Search results for 'performance' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Heather Schmidt Albinger & Sarah J. Freeman (2000). Corporate Social Performance and Attractiveness as an Employer to Different Job Seeking Populations. Journal of Business Ethics 28 (3):243 - 253.score: 18.0
    This study investigates the hypothesis that the advantage corporate social performance (CSP) yields in attracting human resources depends on the degree of job choice possessed by the job seeking population. Results indicate that organizational CSP is positively related to employer attractiveness for job seekers with high levels of job choice but not related for populations with low levels suggesting advantages to firms with high levels of CSP in the ability to attract the most qualified employees.
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  2. W. Gary Simpson & Theodor Kohers (2002). The Link Between Corporate Social and Financial Performance: Evidence From the Banking Industry. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 35 (2):97 - 109.score: 18.0
    The purpose of this investigation is to extend earlier research on the relationship between corporate social and financial performance. The unique contribution of the study is the empirical analysis of a sample of companies from the banking industry and the use of Community Reinvestment Act ratings as a social performance measure. The empirical analysis solidly supports the hypothesis that the link between social and financial performance is positive.
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  3. Supriti Mishra & Damodar Suar (2010). Does Corporate Social Responsibility Influence Firm Performance of Indian Companies? Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):571 - 601.score: 18.0
    This study examines whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) towards primary stakeholders influences the financial and the non-financial performance (NFP) of Indian firms. Perceptual data on CSR and NFP were collected from 150 senior-level Indian managers including CEOs through questionnaire survey.Hard data on financial performance (FP) of the companies were obtained from secondary sources. A questionnaire for assessing CSR was developed with respect to six stakeholder groups - employees, customers, investors, community, natural environment, and suppliers. A composite measure of (...)
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  4. Jacques Igalens & Jean-Pascal Gond (2005). Measuring Corporate Social Performance in France: A Critical and Empirical Analysis of ARESE Data. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 56 (2):131 - 148.score: 18.0
    This article studies the idea of Corporate Social Performance (CSP) from a critical perspective using empirical elements derived from analysis of year 2000 ARESE data. ARESE is the French first mover social rating agency providing quantified data about the Social Performance of French companies. The paper starts out by reviewing leading CSP models and discussing problems inherent to the measurement of this construct before going on to present and analyse ARESE data - whose suitability for existing models will (...)
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  5. Stanley Godlovitch (1998). Musical Performance: A Philosophical Study. Routledge.score: 18.0
    This book evaluates traditional musical performance and asks where its unique value lies.
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  6. Pieter van Beurden & Tobias Gössling (2008). The Worth of Values – a Literature Review on the Relation Between Corporate Social and Financial Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):407-424.score: 18.0
    One of the older questions in the debate about Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is whether it is worthwhile for organizations to pay attention to societal demands. This debate was emotionally, normatively, and ideologically loaded. Up to the present, this question has been an important trigger for empirical research in CSR. However, the answer to the question has apparently not been found yet, at least that is what many researchers state. This apparent ambivalence in CSR consequences invites a literature study that (...)
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  7. Maria Ceu Cortez, Florinda Silva & Nelson Areal (2009). The Performance of European Socially Responsible Funds. Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4):573 - 588.score: 18.0
    Recent years have witnessed an increasing growth in mutual funds that invest according to social criteria. As a consequence, the financial performance of these portfolios has attracted the interest of academics and practitioners. This paper investigates the performance of a sample of socially responsible mutual funds from seven European countries investing globally and/or in the European market. Using unconditional and conditional models, we assess the performance of these funds in comparison to conventional and socially responsible benchmark portfolios. (...)
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  8. Yongqiang Gao (2009). Corporate Social Performance in China: Evidence From Large Companies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (1):23 - 35.score: 18.0
    Based on a contest analysis of the official websites of top 100 companies in China in 2007, the paper reports the social performance of large Chinese companies. We try to focus on and answer the following three questions about CSP of large companies in China: (1) how is their overall social performance?; (2) what are the social issues they addressed?; and (3) what are the stakeholders they addressed? The results are also compared among different ownership companies and among (...)
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  9. Maria-Gaia Soana (2011). The Relationship Between Corporate Social Performance and Corporate Financial Performance in the Banking Sector. Journal of Business Ethics 104 (1):133-148.score: 18.0
    Since the 1970s, many Anglo-American studies have investigated the theme of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and its costs and benefits. Most studies have tried to test, largely in samples of multiple industries, the relationship between corporate social performance (CSP) and corporate financial performance (CFP). These analyses, however, have produced conflicting results and any attempt to give a generalized and coherent conclusion has proved inadequate. This article examines the ways CSP can be proxied and investigates the possible relationship between (...)
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  10. Inge C. Kerssens-van Drongelen & Olaf A. M. Fisscher (2003). Ethical Dilemmas in Performance Measurement. Journal of Business Ethics 45 (1-2):51 - 63.score: 18.0
    In this article we discuss the ethical dilemmas facing performance evaluators and the "evaluatees" whose performances are measured in a business context. The concepts of role morality and common morality are used to develop a framework of behaviors that are normally seen as the moral responsibilities of these actors. This framework is used to analyze, based on four empirical situations, why the implementation of a performance measurement system has not been as effective as expected. It was concluded that, (...)
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  11. Brad Partridge (2011). Fairness And Performance-Enhancing Swimsuits AT The 2009 Swimming World Championships: The 'Asterisk' Championships. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 5 (1):63-74.score: 18.0
    The use of polyurethane swimsuits at the 2009 World Aquatics Championships resulted in world records being set for almost all swimming events. This paper explores the implications that the use of these performance-enhancing swimsuits had on fairness in relative and absolute outcomes in swimming. I claim that the use of ?super swimsuits? unfairly influenced relative outcomes within the competition because not all swimmers used, or had access to, the same types of swimsuit (some of which were clearly ?faster? than (...)
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  12. Marc Orlitzky (2001). Does Firm Size Comfound the Relationship Between Corporate Social Performance and Firm Financial Performance? Journal of Business Ethics 33 (2):167 - 180.score: 18.0
    There has been some theoretical and empirical debate that the positive relationship between corporate social performance (CSP) and firm financial performance (FFP) is spurious and in fact caused by a third factor, namely large firm size. This study examines this question by integrating three meta-analyses of more than two decades of research on (1) CSP and FFP, (2) firm size and CSP, and (3) firm size and FFP into one path-analytic model. The present study does not confirm size (...)
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  13. Jennifer C. Chen, Dennis M. Patten & Robin W. Roberts (2008). Corporate Charitable Contributions: A Corporate Social Performance or Legitimacy Strategy? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):131 - 144.score: 18.0
    This study examines the relation between firms’ corporate philanthropic giving and their performance in three other social domains – employee relations, environmental issues, and product safety. Based on a sample of 384 U.S. companies and using data pooled from 1998 through 2000, we find that worse performers in the other social areas are both more likely to make charitable contributions and that the extent of their giving is larger than for better performers. Analyses of each separate area of social (...)
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  14. Belaid Rettab, Anis Ben Brik & Kamel Mellahi (2009). A Study of Management Perceptions of the Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on Organisational Performance in Emerging Economies: The Case of Dubai. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):371 - 390.score: 18.0
    Although a number of studies have shown that corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities often lead to greater organisational performance in western developed economies, researchers are yet to examine the strategic value of CSR in emerging economies. Using survey data from 280 firms operating in Dubai, this study examines the link between CSR activities and organisational performance. The results show that CSR has a positive relationship with all three measures of organisational performance: financial performance, employee commitment, and (...)
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  15. K. Gregory Jin & Ronald G. Drozdenko (2010). Relationships Among Perceived Organizational Core Values, Corporate Social Responsibility, Ethics, and Organizational Performance Outcomes: An Empirical Study of Information Technology Professionals. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (3):341 - 359.score: 18.0
    This study is an extension of our recent ethics research in direct marketing (2003) and information technology (2007). In this study, we investigated the relationships among core organizational values, organizational ethics, corporate social responsibility, and organizational performance outcome. Our analysis of online survey responses from a sample of IT professionals in the United States indicated that managers from organizations with organic core values reported a higher level of social responsibility relative to managers in organizations with mechanistic values; that managers (...)
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  16. Peter Kivy (1995). Authenticities: Philosophical Reflections on Musical Performance. Cornell University Press.score: 18.0
    "In his latest book on the aesthetics of music, Peter Kivy presents an argument not for authenticity but for authenticities of performance, including ...
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  17. Rim Makni, Claude Francoeur & François Bellavance (2009). Causality Between Corporate Social Performance and Financial Performance: Evidence From Canadian Firms. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):409 - 422.score: 18.0
    This study assesses the causal relationship between corporate social performance (CSP) and financial performance (FP). We perform our empirical analyses on a sample of 179 publicly held Canadian firms and use the measures of CSP provided by Canadian Social Investment Database for the years 2004 and 2005. Using the “Granger causality” approach, we find no significant relationship between a composite measure of a firm’s CSP and FP, except for market returns. However, using individual measures of CSP, we find (...)
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  18. Geoff Moore (2001). Corporate Social and Financial Performance: An Investigation in the U.K. Supermarket Industry. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 34 (3-4):299 - 315.score: 18.0
    The comparison of corporate social performance with corporate financial performance has been a popular field of study over the past 25 years. The results, while broadly conclusive of a positive relationship, are not entirely consistent. In addition, most of the previous studies have concentrated on large-scale cross-industry studies and often with a single variable for corporate social performance, in order to produce statistically significant results. This weakens the richness of understanding that might be obtained from a single (...)
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  19. Bernadette M. Ruf, Krishnamurty Muralidhar, Robert M. Brown, Jay J. Janney & Karen Paul (2001). An Empirical Investigation of the Relationship Between Change in Corporate Social Performance and Financial Performance: A Stakeholder Theory Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 32 (2):143 - 156.score: 18.0
    Stakeholder theory provides a framework for investigating the relationship between corporate social performance (CSP) and corporate financial performance. This relationship is investigated by examining how change in CSP is related to change in financial accounting measures. The findings provide some support for a tenet in stakeholder theory which asserts that the dominant stakeholder group, shareholders, financially benefit when management meets the demands of multiple stakeholders. Specifically, change in CSP was positively associated with growth in sales for the current (...)
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  20. Nikolay A. Dentchev (2004). Corporate Social Performance as a Business Strategy. Journal of Business Ethics 55 (4):397 - 412.score: 18.0
    Having the ambition to contribute to the practical value of the theory on corporate social performance (CSP), this paper approaches the question whether CSP can contribute to the competitive advantage of firms. We adopted an explorative case-study methodology to explore the variety of positive and negative effects of CSP on the competitiveness of organizations. As this study aimed at identifying as great variety of these effects as possible, we selected a diversified group of respondents. Data was thus collected through (...)
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  21. Greig A. Mill (2006). The Financial Performance of a Socially Responsible Investment Over Time and a Possible Link with Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 63 (2):131 - 148.score: 18.0
    This paper empirically examines the financial performance of a UK unit trust that was initially “conventional” and later adopted socially responsible investment (SRI) principles (ethical investment principles). Comparison is made with three similar conventional funds whose investment objectives remained unchanged. Analysis techniques employed in previous studies find similar results: mean risk-adjusted performance is unchanged by the switch to SRI, with no evidence of over-or under-performance relative to the benchmark market index by any of the four funds. More (...)
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  22. K. Gregory Jin, Ronald Drozdenko & Sara DeLoughy (2013). The Role of Corporate Value Clusters in Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Performance: A Study of Financial Professionals and Implications for the Financial Meltdown. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):15-24.score: 18.0
    This article delves into a potential mindset that may be responsible for the recent financial meltdown. Research relating to this mindset from different perspectives is reviewed. The findings from this literature review are used to create a conceptual framework for the empirical, ethical, and corporate social responsibility study of financial professionals. Data were collected from a survey of the professional membership of a large national association of financial professionals. This article reports the results of the analysis of data relative to (...)
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  23. Chi-Shiun Lai, Chih-Jen Chiu, Chin-Fang Yang & Da-Chang Pai (2010). The Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility on Brand Performance: The Mediating Effect of Industrial Brand Equity and Corporate Reputation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (3):457 - 469.score: 18.0
    In this article, the researchers explore the following question. Can corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the corporate reputation of a firm lead to its brand equity in business-to-business (B2B) markets? This study discusses CSR from customers' viewpoints by taking the sample of industrial purchasers from Taiwan small-medium enterprises. The aims of this study are to investigate: first, the effects of CSR and corporate reputation on industrial brand equity; second, the effects of CSR, corporate reputation, and brand equity on brand (...); and third, the mediating effects of corporate reputation and industrial brand equity on the relationship between CSR and brand performance. Empirical results support the study's hypotheses and indicate that CSR and corporate reputation have positive effects on industrial brand equity and brand performance. In addition, corporate reputation and industrial brand equity partially mediate the relationship between CSR and brand performance. (shrink)
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  24. Francesco Perrini, Angeloantonio Russo, Antonio Tencati & Clodia Vurro (2011). Deconstructing the Relationship Between Corporate Social and Financial Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (S1):59-76.score: 18.0
    For four decades, research on the role and responsibilities of business in society has centered on the business case for corporate social responsibility (CSR) and an increasing number of studies on the corporate social performance (CSP)—corporate financial performance (CFP) link emerged leading to controversial results. Heeding the call for a deeper understanding of the mechanisms linking certain CSR efforts to certain performance outcomes, this study provides a stakeholder-based organizing framework rooted in an extensive review of existing literature (...)
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  25. Rashid Ameer & Radiah Othman (2012). Sustainability Practices and Corporate Financial Performance: A Study Based on the Top Global Corporations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 108 (1):61-79.score: 18.0
    Sustainability is concerned with the impact of present actions on the ecosystems, societies, and environments of the future. Such concerns should be reflected in the strategic planning of sustainable corporations. Strategic intentions of this nature are operationalized through the adoption of a long-term focus and a more inclusive set of responsibilities focusing on ethical practices, employees, environment, and customers. A central hypothesis, that we test in this paper is that companies which attend to this set of responsibilities under the term (...)
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  26. Cyril Bouquet & Yuval Deutsch (2008). The Impact of Corporate Social Performance on a Firm's Multinationality. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (4):755 - 769.score: 18.0
    Using panel data of 4,244 company years, we examine whether and how corporate social performance (CSP) affects a firm’s capacity to achieve profitable sales in foreign markets. Based on our extension of instrumental stakeholder theory into the international arena, we hypothesized a U-shaped relationship between CSP and multinationality. Results supported our contention that multinational enterprises (MNEs) need to be substantially committed to social performance objectives if they are to recoup the cost of their CSP investments, and improve their (...)
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  27. Jean McGuire, Sandra Dow & Kamal Argheyd (2003). CEO Incentives and Corporate Social Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 45 (4):341 - 359.score: 18.0
    This paper examines the relationship between CEO incentives and strong and weak corporate social performance. Using the KLD database we find that incentives have no significant relationship with strong social performance. Salary and long-term incentives have a positive association with weak social performance.
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  28. Yei-Yi Chen & WenChang Fang (2008). The Moderating Effect of Impression Management on the Organizational Politics–Performance Relationship. Journal of Business Ethics 79 (3):263 - 277.score: 18.0
    This study investigates the complexities in the relationship between perceptions of organizational politics and performance ratings by examining the moderating effect of impression management on that relationship. Expectancy theory was employed to better understand the moderating effect. We proposed that two kinds of impression management tactics occurred: supervisor-focused and job-focused, respectively. It was hypothesized that increased exercise of impression management would mitigate the negative effects of perceptions of organizational politics and performance ratings. Data were collected from 290 full-time (...)
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  29. Robert A. Giacalone, Karen Paul & Carole L. Jurkiewicz (2005). A Preliminary Investigation Into the Role of Positive Psychology in Consumer Sensitivity to Corporate Social Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 58 (4):295 - 305.score: 18.0
    Research on positive psychology demonstrates that specific individual dispositions are associated with more desirable outcomes. The relationship of positive psychological constructs, however, has not been applied to the areas of business ethics and social responsibility. Using four constructs in two independent studies (hope and gratitude in Study 1, spirituality and generativity in Study 2), the relationship of these constructs to sensitivity to corporate social performance (CSCSP) were assessed. Results indicate that all four constructs significantly predicted CSCSP, though only hope (...)
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  30. C.-F. Wu (2006). The Study of the Relations Among Ethical Considerations, Family Management and Organizational Performance in Corporate Governance. Journal of Business Ethics 68 (2):165 - 179.score: 18.0
    Corporate governance is increasingly becoming an issue of global concern, not least because we are more and more living in a corporate world that transcends international boundaries. The main purpose and motivation of this study is to determine how the international community should motivate businesses in fostering exemplary corporate governance, therefore eliminating obstacles to ethically exemplary behavior. The empirical approach utilized here has been applied to 161 businesses, both listed and over-the-counter (OTC) companies, with the results indicating that ethical considerations, (...)
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  31. Justin J. Keeble, Sophie Topiol & Simon Berkeley (2003). Using Indicators to Measure Sustainability Performance at a Corporate and Project Level. Journal of Business Ethics 44 (2/3):149 - 158.score: 18.0
    More and more businesses are aligning their activities with the principles of sustainable development. Therefore they need to adapt their ways of measuring corporate performance. However, it includes issues which may be outside the direct control of the organisation, that are difficult to characterise and often are based on value judgements rather than hard data. The difficulty in measuring performance is further complicated by the fact that many corporations have a complex organisational structure, with different business streams, functions (...)
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  32. Daniel J. Slater & Heather R. Dixon-Fowler (2009). Ceo International Assignment Experience and Corporate Social Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):473 - 489.score: 18.0
    Research suggests that international assignment experience enhances awareness of societal stakeholders, influences personal values, and provides rare and valuable resources. Based on these arguments, we hypothesize that CEO international assignment experience will lead to increased corporate social performance (CSP) and will be moderated by the CEO's functional background. Using a sample of 393 CEOs of S&P 500 companies and three independent data sources, we find that CEO international assignment experience is positively related to CSP and is significantly moderated by (...)
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  33. Han Donker, Deborah Poff & Saif Zahir (2008). Corporate Values, Codes of Ethics, and Firm Performance: A Look at the Canadian Context. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):527 - 537.score: 18.0
    In this empirical study, we present two new models that are corporate ethics based. The first model numerically quantifies the corporate value index (CV-Index) based on a set of predefined parameters and the second model estimates the market-to-book values of equity in relation to the CV-Index as well as other parameters. These models were applied to Canadian companies listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX). Through our analysis, we found statistically significant evidence that corporate values (CV-Index) positively correlated with firm (...)
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  34. Elena Fraj-Andrés, Eva Martinez-Salinas & Jorge Matute-Vallejo (2009). A Multidimensional Approach to the Influence of Environmental Marketing and Orientation on the Firm's Organizational Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (2):263 - 286.score: 18.0
    Since it implies a reduction in the quality and the quantity of the natural resources, environmental degradation is a present day problem that requires immediate solutions. This situation is driving firms to undertake an environmental transformation process with the purpose of reducing the negative externalities that come from their economic activities. Within this context, environmental marketing is an emerging business philosophy by which organizations can address sustainability issues. Moreover, environmental marketing and orientation are seen as valuable strategies to improve a (...)
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  35. Cláudia Sarrico, Maria Rosa, Pedro Teixeira & Margarida Cardoso (2010). Assessing Quality and Evaluating Performance in Higher Education: Worlds Apart or Complementary Views? Minerva 48 (1):35-54.score: 18.0
    This paper reflects on quality assessment and performance evaluation in higher education, namely by analysing the insufficient link between those two aspects. We start by reviewing the current state of the art regarding different processes and mechanisms of quality assessment and performance evaluation and discuss some of the major issues regarding the implementation of some of them. In particular, we analyse the current limitations regarding data collected, available and publicised on the performance of HEIs and the problems (...)
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  36. Stewart Jones, Sandra van der Laan, Geoff Frost & Janice Loftus (2008). The Investment Performance of Socially Responsible Investment Funds in Australia. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):181 - 203.score: 18.0
    Interest in the notion of the possible financial sacrifice suffered by socially responsible investment (SRI) fund investors for considering ethical, social and environmental issues in their investment decisions has spawned considerable academic interest in the performance of SRI funds. Both the Australian and international research literature have yielded largely mixed results. However, several of these studies are hampered by methodological problems which can obscure the significance of reported results, such as the use of small sample sizes, inconsistencies in the (...)
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  37. Javier Gil-Bazo, Pablo Ruiz-Verdú & André A. P. Santos (2010). The Performance of Socially Responsible Mutual Funds: The Role of Fees and Management Companies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (2):243 - 263.score: 18.0
    In this article, we shed light on the debate about the financial performance of socially responsible investment (SRI) mutual funds by separately analyzing the contributions of before-fee performance and fees to SRI funds' performance, and by investigating the role played by fund management companies in the determination of those variables. We apply the matching estimator methodology to obtain our results and find that in the period 1997–2005, US SRI funds had better beforeand after-fee performance than conventional (...)
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  38. Fahri Karakas (2010). Spirituality and Performance in Organizations: A Literature Review. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):89 - 106.score: 18.0
    The purpose of this article is to review spirituality at work literature and to explore how spirituality improves employees' performances and organizational effectiveness. The article reviews about 140 articles on workplace spirituality to review their findings on how spirituality supports organizational performance. Three different perspectives are introduced on how spirituality benefits employees and supports organizational performance based on the extant literature: (a) Spirituality enhances employee well-being and quality of life; (b) Spirituality provides employees a sense of purpose and (...)
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  39. Jyoti D. Mahadeo, Teerooven Soobaroyen & Vanisha Oogarah Hanuman (2012). Board Composition and Financial Performance: Uncovering the Effects of Diversity in an Emerging Economy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (3):375-388.score: 18.0
    We examine the key elements of board diversity (or heterogeneity) amongst listed companies operating in an emerging economy (Mauritius) and the extent to which these influence financial performance. Specifically, we ask whether there is evidence of tangible benefits in pursuing a strategy of board diversity in terms of gender-, age-, educational background and independence in a corporate context which has long been dominated by family-led and ‘closed’ boardrooms. In light of recent corporate governance developments which appear to foster greater (...)
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  40. Cory Searcy (2012). Corporate Sustainability Performance Measurement Systems: A Review and Research Agenda. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 107 (3):239-253.score: 18.0
    Corporate sustainability performance measurement systems (SPMS) have been the subject of a growing amount of research. However, there are many challenges and opportunities associated with the design, implementation, use, and evolution of these systems that have yet to be addressed. The purpose of this article is to identify future directions for research in the design, implementation, use, and evolution of corporate SPMS. A concise review of key literature published between 2000 and 2010 is presented. The literature review focuses on (...)
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  41. Irene Goll & Abdul A. Rasheed (2004). The Moderating Effect of Environmental Munificence and Dynamism on the Relationship Between Discretionary Social Responsibility and Firm Performance. Journal of Business Ethics 49 (1):41-54.score: 18.0
    This study examines the relationships between a company''s emphasis on discretionary social responsibility, environment, and firm performance. It tests the proposition that environmental munificence and dynamism moderate the relationship between discretionary social responsibility and financial performance. Social responsibility was measured with a three-item scale in a sample of 62 firms using a questionnaire. Environmental munificence and dynamism were measured using archival sources as was financial performance (return on assets and return on sales). The results of moderated regression (...)
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  42. Rebecca M. Guidice, G. Stoney Alder & Steven E. Phelan (2009). Competitive Bluffing: An Examination of a Common Practice and its Relationship with Performance. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4):535 - 553.score: 18.0
    Bluffing, a common and consequential form of competitive behavior, has been comparably ignored in the management literature, even though misleading one's rivals is suggested to be an advantageous skill in a multifaceted and highly competitive environment. To address this deficiency and advance scholarship on competitive dynamics, our study investigates the moral reasoning behind competitive bluffing and, using a simulated market-entry game, examines the performance effects of bluffing. Findings suggest that decision makers' views on the ethicality of bluffing competitors differ (...)
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  43. Pascual Berrone, Jordi Surroca & Josep A. Tribó (2007). Corporate Ethical Identity as a Determinant of Firm Performance: A Test of the Mediating Role of Stakeholder Satisfaction. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 76 (1):35 - 53.score: 18.0
    In this article, we empirically assess the impact of corporate ethical identity (CEI) on a firm's financial performance. Drawing on formulations of normative and instrumental stakeholder theory, we argue that firms with a strong ethical identity achieve a greater degree of stakeholder satisfaction (SS), which, in turn, positively influences a firm's financial performance. We analyze two dimensions of the CEI of firms: corporate revealed ethics and corporate applied ethics. Our results indicate that revealed ethics has informational worth and (...)
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  44. Charles H. Cho, Dennis M. Patten & Robin W. Roberts (2006). Corporate Political Strategy: An Examination of the Relation Between Political Expenditures, Environmental Performance, and Environmental Disclosure. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 67 (2):139 - 154.score: 18.0
    Two fundamental business ethics issues that repeatedly surface in the academic literature relate to business's role in the development of public policy [Suarez, S. L.: 2000, Does Business Learn? (The University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor, MI); Roberts, R. W. and D. D. Bobek: 2004, Accounting, Organizations and Society 29(5-6), 565-590] and its role in responsibly managing the natural environment [Newton, L.: 2005, Business Ethics and the Natural Environment (Blackwell Publishing, Oxford)]. When studied together, researchers often examine if, and how, (...)
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  45. M. Victoria López, Arminda Garcia & Lazaro Rodriguez (2007). Sustainable Development and Corporate Performance: A Study Based on the Dow Jones Sustainability Index. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 75 (3):285 - 300.score: 18.0
    The goal of this paper is to examine whether business performance is affected by the adoption of practices included under the term Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). To achieve this goal, we analyse the relation between CSR and certain accounting indicators and examine whether there exist significant differences in performance indicators between European firms that have adopted CSR and others that have not. The effects of compliance with the requirements of CSR were determined on the basis of firms included (...)
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  46. Marcus Wagner (2010). Corporate Social Performance and Innovation with High Social Benefits: A Quantitative Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (4):581 - 594.score: 18.0
    This article analyses the link between innovation with high social benefits and corporate social performance (CSP) and the role that family firms play in this. This theme is particularly relevant given the large number of firms that are family-owned. Also the implicit potential of innovation to reconcile corporate sustainability aspects with profitability justifies an extended analysis of this link. Governments often support socially beneficial innovation with various policy instruments, with the intention of increasing international competitiveness and simultaneously supporting sustainable (...)
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  47. Angeles Fernandez-Izquierdo & Juan Carlos Matallin-Saez (2008). Performance of Ethical Mutual Funds in Spain: Sacrifice or Premium? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):247 - 260.score: 18.0
    There is currently much debate in the economic literature about whether ethical investment involves a financial sacrifice or premium. One of the most common methods of testing this compares the financial performance of ethical investment funds with that of other funds not considered “socially responsible” or ethical. The majority of these research studies evaluate the performance of the ethical funds according to classic measures, whereby different financial markets, in different countries and for different periods of time serve as (...)
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  48. Victor S. Maas & Raquel Torres-González (2011). Subjective Performance Evaluation and Gender Discrimination. Journal of Business Ethics 101 (4):667-681.score: 18.0
    Gender discrimination continues to be a problem in organizations. It is therefore important that organizations use performance evaluation methods that ensure equal opportunities for men and women. This article reports the results of an experiment to investigate whether and, if so, how the gender of the rater and that of the ratee moderate the relationship between the level of subjectivity in performance appraisals and organizational attractiveness. Participants in the experiment were 313 undergraduate students. We predicted, and indeed established, (...)
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  49. M. Joseph Sirgy (2002). Measuring Corporate Performance by Building on the Stakeholders Model of Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 35 (3):143 - 162.score: 18.0
    The main thesis guiding the conceptual development of our corporate performance measurement model is that business success – defined as long-term survival and growth – is determined by relationship quality (1) among the various organizational departments (internal stakeholders), (2) between internal and external stakeholders, and (3) between internal and distal stakeholders. Relationship quality among internal stakeholders is conceptualized and operationalized in terms of internal service quality. Relationship quality between internal and external stakeholders is conceptualized and operationalized in terms of (...)
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  50. Chen-Fong Wu (2002). The Relationship of Ethical Decision-Making to Business Ethics and Performance in Taiwan. Journal of Business Ethics 35 (3):163 - 176.score: 18.0
    This paper examines the relationship of ethical decision-making by individuals to corporate business ethics and organizational performance of three groups: (i) SMEs (small and medium enterprises), (ii) Outstanding SMEs (the Key Stone Award winners) and (iii) Large Enterprises, in order to provide a reference for Taiwanese entrepreneurs to practice better business ethics. The survey method involved random sampling of 132 enterprises within three groups. Some 524 out of 1320 questionnaires were valid. The survey results demonstrated that ethical decision-making by (...)
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