesis that there may be different modular subsystems (...)
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  21. James J. Gibson (1968). The Senses Considered As Perceptual Systems. Allen & Unwin.score: 82.0
  22. Heiko Lex, Christoph Schütz, Andreas Knoblauch & Thomas Schack (forthcoming). Cognitive Representation of a Complex Motor Action Executed by Different Motor Systems. Minds and Machines:1-15.score: 82.0
    The present study evaluates the cognitive representation of a kicking movement performed by a human and a humanoid robot, and how they are represented in experts and novices of soccer and robotics, respectively. To learn about the expertise-dependent development of memory structures, we compared the representation structures of soccer experts and robot experts concerning a human and humanoid robot kicking movement. We found different cognitive representation structures for both expertise groups under two different motor performance conditions (human vs. humanoid robot). (...)
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  23. David A. Givner (1982). Direct Perception, Misperception and Perceptual Systems: J. J. Gibson and the Problem of Illusion. Nature and System 4 (September):131-142.score: 76.0
  24. Neil Van Leeuwen (2011). Review of Sleights of Mind: What the Neuroscience of Magic Reveals About Our Brains. [REVIEW] Cognitive Neuropsychiatry 16 (5):473-478.score: 74.0
    The book I review, _Sleights of Mind_, aims to illuminate properties of perceptual systems by discussing human susceptibility to magical illusions. I describe how the authors use psychological principles to explain two tricks, spoon bending and the Miser's Dream. I also argue that the book is congenial to the following view of illusions: susceptibility to illusion is the result of evolutionary trade-offs; perceptual systems must make assumptions in order to function at all, but susceptibility to illusion is the (...)
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  25. Kevin Connolly (forthcoming). Sensory Substitution and Perceptual Learning. In Fiona Macpherson (ed.), Sensory Substitution and Augmentation. Oxford University Press.score: 72.0
    When a user integrates a sensory substitution device into her life, the process involves perceptual learning, that is, ‘relatively long-lasting changes to an organism’s perceptual system that improve its ability to respond to its environment’ (Goldstone 1998: 585). In this paper, I explore ways in which the extensive literature on perceptual learning can be applied to help improve sensory substitution devices. I then use these findings to answer a philosophical question. Much of the philosophical debate surrounding (...)
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  26. Jon Altschul, Anthony Brueckner & Christopher Buford (2014). Vahid, Burge, and Perceptual Entitlement. Metaphilosophy 45 (3):325-330.score: 72.0
    Hamid Vahid criticizes Tyler Burge's account of perceptual entitlement. Vahid argues that Burge's account fails to satisfy a criterion of adequacy that any correct account of perceptual warrant must satisfy. According to Vahid, a correct account of perceptual warrant must allow for perceptual beliefs which are produced by a properly functioning perceptual system yet which lack warrant. The present article argues that Vahid's critique of Burge fails. It presents numerous examples of such beliefs that (...)
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  27. Nigel J. T. Thomas (2001). Perceptual Systems: Five+, One, or Many? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):241-242.score: 72.0
    Commentary on "On Specification and the Senses," by Thomas A. Stoffregen and Benoît G. Bardy: Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 24, 195-261 (2001).
    The target article's value lies not in its defence of specification, or the "global array" concept, but in its challenge to the paradigm of 5+ senses, and its examples of multiple receptor types cooperatively participating in specific information pick-up tasks. Rather than analysing our perceptual endowment into 5+ senses, it is more revealing to type perceptual systems according (...)
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  28. John B. Pittenger (2001). Three Consequences of Believing That Information Lies in Global Arrays and That Perceptual Systems Use This Information. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):236-237.score: 72.0
    Stoffregen & Bardy provide grounds to suppose that specification requires global arrays and that this information is used by perceptual systems. Three conclusions follow from this supposition; (1) global specification will be taken seriously only if additional examples are discovered; (2) research into single-sense information must take global information into account, and (3) ecological psychologists must account for perceptions based upon non-specific information.
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  29. Edoardo Zamuner (2011). A Theory of Affect Perception. Mind and Language 26 (4):436-451.score: 66.0
    What do we see when we look at someone's expression of fear? I argue that one of the things that we see is fear itself. I support this view by developing a theory of affect perception. The theory involves two claims. One is that expressions are patterns of facial changes that carry information about affects. The other is that the visual system extracts and processes such information. In particular, I argue that the visual system functions to detect the (...)
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  30. István Aranyosi (2013). The Peripheral Mind: Philosophy of Mind and the Peripheral Nervous System. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
    Philosophers of mind, both in the conceptual analysis tradition and in the empirical informed school, have been implicitly neglecting the potential conceptual role of the Peripheral Nervous System (PNS) in understanding sensory and perceptual states. Instead, the philosophical as well as the neuroscientific literature has been assuming that it is the Central Nervous System (CNS) alone, and more exactly the brain, that should prima facie be taken as conceptually and empirically crucial for a philosophical analysis of such (...)
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  31. Aude Oliva Timothy F. Brady (2012). Spatial Frequency Integration During Active Perception: Perceptual Hysteresis When an Object Recedes. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 66.0
    As we move through the world, information about objects moves to different spatial frequencies. How the visual system successfully integrates information across these changes to form a coherent percept is thus an important open question. Here we investigate such integration using hybrid faces, which contain different images in low and high spatial frequencies. Observers judged how similar a hybrid was to each of its component images while walking towards or away from it or having the stimulus moved towards or (...)
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  32. Leo Poom Marcus Lindskog, Anders Winman, Peter Juslin (2013). Measuring Acuity of the Approximate Number System Reliably and Validly: The Evaluation of an Adaptive Test Procedure. Frontiers in Psychology 4 (August).score: 66.0
    Two studies investigated the reliability and predictive validity of commonly used measures and models of Approximate Number System acuity (ANS). Study 1 investigated reliability by both an empirical approach and a simulation of maximum obtainable reliability under ideal conditions. Results showed that common measures of the Weber fraction (w) are reliable only when using a substantial number of trials, even under ideal conditions. Study 2 compared different purported measures of ANS acuity as for convergent and predictive validity in a (...)
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  33. Marcus Lindskog, Anders Winman & Peter Juslin (2013). Are There Rapid Feedback Effects on Approximate Number System Acuity? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7 (June).score: 66.0
    Humans are believed to be equipped with an Approximate Number System (ANS) that supports non-symbolic representations of numerical magnitude. Correlations between individual measures of the precision of the ANS and mathematical ability have raised the question of whether the precision can be improved by feedback training. A study (DeWind and Brannon, 2012) reported improvement in discrimination precision occurring within 600-700 trials of feedback, suggesting ANS malleability with rapidly improving acuity in response to feedback. We tried to replicate the rapid (...)
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  34. Thomas Miconi & Rufin Vanrullen (2010). The Gamma Slideshow: Object-Based Perceptual Cycles in a Model of the Visual Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4:205-205.score: 66.0
    While recent studies have shed light on the mechanisms that generate gamma (>40Hz) oscillations, the functional role of these oscillations (if any) is still debated. Here we suggest that the purported mechanism of gamma oscillations (feedback inhibition from local interneurons), coupled with lateral connections implementing “Gestalt” principles of object integration, naturally leads to a decomposition of the visual input into object-based “perceptual cycles”, in which neuron populations representing different objects within the scene will tend to fire at successive cycles (...)
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  35. Carolyn Dicey Jennings (forthcoming). Attention and Perceptual Organization. Philosophical Studies:1-14.score: 60.0
    How does attention contribute to perceptual experience? Within cognitive science, attention is known to contribute to the organization of sensory features into perceptual objects, or “object-based organization.” The current paper tackles a different type of organization and thus suggests a different role for attention in conscious perception. Within every perceptual experience we find that more subjectively interesting percepts stand out in the foreground, whereas less subjectively interesting percepts are relegated to the background. The sight of a sycamore (...)
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  36. W. Martin Davies (2004). Amodal or Perceptual Symbol Systems: A False Dichotomy? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):162-163.score: 60.0
    Although Barsalou is right in identifying the importance of perceptual symbols as a means of carrying certain kinds of content, he is wrong in playing down the inferential resources available to amodal symbols. I argue that the case for perceptual symbol systems amounts to a false dichotomy and that it is feasible to help oneself to both kinds of content as extreme ends on a content continuum. The continuum thesis I advance argues for the inferential content at one (...)
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  37. Bipin Indurkhya (1999). Creativity of Metaphor in Perceptual Symbol Systems. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):621-622.score: 60.0
    A metaphor can often create novel features in an object or a situation. This phenomenon has been particularly hard to account for using amodal symbol systems: although highlighting and downplaying can explain the shift of focus, it cannot explain how entirely new features can come about. We suggest here that the dynamism of perceptual symbol systems, particularly the notion of simulator, provides an elegant account of the creativity of metaphor. The elegance lies in the idea that the creation of (...)
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  38. S. Peri (1977). The Problem of Universals and its Perceptual Correlates. Synthese 35 (4):447 - 456.score: 60.0
    This paper deals with the philosophical questions which gave rise to the traditional realist theories of universals. The main thesis is that these same questions may also be interpreted as scientific-empirical questions. The study of these problems has begun only very recently and the relevance of the results for the traditional problem of intensional entities has only been remarked by few workers aware of the philosophical problem. The approach adopted here is that of regarding man as a perceptual (...) situated in an environment and showing certain capacities like perception of universals. The possible ways of access to these entities is discussed on the basis of some recent empirical findings related to perception. One conclusion is that in order to answer the basic philosophical question of how properties, particulars and propositions are perceived may be answered within the domains of science, accepting only the usual presuppositions used in it. Basically, such an approach sees the root of the problem in the great complexity of information processing involved in the actual perception of properties, particulars and propositions. (shrink)
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  39. Ruediger Oehlmann (1999). Can Metacognition Be Explained in Terms of Perceptual Symbol Systems? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):629-630.score: 60.0
    Barsalou's theory of perceptual symbol systems is considered from a metacognitive perspective. Two examples are discussed in terms of the proposed perceptual symbol theory. First, recent results in research on feeling-of-knowing judgement are used to argue for a representation of familiarity with input cues. This representation should support implicit memory. Second, the ability of maintaining a theory of other people's beliefs (theory of mind) is considered and it is suggested that a purely simulation-based view is insufficient to explain (...)
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  40. F. Lowenthal (1999). Can Handicapped Subjects Use Perceptual Symbol Systems? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):625-626.score: 60.0
    It is very tempting to try to reconcile perception and cognition perceptual symbol systems may be a good way to achieve this; but is there actually a perception-cognition continuum? We offer several arguments for and against the existence of such a continuum and in favor of the choice of perceptual symbol systems. One of these arguments is purely theoretical, some are based on PET-scan observations and others are based on research with handicapped subjects who have communication problems associated (...)
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  41. Xing Tian & David Poeppel (2012). Mental Imagery of Speech: Linking Motor and Perceptual Systems Through Internal Simulation and Estimation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 60.0
    The neural basis of mental imagery has been investigated by localizing the underlying neural networks, mostly in motor and perceptual systems, separately. However, how modality-specific representations are top-down induced and how the action and perception systems interact in the context of mental imagery is not well understood. Imagined speech production (‘articulation imagery’), which induces the kinesthetic feeling of articulator movement and its auditory consequences, provides a new angle because of the concurrent involvement of motor and perceptual systems. On (...)
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  42. David Poeppel Xing Tian (2012). Mental Imagery of Speech: Linking Motor and Perceptual Systems Through Internal Simulation and Estimation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 60.0
    The neural basis of mental imagery has been investigated by localizing the underlying neural networks, mostly in motor and perceptual systems, separately. However, how modality-specific representations are top-down induced and how the action and perception systems interact in the context of mental imagery is not well understood. Imagined speech production (‘articulation imagery’), which induces the kinesthetic feeling of articulator movement and its auditory consequences, provides a new angle because of the concurrent involvement of motor and perceptual systems. On (...)
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  43. Niklas Luhmann (2000). Art as a Social System. Stanford University Press.score: 60.0
    Germany's leading contemporary social theorist provides a definitive analysis of art as a social and perceptual system which not only represents an important intellectual step in discussions of art but also an important advance in systems theory. Luhmann insists on the radical incommensurability between psychic systems (perception) and social systems (communication). Art is a special kind of communication that operates at the boundary between the social system and consciousness in ways that profoundly irritate communication while remaining strictly (...)
     
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  44. David Forman (2010). Second Nature and Spirit: Hegel on the Role of Habit in the Appearance of Perceptual Consciousness. Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (4):325-352.score: 54.0
    Hegel's discussion of the concept of “habit” appears at a crucial point in his Encyclopedia system, namely, in the transition from the topic of “nature” to the topic of “spirit” (Geist): it is through habit that the subject both distinguishes itself from its various sensory states as an absolute unity (the I) and, at the same time, preserves those sensory states as the content of sensory consciousness. By calling habit a “second nature,” Hegel highlights the fact that incipient spirit (...)
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  45. John Dilworth (2007). Conscious Perceptual Experience as Representational Self-Prompting. Journal of Mind and Behavior 28 (2):135-156.score: 54.0
    Journal of Mind and Behavior 28 no. 2 (2007), pp. 135-156. The self-prompting theory of consciousness holds that conscious perceptual experience occurs when non-routine perceptual data prompt the activation of a plan in an executive control system that monitors perceptual input. On the other hand, routine, non-conscious perception merely provides data about the world, which indicatively describes the world correctly or incorrectly. Perceptual experience instead involves data that are about the perceiver, not the world. Their (...)
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  46. F. de Vignemont & P. Fourneret (2004). The Sense of Agency: A Philosophical and Empirical Review of the "Who" System. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):1-19.score: 54.0
    How do I know that I am the person who is moving? According to Wittgenstein (1958), the sense of agency involves a primitive notion of the self used as subject, which does not rely on any prior perceptual identification and which is immune to error through misidentification. However, the neuroscience of action and the neuropsychology of schizophrenia show the existence of specific cognitive processes underlying the sense of agency—the ‘‘Who'' system (Georgieff & Jeannerod, 1998) which is disrupted in (...)
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  47. Clinton Cooper & Claire F. Michaels (2001). Perception, Learning, and Judgment in Ecological Psychology: Who Needs a Constructivist Ventral System? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):101-102.score: 54.0
    Norman's identification of a ventral system embodying a constructivist theory of perception is rejected in favor of an ecological theory of perception and perceptual learning. We summarize research showing that a key motivation for the ventral-constructivist connection, percept-percept coupling, confuses perceptual and post-perceptual processes.
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  48. Leslie M. Kay (2001). Chaotic Itinerancy: Insufficient Perceptual Evidence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):819-820.score: 54.0
    Chaotic itinerancy is useful for illustrating transitions in attractor dynamics seen in the olfactory system. Cantor coding is a good model for information processing, but so far it lacks perceptual proof. The theories presented provide a large step toward bridging the use of chaos as an interpretive tool and hard examination of chaotic neural activity during perception.
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  49. Petra Stoerig & Stephan Brandt (1993). The Visual System and Levels of Perception: Properties of Neuromental Organization. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (2).score: 54.0
    To see whether the mental and the neural have common attributes that could resolve some of the traditional dichotomies, we review neuroscientific data on the visual system. The results show that neuronal and perceptual function share a parallel and hierarchical architecture which is manifest not only in the anatomy and physiology of the visual system, but also in normal perception and in the deficits caused by lesions in different parts of the system. Based on the description (...)
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  50. Merav Ahissar & Shaul Hochstein (2004). The Reverse Hierarchy Theory of Visual Perceptual Learning. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (10):457-464.score: 54.0
    Perceptual learning can be defined as practice-induced improvement in the ability to perform specific perceptual tasks. We previously proposed the Reverse Hierarchy Theory as a unifying concept that links behavioral findings of visual learning with physiological and anatomical data. Essentially, it asserts that learning is a top-down guided process, which begins at high-level areas of the visual system, and when these do not suffice, progresses backwards to the input levels, which have a better signal-to-noise ratio. This simple (...)
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